Appendices

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Agricultural Sciences

43-06-001 Change. Increase the number of credits required for minor from 18 to 21 credits; Revise program description; Add C or better to Prescribed and Additional Courses; Add AG BM 101 to Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Agribusiness Management Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (AG BM)

The Agribusiness Management minor is offered for students who wish to add business and management principles to their undergraduate major.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 21 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)[1]
AG BM 101 GS(3), AG BM 102(3), AG BM 106(3), AG BM 200(3) (Sem: 2-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)[1]
Select 9 credits (6 of which must be from 400-level) from AG 301W(3), AG BM 302(3), AG BM 308W(3), AG BM 320(3), AG BM 338 IL(3), AG BM 407(3), AG BM 408(3), AG BM 420(3), AG BM 440(3), AG BM 460(3), and AG BM 495A(1-3) or AG BM 495B(1-3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-002 Change. Increase the number of credits required for minor from 20 to 23-24 credits; Revise program description; Add C or better to Prescribed and Additional Courses; Add CHEM 202 to Prescribed Courses; Add CHEM 210 to Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Animal Science Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (AN SC)

The Animal Science minor is designed for students who wish to supplement their academic major with studies in animal science. Students are required to complete a minimum of 23 credits, at least 6 of which must be at the 400 level. A grade of C or better must be obtained in each course in order to complete the minor.

The core of prescribed courses develops a foundation in the various basic disciplines of animal science. Additional courses may be selected by the student to emphasize the production/management of beef cattle, companion animals, dairy cattle, horses, poultry, sheep, or swine or to emphasize genetics, nutrition, or physiology.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 23-24 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (11 credits)[1]
AN SC 201(4), AN SC 290W(1), AN SC 301(3) (Sem: 3-4)
CHEM 202(3) (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)[1]
Select 3 credits from AN SC 207(2) and AN SC 208(1); or AN SC 300 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits from AN SC 305(3), AN SC 306(3), AN SC 308(4), AN SC 309(4), AN SC 310(3), AN SC 311(4), AN SC 327(3), CHEM 210(3) (Sem:3-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits of 400-level AN SC courses (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-003 Change. Increase the number of credits required for minor from 20-21 to 26-28 credits; Add SOILS 101 to Prescribed Courses; Add BIOL 110, 127 to Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Arboriculture Minor

College of Agricultural Sciences (ARBOR)

The Arboriculture minor has been designed to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the principles and practices of the arboriculture profession. Combined with a major in Horticulture or Forestry, this minor will help prepare students for a career in arboriculture. The courses in the minor include arboriculture, disease and insect control, the planting and maintenance of plants in the landscape, and management of trees in urban environments. HORT 201, and many of the introductory positions available to graduates with an arboriculture minor, require physical strength and conditioning.The profession of arboriculture has many opportunities available in the application of arboricultural practices, sales, consulting, management of companies, and management of urban trees.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 26-28 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (18 credits )
HORT 201(2), HORT/FOR 301(3), SOILS 101 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ENT 313(2), ENT 314(1) (Sem: 5-6)
FOR 401(3), HORT 408(4) (Sem 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (8-10 credits)
Select 3 credits from FOR 203(3), HORT 137(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 2-3 credits from PPEM 300 GN(3) or PPEM 318(2) (Sem:5-6)
Select 3-4 credits from BIOL 110 GN(4) or BIOL 127 GN(3) (Sem: 5-6)


43-06-004 Change. Increase the number of credits required for minor from 18 to 22 credits; Add C or better to Prescribed and Additional Courses; Add ENT 402W, 424, 425, 432, 445 to Additonal Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Entomology Minor

College of Agriculture Sciences (ENT)

Through the Department of Entomology, the minor in Entomology is primarily designed for (but not restricted to) students in the Agroecology major seeking additional studies in the entomological sciences. Successful completion of this minor area of study will help prepare students for graduate studies in entomology and related fields.

A minor in Entomology requires 22 credits in approved courses in addition to the major requirements of the student’s choice. Appropriate course substitutions may be considered with minor adviser approval.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 22 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)[1]
BIOL 110 GN(4)[18], ENT 313(2), ENT 457(3) (Sem: 2-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (13 credits)[1]
Select 1 credit from ENT 314(1) or ENT 316(1) (Sem: 2-4)
Select 3 credits from AGECO 201(3), BIOL 222(3), BIOL 427(3), PPEM 405(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits from ENT/VB SC 402W(3), ENT 410(3), ENT 420(3), ENT 424(3), ENT 425(3), ENT 432(4), ENT 445(3) (Sem: 4-8)
Select 3 credits of ENT 496(1-18) (Sem: 4-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[18] A grade of C or better per course is required for teacher certification.


43-06-005 Change. Revise program description; Remove Prescribed Courses Area; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Environmental Resource Management Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (E R M)

The Environmental Resource Management (E R M) minor is designed to provide science-based non-majors with a cohesive selection of courses related to the sustainable management of environmental resources.

The minor was developed to permit students from other majors to have their environmental interests and training formally documented on their academic records. Because so many of society’s activities have an impact on environmental quality, the minor should appeal to students with majors from a wide variety of science-based disciplines.

The E R M minor includes an introduction to calculations and problem-solving skills common to managing environmental resources, and allows students to select a wide variety of other E R M courses that cater to their strengths and interests. Students may also elect to take courses in environmental law, resource allocation and economics, and soil sustainability and management. Individual programs are determined jointly by the student and the E R M Program Coordinator.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)[1]
Select 18 credits from A S M 327(3), SOILS 101 GN(3), or any E R M course. At least 6 credits must be at the 400-level (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-006 Change. Reduce the number of credits required for minor from 18-19 to 18 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Horticulture Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (HORT)

The minor in Horticulture consists of a minimum of 18 credits. A grade of C or better is required in all courses used for the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
HORT 101(3), HORT 202(3), HORT 315(3) (Sem: 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 3 credits in systematics from HORT 131(3), HORT 137(3), HORT 138(3), or HORT 232(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 6 credits in foundation and production courses from HORT 402W(3), HORT 407(3), HORT 412W(3), HORT 420(3), HORT 431(3), HORT 432(3), HORT 433(3), HORT 450(3), HORT 453(3), HORT 455(3), or HORT 459(3) (Sem: 7-8)


43-06-007 Change. Add SOILS 402, 404 to Additional Courses for Management Option; Remove SOILS 401 from Prescribed Courses for Management Option; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

 Landscape Contracting

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (LSCPE)

PROFESSOR DAN T. STEARNS, Program Coordinator

Landscape contracting involves constructing, establishing, and maintaining landscapes from small residential projects to large commercial and industrial projects, as well as producing plans for small-scale residential and commercial sites. Students develop skills in construction, site design, plant material usage, plant establishment, and landscape maintenance. Students are also educated in areas such as graphics, surveying, soils, turfgrass management, weed and pest management, and in business operations.

Students are encouraged to obtain on-the-job experience in landscape contracting by working with a landscape maintenance or construction firm, or other related business. Credits for this experience are available for those who choose to enroll in an internship.

A wide variety of opportunities exist for landscape contracting graduates. They may be employed by design/build firms, landscape management firms, nurseries, or garden centers. Others may choose to work for municipalities, golf courses, parks, or botanical gardens.

DESIGN/BUILD OPTION: This option focuses on the development of skills in the planning and implementation of landscape projects. Employment opportunities exist with landscape contracting companies, irrigation companies, and retail centers.

MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option provides professional education in the management of landscapes. Employment opportunities include positions with landscape management companies and golf courses.

For the B.S. degree in Landscape Contracting, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 3-15 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 81-93 credits
(This includes 21-24 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 3-6 credits of GA courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GS courses)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 67-68 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (51 credits)
HORT 410W(3), HORT 468(2)[1], LARCH 060 GA;US;IL(3), MATH 026 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)
A S M 217(3), ACCTG 211(4), B A 250(3), B LAW 243(3), CHEM 101 GN(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), HORT 101 GN(3)[1], HORT 120(2)[1], HORT 131(3)[1], HORT 137(3)[1], HORT 138(3)[1], HORT 408(4)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
SOILS 101 GN(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (16-17 credits)
AG BM 101 GS(3), ECON 014 GS(3), ECON 102 GS(3), or ECON 104 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
BIOL 110 GN(4) or BIOL 127 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)
SPAN 001(4) or SPAN 002(4) or SPAN 105(4) (Sem: 3-4)
AG BM 220(3) or MKTG 220(3) (Sem: 5-6)
TURF 100(3) or TURF 235(3) (Sem: 5-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 14-26 credits

DESIGN/BUILD OPTION: (25-26 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (23 credits)
ART 020 GA(3), EDSGN 010(1), HORT 220(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
HORT 269(3)[1], HORT 464(4)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
HORT 368(4)[1], HORT 466(5)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (2-3 credits)
Select 2-3 credits from ENT 313(2), ENT 314(1), HORT 238(3), PPEM 300(3) or PPEM 318(2) (Sem: 5-6)

MANAGEMENT OPTION: (14-15 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
ENT 313(2), ENT 314(1), HORT 238(3)[1], HORT 250(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (5-6 credits)
PPEM 300(3) or PPEM 318(2) (Sem: 7-8)
SOILS 402(3) or SOILS 404(3) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-008 Change. Increase the number of credits required for the minor from 18 to 22 credits; Revise program description; Add BIOL 110 to Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Mushroom Science and Technology Minor

University Park, College Of AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES (M S T)

JOHN PECCHIA, RES ASSOC/ASST PROF PPEM

This interdisciplinary minor is designed to prepare students for a career in the mushroom industry. The minor offers practical work experience at the University’s Mushroom Research Center. Students are required to complete a minimum of 22 credits. The core of prescribed courses provides a foundation in the basic fundamentals of mushroom science and technology. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

For the MINOR in Mushroom Science and Technology Minor a minimum of 22 credits are required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 22 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits) [1]
BIOL 110 GN(4), PPEM 405(3), PPEM 425(4), PPEM 496(1-18) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from: AG BM 200(3); ENT 202 GN(3); ENT 313(2); FD SC 408(2); FD SC 409W(3); MGMT 150(3); MICRB 201(3); MICRB 202(2) (Sem: 3-8)


43-06-009 Change. Increase the number of credits required for minor from 18 to 22 credits; Add C or better to Prescribed and Additional Courses; Add BIOL 110 to Prescribed Courses; Add PPEM 454 to Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Plant Pathology Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (PPATH)

The Plant Pathology minor is designed for students who wish to learn more about the causes and control of plant diseases. These students may pursue careers in commercial crop production, industrial sales, private consulting, extension, or research. Increasing emphasis on biological control, integrated pest management, and sustainable agricultural practices requires knowledge of plant pathogen biology, host-parasite interactions, and environmental parameters influencing disease development. The Plant Pathology Minor focuses on these areas and gives students the background necessary to develop or utilize environmentally sound disease management strategies. This program is designed to supplement majors in any field of the biological sciences and also can be used to prepare students for graduate studies in Plant Pathology.

The minor in Plant Pathology requires 22 credits in approved courses in addition to the major requirements of the student’s choice.

Students must receive a grade of C or better in all courses required for the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 22 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (7 credits)[1]
BIOL 110 GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
*3 credits of PPEM 496 (1-18) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)[1]
**Select 3 credits from: PPEM 300 GN(3), PPEM 405(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select a minimum of 12 credits from: AGECO 121 GN(3), AGECO/ENT 457(3), PPEM 120 GN(3), PPEM 300 GN(3), PPEM 318(2), PPEM 405(3), PPEM 412(3), PPEM 416(3), PPEM 417(3), PPEM 425(4), PPEM 430(3), PPEM 454(3), *PPEM 496(1-3), PPEM 497(1-3), and the departmental list of additional courses for the Plant Pathology Minor with the approval of the minor adviser. (Sem: 3-8)

*Students must select, in consultation with the Plant Pathology Minor adviser, at least 3 credits of PPEM 496 (Independent Study) working with one or more faculty in the department of Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology. An additional three Independent Study credits may be applied to the Minor requirements as Additional Courses.

** Students may select one of these two courses for the second list of Additional Courses, but the same course cannot be counted toward both lists.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-010 Change. Increase the number of credits required for minor from 18 to 22 credits; Add C or better to Prescribed and Additional Courses; Add BIOL 110 to Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Wildlife and Fisheries Science Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (W F S)

The Wildlife and Fisheries Science minor provides non-majors with an introduction to the principles and practices of wildlife and fisheries conservation, research, and management. Although the minor includes both wildlife and fisheries course offerings, courses may be selected to provide a focus in one area or the other.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 22 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10 credits)[1]
BIOL 110 GN(4), W F S 209(3), W F S 430(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)[1]
Select 12 credits from W F S 300(2), W F S 407(3), W F S 408(3), W F S 410(3), W F S 422(3), W F S/E R M 435(3), W F S 440(3), W F S 447W(3), W F S 450(3), W F S 452(2), W F S 460(3), W F S 462(3), W F S 463W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-06-011 AN SC 322H
Animal Genetics and Selection – Honors
ANIM GEN SEL HON (3)
Fundamental principles of genetics as applied to breeding farm animals.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-012 CED 400 (US)
Exploring Indigenous Ways of Knowing in Great Lakes Region: Lecture
INDIGEN KNOW LECT (2.5)
Explore concepts and values distinctive to indigenous ways of knowing in the Great Lakes Region through readings, reflections, and library research.
PREREQUISITE: R SOC 011, SOC 011 or equivalent
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-013 CED 401 (US)
Exploring Indigenous Ways of Knowing Among the Ojibwe
INDIG KNOW TRAVEL (0.5)
Through an intensive cultural engagement students will learn skills important to the pursuit of ethnographic research in cross-cultural contexts.
PREREQUISITE:  CED 400A or comparable course
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-014 INTAG 199 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-015 PPEM 225
Mushroom Cultivation
MUSHROOM CULTIV (3)
Students will learn about commercial production of edible mushrooms and how to cultivate them on both a small and commercial scale.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 110 or equivalent
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-016 VB SC 190
Careers in Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
CAREERS VB SC (1)
Career strategic planning and opportunities for Veterinary and Biomedical  Sciences.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-017 VB SC 403H
Principles of Animal Disease Control
PRIN AN DIS CNTRL (3)
Principles of disease control based on knowledge of the epidemiology of  animal disease.
PREREQUISITE:  MICRB 106 or MICRB 201. Prerequisite or concurrent: AN SC 301
PROPOSED START: S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-018 AN SC 322
Principles of Animal Breeding
PRIN AN BREEDING (3:2:2)
The fundamental principles of genetics as applied to breeding farm animals.
APPROVED START: S12013

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Animal Genetics and Selection (ANIM GEN SEL)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Fundamental principles of genetics as applied to breeding farm animals.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 110 or BIOL 011 and BIOL 012
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-019 FOR 430
Conservation Biology
CONSERVATION BIOL (3:3:0)
The application of biological principles to issues in the conservation of biodiversity.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W or FOR 308
CROSS LIST: W F S 430
APPROVED START: S12013

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W or FOR 308 or W F S 209
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-020 W F S 209 (GN)
Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation
WILDL FISH CONSERV (3:3:0)
Survey of current and historical issues in wildlife and fisheries conservation; emphasis on vertebrate biodiversity, habitat management and protection, and populations.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 110 or BIOL 240W
APPROVED START: S12013

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: BIOL 110
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-021 W F S 430
Conservation Biology
CONSERVATION BIOL (3:3:0)
The application of biological principles to issues in the conservation of biodiversity.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W or FOR 308
CROSS LIST: FOR 430
APPROVED START: S12013

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W or FOR 308 or W F S 209
PROPOSED START: SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Altoona

COURSE ADDS

43-06-022 DANCE 412
Practical Applications of Movement in the Classroom
PRAC APP MVMT (3)
This course will guide the students in movement-oriented activities and explore how these activities relate to learning academic concepts.
PREREQUISITE: DANCE 261 or HD FS 229 or HD FS 239
PROPOSED START: S12015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Arts and Architecture

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-023 INART 055 (GA)
History of Electroacoustic Music
HIST EL MUS (3)
A history of electroacoustic music as a consequence of developments in culture and technology from 1880 to present.
APPROVED START: S12012

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: MUSIC
CHANGE NUMBER: 434
ADD PREREQUISITE: INART 258A or INART 258B or permission of program
PROPOSED START: SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Behrend

43-06-024 Add. New B.A. in Digital Media, Arts, and Technology program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Digital Media, Arts, and Technology

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (DIGIT)

Sharon Dale, incharge

Digital technology has transformed the way we live, interact, learn, and work. The interdisciplinary Digital Media, Arts, and Technology (DIGIT) major is designed for students who are curious about and want to explore the growing significance of technology in the modern world. DIGIT combines historical and theoretical course work with intensive practical training in the creation and use of digital media tools and computational systems. Foundational DIGIT courses familiarize students with the key concepts, methods, history, theories and practices of Digital Liberal Arts while a range of competency courses introduce them to industry-standard software applications alongside cutting edge tools that continue to emerge from the open source community. Combining the broad perspective of liberal arts training with in-demand technical skills, DIGIT incorporates either a capstone project or a digital media internship, in order to provide students with a successful transition from college to an increasingly technological job market.

Entrance Requirement: Students must earn C or better in ENGL 015 or ENGL 030 and COMM 270 to be eligible for entrance to the major.

For the B.A. degree in DIGIT a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(6-16 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 9-18 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.) (See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: (48-49 credits)
(This includes 6-16 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GA courses for all categories; 0-4 credits of GQ courses for Data Visualization and Assessment category; 0-3 credits of GN courses for the Sound and Motion category; 0-6 credits of GS courses for the Modeling and Simulation/Human Computer Interaction category.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (21 credits)
ART 168 GA(3)[1], COMM 270(3)[1] , PHOTO 100 GA(3), (Sem: 1-6)
DIGIT 100(3)[1] (Sem: 1-6)
DIGIT 110(3)[1], DIGIT 210(3)[1] (Sem: 2-6)
DIGIT 400(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (21-22 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from: CAS 426W(3)[1] or ENGL 211W(3)[1] or HIST 301W(3)[1] or PSYCH 301W(4)[1] or PL SC 480W(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from: DIGIT 494(3)[1] or DIGIT 495(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

Select 9 credits from one of the following categories: (Sem: 4-8)
(May double count with general education courses)
(Some courses may require prerequisites)
Digital Humanities: ART 203(3), ENGL 050 GA(3), ENGL 229(3), ENGL 420(3)[1], GEOG 160 GS(3) and GEOG 161(1), GEOG 363(3)[1], HIST 490/L ST 490(3)[1]
Sound and Motion: COMM 242(3), COMM 481(3)[1], GD 100 GA(3), INART 050 GN(3), INART 236 GA(3), INART 258A, GA(3), MUSIC 008 GA(3), MUSIC 458(3)[1]
Modeling & Simulation/Human Computer Interaction: CMPSC 102(3), CMPSC 302(3) [1], DIGIT 430(3)[1], MIS 387(3)[1], PSYCH 244 GS(3), PSYCH 253 GS(3), PSYCH 444(3)[1]
Data Visualization & Assessment: CMPSC 203 GQ(4), DIGIT 410(3)[1], MIS 204(3), MIS 336(3)[1], MIS 345(3)[1], MIS 430(3)[1]
Select 6 credits from a second category not used above (Sem: 4-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits (with at least three credits at the 400-level) from the following list or in consultation with advisor. (Sem: 4-8)

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Business

43-06-025 Change. Add MGMT 355 to the Organizational Leadership Concentration. Remove MGMT 433 from the Organizational Leadership Concentration.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Management

University Park, Smeal College of Business (MGMT)

PROFESSOR DENNIS GIOIA, Chair, Department of Management and Organization

This major provides students with knowledge and skills managers need to deal with contemporary management challenges, such as leading and motivating people of different ages and backgrounds, developing strategies for competing in the global economy, and balancing the interest of multiple stakeholders in a complex legal, political, and ethical environment. The management core provides a general overview of the knowledge and skills required for effectively managing people and organizations. Students then supplement that overview with either the Human Capital Management concentration or the Organizational Leadership concentration. Career opportunities are in management trainee positions, human capital management, customer service, consulting, and family businesses.

Human Capital Management Concentration – The HCM concentration prepares students for a professional career in human resources management, and develops skills and expertises in areas such as planning, staffing, job design, employee development, performance management, compensation, change management, and managing diversity.

Organizational Leadership Concentration – The Organizational Leadership concentration provides students with knowledge of the attributes, processes and skills associated with leading organizations in dynamic times. It emphasizes student development of capabilities in leading themselves and others, leading change, and leading strategically in a global economic and social environment.

Entrance Requirement: To be eligible for entrance into the Management (MGMT) major, a degree candidate must be enrolled in the Smeal College of Business or the Division of Undergraduate Studies and satisfy requirements for entrance to the major.

Specific entrance requirements include:

  1. The degree candidate must be taking, or have taken, a program appropriate for entry to the major as shown in the bulletin, including approximately 60 credits of course work.
  2. Complete the following entrance to major requirements: ACCTG 211(4)[1]; ECON 102 GS(3); SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1]; ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3); and MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1]; FIN 301(3)[1]; MGMT 301(3)[1]; and MKTG 301(3)[1]. These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.
  3. In addition to the above requirements, the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University may approve administrative enrollment controls that limit the number of students who are admitted to majors in the Smeal College of Business. In each case, however, academic requirements are established for admission. For information on enrollment controls, consult the Smeal College of Business Web site (http://www.smeal.psu.edu).

For the B.S. degree in Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required (at least 15 credits must be taken at the 400 level).

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 14 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 73 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (46 credits)
ACCTG 211(4)[1], ECON 102 GS(3), FIN 301(3)[1]; MGMT 301(3)[1]; and MKTG 301(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
B A 342(3), B A 411(3), B LAW 341(3), ECON 104 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), MIS 204(3), SCM 301(3), MGMT 326(3)[1], MGMT 451W(3)[1], MGMT 471(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (17 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)

Select 9 credits from one of the following two areas of concentration:

A. Human Capital Management Concentration (9 credits)
MGMT 341(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
Select six credits[1] from the following: MGMT 441(3), MGMT 443(3), MGMT 445 US(3) (Sem: 6-8)

B. Organizational Leadership Concentration (9 credits)
MGMT 355(3) [1] (Sem: 5-6)
Select nine credits[1] from the following: MGMT 420(3), MGMT 445 US(3), MGMT 461 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (10 credits)
Select 4 credits: Attainment of 12th-credit-level proficiency in a single foreign language. (4 credits) Proficiency must be demonstrated by either examination or course work (Sem: 1-4)
Select 6 credits of supporting coursework from an approved department list. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-026 Change. Add R M 440 to the Enterprise Risk Management Option. Remove I B 403 from Prescribed Courses Area in the Enterprise Risk Management Option. Move R M 320W from Additional Courses Area for the Major to Prescribed Courses Area for the Actuarial Science Option and the Enterprise Risk Managment Option; R M 330W from Additional Courses Area for the Major to the Prescribed Courses Area for the Real Estate Option. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Risk Management

University Park, Smeal College of Business (R M)

PROFESSOR Austin J. Jaffe, Chair, Department of Risk Management

The Risk Management major prepares students for careers in a wide range of private industries and public service agencies involving such areas as operations, property development, financial strategy, and government. The major is integrative in nature by crossing traditional business boundaries while offering specific areas of study in actuarial science, enterprise risk management, and real estate. High profile risks are faced by leaders and managers up and down the corporate ladder and require specialized skills, knowledge and preparation. The Risk Management major prepares students for this along with a chance to study risk from three different perspectives by offering specialty courses along with a common pool of risk management courses. This structure assures that the students in the risk management major are equipped with the common tools of risk analysis while at the same time permitting the students to tailor the specifics of their training through the selection of a particular option.

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE OPTION: The courses in the Actuarial Science option stress the application of mathematical and statistical concepts to the measurement of life and other contingencies, while at the same time giving the student a broad understanding of the business environment. Students in the Actuarial Science option are encouraged to begin the series of professional examinations leading to Associateship and Fellowship in either the Society of Actuaries (A.S.A./F.S.A.) or the Casualty Actuarial Society (A.C.A.S./F.C.A.S.).

Entrance requirements to the Actuarial Science OptionTo be eligible for entrance into the Actuarial Science option, a degree candidate must be enrolled in the Smeal College of Business or the Division of Undergraduate Studies and satisfy the following requirements for entrance:

  1. The degree candidate must be taking, or have taken, a program appropriate for entry to the major as shown in the bulletin, including approximately 60 credits of course work.
  2. Complete the following entrance to major requirements: ACCTG 211(4)[1]; ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3); FIN 301(3)[1]; MATH 140 GQ(4)[1]; MATH 141(4)[1], MGMT 301(3)[1]; and MKTG 301(3)[1]; SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1]. These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.
  3. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.20 prior to and through to the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.

ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT OPTION: The Enterprise Risk Management Option prepares students to identify, quantify and qualify the regulatory, legal, financial and contractual aspects of enterprise risk; the management of such risks; and the application of risk financing techniques to control risk exposures in organizations. Emphasis is also placed on the understanding of the principles and risks underlying complex business contracts.

Entrance requirements to the Enterprise Risk Management Option —To be eligible for entrance into the Risk Management major and the Enterprise Risk Management Option, a degree candidate must be enrolled in the Smeal College of Business or the Division of Undergraduate Studies and satisfy the following requirements for entrance:

  1. The degree candidate must be taking, or have taken, a program appropriate for entry to the major as shown in the bulletin, including approximately 60 credits of course work.
  2. Complete the following entrance to major requirements: ACCTG 211(4)[1]; ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3); FIN 301(3)[1]; MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1]; MGMT 301(3)[1]; and MKTG 301(3)[1]; SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1]. These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.
  3. In addition to the above requirements, the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University may approve administrative enrollment controls that limit the number of students who are admitted to majors in the Smeal College of Business. In each case, however, academic requirements are established for admission. For information on enrollment controls, consult the Smeal College of Business Web site (http://www.smeal.psu.edu).

REAL ESTATE OPTION: This option is designed to prepare the student for a wide range of professional opportunities in corporate real estate management, real estate brokerage, appraisal, property management, mortgage lending and banking, development, and governmental service.

Entrance requirements to the Real Estate Option —To be eligible for entrance into the Risk Management major and the General or Real Estate Options, a degree candidate must be enrolled in the Smeal College of Business or the Division of Undergraduate Studies and satisfy the following requirements for entrance:

  1. The degree candidate must be taking, or have taken, a program appropriate for entry to the major as shown in the bulletin, including approximately 60 credits of course work.
  2. Complete the following entrance to major requirements: ACCTG 211(4)[1]; ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3); FIN 301(3)[1]; MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1]; MGMT 301(3)[1]; and MKTG 301(3)[1]; SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1]. These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.
  3. In addition to the above requirements, the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University may approve administrative enrollment controls that limit the number of students who are admitted to majors in the Smeal College of Business. In each case, however, academic requirements are established for admission. For information on enrollment controls, consult the Smeal College of Business Web site (http://www.smeal.psu.edu).

For the B.S. degree in Risk Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required (at least 15 credits must be taken at the 400 level).

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection,)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 11-14 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 73-76 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; and 3 credits of GS.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 48 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (37 credits)
ACCTG 211(4)[1], ECON 102 GS(3), FIN 301(3)[1], MGMT 301(3)[1], MKTG 301(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
B A 342(3), B A 411(3), B LAW 341(3), ECON 104 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), MIS 204(3), R M 301(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (4 credits)
Select 4 credits: Attainment of 12th credit level proficiency in a single foreign language (4 credits). Proficiency must be demonstrated by either examination or course work. (Sem: 1-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 28-31 credits

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE OPTION: (31 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (25 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 231(2)[1], STAT 414(3)[1] (Sem: 3-5)
R M 320W(3)[1], R M 410(3)[1], R M 411(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
R M 412(3)[1], R M 430(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
R M 401(3)[1] or R M 420(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT OPTION: (28 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (18 credits)
R M 320W(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
B LAW 441(3)[1], FIN 406(3)[1], SCM 301(3)[1],(Sem: 5-8)
R M 405(3)[1], R M 440(3)[1](Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select six credits of supporting coursework from an approved department list. (Sem: 5-8)

REAL ESTATE OPTION: (28 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
R M 330W(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
R M 450(3)[1], R M/FIN 460(3)[1], R M/FIN 470(3)[1], SCM 301(3)[1], (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits [1] from FIN 406(3), R M 420(3), R M/B LAW 424(3), R M/B LAW 425(3), R M 480(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select six credits of supporting coursework from an approved department list. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-06-027 ACCTG 417
Corporate and Managerial Communication
BUS COMM ACCTG (2-3)
Development of communication skills required for business students interested in corporate accounting, finance, and/or consulting roles through case study, individual, and team presentations.
PREREQUISITE: CAS 100
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-028 R M 440
Risk, Strategy, and Decision Making
RISK AND STRATEGY (3)
To examine key strategic concepts, ranging from cognitive to organizational, that are critical for managing risk at the enterprise level.
PREREQUISITE: R M 320W or R M 330W
PROPOSED START: S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-029 B A 301
Finance
FINANCE (3)
An overview of finance for non-business majors. Topics include financial markets and institutions, investments, and financial decision making in organizations.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211; ECON 102; 3 credits of 200-level statistics
APPROVED START: SP2015

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ECON 102
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-030 R M 410
Compound Interest and Annuities
COMPD INT ANNUIT (3:3:0)
Compound interest and annuity functions; equations of value; determination of yield rates; construction of tables.
PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: R M 301; MATH 414 or STAT 414
APPROVED START: SP2012

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Financial Mathematics for Actuaries (FIN MATH FOR ACTSC)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Compound interest and annuity functions; life annuities; equations of value; determination of yield rates; bonds; introduction to derivatives.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATH 414 or STAT 414
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-031 R M 420
Property and Casualty Insurance
PROP & CASULTY INS (3:3:0)
Actuarial methods and concepts used to develop manual rates for property and casualty insurance.
PREREQUISITE: R M 320W or R M 330W
APPROVED START: SP2012

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Property, Casualty, and Health Insurance (PRP CSLTY HLTH INS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Actuarial methods and concepts used to model property, casualty and health insurance losses along with credibility theory.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: R M 412
PROPOSED START: SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Capital

43-06-032 Drop. Drop B.S. in Applied Behavioral Science.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Applied Behavioral Science

Capital College (ABESC)

PROFESSOR KENNETH B. CUNNINGHAM, Program Coordinator, School of Behavioral Sciences and Education

The Applied Behavioral Science major is an interdisciplinary program that provides a base of theoretical and empirical knowledge from the social and behavioral sciences and the hands-on skills needed to apply that knowledge effectively in working with people. The major helps students prepare for careers that provide direct service to individuals in need of assistance. These careers are in a variety of human services both in the public and private sectors or in personnel-related positions such as human resources. The major is especially useful for adult learners who are interested in augmenting their professional skills and advancing their career positions through an academic program which combines course work from selected social and behavioral science fields.

Graduates may also pursue advanced degrees in fields such as community psychology, social work, human resource management, gerontology, urban planning, and counseling. The strengths of the program include: internships directly related to the student’s area of interest, flexibility in course selection that allows students to focus on particular interests, a solid foundation of knowledge on which to build skills, and skill development courses.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Applied Behavioral Science major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

For a B.S. degree in Applied Behavioral Science, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(9 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR )

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 4-10 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 74-80 credits
(This includes 9 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (23-29 credits)[1]
ENGL 202A GWS(3), PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
SO SC 480W(4), SO SC 481(4), SO SC 492(3) (Sem: 5-8)
SOC 405(3) (Sem: 5-8)
BE SC 395(3-9) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (45 credits)[1]
Select 3 credits from: SOC 001 GS(3) or SOC 005 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: ANTH 045 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 020 GS(3), PL SC 001 GS(3), PL SC 003 GS;IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 30 credits (a minimum of 3 credits at the 400 level) in consultation with an adviser from the following: AFR 192 GH;IL(3) or AF AM 212 US(3) or any BE SC, HD FS, or SOC course.
–Take a minimum of 9 credits from BE SC
–Take a minimum of 9 credits from SOC
–Take a minimum of 6 credits from HD FS) (Sem: 5-8)

Select 9 credits (a minimum of 3 credits at the 400 level) in consultation with an adviser from PSYCH, PUBPL, PL SC, CRIMJ (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)[1]
Select 6 credits from department list in consultation with an adviser (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-033 E E 481
Control Systems
CONTROL SYSTEMS (4)
Classical/modern approaches to system analysis/design; time/frequency domain modeling, stability, response, optimization, and compensation.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 211; PHYS 211; E E 352
APPROVED START: SP2008

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: PHYS 211; E E 352
PROPOSED START: SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Communications

43-06-034 Change. Increase number of credits for the Requirements for the Major from 34 to 34-35 credits; Revise program description; Add COMM 280, 380 to Prescribed Courses; Add SCM 200, STAT 200 to Additional Courses; Add COMM 190, 283W, 310, 403, 403H, 404, 410, 419, 419H, 484A, 486W, 487W to Additional Courses; Add COMM 110, 118, 412 to Supporting Courses and Related Areas; Remove COMM 381, 387 from Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Telecommunications

University Park, College of Communications (TELCM)

PROFESSOR MATTHEW JACKSON, Head, Department of Telecommunications

The Telecommunications program seeks to prepare informed, responsible professionals for leadership roles in the electronic communication and information industries. The program stresses the social, cultural and economic impact of electronic media, including radio, television, videogames, telephones and the Internet.

Students can choose an emphasis in programming and production, management and entrepreneurship, law and policy.

Graduates go on to careers at local radio and television stations; broadcast, cable and satellite networks; Internet content and service providers; wired and wireless telephone companies; and other related media and entertainment industries. The major emphasizes the business and legal parameters of telecommunications, making it an excellent preparation for law school or graduate school and careers in government policy and the entertainment field.

Students must select at least 80 credits in courses outside the College of Communications, including at least 65 in the liberal arts and sciences.

For the B.A. degree in Telecommunications, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3-4 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 19 -20 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 34-35 credits[1]
(This includes 3-4 credits of General Education GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10 credits)
COMM 160(1) (Sem: 1-4)
COMM 180 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
COMM 280(3), COMM 380(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21-22 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from: ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 014 GS(3), SCM 200 GQ(4), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Students must meet with a faculty advisor to approve their course selections from the following areas:
Select 18 credits from COMM 190/GAME 140(3), COMM 282(3), COMM 283W(3), COMM 310(3), COMM 374(3), COMM 383(1-3), COMM 383A(1.5), COMM 384(3), COMM 385(3), COMM 386(3), COMM 403(3), COMM 403H(3), COMM 404(3), COMM 410 IL(3), COMM 419 US;IL(3), COMM 419H US;IL(3), COMM 479(3), COMM 483(3), COMM 484(3), COMM 484A(3), COMM 485(3), COMM 486W(3), COMM 487W(3), COMM 489W(3), COMM 490(3), COMM 491(3), COMM 492(3), COMM 493(3), COMM 495(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits in social aspects of communication from COMM 110 GH(3), COMM 118 GS(3), COMM 205 US(3), COMM 304(3), COMM 403(3), COMM 405(3), COMM 409(3), COMM 410 IL(3), COMM 411(3), COMM 412(3), COMM 413W(3), COMM 417(3), COMM 418(3), COMM 419 US;IL(3), COMM 496(1-3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-06-035 COMM 280
Introduction to Telecommunications Technologies
TELECOM TECH (3)
Students will evaluate content creation and distribution methods and demonstrate proficiency across emerging digital products and services.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-036 COMM 310
Digital Media Metrics
DIGI MEDIA METRICS (3)
Analysis of audience data for traditional and new media to create metrics for advertising, content marketing and audience analysis.
PREREQUISITE: fourth semester standing
CROSS LIST: IST 310
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-037 COMM 416
News Practicum
NEWS PRACTICUM (3)
News Practicum is a professionally oriented course for students who have mastered basic news writing and interviewing skills to produce stories for professional news outlets.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 260W, and permission of the program
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-038 COMM 437A
Advanced Documentary Production Abroad
ADV DOC ABROAD (3)
Advanced exploration of documentary production techniques and aesthetics through the completion of a short video project abroad.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 337, COMM 340, COMM 342W
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-039 COMM 450B
Digital Advertising
DIGITAL AD (3)
This course will explore the digital advertising “ecosystem,” identify key players and trends, and review programmatic media buying.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 310 or IST 310
CROSS LIST: IST 450B
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-040 COMM 484A
Wireless Devices and Global Markets
WIRELESS DEVICES (3)
Examination of the global market for smartphones, tablets, and other wireless devices.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 180, COMM 280, COMM 483; or permission of program
PROPOSED START: S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-041 COMM 320
Introduction to Advertising
INTRO ADVERTISING (3:3:0)
Advertising management in business, including communication theory; common industry practices; basics of copy, media, and budget decision; and environmental influences. A student may not receive credit for both COMM 320 and MKTG 322.
PREREQUISITE: fourth-semester standing
APPROVED START: SP1989

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: third semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-042 COMM 337W
Intermediate Documentary Production
INT DOC PROD (3)
Writing-intensive exploration of documentary video techniques and aesthetics through the completion of short exercises.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 242 and Film-Video major
APPROVED START: SP2012

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 337
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Exploration of documentary video techniques and aesthetics through the completion of short exercises and projects.
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-043 COMM 370
Public Relations
PUBLIC RELATIONS (3:3:0)
Public understanding of organizations and institutions; identification and analysis of public; media relations; public relations practice.
PREREQUISITE: fourth-semester standing
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: third semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-044 COMM 372
Digital Public Relations
DIGITAL PR (3)
This course discusses digital strategies and techniques for public relations.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 370
APPROVED START: S12014

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 320; COMM 370
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-045 COMM 381
Telecommunications Regulation
TELECOM REGULATION (3:3:0)
Overview of the regulation of electronic media.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 180; ECON 102 or ECON 014
APPROVED START: SP2011

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 404
CHANGE TITLES: Telecommunications Law (TELECOM LAW)
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 180
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-046 COMM 383A
Webcast Production
WEBCAST PRODUCTION (1.5)
Explore all aspects of producing a live television show. Final project is streaming a live webcast online.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 282 or COMM 242
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Explore all aspects of producing a live television show. Includes streaming a live webcast online.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 283 or permission of program
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-047 COMM 387
Telecommunications Management
TELECOM MANAGEMENT (3:3:0)
Introduction to basic principles of management as they apply in electronic media industries.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 180; ECON 102 or ECON 014
APPROVED START: FA2011

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 380
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 180
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-048 COMM 479
Telecommunication Economics
TELECOM ECONOMICS (3)
Economic, regulatory/business issues in the design/operation of large-scale telecommunication networks such as telephone, cable, wireless, and computer networks.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 180, and ECON 102 or ECON 014
APPROVED START: FA2011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 180, COMM 380; or permission of the program
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-049 COMM 483
Wireless Communications Industry
WIRELESS COMM (3)
A broad examination of the wireless phone industry including its development, current structure and future.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 381 and COMM 387
APPROVED START: SP2011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 180, COMM 380 or permission of the program
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-050 COMM 484
Emerging Telecommunications Technologies
EMERG TELECOM TECH (3:3:0)
Overview of technology of electronic media and related societal issues.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 180
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 180, COMM 280; or permission of the program
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-051 COMM 484H
Emerging Telecommunications Technologies
EMERG TELECOM TECH (3:3:0)
Overview of technology of electronic media and related societal issues.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 180
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 180, COMM 280; or permission of the program
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-052 COMM 489W
Media and Information Industries
MEDIA INDUSTRIES (3)
The structure, conduct and performance of firms and industries in the electronic media and information sectors.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 387 or equivalent
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Advanced Telecommunications Topics (TELECOM TOPICS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Exploration of advanced topics related to the telecommunications
industries.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 180, COMM 280, COMM 380; or permission of the program
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-053 COMM 490
Issues in Electronic Commerce: Policy and Implementation
E-COMMERCE:POLICY (3)
Analysis of policy, strategic issues, and implications raised by the rapid growth of electronic commerce over the Internet.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 180 for telecom major; permission of instructor for non-telecom majors
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Issues in Electronic Commerce (E-COMMERCE)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Analysis of issues related to electronic commerce over the Internet.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 180, COMM 380, or permission of program
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-054 COMM 491
International Telecommunications and Trade Policy
INTL TELECOM (3)
Development in the law, policy, and business of international telecommunications; emphasis on multilateral forums–International Telecommunications Union and World Trade Organization.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 180
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: International Telecommunications
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Impact of globalization, regulation, and new technologies on telecommunications in different countries and regions.
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-055 COMM 493
Entrepreneurship in the Information Age: Senior Seminar
INFO ENTRPRNSHIP (3)
Provides students with knowledge/tools to take their innovation/technology idea through the business planning, capital, and operations budgeting processes.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 387
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLES: Entrepreneurship in the Information Age
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 180, COMM 380, or permission of the program
PROPOSED START: SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Earth and Mineral Sciences

43-06-056 Change. Drop Energy Systems Option; Decrease number of credits Required for the Major from 87-101 to 87-89 credits; Increase number of credits required for the option from 27-40 to 24-36; Revise program description; Add CAS 100, EM SC 100S to Additonal Courses for the Major; Add E B F 410, 411, PHYS 250 to Additional Courses for Energy Land Management Option; Move GEOSC 454, P N G 405, PHYS 211 from Prescribed Courses in Energy Land Management Option to Additional Courses in the Option; Move ECON 104, R M 302 from Prescribed Courses for Energy Land Management Option to Prescribed Courses for the Major; Add CHEM 110, E B F 411, 483, EME 301, PHYS 211, PHYS 251 to Additional Courses for the General Option; Add Supporting Courses and Related Areas to General Option;  Remove ECON 428 from Additional Courses in the General Option; Remove Prescribed Courses for General Option; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Energy Business and Finance

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (EBF)
University Park, Smeal College of Business

The major in Energy Business and Finance, offered jointly by the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences and the Smeal College of Business, combines training in business, economics, finance, and the physical sciences with a core of courses focusing on energy and related industries. The major helps students prepare for careers in the energy industry, as well as financial institutions, nonprofit groups, and international organizations dealing with energy issues. The curriculum also provides a strong base for further study in business, economics, law, and social sciences.

Entrance Requirement: To be eligible for entrance into the Energy Business and Finance major, a degree candidate must satisfy requirements for entrance to major. Specific entrance requirements include:

  1. The degree candidate must have completed more than 27.1 credits of course work.
  2. The degree candidate must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0.
  3. Complete the following entrance to major requirements: ECON 102 GS(3)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1].

GENERAL OPTION
The General option of the Energy Business and Finance major is appropriate for students who want a broad understanding of the earth and environmental sciences in preparation for careers in industry, commerce, and government.

ENERGY LAND MANAGEMENT OPTION

The Energy Land Management Option in the major of Energy Business and Finance focuses on issues in the acquisition of sub-surface exploration rights. Thus, it is designed to prepare students for a career as a land professional in an energy exploration company. The curriculum, designed in consultation with the American Association of Professional Landmen, requires courses in real estate fundamentals, energy law, geographic information sciences, petroleum engineering and petroleum geology.

Integrated B.S. in Energy Business and Finance (EBF) and M.S. in Energy and Mineral Engineering (EME)

The integrated undergraduate-graduate (IUG) program between the Energy Business and Finance undergraduate program and the Energy and Mineral Engineering graduate program enables academically superior and research-focused EBF undergraduate students to also obtain an M.S. degree in Energy and Mineral Engineering in five years of study. Students should refer to the Energy and Mineral Engineering graduate program in the Graduate Program Bulletin for the IUG admission and degree requirements. (http://bulletins.psu.edu/bulletins/whitebook/graduate_degree_programs.cfm?letter=E&program=grad_eme.htm)

For the B.S. degree in Energy Business and Finance, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(25-27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 11-15 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 87-89 credits
(This includes 25-27 credits of General Education Courses: 4-6 credits of GN courses, 9 credits of GWS courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, and 6 credits of GS courses.

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 69 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (48 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1)
ECON 102 GS(3)[1], EM SC 100S GWS(3) (Sem: 1)
MATH 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 2)
E B F 200 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 3)
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 104 GS(3), ECON 302 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
E B F 301(3)[1], E B F 304W(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
EME 460(3)[1], I B 303 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
R M 302(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)
E B F 401(3)[1], E B F 473(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21 credits)
Select 3 credits from: CAS 100 GWS(3) or EM SC 100S GWS(3) (Sem: 1)
Select 3 credits from: CMPSC 101 GQ(3), CMPSC 200 GQ(3), CMPSC 201 GQ(3), CMPSC 202 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from: ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from: B A 243(4), B LAW 243(3), or E R M 411(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from: E B F 472(3)[1], STAT 301 GQ(3)[1], or STAT 401(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from: E B F 483(3)[1] or E B F 484(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 3 credits from: ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 7-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 24-36 credits

ENERGY LAND MANAGEMENT OPTION (25 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
GEOSC 001(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
GEOG 160 GS(3)[1], GEOG 363(3) (Sem: 5-8)
E B F 402(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (13 credits)
Select 4 credits from: PHYS 211 GN(4)[1] or PHYS 250 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from: GEOG 361(3)[1], GEOG 362(3)[1], GEOG 364(3)[1], or GEOG 463(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from: E B F 411(3) or GEOSC 454(3) (Sem: 7-8)
Select 3 credits from E B F 410(3) or
P N G 405(3) (Sem: 7-8)

GENERAL OPTION: (24-36 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
Select 6-7 credits from: CHEM 110 GN(3), EARTH 100 GN(3), EARTH 101 GN;US(3), EARTH 103 GN(3), EARTH 111 GN;US(3), EARTH 150 GN(3), EGEE 101 GN(3), EGEE 102 GN(3), EGEE 120 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 110 GN(3), GEOG 115 GN(3), GEOSC 002 GN(3), GEOSC 010 GN(3), GEOSC 020 GN(3), GEOSC 021 GN(3), GEOSC 040 GN(3), MATSE 081 GN;IL(3), METEO 003 GN(3), METEO 101 GN(3), PHYS 211 GN(4) or PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: CED 404(3), CED 429(3), CED 431W(3), E B F 411(3), E B F 483(3)[if not selected for requirement above], ECON 490(3), EME 301(3), GEOG 424 US;IL(3), GEOG 430(3), GEOG 431(3), GEOG 444(3), GEOG 493(3), GEOSC 402Y IL(3), GEOSC 454(3), METEO 473(3), PL SC 490(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15-26 credits)
Select either:

Select from one of the following minors:
Arabic, Chinese, Civic and Community Engagement, Earth Systems, Energy Engineering, Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Environmental Resource Management, Environmental Systems Engineering, Geographic Information Science, Geosciences, Mathematics, Meteorology, Mining Engineering, Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, Russian, Spanish, Statistics, Watersheds and Water Resources or a relevant minor selected in consultation with an adviser;

Or

A concurrent major in any subject;

Or

A 15 credit semester-long education abroad program approved by the professor in charge of the E B F major;

Or

A minor in Asian Studies together with an approved E B F summer term abroad experience.

Course Substitutions for the Integrated B.S. in Energy Business and Finance (EBF) and M.S. in Energy and Mineral Engineering (EME)

As many as twelve of the credits required for the master’s degree may be applied to both the B.S. and M.S. degrees. A minimum of six credits counted for both the B.S. and M.S. degrees must be at the 500-level. Thesis and culminating/capstone experience credits may not be double counted. The undergraduate degree program officer will determine the specific undergraduate required courses for which the 500-level courses may be used to substitute to meet institutional and accreditation requirements.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-06-057 EGEE 442
Electrochemical Methods
ELMETH (3)
This summer course is for senior undergraduates, graduate students and professionals to learn electrochemical methods and data analysis.
PREREQUISITE: EGEE 441
PROPOSED START: S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-057A E B F 473
Risk Management in Energy Industries
RISK MGMT ERTH SCI (3)
Analysis of strategies for mitigating business risk from market, atmospheric, geophysical uncertainties including the use of energy/mineral commodity futures/options, weather derivatives, and insurance.
PREREQUISITE: MSIS 200 or STAT 200 or E B F 472
APPROVED START: FA2010

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: E B F 472, STAT 301, or STAT 401
PROPOSED START: S12015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Education

COURSE ADDS

43-06-058 C I 492
Identities, Power and Perceptual Pedagogies in Teaching and Learning
IDENTITIES & POWER (3)
Students will perform inquires into the intersections of identities, power, and pedagogical formations in relation to urban teaching/learning contexts.
PREREQUISITE: 5th semester standing
CROSS LIST: AF AM 492 EDTHP 492
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-059 EDTHP 492
Identities, Power and Perceptual Pedagogies in Teaching and Learning
IDENTITIES & POWER (3)
Students will perform inquires into the intersections of identities, power, and pedagogical formations in relation to urban teaching/learning contexts.
PREREQUISITE: 5th semester standing
CROSS LIST: AF AM 492 C I 492
PROPOSED START: S12015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Engineering

43-06-060 Change. Decrease the number of credits required for the Degree from 130 to 129 credits. Decrease the number of credits required for the Major from 112-113.5 to 111-112.5 credits. Change number of credits for the Requirements for the Options from 33-34.5 to 36-37.5 credits. Revise program description. Add B E 460, 466W to Prescribed Courses for the Major. Add Additional Courses Area to the Agricultural Engineering Option; Food and Biological Processing Engineering Option; and Natural Resources Engineering Option. Add I E 424 to Prescribed Courses for the Food and Biological Processing Engineering Option. Remove B E 469W from Prescribed Courses Area for the Major. Remove B E 300, I E 424 from Prescribed Courses for the Major. Change credits for B E 302 from 3 to 4 credits. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Semester 2015

Biological Engineering

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences
University Park, College of Engineering (B E)

PROFESSOR PAUL H. HEINEMANN, Head of the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering

This major helps prepare students for careers involving the application of engineering principles to agricultural and biological production systems, processing systems, and conservation of land and water resources. Education in mathematics, physics, and engineering sciences common to all engineering disciplines is provided along with specialized training in biological and agricultural sciences. The curriculum covers all areas of biological engineering, including development of machines for biological processing and agriculture, postharvest handling and processing, natural resource management and utilization, biological processes, food engineering, and structures and their environmental modifications. A student must select the Agricultural Engineering option, Food and Biological Processing Engineering option or the Natural Resources Engineering option.

Program Educational Objectives:

Early career Biological Engineering graduates will be expected to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in basic and engineering sciences related to biological processing, natural resource, and agricultural engineering fields;
  2. Effectively identify, analyze and design sustainable solutions to address issues and opportunities throughout the world;
  3. Have the ability to work in teams and effectively communicate within and outside the profession;
  4. Demonstrate strong leadership skills, ethical integrity, and professional engagement

Program Outcomes (Student Outcomes):

Upon graduation Biological Engineering students will be able to:

1. Technical Knowledge

A. Demonstrate proficiency in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology
B. Demonstrate proficiency in engineering sciences
C. Demonstrate proficiency in communications and information tools

2. Analytical and Problem Solving

A. Understand scientific and engineering fundamentals and can apply them to solving problems
B. Solve open-ended, real-world problems by applying fundamentals and principles of biological engineering
C. Work in teams to solve problems

3. Human Relations and Leadership

A. Value cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary activities and to recognize the rights of others.
B. Involved in and able to assume leadership in professional and community activities.

4. Professional Responsibility

A. Remain abreast of major contemporary issues.
B  Remain abreast of developments, technology, and tools in the Biological Engineering profession.
C. Understand how the engineering profession relates to societal problems and issues and to understand social and ethical implications or the solutions that are generated in Goal II.B.
D. Know how to make informed ethical decisions.
E. Assume, over time, greater responsibility in their profession/career.

Principles of engineering design experiences are integrated throughout the junior-year curriculum by having students solve problems typical of those encountered in the agricultural and biological engineering profession. A year-long major design experience in the senior year emphasizes that biological engineers must learn not only how to develop engineering solutions to unique, practical problems using the newest technology, but also to assess and integrate the social and ethical implications of their solutions.

Careers for graduates include design, development, and research engineering positions involving biological processes, machinery development, natural resources management, materials handling, biological product development, and structural systems for animals, plants, and crop storage. Biological engineers are employed in industry, consulting firms, and governmental agencies in the United States and abroad. Graduates deal with the various engineering aspects associated with production and processing of food, fiber, and other biological materials, within the constraints of environmental protection and natural resource conservation.

ENTRANCE TO MAJOR — In addition to the minimum grade point average (GPA) requirements* described in the University Policies, all College of Engineering entrance to major course requirements must also be completed with a minimum grade of C: CHEM 110 (GN), MATH 140 (GQ), MATH 141 (GQ), MATH 250 or MATH 251, PHYS 211 (GN) and PHYS 212 (GN). All of these courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the admission to major process is carried out.

*In the event that the major is under enrollment control, a higher minimum cumulative grade-point average is likely to be needed and students must be enrolled in the College of Engineering or Division of Undergraduate Studies at the time of confirming their major choice.

For the B.S. degree in Biological Engineering, a minimum of 129 credits is required. The baccalaureate program in Biological Engineering at University Park is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27-28.5 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 111-112.5 credits
(This includes 27-28.5 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GWS courses; and 1.5 credits of GHA courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 75 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (68 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1), E MCH 211(3)[1], EDSGN 100(3), ENGL 015 GWS(3), MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
E MCH 212(3)[1], E MCH 213(3)[1], M E 300(3)[1], MATH 231(2), MATH 251(4)[1], PHYS 212 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
B E 301(3)[1], B E 302(4)[1], B E 304(3)[1], B E 305(3)[1], B E 308(3)[1], B E 391 GWS(2) (Sem: 5-6)
B E 392 GWS(2), B E 460(1), B E 466W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
CAS 100A GWS(3) or CAS 100B GWS(3)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
AG BM 101 GS(3) or ECON 102 GS(3), or ECON 104 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTIONS: 36-37.5 credits

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING OPTION: (36 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
C E 360(3)[1] or M E 320(3) [1] (Sem: 5-6)
I E 424(3) or STAT 401(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (30 credits)
Select 3 credits in math/basic science[26] (Sem: 3-6)
Select 6 credits from B E 303(3)[1], B E 306(3)[1], B E 307(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits in engineering science/design[26] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits in agricultural/biological science[26] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 6 credits in biological engineering[26] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 6 credits in technical selection[26] (Sem: 7-8)
(Students may apply 3 credits of ROTC to the technical selection category and 3 credits to the GHA category upon completion of the ROTC program.)

FOOD AND BIOLOGICAL PROCESSING ENGINEERING OPTION: (37.5 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (16.5 credits)
B M B 211(3), CHEM 202(3), NUTR 100 GHA(1.5) (Sem: 5-6)
B E 465(3), B E 468(3), I E 424(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
C E 360(3)[1] or M E 320(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 6 credits in emphasis technical elective[26] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 6 credits in any engineering science/design[26] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 6 credits in technical selection[26] (Sem: 7-8)
(Students may apply 3 credits of ROTC to the technical selection category and 3 credits to the GHA category upon completion of the ROTC program.)

NATURAL RESOURCES ENGINEERING OPTION: (36 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)
SOILS 101 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)
A S M 309 (3)[1], B E 307(3)[1], C E 360(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
B E 467(3), B E 477(3), B E 487(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
I E 424(3) or STAT 401(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 6 credits in engineering science/design[26] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits in biological/environmental sciences[26] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 3 credits in technical selection[26] (Sem: 7-8)
(Students may apply 3 credits of ROTC to the technical selection category and 3 credits to the GHA category upon completion of the ROTC program.)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[26] Courses to be selected from a list approved by the Agricultural and Biological Engineering faculty. These courses must be chosen so that the engineering design and engineering science requirements for the major are met.


43-06-061 Change.Decrease the number of credits required for the Degree from 134 to 133; Decrease the number of credits required for the Major from 116 to 115; Revise Prescribed, Additional, and Supporting Courses for all Options; Add CH E 230, 452, MATH 231 to Prescribed Courses Area for the Major; Remove CH E 360, MATH 230 from the Prescribed Courses Area for the Major; Change credits as indicated by underlining

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Chemical Engineering

University Park, College of Engineering (CH E)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR PHILLIP E. SAVAGE, Head, Department of Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering is one of the most versatile professions–you’ll find Chemical Engineers employed in a broad array of industries ranging from pharmaceutical and biotechnical companies to semiconductor manufacturing to start-up companies converting the latest laboratory discoveries to large-scale commercial production. Chemical Engineers work with catalysts to develop new ways to manufacture medicines and plastics; they develop control systems that enable the safe production of products from semiconductors to household soap; they design chemical and petroleum plants; they research the effects of artificial organs on blood flow; and they develop the equipment and processes necessary for advances in biotechnology. While chemistry emphasizes the facts and principles of science, chemical engineering emphasizes its practical application for the development of new products and processes.

The undergraduate program in Chemical Engineering provides students with fundamental skills in problem solving, analysis, and design, along with hands-on experience in practical applications. The curriculum builds upon the traditional foundation in the chemical and energy-related industries and introduces new material in the life sciences, polymers, and environmental fields. Students have numerous opportunities to pursue more specialized areas including formal options in Bioprocess and Biomolecular Engineering, Energy and Fuels, and Polymer Engineering.

Program Educational Objectives (PEOs):

The undergraduate program in chemical engineering at Penn State has been designed so that students can identify and pursue their personal and professional goals while obtaining a strong foundation in the principles and practice of Chemical Engineering.

The program aims to produce graduates who will attain one or more of the following:

  1. Careers as practicing chemical engineers in traditional chemical and energy-related industries as well as in expanding areas of materials, environmental, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology industries.
  2. Advanced degrees in chemical engineering (or a related technical discipline), medicine, law, or business.
  3. Positions that provide the technical, educational, business, and/or political leadership needed in today’s rapidly changing, increasingly technological, global society.

Program Outcomes (Student Outcomes):

(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
(d) an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
(g) an ability to communicate effectively
(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

ENTRANCE TO MAJOR — In addition to the minimum grade point average (GPA) requirements* described in the University Policies, all College of Engineering entrance to major course requirements must also be completed with a minimum grade of C: CHEM 110 (GN), MATH 140 (GQ), MATH 141 (GQ), MATH 250 or MATH 251, PHYS 211 (GN) and PHSY 212 (GN). All of these courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the admission to major process is carried out.

For the B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering, a minimum of 133 credits is required. This baccalaureate program in Chemical Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 115 credits
(This includes 27 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 97 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (87 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), EDSGN 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
B M B 251(3), CH E 210(3)[1], CH E 220(3)[1], CH E 230(1), CH E 300(1), CH E 320(3)[1], CH E 330(3)[1], CH E 340(3), CH E 350(3)[1], CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2), CHEM 457(1-2), MATH 231(2), MATH 251(4)[1], PHYS 212 GN(4)[1], ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
CHEM 466(3) (Sem: 6)
CH E 410(3)[1], CH E 430(3)[1], CH E 452(3), CH E 470(3), CH E 480W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), or ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
CAS 100A GWS(3) or CAS 100B GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 18 credits

BIOPROCESS AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING OPTION: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
CH E 438(3), CH E 449(3), B M B 442(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
BME 443/MATSE 403(3) or BME 444/MATSE 404 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 3-6 credits from departmental list of BPBME Engineering Electives (Sem: 5-8)
Select 0-3 credits from departmental list of BPBME Science Electives (Sem: 5-8)

ENERGY AND FUELS OPTION: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
EGEE 411W(3), EGEE 455(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
F SC 401(3) or ENVSE 400(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from departmental list of Energy Electives (Sem: 5-8)

GENERAL OPTION: 18 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
BME 443/MATSE 403(3) or EGEE 455(3) or MATSE 201(3) or MATSE 202(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 6 credits in 400-level chemical engineering electives from department list (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits of approved engineering electives from department list (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits of approved professional electives from department list
[31] (Sem: 5-8)

POLYMER ENGINEERING OPTION (18 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
MATSE 202(3), MATSE 441(3), MATSE 446(3), MATSE 447(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from: BME 443/MATSE 403(3), BME 444/MATSE 404 IL(3), CH E 443(3), M E 403(3), MATSE 445(3) (Sem: 5-8)

RESEARCH INTENSIVE OPTION (18 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
CH E 494(6) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
CH E 446(3) or CH E 544(3) (Sem: 7-8)
Select 3 credits from: MATSE 201(3), MATSE 202(3), EGEE 455(3), BME 444/MATSE 404 IL(3), CH E 510(3) [91]

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits of approved Research Electives from departmental list (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[31] Students may substitute 6 credits of ROTC for part of this requirement in consultation with department.
[91] “…senior, undergraduate students with an average of at least 3.5, and certain other students with averages of at least 3.00 who have been granted special permission to enroll through the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services.” Penn State University 2003-2004 Graduate Degree Programs Bulletin. Instructor approval is also required.


COURSE ADDS

43-06-062 B E 460
Biological Engineering Design I
BIOL ENG DSGN I (1)
Part one of a two course sequence; culminating design experience with projects in agricultural, food and biological processing, and natural resource engineering.
PREREQUISITE: B E 301; B E 391; 7th semester standing
PROPOSED START: S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-063 B E 302
Transport Processes for Biological Systems
TRANSPORT PROCESS (3)
Engineering applications of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and diffusion, to biological systems at scales ranging from microbial to ecological.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 231, MATH 251, B E 300, B E 301, M E 300
CONCURRENT: C E 360 or M E 320
APPROVED START: FA2012

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Heat and Mass Transfer in Biological Systems (HEAT & MASS TRANS)
CHANGE CREDITS: 4
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Engineering applications of the fundamentals of heat and mass transfer to natural and engineered biological systems.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATH 231, MATH 251, B E 301, M E 300 . Prerequisite or concurrent: C E 360 or M E 320
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-064 B E 304
Engineering Properties of Food and Biological Materials
FOOD BIO MATL PROP (3:2:2)
Composition, structure, and properties relationships. Measurement of mechanical thermal, chemical and biological properties, their variability, and use in engineering calculations.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 213. Prerequisite or concurrent: B E 300; C E 360 or M E 320; MATH 251
APPROVED START: FA2008

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: E MCH 210 or E MCH 213. Prerequisite or concurrent: B E 301; MATH 251; C E 360 or M E 320
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-065 B E 466W
Biological Engineering Design
BIOL ENG DSGN (3)
This course focuses on a industry sponsored design project offered in conjunction with the College of Engineering Learning Factory.
PREREQUISITE: B E 391; senior level standing in B E
APPROVED START: S12010

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Biological Engineering Design II (BIOL ENG DSGN II)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Part two of a two course sequence; culminating design experience with
projects in agricultural, food and biological processing, and natural resource engineering.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: B E 460
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-066 M E 410
Heat Transfer
HEAT TRANSFER (3:3:0)
Thermal energy transfer mechanisms: conduction (steady, transient), convection (internal, external), radiation; lumped parameter method; heat exchangers; introduction to numerical methods.
PREREQUISITE: AERSP 308, AERSP 311, C E 360, or M E 320; CMPSC 200 or CMPSC 202; MATH 220 or NUC E 309; MATH 251
APPROVED START: SP2011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: M E 320 or BME 409; CMPSC 200 or CMPSC 201; MATH 220 or NUC E 309
PROPOSED START: SP2016

COURSE DROPS

43-06-067 B E 300
Biological Systems
BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS (3:2:2)
Structure, function, and energy transformation of biological systems that affect solutions to engineering problems. Effects of engineering activities on ecosystems.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 110, PHYS 211
CONCURRENT: CH E 220 or M E 201 or M E 300
PROPOSED START: SP2016

43-06-068 B E 469W
Optimization of Biological Production and Processing Systems
OPTIMIZATION (3:3:0)
Engineering and biological principles combined with economics and mathematical techniques to evaluate and optimize biological production and processing systems.
PREREQUISITE: B E 301 and B E 461, B E 462, B E 464, B E 465, B E 466W, B E 467, or B E 468
PROPOSED START: SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Health and Human Development

43-06-069 Change. Increase the number of credits required for the Major from 76.5-95 to 80.5-99; Revise program description. Add ACCTG 211, ECON 102 to Prescribed Courses Area for the Major; B A 303 to Additional Courses Area for the Major; Move MKTG 221 from Prescribed Courses Area for the Major to Additional Courses Area for the Major; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Semester 2015

Hospitality Management

University Park, College of Health and Human Development (HM)
Penn State Berks (HMBL) – Effective Fall Semester 2015

PROFESSOR JOHN O’NEILL, Director, School of Hospitality Management

This major helps provide preparation for management positions in hotels, restaurants, institutions, and other hospitality organizations. The program is designed to give the student a broad general education and a strong management and problem-solving orientation balanced with the requisite technical skills, all of them essential for career progression to upper-management positions in the hospitality professions. The program also helps prepare students for graduate study.

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option helps prepare students for management positions in any segment of the hospitality industry, including hotels, restaurants, institutional or non-commercial operations, clubs, resorts, and casinos. The management focus helps provide students with the analytical, interpersonal, and organizational skills necessary to effectively function as hospitality professionals.

MANAGEMENT DIETETICS OPTION: This option helps prepare graduates for general management positions within the food services operated by or for medical organizations, health and life care facilities, college feeding, governmental agencies, and community feeding programs. The management dietitian is qualified to solve both nutrition and food service problems. Graduates may also choose to work in the management of commercial food service operations. Together with the necessary clinical experience, the option satisfies the eligibility requirements for membership in the American Dietetic Association.

HOSPITALITY ENTREPRENEURSHIP OPTION: (offered only at Penn State Berks ) This option helps prepare students for careers as owners or managers of small independently-owned hospitality operations or as entrepreneurs within large hospitality corporations or management companies in hospitality segments such as a restaurants, hotels, and non-commercial operations. The entrepreneurship focus helps provide students with creative problem solving, opportunity recognition, and leadership skills necessary to effectively manage small or individual unit’s hospitality operations.

For the B.S. degree in Hospitality Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required. The B.S. degree program consists of three options: (1) Hospitality Management, (2) Management Dietetics, and (3) Hospitality Entrepreneurship.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(10.5-24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-5 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 80.5-99 credits[1]
(For the HM option, this includes 10.5 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 1.5 credits of GHA courses. For the Management Dietetics option, this includes 24 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GHA courses. For the Hospitality Entrepreneurship option, this includes 3 credits of GS courses and 6 credits of GQ courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 58 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (55 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 102 GS(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
HM 201(3), HM 202(1), HM 228(1), HM 271(3), HM 329(3), HM 330(2), HM 335(3), HM 336(3), HM 350 GQ(3), HM 365 IL(3), HM 380(3), HM 430(3), HM 435(3), HM 442(3), HM 466 US(3), HM 490W(3), HM 492(1) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
B A 303(3) or MKTG 221(3) (Sem: 1-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 22.5-41 credits

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT OPTION: (22.5 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10.5 credits)
HM 355(3), HM 480(3), NUTR 100 GHA(1.5), NUTR 119(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (12 credits)
Select 12 credits of HM courses from an approved department list, up to 4 credits of any foreign language, and other courses in consultation with an advisor.

MANAGEMENT DIETETICS OPTION: (41 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (38 credits)
B M B 211(3), BIOL 141 GN(3), CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 202(3), MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 107 GN(1) (Sem: 3-4)
NUTR 120(3), NUTR 251 GHA(3), NUTR 370(1), NUTR 400(1), NUTR 445(3), NUTR 446(3), NUTR 452(3), NUTR 453(3), NUTR 456(2) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSE (3 credits)
PSYCH 100 GS(3) or SOC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)

HOSPITALITY ENTREPRENEURSHIP OPTION: (24-25 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
HM 305(3), HM 319(3), HM 484(3), MGMT 215(3), NUTR 119(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
Select 9-10 credits from the following: B A 243(4), B A 250(3), ENGR 310(3), MGMT 425(3), MGMT 427(3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-06-070 HD FS 258
Introduction to Child Maltreatment and Advocacy Studies
INTRO TO CMAS (3)
Introduction to multidisciplinary field of clinical maltreatment.
CROSS LIST: CMAS 258
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-071 HD FS 465
Child Maltreatment: Prevention and Treatment
PREV & TREAT (3)
Advanced examination in approaches for preventing child maltreatment and treating its consequences.
PREREQUISITE: CMAS 258 or HD FS 258
CROSS LIST: CMAS 465
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-072 KINES 100
The Cultural and Behavioral Foundations of Kinesiology
CULTURALBEHAVKINES (3)
Philosophical, ethical, historical, cultural, psychological, and behavioral foundations of human movement, health, wellness and exercise.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-073 KINES 101
The Biophysical Foundations of Kinesiology
BIOPHYSICAL KINES (3)
Biomechanical, physiological, and neurobiological foundations of human movement and exercise, including applications to clinical conditions, rehabilitation, and fitness are presented.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-074 KINES 467
The Science of Performance Enhancement
SCI PERF ENHANCE (3)
Evidence-based evaluation of performance enhancing substances and methods in sport.
PREREQUISITE: KINES 345 and KINES 350
PROPOSED START: S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-075 HM 490W
Strategic Hospitality Management
STRAT HOSP MGMT (3:3:0)
This capstone writing-intensive class integrates content from throughout the previous  curriculum, focusing on strategic application to current industry issues.
PREREQUISITE: a grade of “C” or better for HM 365, HM 435, HM 442
APPROVED START: FA2014

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: a grade of “C” or better in HM 336, HM 365, and HM 442
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-076 NUTR 120
Food Preparation
FOOD PREPARATION (3:2:2)
Scientific principles of basic food preparation, with an emphasis on the physical and chemical aspects.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 202
APPROVED START: S12007

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 320
CHANGE TITLES: Science and Methods of Food Preparation (SCI FOOD PREP)
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: NUTR 251, CHEM 202
PROPOSED START: SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Intercollege Program

43-06-076A Add. New Child Maltreatment and Advocacy Studies Minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Fall 2015

Child Maltreatment and Advocacy Studies Minor

Intercollege Program (CMAS)

The Inter-college minor in Child Maltreatment and Advocacy Studies is designed for students who wish to supplement their academic majors with studies in child protection and well-being. The minor provides students with a broad and interdisciplinary introduction to child maltreatment and serves to establish foundational knowledge of the history and and etiology of child maltreatment, the structure and administration of child protective service systems, and the identification, investigation, treatment, and prevention of child maltreatment. Students completing this minor will have an understanding of the issues surrounding child maltreatment and advocacy and will be better prepared for professions across a variety of settings that serve children. To meet a diverse range of student interests, four core courses (12 credits) establish foundational knowledge in child maltreatment and advocacy and two elective courses (6 credits) offer opportunities for students to select course options aligned with their professional goals. A capstone course involving field work, research, or other relevant work is required.

For a minor in Child Maltreatment and Advocacy Studies a minimum of 18 credits are required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENT FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
CMAS 258(3), CMAS 465(3), CMAS 466(3), CMAS 495(1-3)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (5-6 credits)
Select 6 credits from BB H 146 GHA(3), BB H 301(3), BB H 446(3), CN ED 422(3), CN ED 431(3), CRIM 012 GS(3), CRIM 422(3), CRIM 423(3), CRIM 441(3), EDPSY 010(3), HD FS 129 GS(3), HD FS 229 GS(3), HD FS 239 GS(3), HD FS 432(3), HD FS 453(3), HD FS 455(3), NURS 111(4), NURS 230(4), NURS 245(3), NURS 409(3), PSYCH 270(3), PSYCH 243 GS(3), PSYCH 231 GS(3), PSYCH 436(3), PSYCH 476(3), PSYCH 421, RHS 300(3), RHS 301(3), RHS 401(3), RHS 402(3), RHS 400W(3), SOC 005 GS(3), SOC 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)

COURSE ADDS

43-06-077 CMAS 258
Introduction to Child Maltreatment and Advocacy Studies
INTRO TO CMAS (3)
Introduction to the multidisciplinary field of child maltreatment.
CROSS LIST: HD FS 258
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-078 CMAS 465
Child Maltreatment: Prevention and Treatment
PREV & TREAT (3)
Advanced examination in approaches for preventing child maltreatment and treating its consequences.
PREREQUISITE: CMAS 258 or HD FS 258
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-079 CMAS 466
Systems and Community Responses
SYS COM RESP (3)
An exploration of the multidisciplinary response to child maltreatment.
PREREQUISITE: CMAS 258
CROSS LIST: NURS 466
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-079A CMAS 493
Child Maltreatment and Advocacy Studies: Capstone Experience
CMAS CAPSTONE (1-3 per semester/maximum of 3)
This course serves as the capstone experience for students enrolled in the Child Advocacy and Maltreatment Studies minor.
PREREQUISITE: CMAS 258 or HD FS 258
CONCURRENT: CMAS 465 or HD FS 465, CMAS 466 or HD FS 466
PROPOSED START: S12015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Information Sciences and Technology

43-06-080 Change. Decrease the number of credits for the minor from 19 to 18; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology for Aerospace Engineering Minor

University Park, College of Engineering (ISASP)

The role of Information Sciences and Technology in the practice of Aerospace Engineering is very important. Aerospace systems rely heavily on computers, software, and digital information; for control, sensors, and other onboard systems. The Boeing 777 has more than 1000 processors and roughly 20 million lines of software onboard, and F-16 and F-117As cannot fly without their onboard computers. In addition, many future aerospace vehicles will be unmanned, and the software challenges will be even greater. The onboard memory has also increased exponentially, the F-106 had 20 KBytes of memory and the new Joint Strike Fighter might have 2 GBytes of memory. The hardware and software must be carefully designed and thoroughly tested, since most aerospace systems are mission- or safety-critical systems. Computers and software are heavily used in the design, development, and manufacturing of aerospace systems. Large supercomputers are often used in the design process. The IST minor will enrich their educational achievements and increase their chances in obtaining employment or entering graduate school. The NSF and the DOD are encouraging universities to enhance their educational programs so that we have well-qualified engineers for future systems, and our IPAC members have stressed the importance of IT for our students.

Student must apply for entrance to the minor no later than their 7th semester.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
CMPSC 201C(3), IST 110 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
IST 210(3), IST 220(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from: AERSP 423(3), AERSP 424(3), AERSP 440(3), or AERSP 460(3) (Sem: 5-8)


43-06-081 Change. Reduce the number of credits for the minor from 19 to 18 credits; Revise program description; Add H P A 433 to Additional Courses; Remove H PA 431 from Additional Courses; Reduce credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology in Health Policy and Administration Minor

University Park, College of Health and Human Development (ISHPA)

Contacts: Health and Human Development -Caroline Condon-Lewis, cxc29@psu.edu; Information Sciences and Technology – Jean Peritz, jperits@ist.psu.edu

The learning objectives of the minor in Information Sciences and Technology in Health Policy and Administration (ISHPA) are to equip students with the skills and knowledge to meet the critical need for persons with expertise in health care information technology. Specialists in this field assist health care organizations develop and apply the information technologies needed to develop Web-based systems for patient education, physician-patient interaction and physician-physician consultation, securely transmit sensitive medical information electronically, and even pioneer efforts for advanced technologies like remote robotic surgery. The ISHPA minor provides students with a solid base in the information sciences and technology through courses in IST’s core curriculum. This core is then supported by selections from a group of HPA courses studying the application of information technology in health planning, financing, or marketing. Students must apply for entrance to the minor no later than the beginning of their seventh semesters.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in this minor.

Scheduling Recommendations by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
IST 110 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
IST 210(3) (Sem: 3-4)
IST 220(3) (Sem: 5-6)
H P A 470(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from H P A 433(3), H P A/BB H 440 US;IL(3), H P A 447(3), or H P A 455(3) (Sem: 5-8)

Note: The H P A courses have additional prerequisites that must be met.


43-06-082 Change. Change the number of credits for the minor from 22 to 21 credits; Change the number of credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology for Industrial Engineering Minor

University Park, College of Engineering (ISTIE)

Collection and processing of information have increased in all sectors for solving engineering problems, including manufacturing and service related problems. Efficient and timely analysis of data is critical for the survival of companies. There is a need for industrial engineers with a strong background in information technology and systems. The minor in Information Sciences and Technology for Industrial Engineering will augment the skills of students in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering in the information systems area. All students pursuing a baccalaureate degree in Industrial Engineering are eligible for this minor.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 21 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
IST 110 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
I E 330(3), IST 210(3), IST 220(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (9 credits)
Select 6-9 credits from I E 418(3), I E 462(3) and I E 433(3) (Sem: 7-8)
Select 0-3 credits from MATH 451(3), MATH 455(3), MATH 456(3), IST 441(3) (Sem: 7-8)


COURSE ADDS

43-06-083 DS 120
Scripting for Data Sciences
DATA SCI SCRIPT (1)
Introductory course in computer-based scripting languages for use in data analyses.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-084 DS 200
Introduction to Data Sciences
INTRO TO DATA SCI (3)
Introductory course in data sciences covering the range of topics in the major.
PREREQUISITE: IST 210, STAT 200; PL SC 309
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-085 DS 220
Data Management for Data Sciences
DATA MGMT-DATA SCI (3)
Advance relational database and introductory course in issues related to managing non-relational data sets.
PREREQUISITE: IST 140, IST 210
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-086 DS 300
Privacy and Security for Data Sciences
PRIVACY & SECUR (3)
The course provides students with the knowledge and skills to analyze and implement protection strategies for data privacy and security.
PREREQUISITE: DS 200, DS 220
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-087 DS 310
Machine Learning for Data Analytics
MACH LEARN&DATA AN (3)
The course teaches students the principles of machine learning (and data mining) and their applications in the data sciences.
PREREQUISITE: DS 220, STAT 318
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-088 DS 320
Integration and Fusion
DATA INT & FUSION (3)
The course teaches students the concepts and techniques of data integration and fusion.
PREREQUISITE: DS 310
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-089 DS 330
Visual Analytics for Data Sciences
VISUAL ANALYTICS (3)
The course introduces visual analytics methods and techniques that are designed to support human analytical reasoning with data.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-090 DS 402
Emerging Trends in the Data Sciences
TRENDS IN DATA SCI (3)
This course exposes and trains students in the analysis of emerging trends in data sciences.
PREREQUISITE: DS 200, DS 220
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-091 DS 410
Data Analytics at Scale
DATA ANALYT SCALE (3)
This course introduces models, computing paradigms, and cyberinfrastructures for storing, processing, analyzing, mining, and linking scale heterogeneous information.
PREREQUISITE: DS 300, DS 310, DS 320
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-092 IST 310
Digital Media Metrics
DIGI MEDIA METRICS (3)
Analysis of audience data for traditional and new media to create metrics for advertising, content marketing and audience analysis.
PREREQUISITE: fourth semester standing
CROSS LIST: COMM 310
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-093 IST 450B
Digital Advertising
DIGITAL AD (3)
This course will explore the digital advertising “ecosystem,” identify key players and trends, and review programmatic media buying.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 310 or IST 310
CROSS LIST: COMM 450B
PROPOSED START: S12015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Liberal Arts

43-06-094 Change. Reduce number of credits required for the degree from 121 to 120 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Anthropology

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (ANTH)

PROFESSOR GEORGE R. MILNER, Head, Department of Anthropology

Anthropology is a holistic scientific discipline having links to the humanities. Anthropologists document, describe, and explain the physical and cultural differences of societies, both past and present. Anthropology sees the individual as part of a larger social order that both impinges upon and is molded by those who belong to it. Anthropology investigates how cultures interact and relate within specific economic, political, and ecological frameworks over time.

The Bachelor of Arts major focuses on the biological and cultural variations of human populations through archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology. In addition to class work, students receive practical training in laboratory and field work.

For the B.A. degree in Anthropology, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(4 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR.)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selections, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 12 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 43 credits[1]
(This includes 4 credits of General Education GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
ANTH 002 GS(3), ANTH 021 GN(3), ANTH 045 GS;US;IL(3) , STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (30 credits)
Select 15 credits in ANTH courses other than ANTH 001 GS;US;IL(3) (no more than 6 credits from 190-199, 290-299, 390-399, and 490-499, other than 297 and 497) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 15 credits from the following ranges (at least 3 credits must be in each range):
a. Archaeology: ANTH 420-439 (Sem: 3-6)
b. Biological anthropology: ANTH 400-419, ANTH 460-473 (Sem: 3-6)
c. Cultural anthropology: ANTH 440-459, ANTH 474-479 (Sem: 3-6)

Integrated B.A./M.A in Anthropology Degree Requirements

The Department of Anthropology offers an integrated B.A./B.S./M.A. (IUG) program designed to allow academically superior students to obtain a B.A. or B.S. degree in Anthropology, a B.A. degree in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies (CAMS), and a M.A. degree in Anthropology in five years of study. To complete the program in five years, students interested in the Integrated Undergraduate and Graduate degree in Anthropology must apply for admission to the Graduate School and the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program by the end of their junior year.

During the first three years, the student will follow course scheduling for the B.A. degree in CAMS and either the B.A. degree in Anthropology or the B.S. degree in Archaeological Science (see the Undergraduate Bulletin). Students who intend to enter the IUG program are encouraged to take upper level classes during their first three years whenever appropriate. By the end of the junior year, students normally apply for admission to both the IUG program and to the Graduate School. Acceptance decisions will be made prior to the beginning of the senior year and M.A. advisors will be appointed for successful applicants. During the senior year, IUG students follow the scheduling of the selected options for their B.A. or B.S. majors, with an emphasis on completing 500-level course work as appropriate. During the senior year, IUG students will start work on their thesis research to meet the M.A. thesis requirements. During the fifth year, IUG students take courses fulfilling the M.A. degree requirements and complete their M.A. thesis.

Admission Requirements

Students who wish to complete the Integrated Undergraduate and Graduate Program in Anthropology should apply for admission to both the Graduate School and the IUG Anthropology Program no later than the end of their junior year. Successful students will be admitted formally into the graduate program in Anthropology just prior to their senior year, if their progress has been satisfactory. Admission prior to the senior year is also possible in some unusual circumstances. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the joint Anthropology-CAMS admission committee. Criteria for admission include a minimum overall GPA of 3.4 in their majors, strong recommendation letters from faculty, and an excellent proposal for a research project with a specific adviser who has agreed to guide the student through to the completion of the M.A. thesis.

Graduate Coursework

REQUIRED COURSES

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)
493. Field Techniques (3)
521. Current Literature in Archaeology (2)
545. Seminar in Anthropology (6)
588. Method and Theory in Archaeology (3)
600. Thesis Research (6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES

Four required credits in ANTH 494(1-12) or CAMS 494(1-12)
Six required credits in CAMS 592(3), 593(3-6), or 596(1-9)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-095 Change. Remove ANTH 426W, 431, 432, 456 from Prescribed Courses; Revise Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Archaeological Science

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (ARSCI)

PROFESSOR GEORGE R. MILNER, Head, Department of Anthropology
(The Bachelor of Science degree in Archaeological Science is offered by the Archaeology Program in the Department of Anthropology.)

This degree provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in research methods, quantification, field methods, and laboratory science. It prepares students with the skills and competencies needed to pursue careers in cultural resource management. Students contemplating futures in nonacademic archaeology should consider this degree or some of its recommended courses.

For the B.S. degree in Archaeological Science, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(10 of these 45 credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 5 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 70 credits[1]
(This includes 10 credits of General Education courses: 4 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GN courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (40 credits)
ANTH 002 GS(3), ANTH 011 GS;IL(3), ANTH 021 GN(3), ANTH 045 GS;US;IL(3), ANTH 421(3), ANTH 423(3), ANTH 428(3), ANTH 433(3), 3 credits from ANTH 492(3-6), 3 credits from ANTH 493(3-6), GEOSC 001(3), SOILS 101 GN(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (30 credits)
Select 9 additional Archaeology credits from the following ranges: ANTH 320-339 or ANTH 420-439 (Sem: 3-8)
Select an additional 18 credits in ANTH electives (other than ANTH 001, no more than 9 credits from 190-199, 290-299, 390-399, 490-499, other than 297 and 497) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from GEOSC 320(3), or SOILS 416(4) (Sem: 6-8)

Integrated B.S. in Archaeological Science and B.A. in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies/M.A. in Anthropology Degree Requirements

The Department of Anthropology offers an integrated B.A./B.S./M.A. (IUG) program designed to allow academically superior students to obtain a B.A. or B.S. degree in Anthropology, a B.A. degree in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies (CAMS), a B.S. degree in Archaeological Science and a M.A. degree in Anthropology in five years of study. To complete the program in five years, students interested in the Integrated Undergraduate and Graduate degree in Anthropology must apply for admission to the Graduate School and the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program by the end of their junior year.

During the first three years, the student will follow course scheduling for the B.A. degree in CAMS and either the B.A. degree in Anthropology or the B.S. degree in Archaeological Science (see the Undergraduate Bulletin). Students who intend to enter the IUG program are encouraged to take upper level classes during their first three years whenever appropriate. By the end of the junior year, students normally apply for admission to both the IUG program and to the Graduate School. Acceptance decisions will be made prior to the beginning of the senior year and M.A. advisors will be appointed for successful applicants. During the senior year, IUG students follow the scheduling of the selected options for their B.A. or B.S. majors, with an emphasis on completing 500-level course work as appropriate. During the senior year, IUG students will start work on their thesis research to meet the M.A. thesis requirements. During the fifth year, IUG students take courses fulfilling the M.A. degree requirements and complete their M.A. thesis.

Admission Requirements

Students who wish to complete the Integrated Undergraduate and Graduate Program in Anthropology should apply for admission to both the Graduate School and the IUG Anthropology Program no later than the end of their junior year. Successful students will be admitted formally into the graduate program in Anthropology just prior to their senior year, if their progress has been satisfactory. Admission prior to the senior year is also possible in some unusual circumstances. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the joint Anthropology-CAMS admission committee. Criteria for admission include a minimum overall GPA of 3.4 in their majors, strong recommendation letters from faculty, and an excellent proposal for a research project with a specific adviser who has agreed to guide the student through to the completion of the M.A. thesis.

Graduate Coursework

REQUIRED COURSES

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)
493. Field Techniques (3)
521. Current Literature in Archaeology (2)
545. Seminar in Anthropology (6)
588. Method and Theory in Archaeology (3)
600. Thesis Research (6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES

Four required credits in ANTH 494(1-12) or CAMS 494(1-12)
Six required credits in CAMS 592(3), 593(3-6), or 596(1-9)

NOTE: Internships will be counted as elective credits.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-096 Change. Reduce number of credits required for the degree from 125 to 122 credits; Revise program description; Revise Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Biological Anthropology

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (BANTH)

PROFESSOR GEORGE R. MILNER, Head, Department of Anthropology
(The Bachelor of Science degree in Biological Anthropology is offered by the Biological Anthropology Program in the Department of Anthropology.)

The Bachelor of Science degree provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in research methods, quantification, and laboratory science. It prepares students with the skills and competencies needed to pursue graduate study or careers in professions associated with biological anthropology and related fields. Students contemplating futures in biomedical or forensic sciences should consult with Penn State’s Premedicine Office or the specific forensic science graduate program to make certain that additional courses in organic chemistry and physics that are required for admission are completed.

For the B.S. degree in Biological Anthropology, a minimum of 122 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(13 of these credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 23-30 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 67credits [1]
(This includes 13 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits GN courses; 4 credits GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (17 credits)
ANTH 002 GS(3), ANTH 021 GN(3), ANTH 045 GS;US;IL(3), BIOL 110 GN(4), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (50 credits)
Select an additional 18 credits in ANTH elective courses other than ANTH 001, (no more than 9 credits from 190-199, 290-299, 390-399, and 490-499 other than 297 and 497) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 15 Biological Anthropology credits from the following ranges: ANTH 401-419(3) or ANTH 460-473(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 8 credits from the following: BIOL 129 GN(4), BIOL 230W GN(4), BIOL 240W GN(4), or KINES 202(4) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 9 credits from the following: B M B 251(3), B M B 401(3), B M B 484(3), B M B 485(3), BIOL 141 GN(3), BIOL 411(3), or BIOL 472(3), (Sem: 3-8)

NOTE: Internships will be counted as elective credits.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-097 Add. New B. A. in Global and International Studies.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Global and International Studies

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (GLIS)

PROFESSOR Eric Hayot, in charge

The interdisciplinary B.A. degree in Global and International Studies is intended to prepare students for lives and careers in a world that is increasingly interdependent. It reflects a “One World” concept that emphasizes the importance of global perspectives, international communication, and study or working experience abroad. The major combines the expertise of multiple disciplines, including the Social Sciences and the Humanities, to suggest a variety of methods for understanding the dynamic issues facing human beings across the globe. The structure of the major also recognizes the fact that the vast majority of the world’s people live in regions other than the European and North American spheres, and that a knowledge of non-Anglophone cultures is an important form of preparation for global citizenship.

The major develops transnational and trans-regional literacy, drawing on coursework both in the Humanities and the Social Sciences to focus on questions of globalization, ethical imagination, and ways to engage peoples and cultures in local terms. Students learn to situate global trends, both macro and micro in nature, in relation to other historical processes. Most courses for the GLIS major will demonstrate a global or regional (rather than national) perspective and address a central topic in one of five designated Pathways.

Human Rights
This Pathway examines the history, development, enforcement, and violations of concepts of the basic rights of mankind. Whether through questions of torture, freedom of conscience, trafficking of women and children, agreements about prisoners of war, human rights constantly need redefining and rethinking if they are to be broad enough to cover everyone on our planet and specific enough to have a real effect on human behavior.

Culture and Identity
Global economic, political, and cultural processes are bound up with complex questions of culture and identity at the individual, familial, and community levels. Examining how differences in language, ideology, religion, race, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation among others impact our sense of self and other, this Pathway considers: foundational expressions of social and cultural values; the formation and contestation of identity over time; the impacts of modernization on individual, family, and community identity; genetic manipulation and modification; and questions of colonization and colonialism on political and cultural structures.

Global Conflict
This Pathway examines war, peace, and security on a global and historical scale to reveal the contingent decisions, random accidents, and devious schemes which continue to be at the root of violence around the world. This Pathway studies conflicts great and small, from tribal warfare to national and international wars, revolutions, acts of terrorism, and so on. It also considers successful and unsuccessful efforts to halt conflict, and how and why approaches to and experiences with peace can affect conflict situations.

Wealth and Inequality
This Pathway considers global distribution of people, goods, and money, both in the contemporary world and in deep historical time, examining feudalism, trade, imperialism, nationalism, and the socioeconomic impacts of globalization. Some of the themes on which it focuses include: motivations for and experiences of such human movement as migration, exploration, travel, slavery, diaspora, asylum, and exile; demographic change; poverty, wealth, and economic inequality; and political, social, and cultural incentives for and restrictions on circulation (censorship, translation, free trade, prize culture, protectionism, access, privilege, bias).

Health and Environment
This Pathway considers the direct impact of global issues on the life on our planet.  As intercontinental travel makes nearly every epidemic already global today, the more and more the health of individuals is directly connected to the health of the globe.  Growing populations, aging demographics, increasing pollution, and decreasing food resources present new challenges for global human health.  Similarly the global cycles of climate change and crisis force us to reconsider both natural processes and anthropogenic influences, examining the philosophy and history of human’s place in nature. Some of the themes on which this Pathway focuses include: the relationship between local resources and global geopolitics; cultural, economic, and social effects of global climate change; pollution and conservation; environmental movements; and evolution and extinction.

Alternatively, students with a GPA above 3.5 may work with advisors and faculty to create a personalized Pathway that reflects their interests.

The B.A. degree requires six credits of foreign-language study beyond the 12-credit proficiency level, or in a second foreign language.The B.A. degree may include a significant engaged scholarship experience (such as undertaking an internship, job, volunteer position, or period of study) located either abroad or in a majority non-English-speaking part of the United States.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

For the B.A. degree in Global and International Studies, a minimum of 120 credits is required

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 15 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 36 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
GLIS 101 GS; IL(3), GLIS 102 GH; IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)
INTST 400 IL(3) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select EITHER 6 cr. in a language beyond 12th-credit level proficiency, OR 6 cr. in a second foreign language, or equivalent proficiencies.  Courses must be taught in the language, i.e., not in English (Sem: 1-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
Select 21 credits in the Pathway courses. Lists of the Pathway courses are kept by departmental advisors, and appear online on the program’s website, glis.la.psu.edu

-15 credits of these 21 will be in a single Pathway concentration (no more than 6 credits towards the Pathway completion are to be from courses in a single department).
-6 credits of these 21 are from other Pathway concentrations.

  • At least 12 credits must be taken at the 400 level or higher.

With approval of the academic advisor and/or the directors of undergraduate studies for the GLIS major, students are encouraged to substitute up to 15 credits of their Pathway work with equivalent coursework in significant engaged scholarship experience (such as undertaking an internship, job, volunteer position, or period of study) located either abroad or in a majority non-English-speaking part of the United States.


43-06-098 Add. New B.S. in Global and International Studies.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Global and International Studies

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (GLIS)

PROFESSOR Eric Hayot, in charge

The interdisciplinary B.A. degree in Global and International Studies is intended to prepare students for lives and careers in a world that is increasingly interdependent. It reflects a “One World” concept that emphasizes the importance of global perspectives, international communication, and study or working experience abroad. The major combines the expertise of multiple disciplines, including the Social Sciences and the Humanities, to suggest a variety of methods for understanding the dynamic issues facing human beings across the globe. The structure of the major also recognizes the fact that the vast majority of the world’s people live in regions other than the European and North American spheres, and that a knowledge of non-Anglophone cultures is an important form of preparation for global citizenship.

The major develops transnational and trans-regional literacy, drawing on coursework both in the Humanities and the Social Sciences to focus on questions of globalization, ethical imagination, and ways to engage peoples and cultures in local terms. Students learn to situate global trends, both macro and micro in nature, in relation to other historical processes. Most courses for the GLIS major will demonstrate a global or regional (rather than national) perspective and address a central topic in one of five designated Pathways.

Human Rights
This Pathway examines the history, development, enforcement, and violations of concepts of the basic rights of mankind. Whether through questions of torture, freedom of conscience, trafficking of women and children, agreements about prisoners of war, human rights constantly need redefining and rethinking if they are to be broad enough to cover everyone on our planet and specific enough to have a real effect on human behavior.

Culture and Identity
Global economic, political, and cultural processes are bound up with complex questions of culture and identity at the individual, familial, and community levels. Examining how differences in language, ideology, religion, race, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation among others impact our sense of self and other, this Pathway considers: foundational expressions of social and cultural values; the formation and contestation of identity over time; the impacts of modernization on individual, family, and community identity; genetic manipulation and modification; and questions of colonization and colonialism on political and cultural structures.

Global Conflict
This Pathway examines war, peace, and security on a global and historical scale to reveal the contingent decisions, random accidents, and devious schemes which continue to be at the root of violence around the world. This Pathway studies conflicts great and small, from tribal warfare to national and international wars, revolutions, acts of terrorism, and so on. It also considers successful and unsuccessful efforts to halt conflict, and how and why approaches to and experiences with peace can affect conflict situations.

Wealth and Inequality
This Pathway considers global distribution of people, goods, and money, both in the contemporary world and in deep historical time, examining feudalism, trade, imperialism, nationalism, and the socioeconomic impacts of globalization. Some of the themes on which it focuses include: motivations for and experiences of such human movement as migration, exploration, travel, slavery, diaspora, asylum, and exile; demographic change; poverty, wealth, and economic inequality; and political, social, and cultural incentives for and restrictions on circulation (censorship, translation, free trade, prize culture, protectionism, access, privilege, bias).

Health and Environment
This Pathway considers the direct impact of global issues on the life on our planet.  As intercontinental travel makes nearly every epidemic already global today, the more and more the health of individuals is directly connected to the health of the globe.  Growing populations, aging demographics, increasing pollution, and decreasing food resources present new challenges for global human health.  Similarly the global cycles of climate change and crisis force us to reconsider both natural processes and anthropogenic influences, examining the philosophy and history of human’s place in nature. Some of the themes on which this Pathway focuses include: the relationship between local resources and global geopolitics; cultural, economic, and social effects of global climate change; pollution and conservation; environmental movements; and evolution and extinction.

Alternatively, students with a GPA above 3.5 may work with advisors and faculty to create a personalized Pathway that reflects their interests.

The B.S. degree requires six credits in quantitative competencies appropriate to the social sciences. The B.S. degree may include a significant engaged scholarship experience (such as undertaking an internship, job, volunteer position, or period of study) located either abroad or in a majority non-English-speaking part of the United States.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

For the B.S. degree in Global and International Studies, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3-6 GQ credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 21-23 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 57-58 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
GLIS 101 GS;IL(3), GLIS 102 GH;IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 021 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-8)
INTST 400 IL(3) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3-4 credits)
Choose 3-4 credits from one of the following: STAT 100 GQ(3) , STAT 200 GQ(4), STAT 220(3), SOC 207(3), or PSYCH 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (42 credits)
Select 21 credits in the Pathway courses. Lists of the Pathway courses are kept by departmental advisors, and appear online on the program’s website, glis.la.psu.edu.

-15 credits of these 21 will be in a single Pathway concentration (no more than 6 credits towards the Pathway completion are to be from courses in a single department).
-6 credits of these 21 are from other Pathway concentrations.

  • At least 12 credits must be taken at the 400 level or higher. These credits do not have to be within a single Pathway.

 

Select 21 credits in related areas such as engineering, business, science, the humanities, or the social sciences, or in another area where competency in Global and International Studies is desirable. The courses are to be selected in consultation with an advisor. At least six credits of such courses must be at the 400-level.

With approval of the academic advisor and/or the directors of undergraduate studies for the GLIS major, students with equivalent coursework in significant engaged scholarship experience (such as undertaking an internship, job, volunteer position, or period of study) located either abroad or in a majority non-English-speaking part of the United States, may use up to 15 of those credits to substitute for credits in the Pathways.


43-06-099 Add. New B. S in Integrated Social Sciences.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2016

Integrated Social Sciences

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (INTSS): offered via World Campus
Christopher P. Long, Professor in Charge

The social sciences are concerned with the study of society and the relations among individuals and institutions within society. The multi-disciplinary Bachelor of Science in Integrated Social Sciences synthesizes the broad sweep of the content, theories, and methodologies of the social sciences. The program draws on core social science disciplines: Anthropology, Communication Arts and Sciences, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. A final capstone portfolio will document integration and synthesis of major themes explored in the program.

Upon completing the program of study, students should be able to articulate the varied theoretical and applied methodologies and interrelationships across the social sciences; communicate effectively using the language and constructs of the social sciences; apply critical thinking in analyzing and applying social science perspectives to society’s problems; demonstrate the ability to understand, evaluate, and critique the results of social science quantitative and qualitative research; formulate, debate, and articulate arguments about social phenomena; and recognize and solve ethical dilemmas in social contexts.

For the B.S. degree in Integrated Social Sciences, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in the ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 24-42 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 51-55 credits [1]
(This includes 0-18 credits of General Education courses: 0-6 credits of GQ courses; 0-6 credits of GS courses, and 0-6 credits of GH courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
L A 201W(3) (Sem: 1-2)
L A 496(3) (Sem: 8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES
(15-19 credits)
In consultation with your adviser, select 6-8 credits in quantification from MATH, CMPSC, IST, PHIL, ACCT, or STAT (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3-4 credits in statistics from the following courses: STAT 200 GQ(4); PSYCH 200 GQ(4); or PL SC 309(3) (Sem: 2-3)
Select 3 credits in ethics from the following courses: PHIL 103 GH(3); PHIL 103W GH(3); PHIL 119 GH(3); or LER 460(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3-4 credits in research methods from the following courses: SOC 207(3); PSYCH 301W(4); CAS 390 GS(3); or LER 312(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (30 credits)
In consultation with your adviser, select 30 credits from social science courses in the following areas: ANTH, CAS, ECON, PL SC, PSYCH, or SOC; or L A 295, L A 395, or L A 495. Students must select at least 15 credits at the 400 level; 9 credits of the 400-level courses must be in one discipline and 6 credits must be in a second discipline. (Sem: )

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-100 Add. New B. S. in Political Science.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Political Science

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts
World Campus

Professor Lee Ann Banaszak, Head, Department of Political Science

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Political Science emphasizes the technical aspects of political science knowledge development and application. In addition to broad coursework in political science, students will complete courses in statistics and research design, advanced classes in social science methods and upper level political science courses that employ quantitative research skills in exploring substantive themes. Students have the opportunity to complete either a research practicum within the Political Science Department, an internship or a TA-ship. This degree will serve students who are interested in political science from the point of view of the practitioner, as well as those who are interested in acquiring practical skills relevant to a variety of careers in politics, government and business.

For the B.S. degree in Political Science, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR) (See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES (19-20 credits)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 67-68 credits [1]
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
PL SC 197 GS(3), PL SC 309(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (49-50 credits)
Select 4 credits from MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 9 credits from PL SC 001 GS(3), PL SC 003 GS;IL(3), PL SC 007 GS(3), PL SC 014 GS;IL(3), PL SC 017 GS(3)(Sem: 1-4)
Select 3-4 credits from CMPSC 101 GQ(3), CMPSC 203 GQ(4), CMPSC 121 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from PL SC 308(3) or PL SC 300H(3) (Sem: 3-7)
Select 9 credits of data intensive PL SC courses from a department list. (Sem: 3-8)
Select 9 credits of any 400-level PL SC course (Sem: 3-8)
Select 9 credits of methodology from PL SC 410(3), GEOG 363(3), GEOG 364(3), STAT 461(3), STAT 462(3), STAT 463(3), STAT 380(3), STAT 466(3) and courses from a department approved list. (Sem: 4-8)
Select 3 credits of 494, 496 or data intensive course from a department list (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from department approved list of courses in the arts, humanities, languages, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and related fields. Students can take a range of courses across disciplines or concentrate their selection to complete a minor in a supporting field. (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-101 Change. Revise Additional Courses Area.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Sexuality and Gender Studies Minor

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (SGS)

The minor in Sexuality and Gender Studies addresses human sexuality and gender as they have been conceptualized and investigated by diverse disciplines: humanities (including history and cultural studies), behavioral and social sciences, biological sciences, and visual and performance arts. Courses in the minor require students to explore scholarship and research on sexuality, sexual orientation, and gender across the lifespan, across cultures, and throughout history. Developing students’ critical skills in a variety of disciplines, courses in the minor cover theories of sexuality and gender; sexual orientation; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender movements; the history of sexual norms; queer theory; gender identity; and impact of gender identities and erotic orientations on the arts; etc.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
ENGL 245 GH;US(3) and HD FS/WMNST 250 US(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)

In order to fulfill the interdisciplinary nature of the minor, students must study both in arts and humanities and in sciences. Students are required to complete a total of at least 12 credits from the two categories below: a minimum of 3 credits from humanities and the arts and a minimum of 3 credits from the sciences. Completion of the minor also requires at least 6 credits at the 400 level in either humanities and the arts or in the sciences (Sem: 1-8). With the permission of the person in charge of the minor, “Special Topics” courses may be substituted for courses listed below.

A. Sexuality studies in humanities and the arts:

ENGL 225 GA;GH(3), ENGL 227 GH;US;IL(3), HIST/WMNST 116 GS;US;IL(3), HIST/WMNST 166 GH;US(3), HIST/WMNST 466 US;IL(3), PHIL 014 GH;US(3), WMNST 301 GH;US;IL(3), WMNST 400 US;IL(3) (Sem: 1-8)

B. Sexuality studies in the sciences:

AF AM/SOC/WMNST 103 US(3), AF AM/WMNST 364 GS;US(3), ANTH 216 GN;GS(3), ANTH 416(3), ANTH 474(3), ANTH/WMNST 476W(3), BB H 146 GHA(3), BB H 251 US(3), BB H 315 US(3), BB H 446(3), BIOL 177 GN(3), GEOG/WMNST 426Y US;IL(3), HD FS 405 US(3), PSYCH 231 GS;US(3), PSYCH 422(3), PSYCH 479/WMNST 471 US(3), OR SOC/WMNST 110 GS;US(3) (Sem: 1-8)


43-06-102 Add. New B.S. In Social Data Analytics.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Social Data Analytics

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts

Professor Lee Ann Banaszak, Head, Department of Political Science

Social Data Analytics is an interdisciplinary major that prepares students to participate in both a research environment where “big data” is a major source of insight into social and political processes, and an economy increasingly organized around data analytics. Students completing the major will have the technical skills to handle, analyze, apply and present big data, and the disciplinary knowledge to draw valid inferences from such information to address real world problems. The program integrates coursework in the social sciences with courses in statistics, mathematics, information science and computer science to develop the unique skill set necessary to conceptualize data sources in relation to the social conditions from which they arise; to think critically about big data in relation to specific problems; and to derive and test hypotheses through application of data tools and techniques. Students will gain valuable practical experience working with data through a capstone experience and participation in faculty research.

This major is intended to produce graduates who are big picture thinkers with the knowledge to formulate good questions and leverage vast stores of unstructured data in answering them. Students will be prepared for careers in government, business, healthcare, and industry. The major also provides a strong foundation for advanced study in social science, law, business and public policy.

For the B.S. degree in Social Data Analytics, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 90-92 credits [1]
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GS courses, and 3 credits of GH courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (54 credits)
PL SC 001 GS(3), PL SC 197(3), CMPSC 121 GQ(3), CMPSC 122(3), IST 210(3) (Sem: 1-2)
PL SC 309(3), SODA 308(3), MATH 220 GQ(3), CMPSC 221(3), CMPSC 360(3), STAT 318(3), DS 220(3) (Sem: 3-4)
DS 310(3), DS 330(3), STAT 380(3) (Sem: 4-6)
DS 300(3), PL SC 496(6) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (36-38 credits)
Select 4 credits from MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 2-4 credits from MATH 111 GQ(2) or MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from PL SC 003 GS;IL(3), PL SC 007 GS(3), PL SC 014 GS;IL(3), PL SC 017 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from PHIL 107 GH(3), S T S 101 GH(3), PHIL 106 GH(3), PHIL 233 GH(3), PHIL 406(3), PHIL 407(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 15 credits of PL SC courses; at least 12 credits must be at the 400 level and at least 9 credits must be data intensive courses from a department list, including but not limited to PL SC 404(3), PL SC 429(3), PL SC 447(3), PL SC 476(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 9 credits from CMPSC 431(3), CMPSC 448(3), CMPSC 465(3), DS 320(3), DS 402(3), DS 410(3), STAT 319(3), STAT 440(3), STAT 464(3) and Analytics courses from a department list.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-06-103 AF AM 492
Identities, Power and Perceptual Pedagogies in Teaching and Learning
IDENTITIES & POWER (3)
Students will perform inquires into the intersections of identities, power, and pedagogical formations in relation to urban teaching/learning contexts.
PREREQUISITE: 5th semester standing
CROSS LIST: C I 492 EDTHP 492
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-104 ANTH 045U (GS;US;IL)
Cultural Anthropology
CULTURAL ANTH (3)
Beginnings of human culture; economic life, society, government, religion, and art among traditional peoples.
PROPOSED START: SP2016

43-06-105 ANTH 215 (GN)
Skin: Evolution, Biology and Culture
SKIN (3)
This course will explore the evolution and roles of skin and human life, including health, communication, and social wellbeing.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 021 or ANTH 045
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-106 ANTH 454 (IL)
Peoples of South Asia
PEOPLES OF S ASIA (3)
This course will cover nation states of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan,  India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Maldives.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 001 or ANTH 045
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-107 ASIA 465Y (IL)
Democratization in Asia
DEMOCRATIZ IN ASIA (3)
A course which identifies components of democracy, such as definitions, measures, datasets, and the democratization process.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 003 or ASIA 100
CROSS LIST: PL SC 465Y
PROPOSED START: SP2016

43-06-108 GER 128 (GH;US;IL)
The Holocaust in Film and Literature
HOLOCAUST FILM/LIT (3)
Thematic, formal, and historical analysis of filmic and literary representation of the Holocaust.
CROSS LIST: CMLIT 128 ENGL 128 J ST 128
PROPOSED START: SP2016

43-06-109 GLIS 101 (GS;IL)
Globalization
GLOBALIZATION (3)
This course provides a broad introduction to the topic of global studies.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-110 GLIS 102 (GH;IL)
Global Pathways
GLOBAL PATHWAYS (3)
Five pathways to thinking globally: Health & Environment, Culture & Identity, Human Rights, Wealth & Inequality, and Global Conflict.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-111 HIST 150 (GH;US)
America in the 1960s: An Introduction
THE 1960S (3)
An introduction to the history of the United States in the 1960s.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-112 HIST 190 (GH;IL)
Religion and Conflict
RELGION CONFLICT (3)
Critical examination of the role religion has played in human conflict.
CROSS LIST: J ST 190 RL ST 190
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-113 J ST 190 (GH;IL)
Religion and Conflict
RELIGION CONFLICT (3)
Critical examination of the role religion has played in human conflict.
CROSS LIST: HIST 190 RL ST 190
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-113A PL SC 010 (GS)
Scientific Study of Politics
SCI STUDY OF POLS (3)
This course introduces students to both the scientific study of politics and the way that study advances our understanding of political actors, events, processes, and institutions.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-114 PL SC 404
Analyzing Public Policy in the American States
ANALYZE PUB POLICY (3)
This course provides students with the tools to empirically evaluate policy proposals and outcomes in the American states.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 001, PL SC 309
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-115 PL SC 446
Business and Government Relations
BUS-GOVT RELATIONS (3)
An examination of the interaction between business and government across different types of political systems.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 001; PL SC 003; or PL SC 014
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-116 PL SC 447
Analysis of Public Opinion and Political Attitudes
PUB OP & POL ATTS (3)
This course engages students in the empirical study of public opinion.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 001 and PL SC 309
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-117 PL SC 451
The Politics of Human Rights
POLS HUMAN RIGHTS (3)
This course examines the politics of human rights and repression, focusing on the causes and consequences of state sponsored violence and human rights violations.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 001, PL SC 003, or PL SC 014
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-118 PL SC 476
Empirical Legal Studies
EMPIRICAL LEGAL ST (3)
This course engages students in the empirical study of law and the courts.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 001, and PL SC 309
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-119 RL ST 190 (GH;IL)
Religion and Conflict
RELIGION CONFLICT (3)
Critical examination of the role religion has played in human conflict.
CROSS LIST: J ST 190 HIST 190
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-120 SPAN 100C
Intermediate Grammar and Composition for Students in Communication-related Fields
SPAN IN THE MEDIA (3)
This online course focused on grammar and the media environment replaces Spanish 100 for students going into Communication majors.
PREREQUISITE: SPAN 003 or placement
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-121 SOC 451 (GS)
Health, Disease & Society
HEALTH & SOCIETY (3)
The emphasis in the course is on the social patterning of health and disease; specifically how health and disease varies by age, gender, race/ethnicity, disability status, socioeconomic status (income, education, occupation), and neighborhood, region, and country.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in sociology or the social and behavioral sciences
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-122 SOC 452
Spatial Inequality
SPATIAL INEQUALITY (3)
This course provides an introduction to concepts, measurement and study of spatial inequality in the US and across the globe.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in sociology or the social and behavioral sciences
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-123 SODA 308
Research Design for Social Data Analytics
RES DESIGN SODA (3)
This course engages students in the study and use of research design tools for the analysis of “big data.”
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 309
PROPOSED START: S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-124 CMLIT 128 (GH;US;IL)
The Holocaust in Film and Literature
HOLOCAUST FILM/LIT (3)
Thematic, formal, and historical analysis of filmic and literary representation of the Holocaust.
CROSS LIST: ENGL 128 J ST 128
APPROVED START: SP2015

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: ENGL 128 J ST 128 GER 128
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-125 ECON 351
Money and Banking
MONEY & BANKING (3:3:0)
Money, credit, commercial and central banking, financial intermediaries, treasury operations, monetary theory and policy, and foreign exchange. Students who have already taken Econ. 451 may not schedule this course.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 102 or ECON 104
APPROVED START: SP2011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ECON 104
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-126 ENGL 128 (GH;US;IL)
The Holocaust in Film and Literature
HOLOCAUST FILM/LIT (3)
Thematic, formal, and historical analysis of filmic and literary representation of the Holocaust.
CROSS LIST: CMLIT 128 J ST 128
APPROVED START: SP2015

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: CMLIT 128 J ST 128 GER 128
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-126A ENGL 221
British Literature to 1798
BRIT LIT TO 1798 (3)
Introduction to literary history and analysis; Beowulf and writers such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, Pope, and Fielding.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION DESIGNATION: GH
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015; ENGL 030, ENGL 137H, ENGL 138T
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-126B ENGL 222
British Literature from 1798
BRIT LIT FROM 1798 (3)
Introduction to literary history and analysis; writers such as Austen, Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Dickens, The Brontes, Yeats, Joyce, and Woolf.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION DESIGNATION: GH
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015; ENGL 030, ENGL 137H, ENGL 138T
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-126C ENGL 231
American Literature to 1865
AMER LIT TO 1865 (3)
Introduction to literary history and analysis; writers such as Bradstreet, Franklin, Emerson, Hawthorne, Douglass, Thoreau, Fuller, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION DESIGNATION: GH
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015; ENGL 030, ENGL 137H, ENGL 138T
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-126D ENGL 232
American Literature from 1865
AMER LIT FROM 1865 (3)
Introduction to literary history and analysis; writers such as Mark Twain, James, Cather, Frost, O’Neill, Faulkner, Hemingway, Hughes, and Morrison.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION DESIGNATION: GH
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015; ENGL 030, ENGL 137H, ENGL 138T
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-127 FR 142 (GH)
French and Francophone Literatures in Translation
FR&FRANCO LIT TRAN (3)
An introduction to the literature of France and French-speaking countries.
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
ADD INTERNATIONAL CULTURES DESIGNATION: IL
CHANGE LONG TITLE: French Fiction, Drama, and Film (In English)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: An introduction, in English, to French and francophone literature and cultural history through film, theater, and literature.
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-128 J ST 128 (GH;US;IL)
The Holocaust in Film and Literature
HOLOCAUST FILM/LIT (3)
Thematic, formal, and historical analysis of filmic and literary representation of the Holocaust.
CROSS LIST: ENGL 128 CMLIT 128
APPROVED START: SP2015

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: ENGL 128 CMLIT 128 GER 128
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-129 J ST 405 (IL)
Ancient Jewish Traditions and Modern Food Movements
JEWISH FOOD (3)
Jewish laws, customs and attitudes with regard to food production, agricultural policy and eating from biblical to modern times.
CROSS LIST: RL ST 405
APPROVED START: SP2012

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Jews and Food (JEWS AND FOOD)
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-130 PL SC 429
Analysis of Electoral Politics
ANALYSIS ELECT POL (3)
The new politics, its technology, and the strategic perspectives that underlie it.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 001
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: PL SC 001, and PL SC 309
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-131 PL SC 465Y (IL)
Democratization in Asia
DEMOCRATIZ IN ASIA (3)
A course which identifies components of democracy, such as definitions, measures, datasets, and the democratization process.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 003 or ASIA 100
APPROVED START: SP2015

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: ASIA 465Y
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-132 RL ST 405 (IL)
Ancient Jewish Traditions and Modern Food Movements
JEWISH FOOD (3)
Jewish laws, customs and attitudes with regard to food production, agricultural policy and eating from biblical to modern times.
CROSS LIST: J ST 405
APPROVED START: SP2012

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Jews and Food (JEWS AND FOOD)
PROPOSED START: SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Nursing

43-06-133 Drop. Drop A.S. in Nursing.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2017

Nursing

Penn State Altoona (2NURS)
Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (2NURS)
University College: Penn State Fayette, Penn State Mont Alto, Penn State Worthington Scranton (2NURS)

PROFESSOR PAULA MILONE-NUZZO, Dean, College of Nursing

Graduates of this major are prepared to provide care in a variety of health care settings to individuals with commonly occurring acute or chronic health problems. After earning the associate degree, students are eligible to take the registered nurse examination for licensure by the State Board of Nursing. The Nursing program is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA  30326 (404-975-5000), www.acenursing.org, and approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing.

All transportation and expenses related to clinical are the responsibility of the student. All students must meet the following clinical facility requirements: carry professional liability insurance; complete annual health examination, criminal background and child abuse history clearances, maintain CPR certification and adhere to any additional requirements of the clinical facilities.

Undergraduate Academic Progression Policy

The Academic Progression policy delineates the academic standards for pre-licensure students (students without an RN license), who are admitted to the undergraduate nursing program. The policy states that all prerequisite courses may be repeated only one time and failure of two nursing courses results in dismissal from the nursing major. Details of the academic progression policy are available in the student handbook.(www.nursing.psu.edu/undergraduate/handbooks).

 Entrance to Major Requirements:

First year and advanced standing (transfer) students may be admitted directly to the major if they meet Admission criteria.

Penn State students who apply by November 30, have the appropriate high school course work, meet the following criteria at Penn State and have a 3.4 cumulative GPA or higher at the end of the fall semester are guaranteed admission into 2NURS:

  • 3-4 credits of 100-level science with a lab with a grade of C or higher: BIOL 129, BIOL 141 and BIOL 142, MICRB 106 and MICRB 107, and CHEM 101 preferred
  • 3 credits of social science with a grade of C or higher: HD FS 129, PSYCH 100, and SOC 001 or SOC 005 preferred
  • 6 additional non-remedial credits, preferably including 3 credits of math

Penn State students have just one opportunity for consideration for the Associate of Science in Nursing and must be enrolled in 2NRCM*, DUS, NURS, or non-degree or provisional status at the time of application and review. Students are strongly encouraged to meet with a nursing advisor prior to application.
*There is a limit of 2 semesters of enrollment (excluding summers) in 2NRCM.

Graduates of this major may qualify for admission to the RN to BS program in Nursing.

For the Associate of Science degree in Nursing, a minimum of 68 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(15 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 62 credits[1]
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (53 credits)
BIOL 129 GN(4), BIOL 141 GN(3), BIOL 142(1), ENGL 015 GWS(3), NURS 111S(4), NURS 112(4), NURS 113(3), NURS 114(3), NURS 116(2), PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 107 GN(1), NURS 211(5), NURS 212(4), NURS 213(5), NURS 214W(3), NURS 216(2)(Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
HD FS 129 GS(3) or PSYCH 212 GS(3); SOC 001 GS(3) or SOC 005 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits of GQ courses (Sem: 3-4)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-06-134 NURS 466
Systems and Community Responses
SYS COM RESP (3)
An exploration of the multidisciplinary response to child maltreatment.
PREREQUISITE: CMAS 258
CROSS LIST: CMAS 466
PROPOSED START: S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-135 NURS 430
Organization and Administration for the Nurse Manager
ORG/ADM NURSE MANG (3:3:0)
Introduction to organizational theory and principles of practice in the administration of nursing services and patient care.
PREREQUISITE: RN license or eligible for NURN major
APPROVED START: SP2013

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: permission of program, or RN license, or eligible for NURN major
PROPOSED START: SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Eberly College of Science

43-06-136 Change. Increase number of credits for the minor from 18 to 22-23; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Astronomy and Astrophysics Minor

University Park, Eberly College of Science (ASTRO)

The minor in Astronomy and Astrophysics, available at the University Park campus, provides educational options to students with interest in astronomy but with principal commitments to an allied field. It is designed principally for majors in Aerospace Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Sciences, Geosciences, Meteorology, and Physics. The educational objectives are to provide students with a profound understanding of the large-scale properties and processes in our Universe including planets and solar systems, our Sun and other stars, our Galaxy and other galaxies; and cosmology. Students in the minor survey the field in the 200-level sequence and then select from a choice of advanced astronomy and allied courses. Minors will be encouraged to take advantage of the many undergraduate research opportunities in the department, often using space-based observatories.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 22-23 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10 credits)
PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
ASTRO 291 GN(3), ASTRO 292 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
Select 6-7 credits from additional ASTRO 400-level courses, AERSP 308(3), AERSP 312(3), E E 472(3), GEOSC 474(3), METEO 466(3), or PHYS 458(4) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from 400-level ASTRO courses, except ASTRO 496 (Sem: 5-8)


43-06-137 Change. Increase the number of credits for the minor from 18 to 33-35 credits; Add B M B 442, CHEM 110, 112, 210, 212, to Prescribed Courses; Add BIOL 222, 322 to Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Minor

University Park, Eberly College of Science (B M B)

The Biochemistry and Molecular Biology minor provides a foundation in traditional biochemistry and an exploration of the current understanding of molecular biology. The fields of biochemistry and molecular biology are extensively interconnected and are taught in the context of the biology of the cell. Stated another way, the B M B minor is a substantial treatment of life processes at the molecular and cellular levels. The minor requires coursework in general biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular biology. A required laboratory course exposes students to the basic techniques and instrumentation used in modern biochemistry and molecular biology laboratories. Students considering this minor should be comfortable with the study of chemistry.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 33-35 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (29-30 credits)[1]
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 112 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
B M B 251(3), B M B 252(3), CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3) (Sem: 3-4)
B M B 400(2-3), B M B 401(3), B M B 402(3), B M B 442(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (3 credits)
BIOL 222(3) or BIOL 322(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (0-3 credits)[1]
Select 0-3 credits of B M B courses at the 400-level (Sem: 7-8)

Note: B M B 408(1-2) and B M B 496(1-18) may not be used to fulfill requirements for the minor.


43-06-138 Change. Increase the number of credits for the minor from 18 to 24 credits; Add CHEM 110, 112 to Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Microbiology Minor

University Park, Eberly College of Science (MICRB)

The minor in Microbiology is a collection of required and elective courses that (1) provides a limited but sound foundation in the discipline, (2) requires students to develop reasonable expertise in handling and characterizing microorganisms, and (3) permits students to emphasize some subdiscipline of microbiology in which they may have a particular interest. The minor specifies the introductory lecture and laboratory courses in microbiology and one course each in immunology and cell biology. A minimum of two laboratory courses exposes students to basic and experimental/applied techniques. Sufficient room exists within the minor for selection of two or three elective courses at the advanced level that may emphasize a specialty area of the discipline such as virology or microbial genetics. Students who complete the minor have a sufficient background to pursue positions in industry that require an appreciable expertise in microbiology.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 24 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (17 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 112 GN(3), MICRB 201(3), MICRB 202(2), MICRB 251(3) (Sem: 3-4)
MICRB 410(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (2-3 credits)
Select 2-3 credits from MICRB 421W(3) or MICRB 422(2) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (4-5 credits)
Select 4-5 credits of 400-level MICRB courses (Sem: 5-8)

Note: B M B 442(3), MICRB 408(1-2), MICRB 496(1-18) and MICRB 497(1-9) may not be used to fulfill the requirements for the minor.


43-06-139 Change. Add PSYCH 100, SOC 001 to Prescribed Courses; Add BIOL 473, STAT 200 to Additional Courses; Remove CHEM 450, 452, CMPSC 101, 121 from Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Premedicine

University Park, Eberly College of Science (P M)

PROFESSOR RONALD A. MARKLE, in charge

This major provides a broad foundation necessary to the understanding of the basic subjects of modern medical studies. The curriculum, which offers a good balance between science and nonscience courses, constitutes an excellent preparation for admission to medical school. It also gives students the freedom to tailor the program to meet their individual needs by permitting a generous number of supporting courses. Specific admission requirements or recommendations of a particular medical school, not already in the required courses of the major, may be included among the supporting courses. Many students also use their supporting courses to pursue a minor.

In order to be eligible for entrance to the Premedicine major, a student must have: 1) attained at least a 3.20 cumulative grade-point average; and 2) completed BIOL 110 GN(4), BIOL 230W GN(4), CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), CHEM 210(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4) and earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses.

THREE-YEAR ALTERNATIVE: A student may also become eligible for the Bachelor of Science degree in this major upon satisfactory completion of:
a. A total of 96 credits, including General Education credits in Writing/Speaking, Health Sciences and Physical Education, and Arts, Humanities, and Social and Behavioral Sciences; 8 credits in a single foreign language; BIOL 110 GN(4), BIOL 230W GN(4); CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), CHEM 210(3)[1], CHEM 212(3)[1], CHEM 213(2)[1]; MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4); PHYS 211 GN(4)[1], PHYS 212 GN(4)[1], PHYS 213 GN(2)[1] and PHYS 214 GN(2)[1].
b. The first year of an accredited medical or dental postgraduate program.

For the B.S. degree in Premedicine, a minimum of 126 credits is required, with at least 18 credits at the 400 level.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 99 credits
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GHA courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (59 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4)[1], BIOL 230W GN(4)[1], CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1)[1], CHEM 112 GN(3)[1], CHEM 113 GN(1)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], NUTR 251 GHA(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
H P A 101(3), PHIL 432(3), PSYCH 100 GS(3), SOC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
CHEM 210(3)[1], CHEM 212(3)[1], CHEM 213(2)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
PHYS 211 GN(4)[1], PHYS 212 GN(4)[1], PHYS 213 GN(2)[1], and PHYS 214 GN(2)[1] (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (16-20 credits)
Select 4-5 credits from BIOL 220W GN(4), BIOL 240W GN(4), MICRB 201(3)/MICRB 202(2) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3-4 credits from STAT 200 GQ(4) or STAT 250 GQ(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 4-5 credits[1] from BIOL 421(4); BIOL 437(4); BIOL 472(3) and BIOL 473(2); MICRB 412(3) and MICRB 422(2) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 5-6 credits[1] from B M B 400(2-3), B M B 401(3), B M B 402(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (26-30 credits)
Select 0-8 credits in a foreign language (proficiency demonstrated by examination or course work to the level of the second semester; if fewer than 8 credits are needed to reach the required proficiency, students choose selections from program list to total 8 credits) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 18-30 credits from program list (A maximum of 12 credits of Independent Study [296, 496] may be applied toward credits for graduation. Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-06-140 Change. Increase the number of credits required for the degree from 82 to 126 credits; Increase number of credits required for the Major from 51-53 to 56-66; Add B M B 401, 402 to Prescribed Courses; Revise program description; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Premedical-Medical

University Park, Eberly College of Science (P M M)

PROFESSOR RONALD A. MARKLE, in charge

This is a special accelerated program in cooperation with the Sydney Kimmel Medical College (SKMC) at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia whereby exceptional students have the opportunity to earn both the B.S. and M.D. degrees in seven years. Students are selected for this program while they are seniors in high school and must begin their undergraduate studies the fall immediately following their graduation. The first three years of the program are completed at University Park and the next four at SKMC Jefferson. The Penn State B.S. degree in Premedicine is awarded after completion of 96 Penn State credits and successful completion of the first two years of the standard curriculum at SKMC Jefferson Medical College.

For a Bachelor of Science in Premedical-Medical a minimum of 126 credits are required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

ELECTIVES: 0-1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 56-66 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (46 credits)[1]
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1)[1], CHEM 112 GN(3)[1], CHEM 113 GN(1)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 210(4), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2), PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), PHYS 213 GN(2), PHYS 214GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
B M B 401(3)[1], B M B 402(3)[1], BIOL 110 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (10-20 credits)
Select 4-5 credits of life science with lab (Sem: 1-6)
Select 3 credits from program list (Sem: 1-6)
Select 3-4 credits of life science (Sem: 3-6)

Note: Depending on advanced placement credit and schedule load, it might also be necessary to enroll during one of the other summer sessions before entering SKMC Jefferson Medical College at semester seven.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-06-141 STAT 184
Introduction to R
INTRODUCTION TO R (1)
Introduction to syntax, programming, data summary techniques, and extensions of the R programming language.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-142 STAT 380
Data Science Through Statistical Reasoning and Computation
STAT DATA SCIENCE (3)
A case study-based course in the use of computing and statistical reasoning to answer data-intensive questions.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 200 or equivalent 200-level statistics course; STAT 184 or demonstrated competency in R
PROPOSED START: S12015

APPENDIX B

GRADUATE

43-06142A New. Add Master of Accounting in Accounting.

Proposed Effective Date: Fall 2015

Accounting

School of Business Administration, Penn State Harrisburg

Dr. Thomas Buttross, Accounting Program Coordinator
School of Business Administration
E355 Olmsted Building
717-948-6145

Degree Conferred:  Master of Professional Accounting

Admissions Requirements

In addition to the general Graduate Council admissions requirements listed in the General Information section of the Graduate Bulletin, the following requirements will also be in place.

For admission to the Graduate School, an applicant must hold either (1) a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or (2) a tertiary (postsecondary) degree that is deemed comparable to a four-year bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. This degree must be from an officially recognized degree-granting institution in the country in which it operates.

Students who apply for admission should have coursework substantially equivalent to an undergraduate degree in Business (or a business discipline) from Penn State University.  If the undergraduate major is not Accounting, an applicant should have completed the following minimum core of accounting coursework (or its equivalent): ACCTG211, ACCTG310, ACCTG340, ACCTG403, ACCTG471, ACCTG472, and FIN 301.

Students should have a grade point average of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) in their final 60 credits of undergraduate coursework, both overall as well as in Accounting courses.  Students must submit scores from the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
The language of instruction at Penn State is English. All international applicants must take and submit scores for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System), with the exceptions noted below. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL is 550 for the paper-based test, or a total score of 80 with a 19 on the speaking section for the Internet-based test (iBT). The minimum acceptable composite score for the IELTS is 6.5.
International applicants are exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement who have received a baccalaureate or a graduate degree from a college/university/institution in any of the following: Australia, Belize, British Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), England, Guyana, Republic of Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States, and Wales.

Degree Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of instruction; all credits must be earned in 400 level, 500 level, or 800 level courses.  A minimum of 21 credits at the 500- or 800-level is required, of which at least 9 credits must be earned in 500-level courses.  Students must complete the following courses:

ACCT 572                      Financial Reporting I
PADM 523                     Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting
ACCT 550                      Professional Responsibilities and Ethics
ACCT 532                      Accounting Information and Decision Systems
ACCTG 881                   Financial Statement Analysis or
ACCT 561                      Financial Statement Analysis I
ACCTG 806                   Advanced Topics in Taxation or
ACCT 510                      Business Tax Planning Theory and Practice
ACCT 504                      Auditing Theory and Practice
BLAW 444                    Advanced UCC and Commercial Transactions
ACCT 545                      Strategic Cost Management
ACCTG 803                   Forensic Accounting and Litigation Support

ACCTG 803 will be the capstone course for the program, integrating materials learned in the other program courses.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 699 or 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Accreditation and Certification

The Master of Professional Accounting program requirements are designed to allow a student who has completed an undergraduate degree in Accounting (or equivalent) to satisfy the current educational requirements for CPA licensure in Pennsylvania and most if not all other states*.

*note: The degree to which Texas is willing to accept on-line courses is uncertain, and they require applicants to select an ethics course from a pre-approved list.  FL, KS, NJ, and WV all require 6 credit hours of Business Law, so students who desire licensure in those states must have a 3 credit undergraduate course in Business Law to complement the graduate course contemplated in this program. Students with an undergraduate degree in business are assumed to meet this requirement.


COURSE ADDS

43-06-143 ACS 542
Physical Principles in Biomedical Ultrasonics
BIOMED ULTRASONICS (3)
Physical principles of advanced ultrasonic imaging and quantitative data acquisition techniques in fields of biology and medicine.
CROSS LIST: E MCH 542
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-144 APDEM 801
Principles of Demography
DEMOG PRINC (3)
This course examines fundamental concepts and ideas in Demography, and U.S. and world population trends associated with these concepts.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-145 APDEM 802
Data, GIS, and Applied Demography
DATA AND GIS (3)
This course provides an overview of key demographic data sets, and promotes familiarity with, and appropriate use of, these data.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-146 ARCH 501
Analysis of Architectural Precedents: Ancient Industrial Revolution
ARCH PRECEDENTS I (3)
Analysis of architectural precendents from antiquity to the turn of the twentieth century through methodologies emphasizing research and critical inquiry.
CONCURRENT: ARCH 531
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-147 ARCH 502
Analysis of Architectural Precedents: Modernism
ARCH PRECEDENTS II (3)
Analysis of architectural precedents of modernism from its multiple, disputed points of origin through the late twentieth century.
PREREQUISITE: ARCH 501
CONCURRENT: ARCH 532
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-148 ARCH 504
Materials and Building Construction II
MATERIALS II (3)
Continuing examination of fundamentals and advanced building materials, systems and construction technologies associated with their architectural use.
PREREQUISITE: ARCH 503
CONCURRENT: ARCH 532, A E 422
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-149 ARCH 522
Visual Communications II
VIS COM II (2)
Continuing examination of two and three-dimensional graphic communication and modeling technqiues for an advanced understanding of visual communications in architecture.
PREREQUISITE: ARCH 521
CONCURRENT: ARCH 532
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-150 ARCH 531
Architectural Design I
ARCH DES I (6)
Studio studying the core methods of the discipline of architectural design and developing skills related to its expression and communication.
PREREQUISITE: ARCH 530
CONCURRENT: ARCH 503, ARCH 521, A E 421
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-151 CSE 820
Software & Hardware Project Management
CS/CE PROJ MGMT (3)
Students study the theory and practice of hardware and software project management.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-152 E MCH 542
Physical Principles in Biomedical Ultrasonics
BIOMED ULTRASONICS (3)
Physical principles of advanced ultrasonic imaging and quantitative data acquisition techniques in fields of biology and medicine.
CROSS LIST: ACS 542
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-153 E SC 550
Power Semiconductor Devices
POWR SEMIC DEV (3)
Power electronic devices: Physics of operation, materials, architectural design, processing, reliability of operations, reliability with applications and challenges.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-154 E SC 555
Neuroscience Data Analysis
NEURODATA (3)
Modern methods for the analysis of neural data.
PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: BIOL 469 or equivalent
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-155 HLS 832
U.S. Military’s Domestic Imperative: Homeland Defense and Defense Support of Civil Authorities
DEF SUP CIVIL AUTH (3)
Provides an overview of the homeland defense mission and domestic support of civil authorities during disasters, and the distinctions between the two.
PREREQUISITE: HLS 801
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-156 I E 575
Foundations of Predictive Analytics
PREDICT ANALYTIC (3)
Survey course on the key topics in predictive analytics.
PREREQUISITE: I E 323, STAT 500 or equivalent
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-157 I E 560
Manufacturing Processes and Materials
MANU PRO MAT (3)
Materials processing and manufacturing methods for engineering materials; manufacturing process modeling and control; manufacturability of engineering materials.
PREREQUISITE: E SC 414M, MATSC 424, or I E 470
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-158 PL SC 543
Political Representation
POLITICAL REP (3)
An examination of significant concepts, ideas, and research questions addressed to recent and classic studies of political representation.
PROPOSED START: S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-159 CHEM 519
Materials Chemistry
MATERIALS CHEM (3)
An overview of the role played by chemistry in the field of materials science.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 516, CHEM 517, or CHEM 518
APPROVED START: FA2012

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CHEM 410, CHEM 412, or CHEM 413, CHEM 432, CHEM 474, CHEM 516, CHEM 517, CHEM 518, CHEM 535, or CHEM 537
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-160 HRER 800
International and Comparative Employment Relations
COMPAR EMPL REL (3)
This course examines employment relations systems in the world today and the influence of globalization on employment relations practice.
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 803
CHANGE TITLES: Human Resources in Multinational Enterprises (HR IN MULTINAT ENT)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course examines current human resource management (HRM) systems world-wide and the influence of globalization on HRM practice.
PROPOSED START: SP2016

APPENDIX C

MEDICINE

COURSE ADDS

43-06-161 PAS 732
Emergency Medicine Rotation I
EM I (3)
This course provides the mandated clinical training in the evaluation and treatment of patients presenting for emergency medicine care.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-162 PAS 733
Emergency Medicine Rotation II
EM II (5)
This course provides clinical training in the evaluation and treatment of patients presenting for emergency medicine care as an elective.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum. Successful completion of PAS 732.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-163 PAS 734
Family Medicine Rotation I
FAM MED I (5)
This course provides clinical training in ambulatory family medicine. Students will encounter patients throughout their lifespan in this mandated rotation.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum. This rotation is offered under the umbrella of primary care experiences and is a hallmark for the educational goals for our PA Program.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-164 PAS 735
Family Medicine Rotation II
FM MED II (5)
This course provides clinical training in ambulatory family medicine. Students will encounter patients throughout their lifespan in this mandated rotation.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum. This rotation is offered under the umbrella of primary care experiences and is a hallmark for the educational goals for out PA Program. This is the second course in the primary care sequence and will fulfill one of the ambulatory care requirements for the PA Program.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-165 PAS 737
General Survery Rotation I
GEN SURG I (5)
This course provides clinical training of physician assistant students in general and other surgery, preoperative, and postoperative care.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-166 PAS 738
General Surgery Rotation II
GEN SURG II (5)
This course provides clinical training of physician assistant students in general and other surgery, preoperative, and postoperative care.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-167 PAS 739
Internal Medicine Rotation I
IM I ROT (5)
This course provides clinical training in internal medicine where students evaluate and manage the adult population over age 18.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-168 PAS 740
Internal Medicine Rotation II
IM II ROT (5)
This course provides further clinical training in internal medicine where students evaluate and manage the adult population over age 18.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum. This is the second course in the primary care sequence. This course will occur following the completion of the first internal medicine course.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-169 PAS 741
Mental Health Rotation I
MENT HLTH I (5)
This course provides clinical training involving the evaluation and treatment of those with mental health disorders.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-170 PAS 742
Mental Health Rotation II
MENT HLTH II (5)
This course provides clinical training involving the evaluation and treatment of those with mental health disorders.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-171 PAS 743
Pediatrics I
PEDS I (5)
This course provides clinical training and experience for care of the pediatric patient.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-172 PAS 744
Pediatrics II
PEDS II (5)
This course provides clinical training and experience for care of the pediatric patient.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-173 PAS 745
Women’s Health I
WOM HLTH I (5)
This course provides clinical training opportunities in women’s health including wellness, prevention, prenatal and gynecologic care in the female population.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-174 PAS 746
Women’s Health II
WOM HLTH II (5)
This course provides clinical training opportunities in women’s health including wellness, prevention, prenatal and gynecologic care in the female population.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-175 PAS 747
Internal Medicine Rotation III
IM III ROT (5)
This course provides further clinical training in internal medicine where students evaluate and manage the adult population over age 18.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum. This is the second course in the primary care sequence. This course will occur following the completion of the first two internal medicine courses (PAS 739, PAS 747). This particular course is considered an elective for a student who previously completed PAS 739 and PAS 740.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-176 PAS 748
Family Medicine Rotation III
FAM MED III (5)
This course provides clinical training in ambulatory family medicine. Students will encounter patients throughout their lifespan in this mandated rotation.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physicina Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum. This rotation is offered under the umbrella of primary care experiences and is a hallmark for the educational goals for our PA Program. This is the third course in the primary care sequence and will fulfill one of the ambulatory care requirements for the PA Program.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth 5 credits.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-177 PAS 756
Summative Experience
SUM EXP (1)
This course is a capstone course that will provide the final comprehensive assessment for students prior to graduation.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physican Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum
CONCURRENT: The student will ordinarily have completed both the pre-clinical and clinical training in the PA program with this class providing the capstone experience for the student.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-178 PHP 831
Public Health Preparedness and the Emergency Operations Plan
PHP EMERG OP PLAN (3)
Teaches fundamentals of emergency preparedness exercises (i.e. orientation, tabletop, drill, functional and full scale exercises.
PREREQUISITE: PHP 530
PROPOSED START: S12015

APPENDIX D

Dickinson School of Law

COURSE ADDS

43-06-179 LLMLW 911
Pre-Writing Process for Lawyers
PRE-WRITING PROCES (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course introduces students to a framework for pre-writing and analyzing a client problem. The course will assist students in developing reading comprehension skills, case briefing skills, legal analysis and synthesis skills, increased proficiency in Legal English, and basic research and citation skills.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-180 LLMLW 912
U.S. Common Law Methods for Criminal Law
COM LW METH CRIM (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of U.S. legal analysis and helps them develop essential skills for success in case analysis courses. The course is structured as a companion course to Criminal Law, introducing students to the use of case briefs, exam-writing skills, and outlines while helping students develop faster reading speeds and techniques for focusing their reading and listening. The course uses hypotheticals and client problems to build students’ legal analysis skills gradually over the course of the semester.
CONCURRENT: CORE 910
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-181 LLMLW 913
U.S. Common Law Analysis and Skills
COM LW ANALY SKILS (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts of U.S. common law analysis and methods. The course will explore the function of case law within a common law system. Students will consider how judicial opinions interact with other sources of law, and the methods common law lawyers use to analyze cases. Students will apply this knowledge to legal problems and build English language skills for clear legal communication.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-182 PERSP 955
Diability Law
DISABILITY LAW (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course will address legal issues and concepts for people living with disabilities. It will cover issues surrounding civil rights discrimination, and public benefits ranging from employment, housing, income supplements, health, and education. Students will review legislation, case law, and rules, and will focus on the practical and social concerns of individuals living with disabilities.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-082A SKILS 974
Appellate Advocacy
APPELLATE ADVOCACY (3)
The purpose of this course is to provide students with skills training in writing, analysis, and oral argument in the context of appellate practice.
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-06-183 SKILS 976
Civil Pretrial Practice and Advocacy
CIV PRE PRAC ADV (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course will combine elements of core curriculum courses, legal writing, and experiential learning by engaging students with a robust fact pattern requiring research and analysis leading to written pre-trial advocacy including pleadings, discovery and disclosures, motions (procedural, substantive, and dispositive), negotiation and settlement documents. Paralleling a case through complex civil litigation, this “in-context” course will provide students with insight into the process of preparing a case for trial or, more likely, bettering the client’s position for a pre-trial disposition.
PROPOSED START: S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-06-184
LLMLW 904
US Common Law Methods
US COMM LW METH (2-4) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
The course is for LL.M. students who speak English as a second language. It serves as a companion to a substantive law course, e.g., Constitutional Law I. Students will build skills in analyzing cases, applying case holdings to hypothetical facts, and understanding the material presented in the substantive law course. Also, students will learn and practice skills necessary for success in law school, e.g., preparation of effective case briefs, class notes, and course outlines.
APPROVED START: S12013

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 914
CHANGE TITLES: U.S. Common Law Methods for Constitutional Law (COM LW METH CONSTI
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The course is structured as a companion course to Constitutional law,
introducing students to the use of case briefs, exam-writing skills, and outlines while helping students develop faster reading speeds and techniques for focusing their reading and listening.
PROPOSED START: SP2016

OLD
43-06-185 PERSP 996
Independent Study
INDEP STUDY (1-4) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
In this course the student, under the supervision of a full-time member of the faculty, will be permitted to do research and write a paper of a substantial nature on a significant subject.
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-3 per semester/maximum of 4
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-06-186 PERSP 998
Higher Education Law Practice
HIGHER ED LAW PRAC (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course is devoted to developing problem solving skills related to legal issues in higher education.
PREREQUISITE: CORE 934; recommended CL&CR 963
CONCURRENT: recommended CL&CR 963
APPROVED START: S12015

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CORE 934 and recommended Prerequisite or concurrent: CL&CR 934
PROPOSED START: FA2015