Appendix 45-06

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-06-001 AG 160 (GH)
Introduction into Ethics and Issues in Agriculture
Ag Ethics/Issues (3)
The course explores ethical theories, concepts of critical thinking, and major ethical issues related to American agriculture.
Ethics and the social contract include substantive ethical theories focusing on rights-based ethical theories (libertarianism and egalitarian theories) and consequentialist theories (utilitarianism and axiology). These theories assist in conceptually defining levels of participation and consent in democracy. This course explores the circumstances in which rational persons and political groups historically agree to be bound in collective decision making. The primary focus by examines four separate ethical themes illustrating why and how individuals accept a variety of terms.The course highlights philosophical/ethical decisions related to agriculture issues during the history of the United States. Issues range from non-interference rights to opportunity rights dealing with food, fiber, natural resource and environmental issues. Procedural theory emphasizes the formation of legitimate and defensible rules rather than ethics. Policy choices are assumed to be legitimate and defensible as long as individuals follow the rules/procedures for decision making. The content of this course meshes the procedural and the substance theories found throughout historical debates in agriculture communities. The course identifies traditional agrarian problem identification, policy formation, policy adoption and funding, program implementation and program evaluation.How ethics figures historically in agriculture policy processes is applied in a variety of case studies and debates as well as selected readings. The course includes an examination of the ethics of when, how and where the policy process historically influenced agriculture public policies. The course emphasizes the need to critically think about various points of view expressed by various conflicting authors.
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
RE-CERTIFY GH DESIGNATION
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course covers ethics and the social contract to include substantive ethical theories focusing on rights-based ethical theories (libertarianism and egalitarian theories) and consequentialist theories (utilitarianism and axiology). These theories assist in conceptually defining levels of participation and consent in democracy. This course explores the circumstances in which rational persons and political groups historically agree to be bound in collective decision making. The primary focus examines four separate ethical themes illustrating why and how individuals accept a variety of terms.The course highlights philosophical/ethical decisions related to agriculture issues during the history of the United States. Issues range from non-interference rights to opportunity rights dealing with food, fiber, natural resource and environmental issues. Procedural theory emphasizes the formation of legitimate and defensible rules rather than ethics. Policy choices are assumed to be legitimate and defensible as long as individuals follow the rules/procedures for decision making. The content of this course meshes the procedural and the substance theories found throughout historical debates in agriculture communities. The course identifies traditional agrarian problem identification, policy formation, policy adoption and funding, program implementation and program evaluation. How ethics figures historically in agriculture policy processes is applied in a variety of case studies and debates as well as selected readings. The course includes an examination of the ethics of when, how and where the policy process historically influenced agriculture public policies. The course emphasizes the need to critically think about various points of view expressed by various conflicting authors.
PROPOSED START: SP2018

OLD
45-06-002 ASM 420
Principles of Off-Road Machines
Princ Offrd Mach (3)
Cabs, tires, traction, power train, electrical systems and technical standards for off-road equipment, including agricultural, loggin, construction, and military machines.
A S M 420 covers the technical aspects of off-road power machinery, such as tractors, self-propelled harvesters, and military, logging and construction equipment. Upon successful completion, students will understand the many facets of design and management of such vehicles (such as mechanical power generation, power allocation, power transmission, traction, operator enclosures, and electrical and electronic systems). Laboratory exercises will involve full-scale equipment with instrumentation used to measure performance. While A S M 420 is not a prerequisite for any other course, it complements engineering and technology courses related to machinery. This course is a technical selection in the Biological Engineering and BioRenewable Systems majors and is required for the Off-Road Equipment minor. It complements other courses for anyone interested in the off-road machinery industries. A S M 420 covers several aspects of function and design related to off-road machinery.
PREREQUISITES: BE 306 or ASM 310
APPROVED START: FA2015

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: ASM 420 covers the technical aspects of off-road power machinery, such as tractors, self-propelled harvesters, and military, logging and construction equipment. Upon successful completion, students will understand the many facets of design and management of such vehicles (such as mechanical power generation, power allocation, power transmission, traction, operator enclosures, and electrical and electronic systems).
Laboratory exercises will involve full-scale equipment with instrumentation used to measure performance. While ASM 420 is not a prerequisite for any other course, it complements engineering and technology courses related to machinery. This course is a technical selection in the Biological Engineering and BioRenewable Systems majors and is required for the Off-Road Equipment minor. It complements other courses for anyone interested in the off-road machinery industries. ASM 420 covers several aspects of function and design related to off-road machinery.
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: BE 306; ASM 310; ME 360
PROPOSED START: SP2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE

45-06-003 Add. New Art Minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Fall 2017

Art Minor

Contact: Graeme Sullivan, gls27@psu.edu; Roy Robson, rrr5237@psu.edu

College of Arts and Architecture

The B.A. degree in art provides a comprehensive liberal education coupled with professional resident instruction in art. Students electing to take the Art Minor will gain access to skills and knowledge to enable them to understand and integrate a range of art and design methods and content to broader academic interests. Students completing this minor will find a flexible coursework structure that ensures their objectives and artistic interests are met. Depending on each student’s objectives and course choices they may choose courses that provide a foundation for a liberal arts education, preparation for a double major, preliminary stages towards a professional career in visual arts and design, or broad grounding for graduate studies. Each student must elect an area of concentration from one or more of the following: ceramics, drawing and painting, new media, photography, printmaking, or sculpture. The Art Minor enables students to advance and integrate visual arts and design knowledge and skills in a range of areas and is especially appropriate for students with substantial interest in art and design, but who intend to pursue careers in other fields.

Entrance Requirements: Admission to the program includes acceptance to the University Park, College of Arts and Architecture (AABA) and Abington College (AAAB) application to the programs, and a portfolio review by faculty members.

Retention Requirements: Students in the Art Minor are expected to maintain acceptable academic growth as demonstrated by earning of grades of C or higher. Failure to do so is grounds for an academic warning, with clear written strategies and a time frame for the student to return to good standing. Should the student not address the issue, he/she may be advised by faculty to consider a different program or minor.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Some courses may require prerequisites.

For a Minor in Art, a minimum of 18 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
ART 110(3), ART 111(3)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
ART 201(3); ART 203(3); ART 211 US(3); ART 220(3); ART 223(3); ART 230(3); ART 240(3); ART 250(3); ART 260(3); ART 280(3); ART 290(3); ART 296(1-18); ART 297(1-9) ART 299 IL(1-12); ARTH 111 GA;IL(3); ARTH 112 GA;IL(3); ARTH 120 GA;IL(3); ARTH 130 GA;US;IL(3); ARTH 140 GA;IL(3)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Students must take 9 credits within one or more of the following areas of concentration: Ceramics, Drawing and Painting, New Media, Sculpture, Printmaking, or Photography. These 9 credits must include 3 credits at the 300-level and 6 credits at the 400-level.

COURSE ADDS

45-06-004 INART 420W
Portfolio Matters: Integrative Arts Capstone
INART CAPSTONE (3)
INART 420W: Portfolio Matters is the writing-intensive capstone course for the Integrative Arts degree. The course is based on the application of integrated learning to complex life and career questions through assignments that include self-reflection exercises, independent research, collaborative teamwork, participation in seminar-based discussions, peer critiques, resume writing, portfolio planning, and individual presentations that may include visual and written elements. The course prepares Integrative Arts majors to be able to evaluate and curate their creative, academic, and work experiences for the development of a strategic plan for a professional portfolio and resume. The course design provides students with the opportunity to use thought and creativity to develop a plan for a portfolio and resume that reflects their creative and intellectual accomplishments and the range of their capabilities.
PROPOSED START:  S12017

45-06-005 MUSIC 207  (GA;GS;US)
Jazz and the African American Experience
JAZZ & AF AM EXPER (3)
The history and evolution of jazz is a significant cultural manifestation of the African American experience. The music and its artists provide a lens through which to examine questions surrounding the African American experience and what it means to be Black in America, engaging with questions about identity, authenticity, freedom, activism, gender, and sexuality, as well as the role of music in African American life.
CROSS LIST: AFAM 207
PROPOSED START:  FA2017

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
THE BEHREND COLLEGE

45-06-006 Change. Move MKTG 330 from Prescribed Courses to Additional Courses. Add Additional Courses Section. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Marketing Minor

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (MRKTG)

Contact(s): Mary Beth Pinto, mxp49@psu.edu

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

For a Minor in Marketing a minimum of 18 credits are required.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
MKTG 301(3), MKTG 342(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
MKTG 330(3); MKTG 344(3)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits of MKTG courses (at least 6 credits at the 400 level) (Sem: 5-8)


45-06-007 Change. Increase the number of credits required for the degree from 120 to 121. Revise program description. Remove electives. Increase the number of credits required for the Major from 88 to 91 credits. Remove MKTG 330 and 440 from Prescribed Courses. Add MKTG 343, 344, and 441 to Prescribed Courses. Remove ECON 481, 482, 485, MIS 336, and SCM 455 from Additional Courses. Add MKTG 445, 478, and 480 to Additional Courses. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Marketing

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (MRKTG)

The objective of the Marketing major is to provide professional education to students leading to careers in business, government, and non-profit organizations. Typically, graduates are employed in business-to-business marketing, management, sales management, retailing, marketing research, digital marketing, and brand management. The major provides a solid foundation in marketing practice, such as analyzing and understanding the needs and wants of present and potential customers, designing appropriate product offerings, establishing pricing policies, developing communication strategies, devising efficient distribution strategies, researching marketing data for the above functions, and coordinating marketing programs with other functional areas of business.

Entrance to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Marketing major requires the completion of 5 entry-to-major courses: ACCTG 211(4); ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 15 GWS(3) or ENGL 30 GWS(3); MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4); STAT 200 GQ(4) or SCM 200(4), and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

For the B.S. degree in Marketing, a minimum of 121 credits is required. Each student must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course in the major field.

Scheduling Recommendations by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 91 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (43 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
SCM 301(3)[1] (Sem:3-6)
MIS 204(3), MKTG 301(3)[1], MKTG 342(3), MKTG 343(3)[1], MKTG 344(3)[1], MKTG 441(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
FIN 301(3)[1], MGMT 301(3)[1], MGMT 471W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (30 credits)
Select 4 credits from: MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
Select 4 credits from: SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
Select 4 credits from: BA 241(2) and BA 242(2) or BA 243(4) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from: ECON 470 IL(3)[1], ECON 473 IL(3)[1], FIN 471(3)[1], MGMT 461 IL(3)[1],
MKTG 445 IL(3)[1], or other 400-level international business courses (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits of Marketing electives from: MKTG 327(3)[1], MKTG 410(3)[1], MKTG 422(3)[1], MKTG 445 Il(3)[1], MKTG 475(3)[1], MKTG 478(3)[1], MKTG 480(3)[1], MKTG 485(3)[1], MKTG 494(1-12)[1], MKTG 495(1-18)[1], or MKTG 497(1-9)[1], (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from an approved specialization area including: any business concentration or major field and any non-business concentration or major field. Note: all credits do not need to be chosen from any one concentration area. (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-06-008 M E  467
Applied Finite Element Analysis
APPL FEM ANLY (3)
Review of matrix algebra; discretization; finite element formulation; application of finite element computer codes.
PREREQUISITE: M E 410 and M E 349
APPROVED START:  FA2011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ME 349
ADD CONCURRENT: ME 410
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
SMEAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

45-06-009 Change. Increase Major Requirements from 73-76 to 79-82 credits. Remove RM 301 from Prescribed Courses for the Major. Add RM 415 and STAT 483 to Additional Courses section of the Actuarial Science Option. Add RM 301 to Prescribed Courses for the Enterprise Risk Management Option. Add RM 301 to Prescribed Courses for the Real Estate Option. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Risk Management

University Park, Smeal College of Business (R M)

PROFESSOR Austin J. Jaffe, Chair, Department of Risk Management

The Risk Management major prepares students for careers in a wide range of private industries and public service agencies involving such areas as operations, property development, financial strategy, and government. The major is integrative in nature by crossing traditional business boundaries while offering specific areas of study in actuarial science, enterprise risk management, and real estate. High profile risks are faced by leaders and managers up and down the corporate ladder and require specialized skills, knowledge and preparation. The Risk Management major prepares students for this along with a chance to study risk from three different perspectives by offering specialty courses along with a common pool of risk management courses. This structure assures that the students in the risk management major are equipped with the common tools of risk analysis while at the same time permitting the students to tailor the specifics of their training through the selection of a particular option.

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE OPTION: The courses in the Actuarial Science option stress the application of mathematical and statistical concepts to the measurement of life and other contingencies, while at the same time giving the student a broad understanding of the business environment. Students in the Actuarial Science option are encouraged to begin the series of professional examinations leading to Associateship and Fellowship in either the Society of Actuaries (A.S.A./F.S.A.) or the Casualty Actuarial Society (A.C.A.S./F.C.A.S.).

Entrance requirements to the Actuarial Science Option — To be eligible for entrance into the Actuarial Science option, a degree candidate must be enrolled in the Smeal College of Business or the Division of Undergraduate Studies and satisfy the following requirements for entrance:

  1. The degree candidate must be taking, or have taken, a program appropriate for entry to the major as shown in the bulletin, including approximately 60 credits of course work.
  2. Complete the following entrance to major requirements: ACCTG 211(4)[1]; ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 15 GWS(3) or ENGL 30 GWS(3); FIN 301(3)[1]; MATH 140 GQ(4)[1]; MATH 141(4)[1], MGMT 301(3)[1]; and MKTG 301(3)[1]; SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1]. These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.
  3. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.20 prior to and through to the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.

ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT OPTION: The Enterprise Risk Management Option prepares students to identify, quantify and qualify the regulatory, legal, financial and contractual aspects of enterprise risk; the management of such risks; and the application of risk financing techniques to control risk exposures in organizations. Emphasis is also placed on the understanding of the principles and risks underlying complex business contracts.

Entrance requirements to the Enterprise Risk Management Option –To be eligible for entrance into the Risk Management major and the Enterprise Risk Management Option, a degree candidate must be enrolled in the Smeal College of Business or the Division of Undergraduate Studies and satisfy the following requirements for entrance:

  1. The degree candidate must be taking, or have taken, a program appropriate for entry to the major as shown in the bulletin, including approximately 60 credits of course work.
  2. Complete the following entrance to major requirements: ACCTG 211(4)[1]; ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 15 GWS(3) or ENGL 30 GWS(3); FIN 301(3)[1]; MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1]; MGMT 301(3)[1]; and MKTG 301(3)[1]; SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1]. These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.
  3. In addition to the above requirements, the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University may approve administrative enrollment controls that limit the number of students who are admitted to majors in the Smeal College of Business. In each case, however, academic requirements are established for admission. For information on enrollment controls, consult the Smeal College of Business Web site (http://www.smeal.psu.edu).

REAL ESTATE OPTION: This option is designed to prepare the student for a wide range of professional opportunities in corporate real estate management, real estate brokerage, appraisal, property management, mortgage lending and banking, development, and governmental service.

Entrance requirements to the Real Estate Option –To be eligible for entrance into the Risk Management major and the General or Real Estate Options, a degree candidate must be enrolled in the Smeal College of Business or the Division of Undergraduate Studies and satisfy the following requirements for entrance:

  1. The degree candidate must be taking, or have taken, a program appropriate for entry to the major as shown in the bulletin, including approximately 60 credits of course work.
  2. Complete the following entrance to major requirements: ACCTG 211(4)[1]; ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 15 GWS(3) or ENGL 30 GWS(3); FIN 301(3)[1]; MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1]; MGMT 301(3)[1]; and MKTG 301(3)[1]; SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1]. These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.
  3. In addition to the above requirements, the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University may approve administrative enrollment controls that limit the number of students who are admitted to majors in the Smeal College of Business. In each case, however, academic requirements are established for admission. For information on enrollment controls, consult the Smeal College of Business Web site (http://www.smeal.psu.edu).

For the B.S. degree in Risk Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required (at least 15 credits must be taken at the 400 level).

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection,)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 11-14 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 79-82 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; and 3 credits of GS.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 48 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (34 credits)
ACCTG 211(4)[1], ECON 102 GS(3), FIN 301(3)[1], MGMT 301(3)[1], MKTG 301(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
BA 342(3), BA 411(3), BLAW 341(3), ECON 104 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), MIS 204(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (4 credits)
Select 4 credits: Attainment of 12th credit level proficiency in a single foreign language (4 credits). Proficiency must be demonstrated by either examination or course work. (Sem: 1-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 31-34 credits

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE OPTION: (31-34 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (28 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 231(2)[1], STAT 414(3)[1] (Sem: 3-5)
RM 320(3)[1], RM 410(3)[1], RM 411(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
RM 412(3)[1], RM 430(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
RM 401(3)[1] or RM 420(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)
RM 415(3)[1]; STAT 483(3)[1]

ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT OPTION: (31 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)
BLAW 441(3)[1], FIN 406(3)[1], RM 301(3)[1], RM 320(3)[1], RM 405(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)
RM 440(3)[1], SCM 301(3) [1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select six credits of supporting coursework from an approved department list. (Sem: 5-8)

REAL ESTATE OPTION: (31 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (18 credits)
RM 301(3)[1], RM 330(3)[1], RM 450(3)[1], RM/FIN 460(3)[1], RM/FIN 470(3)[1], SCM 301(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits [1] from FIN 406(3), RM 420(3), RM/BLAW 424(3), RM/BLAW 425(3), RM 480(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select six credits of supporting coursework from an approved department list. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

46-06-010 IB  470
International Development in an African Context
INTL DEV IN AFRICA (3)
This course looks at international development from an African perspective and discusses  the prospects for African economic growth in the 21st Century. With an understanding of historical events that have shaped the political and social landscape of modern day Africa, the economic potential of African nations will be discussed in detail. Utilizing success stories, the course introduces economic, business, social, and political issues that confront developing countries in Africa, along with solutions that have been proposed or are in use to address various development challenges. This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn first-hand about international development issues. It will introduce students to definitions of international development terms, data on international development, measures of development and development indices, as well as leading issues in International development.
Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course explores some of the key development issues in sub-Saharan Africa, examines empirical findings to better understand Africa and its nations, and reviews the prospects for successful international business in this emerging growth market. Cases studies focus on successful economic growth that have emerged out of Africa and what how these successes are laying the groundwork for future international business opportunities. As such, the various components of the course are designed to promote the student’s abilities to:
• Describe and analyze social, economic, political elements that influence development in African countries. Students will learn that development problems, while often measured in economic terms, are multi-faceted and interrelated, thereby learn to appreciate that meaningful analysis and problem solving in international development must include different components.
• Identify and analyze specific global issues, illustrating the social, economic and political context that may affect their resolution. Students will have the opportunity to experience the different facets of international development and participate, in a limited way, in efforts to address the issues.
PREREQUISITE: Fifth Semester Standing or Higher Required
PROPOSED START:  FA2017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-06-011 RM   320
Risk Management and Insurance
RISK MGMT & INS (3)
Goals and methods of risk management.  Commercial insurance and alternative risk transfer (ART) methods in addition to the characteristics of insurance markets and intermediaries used by risk managers.
PREREQUISITE: RM 301
APPROVED START:  S12011

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 320W
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: FIN 301 and MATH 110 or MATH 140 and STAT 200 or SCM 200
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
46-06-012 RM   330
Real Estate Risk Analysis
R EST RISK ANLYS (3)
Risk and value associated with real estate decision making, which includes purchasing, leasing renovation, financing, and investing.
PREREQUISITE: R M 301
APPROVED START:  S12011

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 330W
CHANGE SHORT TITLE: R EST RISK ANALYS (3)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Risk and value associated with real estate decision making, which includes purchasing, leasing, renovation, financing, and investing. The purpose of this course is to demonstrate how value and risk is central to virtually all real estate decision making, including whether and how to lease, buy or mortgage a property acquisition; whether to renovate, refinance, demolish or expand a property; and when and how to divest a property. The goal is to finish the course with a value oriented framework based on a set of valuation and decision making tools that can be applied in a variety of real world situations and to understand industry indicators (external factors) that determine the level of risk associated with real estate ventures.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: RM 301  5th – 11th Term standing
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-013 RM 410
Financial Mathematics for Actuaries
FIN MATH FOR ACTSC (3)
Compound interest and annuity functions; life annuities; equations of value; determination of yield rates; bonds; introduction to derivatives. R M 410 Financial Mathematics for Actuaries (3) The first section of the course focuses on Interest Theory, including compound interest, annuities- certain, and life annuities; equations of value; loans and their valuation; the pricing of bonds (with and without default), determining their yields to maturity and outstanding balances; determination of yield rates, spot rates, forward rates, and At-Par rates; duration of an asset or liability, and immunization of interest rate risk. The second section introduces students to derivatives, including the description, payoffs, and profits of forwards, futures, puts, calls, and swaps, and how to use them to manage a company’s or investor’s financial risks. The course helps prepare actuarial students for the international actuarial exam FM (Financial Mathematics).
PREREQUISITE: C or better in: STAT 414 or MATH 414
APPROVED START:  SP2016

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: C or better in STAT 414 or MATH 414 and C or better in MATH 230 or
MATH 231
PROPOSED START:  S12018

OLD
45-06-014 RM 411
Actuarial Mathematics I
ACTUARIAL MATH I (3)
A study of the mathematical theory of life contingencies; single-life functions and their applications.
PREREQUISITE: R M 410; STAT 414 or MATH 414
APPROVED START:  SP2012

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: C or better in RM 410
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-015 RM  415
Modeling for Actuarial Science
MODELING FOR ACTSC (3)
Modeling for Actuarial Science, including models of interest rates, used to price liabilities, and models of stock prices and options used to price Employee Options and Cash Balance Accounts.
PREREQUISITE: R M 410
APPROVED START:  S12011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: C or better in RM 410
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-016 RM 420
Property, Casuality, and Health Insurance
PRP CSLTY HLTH INS (3)
Actuarial methods and concepts used to model property, casualty and health insurance losses along with credibility theory.
PREREQUISITE: R M 412
APPROVED START:  SP2016

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: C or better in RM 410
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS

45-06-017 Add. New Digital Journalism and Media Bachelor of Arts.

Proposed Effective Date: Fall 2017

Digital Journalism and Media

University Park, Communications – James Risley, jfr4@psu.edu; Shannon Kennan, ssk168@psu.edu

The Digital Journalism and Media degree, to be offered via the World Campus, will prepare students for the fast-changing field of digital journalism and other web-based communications careers, including multimedia storytelling, digital production and digital media management. This new major, as structured, requires courses on writing, law, ethics and multimedia skills in its core. There are three suggested pathways of courses which can allow students to develop expertise in certain subject areas within mass communications: Digital Journalism, Visual Media and Media Management. They will understand the industries that operate in today’s societies and be prepared for jobs as writers, content producers, leaders and policy makers.

The program will be accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications.

For the B.A. degree in Digital Journalism and Media a minimum of 120 credits are required.

Scheduling Recommendations by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 17-28 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 34 credits [1]
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (16 credits)
COMM 160(1), COMM 271(3), COMM 280(3), COMM 403(3), COMM 409(3), COMM 428A(3) (Sem: 1-15)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
COMM 100 GS(3) or COMM 180 GS(3)
COMM 230 WAC(3) or COMM 260 WAC (3)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
COMM 180(3), COMM 215(3), COMM 269(3), COMM 270(3), COMM 310(3), COMM 337(3), COMM 342(3), COMM 346(3), COMM 380(3), COMM 428B(3), COMM 460(3), COMM 467(3), COMM 469(3), COMM 475(3), COMM 481(3), COMM 487(3), COMM 492(3), COMM 493(3)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

45-06-018 COMM  388
Production Management
PRODUCTION MGMT (3)
Videos are an important means by which organizations communicate, whether online, through social media, during presentations, or delivered through traditional media platforms. In the professional arena, more and more organizations use videos to raise money, communicate, or market and promote their business. This course teaches students how to manage a video production agency and produce videos for clients. COMM 388, through a combination of lecture, readings, and practical exercises, will teach students how to create videos for clients that meet their specific needs.
PREREQUISITE: Select 3 credits from the following courses: COMM 242; COMM 282
Must attain a C or better in prerequisite courses
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-06-019 COMM  333
Film History for Filmmakers I: The Development of the Cinema to 1960
FILM HISTORY I (3)
History of the art, industry, economics, culture, and technology of cinema from its origins to 1960.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 150, Film-Video major
APPROVED START:  S12010

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Film History I describes the prehistory and history of the medium of cinema to 1960. The course explores the artistic, technical, economic development of the cinema, and the cultural contexts in which this development occurred. The course covers narrative, experimental, and documentary cinema and trains students in the techniques of close formal analysis of the cinema. The course stresses formal, thematic, and cultural analysis of the cinema throughout the first decades of its history. This course is integral to the curriculum in Film-Video. It provides Film-Video students with a detailed description of trends in their art form. It provides students with intensive study in the history of an influential medium in the development of the concept of mass media and communications.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 150, COMM 242
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-020 COMM  411
Cultural Aspects of the Mass Media
CLT ASP MASS MEDIA (3)
The mass media as creators and critics of mass culture in American life; relationships between the media and mass culture.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in the arts or the humanities; and 3 credits selected
from the following COMM 100, COMM 110, COMM 118, COMM 150, COMM 180,
COMM 251, COMM 260W, COMM 320, or COMM 370
APPROVED START:  SP2009

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 305; Permission of program
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-021 COMM 496H
Thesis Research
Thesis Research (1-18)
Thesis credits for undergraduate students in the Schreyer Honors College with the area of honors in one of the majors in the College of Communications. The honors thesis may take the form of a scholarly project involving the examination of some aspect of the field of communications, or the thesis may involve the production of a professional project.
APPROVED START: SU2016

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-6
PROPOSED START: SP2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
COLLEGE OF EARTH AND MINERAL SCIENCES

COURSE ADDS

45-06-022 GEOG  424W
Geography of the Global Economy
GEOG GLOBL ECONOMY (3)
This course examines the actors, processes, and policies relevant to understanding the global economic system. How does the global economy work? How is it changing? What are the pieces and how do they fit together? What can we do to shape outcomes within this system? In the first section of the course we examine these questions in the context of the 2009 World Development Report produced by the World Bank.
PREREQUISITE: GEOG 326; GEOG 126; OR ECON 102; OR ECON 104; OR EBF 200
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

COURSE ADDS

45-06-023 HIED 303
Leadership Development through Orientation
LEAD DEV ORIENT (3)
Assisting new students and their parents and family members at New Student Orientation goes far beyond campus tours and providing directions. Today’s mentors are charged with teaching new students about issues related to the classroom transition from high school to college, mental health, alcohol and drug use and abuse, sexual assault prevention, diversity and inclusion, and more.
PROPOSED START:  FA2017

 

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Harrisburg

COURSE ADDS

45-06-024 MATH  448
Mathematics of Finance
MATH FINANCE (3)
The course provides a foundational knowledge of the mathematics and mathematical models of finance, primarily of option pricing, hedging, and portfolio optimization. The topics include the definition of various financial securities and instruments (e.g. bonds, stocks, forward contracts, and options), the theory of interest, the No-Arbitrage Principle, measures of return and volatility, the Markowitz model of portfolio theory, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, the pricing of forward contracts, option trading strategies, the pricing of options via binomial models and the Black-Scholes model, and principles of hedging.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 141, and STAT 200 or STAT 301 or MATH 318 or STAT 318 or STAT 401 or MATH 414 or STAT 414
PROPOSED START:  S12017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-06-025 AM ST 470
Regionalism in America
REGIONALISM IN AM (4)
The concept of spatial patterning as means for exploring and ordering American culture.
APPROVED START:  FA1979

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: ENGL 430
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-026 AM ST 491W
American Themes, American Eras
AM THEMES & ERAS (3-6)
Interdisciplinary American culture course on major themes and eras such as the American Revolutionary Era or the 1930s.
PREREQUISITE: seventh-semester standing
APPROVED START:  FA2007

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: American Studies Perspectives
CHANGE SHORT TITLE: AM STUD PERSPECTIV
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The writing-intensive course covers perspectives and approaches of American Studies scholarship regarding themes, issues, and problems in American culture and their applications in society. It serves as a capstone course for American Studies majors who are required to take two sections on different themes, issues, and problems. It is open to other majors seeking exposure to the interdisciplinary methods and concepts of American Studies in addition to interpretative explorations of American society and culture. Examples of themes, issues, and problems that are covered in the course and represent key concepts in American Studies include “The American Dream,” “Nature and Wilderness in American Culture,” “The American Way of War,” and “American Borders and Frontiers in the American Imagination.”
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-027 ENGL  430
The American Renaissance
AMER RENAISSANCE (3)
Studies in the works and the interrelationships of writers such as Emerson, Hawthorne, Poe, Thoreau, Whitman, Melville, and Dickinson.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015  or ENGL 030
APPROVED START:  SP1995

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Studies in the works and the interrelationships of writers such as Emerson, Hawthorne, Poe, Thoreau, Whitman, Melville, and Dickinson. The course will cover Transcendentalism and the authors who contributed to this movement, many of whom lived in Concord, MA. Though the class will feature the works of Emerson, Hawthorne, and Thoreau, it can also branch out to address other authors such as Margaret Fuller, Jones Very, and Elizabeth Peabody. Departing from Concord, the course will explore Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, both of whom read and were inspired by Emerson. Finally, the course will include works by Herman Melville, who formed a friendship with Hawthorne prior to writing Moby-Dick. Though literature constitutes the center piece of this course, iterations of the course may bring in other parts of the cultural, social, and political landscape: slavery, abolitionism, Jacksonian Democracy, western settlement, art, science, and technology.
ADD CROSS LIST: AMST 470
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

45-06-028 Change. Add HPA 210, 211 and 311 to Supporting Courses and Related Areas. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Health Policy and Administration Minor

University Park, College of Health and Human Development (H P A)
University College, Lehigh Valley

Contact: University Park – Mark Sciegaj, mxs838@psu.edu; Lehigh Valley – Anita Yuskauskas, auy10@psu.edu

The minor in Health Policy and Administration (H PA) is designed to provide students with a background in the policy issues and administrative challenges related to quality, cost, and access to health care. The minor is most appropriate for students interested in clinical and health-related fields (e.g., nursing, nutrition, biobehavioral health, or medicine), professional fields (e.g. business administration or law), or the social sciences (e.g., economics, sociology, political science, psychology), giving these students an understanding of the health care industry and the impact of business and government on that industry.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
HPA 57 GHA(3) and HPA 101(3) (Sem: 3-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 3-6 credits from HPA 210(3), HPA 211(3), HPA 301(3), HPA 310(3), HPA 311(3), HPA 332(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 6-9 credits from 400-level HPA courses (Sem: 5-8)

Note: Some courses have additional prerequisites that must be met.

COURSE ADDS

45-06-029 HM 488
Hospitality Asset Management
HOSP ASSET MGT (3)
This course introduces students to asset management in global hospitality operations. The course is taught from a hospitality perspective and focuses on how asset managers usually work with hospitality asset owners and third party providers to enhance and optimize the value of hospitality assets. The multidisciplinary content includes a variety of perspectives on asset managers helping owners and third party operators make investment decisions, enhance asset value, review and assess contractual agreements, and be aware of ongoing global and local trends that could eventually affect the value of hospitality assets such as hotels and restaurants.
CONCURRENT: HM 336
PROPOSED START:  FA2017

45-06-030 RPTM 98
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Special Topics in RPTM
PROPOSED START:  FA2017

45-06-031 RPTM 197
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Special Topics in RPTM
PROPOSED START:  SU2017

45-06-032 RPTM 198
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Special Topics in RPTM
PROPOSED START:  FA2017

45-06-032A RPTM 220
SUST SOC WELLBEING
Sustainability, Society, and Well-being (3)
We live in a world increasingly connected via global processes and social networks, and increasingly challenged by exponential growth in demands on our planet’s finite environmental resources. This makes sustainability more of an imperative each day. But what exactly is sustainability? How does it relate to your career in RPTM or to your studies in other departments at Penn State?

This course is designed to provide students with strong foundational knowledge about sustainability and how it relates to their career in Recreation, Park and Tourism Management. To develop students’ understanding of the concept of sustainability, the course explores how interconnected social, economic, and environmental systems have resulted in the contemporary sustainability challenges we face both globally and locally. Each week students are presented with the large scale, global status of a particular issue related to sustainability before then exploring these challenges in increasingly local contexts of the U.S., Pennsylvania, and a career path in RPTM. In contemplating the broad scope of sustainability, students will become better informed about the many ways that their career in RPTM is influenced by this global context of challenges to social, environmental, and economic sustainability. In exploring how RPTM activities exert an influence on sustainability goals, students will be better equipped to address sustainability challenges within the organizations in which they work as well as in their everyday lives.
PROPOSED START:  FA2017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-06-033 KINES 267
Fundamental Movement Skills Instruction
MOVEMENT SKILLS (3)
Instruction for performing and delivering developmentally appropriate psychomotor skills, movement patterns, and content to preschool and elementary school-aged children.
PREREQUISITE: KINES 295
APPROVED START:  SP2016

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: KINES 295B
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-034 KINES 454
Women’s Health and Exercise Across the Lifespan
WOMEN HEALTH EXER (3)
In-depth study of the physiological role of exercise in modulating the health of girls and women during different phases of the lifespan.
PREREQUISITE: KINES 350
APPROVED START:  S12010

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: KINES 101
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-035 NUTR  391
Introduction to Professional Nutrition Experience
INTRO PROF NUTR EX (1)
Provides dietetics students with an introduction to the skills necessary to obtain and complete an advanced field experience in nutrition.
APPROVED START:  S12012
PREREQUISITE: sophomore or junior standing in Nutritional Sciences, Dietetics option

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: Nutrition Sciences, Dietetics option, 5th semester standing
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

COURSE DROPS

45-06-036 KINES 17S (GHA)
Ballroom Dance
BALLROOM DANCE (1.5)
A course designed to provide students with basic dance skills and an understanding and appreciation of ballroom dance.
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
COLLEGE OF INFORMATION SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY

45-06-037 Change. Add IST 140, 234, 235, 442, 445, 452 and 453 to Additional Courses section. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Information Sciences and Technology Minor

Abington College – contact: Joe Oakes, jxo19@psu.edu
Berks College
Capital College
University College: Penn State Beaver, Penn State Brandywine, Penn State Greater Allegheny, Penn State Hazleton, Penn State Lehigh Valley, Penn State New Kensington, Penn State Schuylkill, Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Penn State Worthington Scranton, Penn State York, World Campus
University Park, College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST)

This minor is structured to provide students with the theoretical frameworks and skill sets necessary to compete and be productive in the information technology-intensive global context that defines the new “Information Age.” Specifically, the minor will be focused on a program that will build an understanding of core information technologies and related areas of study; will prepare students for the practical application of various information sciences and related technologies; and engage students in sharpening their abilities to think critically and to work in teams. All this will be done with the intent to expose students to the cognitive, social, institutional, and global environments of Information Sciences and Technology and to then apply that knowledge as a supplement to their major.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in this minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
IST 110 GS(3), IST 210(3), IST 220(3) (Sem 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from IST 140(3), IST/COMM 234 GS(3), IST/WMNST 235 US(3), IST 250(3), IST 301(3), or IST 302(3) (Sem 5-8)
Select 6 credits from IST 402(3), IST 431(3), IST 432(3), IST 442 IL(3), IST 445(3), IST 452(3), IST 453(3) (Sem 5-8)


45-06-038 Change. Remove IST 110 from Prescribed Courses. Move IST 452 from Prescribed Courses to Additional Courses. Add Additional Courses section. Remove Supporting Courses and Related Areas section. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Security and Risk Analysis Minor

Penn State Abington – contact: Joe Oakes, jxo19@psu.edu
Penn State Berks
University College: Penn State Beaver, Penn State Mont Alto, Penn State New Kensington, Penn State Worthington Scranton, World Campus
University Park, College of Information Sciences and Technology (SRA)

The minor in Security and Risk Analysis (SRA) is intended to familiarize students with the general frameworks and multidisciplinary theories that define security and related risk analysis. Course work will engage students in the challenges and problems of assuring information confidentiality and integrity (e.g., social, economic, technology, and policy issues) as well as the strengths and weaknesses of various methods for assessing and mitigating associated risk in the students’ major field.

The minor provides a grounding in analysis and modeling used in information search, visualization and creative problem solving. This knowledge is set in the context of legal, ethical and regulatory issues of security including analysis of privacy and security law, internal control standards, regulatory policies and basic investigative processes and principles. Such understanding overviews the information technology that plays a critical role in identifying, preventing and responding to security-related events in the student’s major field.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 21 credits[1]
(At least 6 credits must be at the 400 level.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
SRA 111 GS(3), SRA 211(3), SRA 221(3) (Sem: 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 3 credits from: IST 140(3); CMPSC 101 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-6)
Select 3 credits from: IST 432(3), IST 451(3), IST 452(3), IST 453(3), IST 454(3), IST 456(3), SRA 421(3), SRA 468(3), SRA 471(3), SRA 480(3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
COLLEGE OF THE LIBERAL ARTS

45-06-039 Add. New Bachelor of Arts in Organizational and Professional Communication.

Proposed Effective Date: Fall Semester 2017

Organizational and Professional Communication

University Park, College of The Liberal Arts offered via the World Campus

Lecturer in Communication Arts and Sciences, Amber Jackson, in charge

A Bachelor of Arts in Organizational and Professional Communication provides increased understanding and practice in how people communicate to influence others and shape the world around them. Modern society requires effective communication in professional, personal, social, and multicultural settings. The flexibility of the program offers preparation for a variety of careers, such as law, business, communication, health, administration, social services, and human relations. The bachelor of arts program will facilitate students’ learning of effective oral and written communication, specifically helping students to understand and generate professional texts in a variety of genres. Upon completion of the Organizational and Professional Communication program, students will be able to:

  • Describe the significance of communication in everyday experience and as a distinctive intellectual paradigm;
  • Apply, critique, and extend communication concepts, principles, theories, and perspectives to a variety of organizational contexts;
  • Plan communication inquiry, including humanistic or social scientific approaches;
  • Apply qualitative research methods to organizational and professional contexts;
  • Demonstrate logical, critical, creative, and ethical thinking about communication for decision-making and problem-solving;
  • Generate and perform messages appropriate to their audience, purpose, and context;
  • Locate, synthesize, and assimilate new information from a variety of sources and use it to inform communication analysis and practice within organizations;
  • Engage diverse communities, both local and global, and function as a member of a deliberative society;
  • Write professional texts in a variety of genres using appropriate conventions;
  • Reflect on professional experience and situate that experience within college-level learning.

For the B.A. degree in Organizational and Professional Communication, a minimum of 120 credits is required. Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-9 of these 45 credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

ELECTIVES: 6-18 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 45 credits [1]
(This includes 0-9 credits of General Education courses: 0-3 credits of GH; 0-6 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)
CAS 201 GH(3), CAS 202 GS(3), CAS 204(3), CAS 390 GS(3), CAS 426 WAC(3), LA 201 WAC(3) (Sem: 1-5)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 3 credits in speaking and argumentation from: CAS 212(3); CAS 215(3); CAS 340(3); CAS 252(3) or CAS 340(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits in interpersonal communication or conflict management from: CAS 203 GS(3); CAS 271 US;IL(3); CAS 302(3) or CAS 352(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits in written communication from: ENGL 418(3); ENGL 419(3); ENGL 420(3) or ENGL 480(3) (Sem: 6-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from the following courses; at least 9 credits must be at the 400-level. [2]
CAS 203 GS(3); CAS 212(3); CAS 215(3); CAS 252(3); CAS 271 US;IL(3); CAS 302(3); CAS 340(3); CAS 352(3); CAS 404(3); CAS 452(3); CAS 455(3); CAS 475(3); COMM 428S(3); ENGL 418(3); ENGL 419(3); ENGL 420(3); ENGL 480(3); LER/OLEAD 464(3); LER/OLEAD 465(3); or OLEAD 410(3) (Sem: 6-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[2]A student may not use a course as both an ADDITIONAL course and as a SUPPORTING course.
[3] A student may only apply up to 6 credits of CAS 496 in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR.


45-06-040 Add. New Bachelor of Science in Organizational and Professional Communication.

Proposed Effective Date: Fall Semester 2017

Organizational and Professional Communication

University Park, College of The Liberal Arts offered via the World Campus

Lecturer in Communication Arts and Sciences, Amber Jackson, in charge

A Bachelor of Science in Organizational and Professional Communication provides increased understanding and practice in how people communicate to influence others and shape the world around them. Modern society requires effective communication in professional, personal, social, and multicultural settings. The flexibility of the program offers preparation for a variety of careers, such as law, business, communication, health, administration, social services, and human relations. The Bachelor of Science degree will allow exploration of the group communication context and the principles of leadership. Upon completion of the Organizational and Professional Communication program, students will be able to:

  • Describe the significance of communication in everyday experience and as a distinctive intellectual paradigm;
  • Apply, critique, and extend communication concepts, principles, theories, and perspectives to a variety of organizational contexts;
  • Plan communication inquiry, including humanistic or social scientific approaches;
  • Apply quantitative and qualitative research methods to organizational and professional contexts;
  • Demonstrate logical, critical, creative, and ethical thinking about communication for decision-making and problem-solving;
  • Generate and perform messages appropriate to their audience, purpose, and context;
  • Locate, synthesize, and assimilate new information from a variety of sources and use it to inform communication analysis and practice within organizations;
  • Engage diverse communities, both local and global, and function as a member of a deliberative society;
  • Facilitate groups communication and functions in and out of organizations;
  • Apply principles of leadership to interpersonal and group situations;
  • Demonstrate critical and ethical understanding of conflict in interpersonal, group, and organizational settings;
  • Reflect on professional experience and situate that experience within college-level learning.

For the B.S. degree in Organizational and Professional Communication, a minimum of 120 credits is required. Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(6-9 of these 45 credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 18-27 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 57 credits [1]
(This includes 6-9 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GH; 3-6 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (24 credits)
CAS 201 GH(3), CAS 202 GS(3), CAS 204(3), CAS 390 GS(3), CAS 426W(3), LA 201 WAC(3), SOC 207(3) (Sem: 1-5)
CAS 496(3) (Sem: 8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 6 credits in speaking and argumentation from: CAS 212(3); CAS 215(3); CAS 252(3) or CAS 340(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 6 credits in interpersonal communication or conflict management from: CAS 203 GS(3); CAS 271 US;IL(3); CAS 302(3) or CAS 352(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 6 credits in leadership/group communication from: LER/OLEAD 464(3); LER/OLEAD 465(3); OLEAD 410 IL(3); MGMT 321(3); PSYCH 484(3); PSYCH 485(3); SOC 404(3) or SOC 456(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from the following courses; 6-9 must be at the 400-level [2]
CAS 203 GS(3); CAS 212(3); CAS 215(3); CAS 252(3); CAS 271 US;IL(3); CAS 302(3); CAS 340(3); CAS 352(3); CAS 404(3); CAS 452(3); CAS 455(3); CAS 475(3); COMM 428A(3); ENGL 418(3); ENGL 419(3); ENGL 420(3); LER/OLEAD 464(3); LER/OLEAD 465(3); MGMT 321(3); OLEAD 410(3); PSYCH 484(3); PSYCH 485(3); SOC 404(3) or SOC 456(3) (Sem: 6-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[2]A student may not use a course as both an ADDITIONAL course and as a SUPPORTING course.
[3] A student may only apply up to 6 credits of CAS 496 in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR.

COURSE ADDS

45-06-041 ANTH  275  (GN)
Anthropology of Food
ANTHROPOL OF FOOD (3)
This course is an anthropological approach to understanding temporal and spatial variation in human food consumption and nutrition: why do we eat what we eat? To answer this question, we approach it from multiple perspectives: biological, evolutionary, ecological and social. In this course, students will investigate how food tastes, preferences, and diets of different individuals and societies both in the past and present are affected by genetic variation, by processes of individual and cultural learning, by evolutionary and ecological forces and histories of ecological and social interaction, by existing social contexts and structures, and by global political and economic forces.
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: ANTH 21; ANTH 45
PROPOSED START:  S12017

45-06-042 APLNG 220  (GH;GS;IL)
Multilingual Lives: Stories of Language and Culture Learning
MULTILINGUAL LIVES (3)
In recent years Applied Linguistics has witnessed a narrative turn, with growing interest in complementing its logico-scientific core with analysis of stories about multilingual experiences. This course will explore how the intersection of knowledge domains from the social sciences and the humanities can enrich our understanding and appreciation of multilingualism, including its challenges and its intellectual benefits. The class will first
read and analyze stories about growing up in bi- or multilingual families, immigration in childhood or adulthood, and voluntary learning of languages at home or abroad. Along the way, we will encounter questions about the relationship between language, culture and personal identity as well as questions about the ways in which gender, power, and social class influence our pathways in pursuit of a satisfying sense of self.
PROPOSED START:  S12017

45-06-043 CHNS  412
Business Chinese
BUSINESS CHINESE (3)
This is a three-credit course designed for those who have completed Level Two Chinese or the equivalent. Business knowledge is presented as a means to facilitate language learning, while the content-based materials enhance cultural awareness. Emphasis will be given to helping students gain the linguistic skills that characterize advanced level second language learners, especially linguistic conventions essential to functioning in business environments. Real cases involving successful multinational Chinese and foreign companies and issues such as marketing, branding, mergers and acquisitions, OEM, and international expansion will be used as texts. The selected textbook is in Chinese with English explanations, but students will be guided through in-class discussions in Chinese. Approximately 80% of the instructional language will be conducted in Chinese.
PREREQUISITE: CHNS 110
PROPOSED START:  S12017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-06-044 ECON  421
Analysis of Economic Data
ECON DATA (3)
Economic analysis of data: sources, variable definitions, miscodings, missing observations, censoring and truncation, applications.
APPROVED START:  S12008
PREREQUISITE: ECON 402 or ECON 451; ECON 490

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: There are many data sets but the information contained within them for economic analysis is often unclear without substantial investigation. The broad course objectives are 1) to familiarize students with the deficiencies of real-world data and 2) teach students how to address those deficiencies. Specific topics addressed include the reliability of data sources, the ambiguity in variable definitions, the miscoding of variables, and missing data. In addition, truncation and censoring from the data collection methodologies are examined. The econometric methods of linear regressions and instrumental variables are used to analyze the results of a model with and without the data errors.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ECON 302 and ECON 306
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-045 ECON  422
Applying Monetary Theory and Monetary History
MONETARY HISTORY (3)
Monetary history is examined. Special attention is paid to commodity-based systems, private money, and government monopolies on currency.
APPROVED START:  SP2013
PREREQUISITE: ECON 451

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course provides a framework for the analysis of monetary history. The course objectives are to introduce students to the theoretical framework used by economists to study monetary theory, and to apply that framework in order to explain various monetary systems that have existed in the past. We will examine the empirical evidence, and also consider policy issues in this area. There is scope for re-examining existing analyses of many of those historical systems. Topics discussed in the course include the Federal Reserve control of the money stock, the demand for money, money as part of economic activity, economic indicators and monetary policy, the Lucas critique, interest rates and the frequency at which they are changed, the creation and purpose of central banking, and private banking regulations.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ECON 304 or ECON 351
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-046 ECON  454
Economics of Mergers
ECON MERGERS (3)
Economic analysis of horizontal and vertical mergers; econometric issues in measurement of unilateral and coordinated effects; policy issues.
APPROVED START:  S12008
PREREQUISITE: ECON 444 and ECON 490

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: It is not uncommon for two separate and distinct corporate entities within an industry to merge and become one firm. This course includes topics that examine the economics of mergers as well as economic policy with regard to mergers. There often are both pro-competitive and anti-competitive effects of mergers. In the U.S. the Federal Trade Commission has primary responsibility for assessing the balance between effects. Along with the FTC, the antitrust division of the Department of Justice can analyze potential mergers using economic data and forecasts with tools such as the HHI and four-firm
concentration ratio.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ECON 302 and ECON 306
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-047 ECON  477
Labor Markets in Developing Countries
LABOR & DEVT (3)
Labor demand and supply in developing countries; urban and rural labor markets, modern and informal sectors; policy issues.
APPROVED START:  S12008
PREREQUISITE: ECON 471 or ECON 412

NEW
CHANGE SHORT TITLE: LABOR DVLP COUNTRY
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: In the system of economic development, labor markets emerge and evolve. While some elements of standard labor market analysis, such as the emphasis on demand for labor and supply of labor, remain most relevant here, there are also institutional aspects that are specific to developing countries. The course begins with a short review of the traditional labor market variables (labor force participation, employment and unemployment, earnings) before viewing specific topics relevant to developing countries. These topics include rural vs. urban labor markets and the factors that influence individuals in each setting, industry regulation by national and international law, efficiency wages in growing industries, worker safety, compensating wage differentials, and comparative advantage.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ( ECON 302 OR ECON 315 ) AND ECON 306
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-048 ECON  479
Economics of Matching
ECON OF MATCHING (3)
Economic application of matching to employment, marriage, organ markets, and medical residents.
APPROVED START:  SP2013
PREREQUISITE: ECON 402 or ECON 412, ECON 444

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: There are many resource allocations that are not unilateral decisions but instead require approval from two sides of the market. This course provides the theoretical constructs for the analysis of matching in market environments. Following a review of game theory, the course develops the theory of matching. The topic at large is introduced by the seminal paper in matching “College Admission and the Stability of Marriage” by Gale and Shapley. Other peer-reviewed literature on the topic will be discussed. Topics that follow include economic applications in the areas of employment, marriage, college admissions, human organ donations, medical residents, and other current topics.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ECON 302
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-049 ENGL  301M
Honors Seminar in English: Literature Before 1800
HONORS COURSE (3-12)
Reading, group discussions, and oral and written reports on various specific authors and literary works.
APPROVED START:  FA2005
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015  or ENGL 030; approval of the departmental Honors Committee

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 449M
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Honors Seminar in English: Pre-1800s literature
CHANGE SHORT TITLE: Honors Pre-1800
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course offers honors students the opportunity to explore in depth a period of early English literature before 1800. Topics will vary from year to year, but may include Beowulf and Anglo-Saxon literature and culture, late medieval authors such as Chaucer, Gower, and Langland, sixteenth-century lyric poets, Shakespeare, Shakespeare and film, Elizabethan dramatists, authorship and book history, early women authors, seventeenth-century writers such as Donne, Herrick, Wroth, and Bacon, writers of the English Revolution, Milton, and eighteenth-century writers such as Pope, Dryden, and Swift. Assignments will include extensive primary and secondary reading, participation in class discussion, and a substantial paper or final project.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 137 or ENGL 138
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-050 ENGL  441
Chaucer
CHAUCER (3)
The principal narrative poems and their background.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015  or ENGL 030
APPROVED START:  SP1984

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course surveys the literary career of Geoffrey Chaucer, perhaps the most celebrated English-language poet of the medieval era. The course primarily examines Chaucer’s own writings with consideration of the several international authors and traditions that informed his own literary productions.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 137  and ENGL 138
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-051 LA   401
Professional Development for the Liberal Arts Student
PROF DEV FOR LA (1:1:0)
Provides Liberal Arts students with the techniques and information necessary
to specify and implement postgraduation educational and career plans.
APPROVED START:  FA1983

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 103
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-052 PLSC 309 (H)
Quantitative Political Analysis
Quant Pol Analy (3)
Data analysis and statistical applications in political research, including data processing; inferential statistics; contingency analysis; correlation and regression; multivariant analysis.
PREREQUISITE: any 3 credits in political science
APPROVED START: FA2009

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 309H
CHANGE COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course introduces students to research design and quantitative analysis techniques used in political science with an aim toward developing transferrable skills for future coursework in the political science major, especially the senior thesis process. Students will learn how to construct theories and design studies, how to quantify concepts, and how to test theories using a variety of statistical techniques, including descriptive analysis, correlation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. The course will include classroom lectures and computer lab time to enable students to work hands-on with datasets. This course is the first in a three-course sequence for students interested in writing an honors thesis in political science.
PROPOSED START: SP2018

OLD
45-06-053 WMNST 105  (GS;US)
Living in a Diverse World
DIVERSE WORLD (3)
Critical perspectives on the relationship between social difference and power, emphasizing gender, race, sexuality, class, and disability.
APPROVED START:  SP2015

NEW
RE-CERTIFY GH DESIGNATION
RE-CERTIFY GS DESIGNATION
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course uses literature, film and scholarly texts to inspire students to explore how concepts of social difference, such as those linked to categories of gender, race, sexuality, class, ethnicity, and disability, shape society and everyday interactions historically and today. The course takes an intersectional perspective to explore how and why these categories vary over time and space, the effects of such variations for individuals and communities, and the connections between identity and the exercise of power. Geographically, the course emphasizes the relationship between social difference and power in the U.S. history and society, but takes a transnational perspective when possible by making comparisons to contexts beyond the United States. Furthermore, the class examines how individuals and communities most directly marginalized by these processes contest and re-imagine dominant categories and assumptions. Materials and discussions in the class trace broad social and historical trends as well as dive into the facets of everyday life. The class is designed to encourage reflection on the ethical challenges that arise when we become aware of how privilege, power and difference are intertwined in our world and daily lives.
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
COLLEGE OF NURSING

COURSE ADDS

45-06-054 NURS  100
First Year Seminar in Nursing
NURS FYS (1)
First year seminars in Nursing will introduce the student to the University and the College of Nursing. The primary focus will be engaging students in learning and orienting them to the scholarly community from the outset of their undergraduate studies in a way that will bridge to later experiences in the nursing major and facilitate the high expectations, demanding workload and other aspects of transition to college life. The course content will focus on enhancing opportunities that enable students to provide a holistic focus on the promotion of human health and initiatives that enhance quality of life.
PROPOSED START:  S12017

 

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
EBERLY COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-06-055 BIOL  322
Genetic Analysis
GENETIC ANALYSIS (3)
A discussion of the mechanisms of heredity in prokaryotes and eukaryotes with emphasis on analysis and modes of inference.
APPROVED START:  FA2007
PREREQUISITE: at least two of the following courses: BIOL 220W, BIOL 230W, BIOL 240W, or
MICRB 201

NEW
ADD RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: At least one life science course.
REMOVE ALL PREREQUISITES
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-06-056 CHEM  450
Physical Chemistry – Thermodynamics
PHY CHEM THERMODYN (3)
Introduction to physical chemistry with primary emphasis on chemical thermodynamics and its molecular interpretation.(Graduate credit not allowed for students majoring in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Chemistry, or Chemical Engineering.)
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 112 and MATH 141; PHYS 211 or PHYS 212
APPROVED START:  S12007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CHEM 112 and MATH 141; PHYS 211 or PHYS 212, Students cannot receive credit for both CHEM 450 and CHE 320
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

APPENDIX C

Medicine

COURSE ADDS

45-06-057 PMR 740
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Acting Internship
PMR Acting Interns (5)
The medical students will participate in PM&R evaluations, care for patients on the inpatient rehabilitation service, inpatient PM&R consult service and management of patients within the outpatient clinics. The course will allow the student to build on their physical examination and diagnostic skills through clinical participation, practice, and feedback provided by the attending physicians. They will actively participate in management discussion with interdisciplinary teams during their rotation.
PROPOSED START: SP2017

45-06-057A PS 711
PATIENTS AND SCIENCES – COURSE 1
PATIENTS & SCI-1 (21)
PS1 initially immerses students as contributing participants in primary care practices as patient navigators. Authentic patient -based experiences provide the springboard context for learning through small group (Inquiry or “IQ”) discussions, expert tutorials, and independent study, guided by experienced educational mentors.
PS1 encompasses these core components:
• Patient Navigators: Students will immerse in specific community practice sites 3-4 half-days/week under the supervision of both a physician and a care manager. This on-site mentor team will help students to identify and navigate for patients in need of extra attention/communication or with barriers to care.
• Inquiry Groups (IQ Groups): Students will meet in small (5-7 students) IQ groups at least 10-12 hours/week to share patient stories, focus questions for exploration, and develop learning objectives encompassing the four pillars of the PSU-COM curriculum – Basic Science, Clinical Science, Health Systems Science, and Humanistic Care. The initial weekly session will focus on patient stories and development of case-based learning goals and objectives. Students will research these objectives for subsequent discussions in Wednesday and Friday IQ sessions. Patient cases will be chosen based on student interest and the degree to which they complement and extend prior learning (see mapping and tracking below). The students will also be assigned a formative weekend assignment based weeks’ experiences to synthesize learning from the previous week. These assignments are reviewed on Monday and the IQ cycle begins again.
• Integrated clinical skills and anatomy (emphasizing Hypothesis-Driven Diagnostic Learning–HDDL): Time will be devoted each week to clinical skills and related anatomy from patient cases the students have encountered..
• Collaborative Science Tutorials (CST): Based on the model used at Oxford University (see Glossary), the CST will leverage the subject matter expertise available at University Park and Hershey to explore learning objectives identified (by students and faculty) in the IQ Groups as areas of weakness or insufficient coverage.
• Assessment: Formative and summative assessment activities have been specifically designed to support active learning, self-assessment, and skills in critical and systems thinking.
• Mapping and Tracking: Learning objectives derived from IQ Groups and Collaborative Science Tutorials, self-study, and assessment feedback will be mapped to PSU-COM competencies and sub-competencies scaffolded by the Calgary model of patient presentations (see Glossary). These markers of professional development will be addressed in Portfolio reflections and reviewed with faculty mentors to identify gaps and focus areas for future learning.
PREREQUISITE: Successful admission to the COM – University Park Program
PROPOSED START FA2017

45-06-057A SURG 790
Senior Medical Student Surgery Capstone Course
Surgery Capstone (2.5)
This course is designed for graduating medical students that have applied to or matched a surgical residency (general surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, urology, plastic surgery, and ENT) to provide them with an advanced cognitive knowledge base and experience with procedural skills frequently required of surgical interns. Additionally, this course will allow students to gain invaluable experience with interdisciplinary professionalism and case-based problem solving. Curriculum includes didactic lectures, case-based and small group learning sessions, simulation based procedural instruction and practice, as well as standardized patient encounters. Upon completion of the course students will have better knowledge of surgical patient care, be able to proficiently perform surgical skills frequently required of surgical residents, and have improved confidence in their preparation for surgical residency.
A pre- and post-survey will focus on participants’ confidence in specific procedural skills and common on-call surgical problems. Pre- and post-exams will also be given to measure student’s knowledge on peri-operative patient care and complications. Grading will be Pass-Fail. Additionally, students that complete the skills sessions and pass skill proficiency exams may receive a letter addressed to their residency program director from the course directors to attest to their proficiency of the skills taught in this course.
PREREQUISITES: Open to students in Phase III/IV; successful completion of all phase I, II and III coursework. Students should have applied to/matched into a surgical internship.
PROPOSED START FA2017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-06-057B HMN 743
Graphic Storytelling and Medical Narratives
Graphic Medicine (2.5)
In this course, students will explore the use of graphic storytelling (or Comics) as a medium for communicating medical narratives.

NEW
CHANGE SHORT TITLE: Graphic Medicine
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Graphic Medicine: Comics and Medical Narratives
PROPOSED START: FA2017

APPENDIX D

Dickinson Law

COURSE ADDS

45-06-058 ABROD 901
Study Abroad
Study Abroad (1-12)
Law student attending international study abroad.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-059 BAR 901
Administrative Law
Administrative Law (3)
This course is an introduction to the law of the administrative state—to the constitutional, statutory and judge-made rules governing what agencies may do, the procedures they must follow, and how they can be held to account. Topics include mechanisms for control of agencies by the legislative and executive branches; the constitutional basis for, and limits on, governance by agencies; the availability and effects of judicial review over agency action; and the features of agency rulemaking and adjudication.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-060 BAR 902
Advanced Federal Income Tax
Adv Fed Inc Tax (3)
This course examines the treatment of those taxation principles applicable to investment and business operations applicable to all taxpayers from a perspective that emphasizes tax planning and tax avoidance.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-061 BAR 903
Advanced Torts
Adv Torts (3)
This course focuses on torts not involving physical injury, with substantive and procedural coverage of claims for misrepresentation, defamation, invasion of privacy, interference with contract, and injurious falsehood, along with affirmative defenses to these causes of action. These areas have increased in importance due to the emergence of electronic communications resulting in potential liability.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-062 BAR 904
Basic Federal Income Tax
Basic Fed Inc Tax (3)
The focus of this course is the federal income tax law and the tax policy considerations that inform the design of the structure of the law.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-063 BAR 905
Business Entities I: Unincorporated Business Entities
Unincorp Bus Ent (3)
This course surveys the law of unincorporated business entities. The agency law part of the course will focus on the agency relationship and, more specifically, the duties and obligations of principals and agents to one another and to third parties. Agency law concepts apply to LLCs, partnerships and other business entities. The partnership law part of the course will cover the fiduciary obligations of partners, partners’ management and property rights, and partnership dissolutions. The final part of the course will examine limited liability entities, with emphasis on the formation, organization, and dissolution of limited liability companies.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-064 BAR 906
Business Entities II: Corporations
Corporations (3)
This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of corporate law. The primary emphasis of the course is the body of state law that regulates the activities and internal affairs of business corporations. The course will focus on traditional state law principles of corporate governance, including the fiduciary duties of loyalty and care, the business judgment rule, and shareholder derivative suits. In addition to state corporate law, the course will cover some federal laws that regulate the activities of corporations, focusing on the disclosure requirements and antifraud provisions of the federal securities laws. The course has two complementary objectives: (1) to provide a strong foundation in corporate law for students who intend to enter practice without taking further courses in corporate and securities law; and (2) to prepare students who plan to take Federal Securities Regulation and other advanced courses in anticipation of a career in business law. Business Entities I: Unincorporated Business Entities is strongly recommended as a prerequisite to this course.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-065 BAR 907
Conflict of Laws
Conflict of Laws (3)
In modern business and personal life, significant events frequently involve more than one state or nation. What law applies to multijurisdictional transactions? Which court has the authority to adjudicate any dispute that develops? This course examines the legal rules that have developed for resolving these conflict-of-law problems. Specific topics include: domestic jurisdiction, international jurisdiction, domestic choice of law, extraterritorial application of national law, conflicts between state and federal law, and enforcement of judgments.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-066 BAR 908
Constitutional Law II
Con Law II (3)
This course examines the development of due process and equal protection law under the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments. It includes examination of the structure of the Constitution’s protection of civil rights and civil liberties, as well as substantive and procedural due process, equal protection, and fundamental rights.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-067 BAR 909
Criminal Procedure
Criminal Procedure (3)
This course explores part of the interface between the criminal justice system and the United States Constitution. It introduces students to constitutional analysis by examining the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments as they apply to investigation of wrongdoing and police interrogation as well as to circumstances in which indigent defendants are guaranteed the assistance of counsel.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-068 BAR 910
Employment Discrimination
Employment Discrim (3)
This course will provide an overview of significant doctrinal issues in employment discrimination law, and will seek to develop students’ skills through a rigorous examination of statutory law, regulations and court decisions. It will introduce students to the fundamental legal theories underlying the substantive coverage of the most significant federal equal employment opportunity laws, and legal issues regarding their application.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-069 BAR 911
Evidence
Evidence (3)
This course covers the presentation of evidence in trials under the Federal Rules of Evidence. We will address substantive topics that include relevancy, hearsay, competency, examination of lay and expert witnesses, judicial notice, privilege, authentication, the best evidence rule, in addition to various Constitutional issues and procedural rules.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-070 BAR 912
Family Law
Family Law (3)
This course will examine how the law defines and regulates families and family structures. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to identify what makes up a family, how families are created, separated, the rights attendant to members of families, and the rights flowing from membership within a family structure. Students should be able to understand the importance of family structure in American society and under what circumstances government can intervene in that structure. This course is national in scope, but will be supplemented with some Pennsylvania statutory and case law readings where appropriate.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-071 BAR 913
First Amendment – Free Speech
First Amendment (3)
This course examines the history, values and function of free expression. It specifically considers Supreme Court decisions regarding advocacy of illegal action, expression that provokes a hostile audience reaction, defamation, commercial advertising, obscenity, hate speech, expression in public places, symbolic speech, and campaign finance laws.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-072 BAR 914
Fundamental Skills for the Bar Exam
Fund Bar Skills (2)
This course provides students with a substantive review of selected material routinely tested on the bar exam, primarily through problems and exercises in a bar exam format designed to familiarize students with the exam and techniques for answering multiple choice questions. Individualized feedback is provided every week to assist each student identify areas of strength and weakness. The goal is to enhance student ability to prepare for the bar exam and is intended to supplement, not replace, commercial bar preparation courses. This course is not focused on any particular state, so all students will benefit regardless of where they are sitting for the bar exam.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-073 BAR 915
Payment Systems
Payment Systems (2)
In the modern economy commercial parties use a variety of payment mechanisms. This course provides an overview of different payment systems, the credit system, and the devices that enhance creditworthiness (including guaranties and letters of credit). Classroom discussion is devoted almost exclusively to developing analyses of written problems contained in the course text. Because this course requires familiarity with the Uniform Commercial Code, students should take another Uniform Commercial Code course prior to or concurrently with this course.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-074 BAR 916
Pennsylvania Criminal Law Practice
PA Criminal Law (2)
This course is a step-by-step analysis of the procedure, planning, tactics, and strategy in defending and prosecuting a criminal case in Pennsylvania from pre-arrest through appeal. Special emphasis is placed on all aspects of the procedure and law relating to the suppression of evidence.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-075 BAR 917
Pennsylvania Practice
PA Practice (2)
This course will acquaint the students with civil procedure at the state trial court level. Using Pennsylvania as the model, the course traces a civil case from service of process to trial and includes discussion of venue, pleadings, discovery and dispositive motions. The course also deals with other important aspects of civil practice including statutes of limitation, comparative negligence, compulsory arbitration and settlement.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-076 BAR 918
Remedies
Remedies (3)
This course focuses on the theory and application of legal and equitable relief. Substantive areas include injunctions, specific performance, damages, unjust enrichment, and declaratory relief, along with affirmative defenses to these causes of action.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-077 BAR 919
Sales
Sales (3)
Article Two of the Uniform Commercial Code is an integrated body of statutory law that prescribes the rights and obligations of parties involved in transactions in goods. This course emphasizes the special techniques of statutory construction utilized in interpreting a code as opposed to an isolated statute. The course topics are: code methodology (including the history and jurisprudence of Article Two), contract formation and interpretation, performance obligations, breach and remedies.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-078 BAR 920
Secured Transactions
Secured Trans (3)
This course deals with the creation, enforcement, and priorities of personal property security interests under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and related statutes. It addresses: (a) encumbrances on consumer, commercial, and industrial goods, (b) inventory and receivables financing for manufacturers, distributors, and dealers, and (c) personal property agricultural financing. Relevant provisions of other Articles of the UCC and other state and federal statutes are integrated into the course as required.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-079 BAR 921
Wills, Trusts & Estates
Wills Trusts & Est (3)
This course examines the disposition of property at death by intestate succession and by will. The execution, revocation, construction, and contest of wills, as well as limits on the power to dispose of property by will, are studied. This course also examines the creation, purposes and termination of trusts, including informal trusts, and the interrelationship between trusts and wills.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-080 CCURR 901
Dickinson Law Review (Member)
DLaw Rev Member (1 per semester/maximum of 4)
Member of Dickinson Law Review
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-081 CCURR 902
Dickinson Law Review (Editor)
DLaw Review Editor (2 per semester/maximum fo 4)
Editor of Dickinson Law Review
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-082 CCURR 903
Dispute Resolution Magazine
Dispute Resol Mag (1 per semester/maximum of 2)
This is an academic writing experience for students designated as “law student editors” of the Dispute Resolution Magazine (“DRM”). DRM is a quarterly publication of the ABA Section of Dispute Resolution and covers all aspects of the dispute resolution field—arbitration, mediation, negotiation, med-arb, ombuds, early neutral evaluation, public policy facilitation, etc. Law student editors are responsible for Bluebooking, checking the accuracy of textual assertions, finding additional references as necessary, conducting research, writing case summaries, drafting author bios, and proofreading for substance and style.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-083 CCURR 904
Jus Gentium Journal
Jus Gentium Journl (1 per semester/maximum of 2)
Students work as an editorial assistant on the academic legal journal Jus Gentium: Journal of the History of International Law.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-084 CCURR 905
Medical Legal Colloquium
Med Legal Colloqm (1 per semester/maximum of 2)
The Medical Legal Colloquium is a simulation-based course focused on the law of medical negligence. During the semester, students prepare for and participate in two abridged mock trials involving medical residents from Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Law students work in teams to develop their theory of the case, meet with medical residents to refine their understanding of medical terminology and concepts, and prepare the medical residents to testify as defendants and expert witnesses before a live jury. Class sessions and readings cover the law of medical negligence, trial advocacy in the medical malpractice context, and ideas for reforming the medical malpractice system.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-085 CCURR 906
Moot Court Board
Moot Court Board (1 per semester/maximum of 4)
Member Moot Court Board
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-086 CCURR 907
National Trial Moot Court Team
Nat Trial Mt Ct Tm (2)
Member National Trial Moot Court Team
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-087 CCURR 908
Trial Advocacy Board
Trial Advocacy Bd (1 per semester/maximum of 2)
Member Trial Advocacy Board
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-088 CERT 901
Accounting for Lawyers
Accounting for Law (2)
In this course students learn why financial accounting is a system for measuring and communicating the outcomes of business activities to parties outside the firm. The purposes of this course are to: (1) provide students with a basic understanding of the concepts and principles (i.e., the jargon) underlying financial accounting practices; (2) make students comfortable with financial data (in particular, opening a 10K or annual report); (3) enable students to have a conversation with accountants; and (4) provide students with the technical tools and references to analyze how a particular transaction affects a firm’s financial statements.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-089 CERT 902
Advanced Criminal Procedure
Adv Crim Procedure (3)
This course examines the constitutional, statutory and rule-based issues that arise in the formal processing of a criminal case. Subjects include prosecutorial discretion, grand jury and preliminary hearing, joinder and severance, bail and pretrial release, discovery, plea bargaining and guilty pleas, speedy trial, jury composition and selection, pre-trial publicity, confrontation, crossexamination and the privilege against self-incrimination.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-090 CERT 903
Arbitration: Domestic & International
Arbitration Law (3)
This course provides an introduction to the domestic and international law and practice of arbitration. It assesses the statutory and decisional law basis for arbitration, especially the provisions of the Federal Arbitration Act. It investigates the central doctrinal issues in the field: the enforceability of unilaterally-imposed arbitration agreements, the arbitrability of statutory rights — in particular, civil rights matters, and the use of contract to establish the law of arbitration between the arbitrating parties. Emphasis is placed upon practical problems that have emerged in the practice of arbitration law: the selection of arbitrators, the use of discovery and evidence-gathering in arbitral proceedings, and the content of arbitration agreements.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-091 CERT 904
Civil Liberties Litigation
Civ Lib Litigation (2)
Traditional courses in constitutional law analyze the boundaries of rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution. This course begins with the premise that constitutional rights have been violated, and examines the additional veneer of doctrines that determine whether a remedy will or will not be afforded for deprivation of those rights. In the course of analyzing these doctrines, the course will address advanced issues of constitutional law and theory, statutory interpretation, case analysis and litigation strategy for counsel for the civil liberties plaintiff as well as the lawyer representing the government and its officials.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-092 CERT 905
Copyrights
Copyrights (3)
Copyright law is founded on the tension between incentivizing authors to create and disseminating information as widely as possible. The course will explore the legal and societal difficulties this creates along with emphasizing familiarity with doctrinal issues through practical exercises.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-093 CERT 906
Counterterrorism Law
Counterterrorism (3)
This course will take an in-depth look at counterterrorism. The course will examine competing conceptions and definitions of terrorism at the national and international level and the institutions and processes relevant to operational counterterrorism. This course will include the study of the balance between national security interests and civil liberties found in the following topical areas: relevant Supreme Court decisions in the surveyed nations, legislative provisions in response to acts of terrorism, operational counter-terrorism considerations (including targeted killing), intelligence gathering (including interrogations), policy recommendations, the use of military tribunals or civil courts in trying suspected terrorists, the emerging law regarding enemy combatants and their detention, and the arguable need for new self- defense doctrines at the global level.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-094 CERT 907
Election Law
Election Law (2)
This course covers federal and state election law and will examine the constitutional basis for the regulation of elections, the development of the law in this area over the last 30 years, as well as criminal and civil enforcement of the law, the role of the Federal Election Commission, the formation and regulation of political action committees, as well as related federal tax law provisions impacting operation of political committees and advocacy organizations. The course will also examine the intersection of the election law with congressional ethics rules, lobbying regulations and representation of political candidates and entities in election law matters.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-095 CERT 908
Employee Benefits Law
Employee Benefits (3)
Employer-provided pension and health care programs play a critical role in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. They also affect corporations, financial markets, and the economy as a whole. Employee benefit programs are, in short, an important staple of modern law practice. This course surveys the Employee Retirement Income Security Act and relevant portions of the Internal Revenue Code. Classes examine what benefit plans must do regarding reporting and disclosure, accrual, vesting, funding, and fiduciary standards. The course covers health care reform, the shift from defined benefit to defined contribution programs, and the effect of stock market volatility on benefit programs. Students examine the policy goals underpinning federal benefits law. The course surveys major issues in ERISA litigation, including that statute’s claims and remedies provisions, as well as its preemption of state law.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-096 CERT 909
Employment Law
Employment Law (3)
This course presents a broad survey of both the common law rules and major statutes that govern the relationship between employers and employees. Students will learn about the evolution of the law governing the workplace, and about the interplay of state and federal laws and regulations commonly encountered by attorneys practicing employment law. The topics covered include the legal nature of the employment relationship, employment at-will and its limitations, compensation for workplace injuries, worker safety, wage and hour laws, employee privacy, noncompetition agreements, the protection of trade secrets, and the arbitration of employment related disputes. While the course will provide a broad overview of anti-discrimination law, the substantial body of legal issues on that subject will not be addressed in detail. The course will not address Labor Law or Employee Benefits.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-097 CERT 912
Federal Courts
Federal Courts (3)
This course focuses on the relationship of federal Article III courts to many other dispute resolution forums: Article I courts, state courts, administrative courts, and private and ad hoc dispute resolution forums (e.g., arbitration, mediation, 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund). Building on Civil Procedure, the course examines implied federal rights of action, “arising under” jurisdiction, removal, Erie’s progeny, forum non conveniens, federal common law, and preclusion. Building on Constitutional Law, the course examines standing, political question doctrine, and Congress’ power to restrain federal jurisdiction and allocate authority between Article III judges and other public and private adjudicators. This course is especially useful to students who anticipate clerking for a judge or plan to litigate before federal or state courts, administrative agencies, or arbitral or other dispute resolution forums.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-098 CERT 913
Federal Criminal Practice
Fed Crim Practice (2)
This course is an in-depth examination of all stages of a federal criminal prosecution, commencing with the decision to charge, and continuing through trial and sentencing. Subjects will include the Bail Reform Act of 1984, investigative techniques, motions to suppress, immunity, privileges, trial techniques, and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines. Strategic decisions involving pre-trial proceedings, trials, and sentencing will be addressed via presentations by experienced judges, practitioners, and other participants in the process. The goal of the course is to provide students with practical advice and insightful tops regarding every aspect of federal criminal litigation.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-099 CERT 914
Federal Securities Regulation
Fed Securities Reg (3)
This course will provide an introductory overview of the federal securities laws. The primary focus of the course will be the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The course will examine the principal provisions of those acts and the implementing regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as judicial decisions that interpret and apply the federal securities laws. The course will also examine how the SEC administers and enforces those laws. The first part of the course will focus on the registration requirement that applies to public offerings of securities, the registration and “due diligence” process, and the various exemptions from the registration requirement that may be available to an issuer. The second part of the course will focus on the antifraud provisions of the federal securities laws, corporate reporting and disclosure requirements, lawsuits by private plaintiffs, and the SEC’s enforcement powers.
PROPOSED START: FA21017

45-06-100 CERT 915
Homeland Security Law
Homeland Security (3)
This course examines the multifaceted concept of homeland security and the legal authorities governing the protection of the homeland. This course will be divided into three components. The first will examine the most significant threats to homeland security, whether natural or manmade, including terrorism, cyber activities, hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, power outages, hazardous materials spills, pandemic health threats, and others. The second component will provide an overview of the organization of homeland security institutions, and examine the division of homeland security responsibilities and jurisdictions between federal, state and local governments, and the private sector. This section will also consider the appropriate level of interagency and intergovernmental coordination. The third and most significant component, will explore the legal architecture governing how the public and private sectors identify, prepare for and respond to threats to homeland security. This section will also consider how political decision-making structures influence the development of homeland security laws, and the appropriate balance between security and civil rights and liberties. By the end of this course, students will have a solid understanding of the complex set of actors, institutions and processes that make up the homeland security infrastructure, a strong working knowledge of the governing legal authorities, and an appreciation for the most significant and persistent controversies in the field.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-101 CERT 916
Immigration Law
Immigration Law (3)
This class surveys the immigration laws of the United States, including the administrative and regulatory framework of the United States agencies charged with enforcing U.S. immigration laws. The topics covered by this course include the power of the Congress to regulate immigration; substantive provisions and procedures governing admission and exclusion; nonimmigrant and immigrant visa classifications and visa processing; asylum and refugee status; the effect of criminal acts on immigration status; grounds for removal from the United States; relief from deportation; judicial review; and the law of naturalization and derived citizenship.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-102 CERT 917
Information Privacy & Security Law
Info Privacy & Sec (3)
As information technology advances, the legal issues surrounding information privacy, data collection, data retention, data access, and data disclosure grow increasingly complicated. This course will explore information privacy and security issues arising from technological change and resulting shifts in societal perceptions of individual privacy, including how private and government actors electronically gather data, what type of data is gathered (personally identifiable information, biometric data, geolocation data, intimate personal details), and how such data is compiled, shared, bought, and sold across private industry data platforms and government electronic databases. The course overviews the current legal regime in the United States meant to address such issues. This overview will take into account constitutional, statutory, contract, and common law sources of information privacy and security law, at both the federal and state level. There will be particular focus on the First and Fourth Amendment concerns that result from such data gathering. The course concludes with a focus on developing fair information practices and principles to mitigate constitutional privacy concerns.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-103 CERT 918
International Business Transactions
Intl Bus Trans (2)
This course considers private business transactions that cross national boundaries. Topics include formation and enforcement of commercial agreements, forms of international transactions (e.g., agencies, distributorships, licensing agreements, franchising, and foreign subsidiaries), government regulation, electronic commerce, international and cross-cultural business negotiation and techniques for resolution of international business disputes (e.g., judicial procedure, arbitration, mediation).
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-104 CERT 919
International Criminal Law
Intl Criminal Law (3)
This course traces the history of criminal law, from its earliest manifestations in cultural texts, to the first attempts to codify the laws of war by Henri Dunant and Francis Lieber. Before examining the most recent efforts to enforce international criminal laws as embodied by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court in The Hague, students will explore the legacy of Nuremberg and its contribution to modern criminal law. The course will include a detailed study of the Geneva Conventions, crimes against humanity and genocide and explore, not only the related jurisprudence, but policy issues arising out of attempts to hold senior political and military officials responsible for the commission of international crimes.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-105 CERT 920
International Investment Transactions
Intl Invest Trans (2)
The course aims to offer thorough instruction on the role of the State in foreign economic relations, the purpose of foreign investment laws, the nature of foreign investment guarantees, the transaction aspects of foreign corporate vehicles, and the role of arbitration in settling foreign investment disputes.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-106 CERT 921
Internet Law
Internet Law (3)
The course examines how the rise of the Internet has challenged traditional areas of the law, while also exploring how law has shaped the Internet. The course covers issues such as network structure, governance architecture, domain names, jurisdiction, intellectual property, and e-commerce.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-107 CERT 922
Intro to Intellectual Property
Intro Intel Prop (3)
The introduction to intellectual property (IP) course investigates whether and, if so, how to protect different types of creations of the individual mind—e.g. inventions, artwork, slogans, etc. The course examines the three major areas of IP (trademarks, copyrights, and patents) along with numerous subsidiary IP regimes (trade secrets, right of publicity, unfair competition, and numerous sui generis protections). The course is suitable for those wanting to receive a general overview of intellectual property and how it might relate to their area of concentration or to students desiring to specialize in one or more fields of IP.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-108 CERT 923
Labor Law
Labor Law (3)
This course is an extended study of the federal National Labor Relations Act focusing on the right to form and join labor organizations, strikes, boycotts and picketing, collective bargaining, and the enforcement of collective bargaining agreements.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-109 CERT 924
Military Law
Military Law (2)
This course examines the military justice system, essentially military procedural and substantive criminal law. Students will learn about the statutes, policies, principles, standards, and rules governing the military justice process and jurisdiction from investigation through trial (including sentencing such as death penalty) and the appellate process. The course will begin with an overview of the military justice system. It will then address military criminal procedure. Next, will be a review of substantive criminal law, focusing on crimes and defenses specific to the military.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-110 CERT 925
National Security Law
Ntl Security Law (3)
This course examines the domestic and international legal frameworks governing the use of national security powers by the U.S. It explores the use of military force, the structures of the law enforcement and intelligence communities, and counterterrorism activities; and considers the interplay of law with legislative, administrative and policymaking processes. Students will gain a strong working knowledge of the most significant controversies surrounding the use of national security powers, and the relevant constitutional, statutory and international sources of law, and will be able to articulate and critique arguments about the legality of the exercise of governmental and military power in response to national security threats.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-111 CERT 926
Nonprofit Organizations
Nonprofit Orgs (3)
This course presents an overview of laws and policies that affect the nonprofit sector, a vital component of national and international economies. Students will examine alternative legal structures (including how to form a nonprofit corporation under U.S. law), federal and selected state tax laws, fiduciary duties of governing boards, charitable gifting rules, restrictions on private inurement, and the important roles played by nonprofits nationally and globally. The course will permit students to examine specific legal issues relating to selected nonprofit organizations such as religious organizations, private schools, hospitals and long-term care facilities, social clubs, trade and professional organizations or political organizations.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-112 CERT 927
Patent Law
Patent Law (3)
This course examines the theory behind patent protection and the societal ramifications of providing limited legal monopolies to inventors. The course explores patentable subject matter, the requirements for obtaining a patent, patent rights, infringement, remedies, and different patent types—e.g., utility patents, design patents, and plant patents.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-113 CERT 928
Post-Conviction Process
Post-Conviction Pr (3)
This course examines the sentencing process, sentencing guidelines, community-based sanctions, the death penalty, probation and parole, appeals, federal habeas corpus, state post-conviction remedies and prisoner’s rights.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-114 CERT 929
Real Estate Negotiation & Drafting
Real Estate Negot (3)
This course covers transactional drafting techniques for any commercial matter, and negotiation exercises useful in all legal settings. It then addresses the structure and law of real estate transactions, including agreements of sale, title and survey matters, leasing, financing, easements, and development rights.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-115 CERT 930
State & Local Government Law
St & Loc Gov Law (3)
This course survey important issues in governmental organization and management. Emphasis is placed on intergovernmental relations, the legislative process, personnel issues, financing, and contracting. The course will conclude with a consideration of recent trends toward metropolitan regionalism.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-116 CERT 931
Taxation of Business Entities
Tax Bus Entities (3)
This course covers the taxation of common business structures and their owners including corporations, partnerships, and limited liability companies.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-117 CERT 932
Trademarks
Trademarks (2)
This course examines numerous theoretical justifications for trademarks—i.e., words, names, symbols, or devices that identify and distinguish goods and indicate the source of the goods. The course also explores what can be trademarked, infringement standards, federal registration, trademark dilution, defenses to infringement, and remedies.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-118 CERT 933
White-Collar Crime
White-Collar Crime (3)
This course provides an introductory overview of the investigation, prosecution, and defense of white collar criminal cases. The objectives of the course are to introduce the principal white collar offenses, to provide an understanding of the legal process through which white collar crimes are investigated and prosecuted, and to impart a familiarity and comfort level with the special “rules of the game” that apply to lawyers (both prosecutors and defense counsel) in white collar criminal cases.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-119 ELECT 901
Agricultural Law
Agricultural Law (3)
This course will survey agricultural law issues including labor issues, land and water use, and food animal production and welfare. In addition, the course will focus heavily on the regulation of food production, food safety and food labeling. Finally, the course will review the emerging agriculture of medical cannabis and industrial hemp production.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-120 ELECT 902
Antitrust
Antitrust (3)
This course is principally an examination of antitrust law and policy in the U.S. as evolved through prosecutions by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission. There is brief coverage of leading market regulatory schemes such as those affecting marketing of foods, drugs, textiles, toxic substances, securities, and consumer products. In the antitrust area, commercial conduct alleged to violate price fixing, market allocation, tying, exclusive dealing, asset acquisition, and price discrimination norms are considered at length with some attention to state antitrust law.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-121 ELECT 903
Banking Regulation
Banking Regulation (2)
This course will focus on banks as financial intermediaries and compare them to both the securities and insurance industries. The dual banking system of state and federal regulation will be explored as to bank formation, supervision and regulation. The course will explore the ownership and control issues affecting banks and the supervision and regulation of bank holding companies and their subsidiaries engaged in nontraditional banking activities. The causes of the financial crisis of 2007-2009, together with the reaction of financial institutions, the states, the U.S. Congress and the regulators to the crisis, will also be examined. The course will include an assessment of the deposit insurance system and the problems associated with troubled and failed banks. The course will emphasize the potential administrative enforcement, civil and criminal exposure of both regulated entities and individuals involved within those industries.
PREREQUISITE: ELECT 904
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-122 ELECT 904
Bankruptcy
Bankruptcy (3)
The rights, duties, and remedies of both debtor and creditor are examined. The course covers the collection process, enforcement of money judgments, and insolvency proceedings. Federal bankruptcy law is emphasized.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-123 ELECT 905
Communications Law
Communications Law (2)
This course will explore current issues in communications law including First Amendment constraints on the regulation of the content of telephone calls and television advertising, cable TV monopolies, and telecommunications regulations and deregulation. Course materials explore regulatory, constitutional, and antitrust law principles as they apply to broadcast, cable, and telecommunications activities.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-124 ELECT 906
Comparative International Tax Law
Comp Intl Tax Law (3)
This course treats the unique problems of Home country taxation of foreign income and operations of resident persons and enterprises and Host country taxation of foreign persons and enterprises from the perspective of many nations perspectives.
PREREQUISITE: BAR 904
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-125 ELECT 907
Construction Law
Construction Law (2)
This course examines the peculiar legal problems encountered on construction projects. It covers contract, tort and statutory law as adapted specifically to the construction industry. It analyzes the perspectives of an owner, developer, architect/engineer, contractor, subcontractor and bonding company, both in the context of private and public construction projects, commercial and residential. The principal areas of inquiry are contract structure, public bidding, theories of liability, payment and security mechanisms, claims related to time, disruption and extra work, and claims arising from construction defects.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-126 ELECT 908
Education Law
Education Law (3)
This course covers the basic premises of compulsory education; issues concerning exclusion of students; school control of student behavior and curriculum; teacher employment problems; and issues of funding, minority rights, and school liability. The course will also examine the law applicable to higher education.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-127 ELECT 909
Elder Law
Elder Law (3)
This course presents a survey of the legal issues associated with aging, including introduction to national and global demographics on population aging; comparative policies on Social Security; quality of health care, including care under Medicare and Medicaid (and alternative forms of payment systems for health care and long term care); age discrimination in employment; housing for older adults, including nursing homes, assisted living and continuing care facilities; advance health care decision making; and fiduciary duties of agents and family members.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-128 ELECT 910
Energy Law and Policy
Energy Law & Plcy (3)
This course is the introductory course in the regulation of energy in the United States. It also considers some of the international impact of U.S. energy policy. The course examines each significant form of energy (oil, natural gas, nuclear power, electricity, coal and renewables) in terms of the manner in which each form is regulated by various government institutions. To understand the various forms of regulation, we will also consider a substantial amount of economic, political and socio/psychological information.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-129 ELECT 911
Environmental Law
Environmental Law (3)
This course introduces some of the most important concepts, issues, and statutes in environmental law. After discussing the economic and ethical bases for environmental law and briefly reviewing the relevant principles of constitutional and common law, students examine a representative selection of federal statutes, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, “Superfund,” and the Clean Air Act.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-130 ELECT 912
Estate Planning
Estate Planning (3)
Studies the concepts and techniques required to develop estate plans. Topics include the initial client interview, drafting of wills and trusts, powers of attorney, living wills, disability planning and income taxation of trusts and estates. The psychological and ethical aspects of estate planning will be covered. The course will also survey the federal gift, estate and generation skipping taxes. The course is intended to be an introduction to estate planning, valuable to both the person intending to specialize in the field and the general practitioner.
PREREQUISITE: BAR 904
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-131 ELECT 913
Gender and Sexuality Law
Gender & Sexuality (3)
This course will focus on how the law treats issues concerning gender and sexuality. The doctrinal themes that will be explored include constitutional notions of privacy/liberty, equality and expression as applied to categories based on gender, sexuality and/or sexual orientation. For example, topics might include the right to sexual privacy (including access to birth control and abortion); discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation (including sodomy laws and same sex marriage); evolving theories of sexuality (including the rights of transgender persons and intersexuals; transsexuals, and the gay gene); identity speech and the First Amendment (including the gay prom case and sexual harassment cases); military exclusions; and the privatization of family law and family formation. The course will examine the relationship between gender and sexuality, based on a multi-disciplinary approach informed by history, medicine, science and broader social and political theories.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-132 ELECT 914
Health Care Law and Policy
Hlth Care Law/Plcy (3)
This is a survey course focused primarily on how the law influences the delivery and financing of health care in the United States. The course will examine an array of legal and policy issues related to our health care system, including: the legal structure of the patient-physician relationship; professional licensure and competence; health care privacy, decision-making, and autonomy; the legal and corporate structure of health care enterprises; regulatory and market-based approaches to improving the quality of health care delivery; payment and financing systems including the Medicare and Medicaid programs, insurance, charitable care, managed care, ERISA, and private payment; and enforcement mechanisms, including federal and state civil and criminal statutes and regulations aimed to combat health care fraud and abuse. The course also will focus on the challenges facing the U.S. health care delivery system and proposals for systemic reform, including an in-depth examination of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and its potential impacts on health care access, delivery, cost, and quality.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-133 ELECT 915
Insurance Law
Insurance Law (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles governing the creation, sale and enforcement of the most common forms of insurance in the U.S. Students will be introduced to the following insurance lines: personal liability, professional liability, commercial general liability, homeowners, automobile, life and casualty, and health. The peculiarities of each line will be discussed as well as the problems common to all lines: moral hazard, adverse selection and outright fraud. The social function of insurance as well as historical anomalies are covered in order to give the student the broadest possible exposure to the issues lawyers confront regularly in this area of practice.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-134 ELECT 916
International Law
International Law (2)
This course introduces students to key concepts and doctrines of international law. It examines the sources of international law such as custom and treaty, the bases of international jurisdiction, issues of statehood, recognition and succession, nationality, international agreements, and U.S. participation in the international legal system. The course provides students with the basics needed for both public and private international law practice.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-135 ELECT 917
Intro to Cuban Legal Systems
Intr Cuba Leg Sys (1)
This course is structured around a mandatory, one-week visit in Cuba. Students will be introduced to Cuban law and legal systems in a Communist setting, including structured opportunities to meet with legal specialists in a variety of settings, such as the University of Havana Law School, courts, administrative agencies and development groups, as well as participating in cultural events (history, music, art).
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-136 ELECT 918
Juvenile Law
Juvenile Law (3)
This course examines the legal position of the child in society and the extent to which the child may be legally controlled by parent(s) or state. Subject matters include the right of the child to control reproductive decision- making, child support and paternity issues, child abuse and neglect, foster care, termination of parental rights, adoption, medical treatment of juveniles, and medical experimentation on juveniles. The course also examines the delinquency jurisdiction of juvenile court, the constitutional protections afforded the child accused of criminal activity, adjudications of delinquency, punishment or placement of the child in the dispositional phase of juvenile proceedings, and treatment of the child as an adult offender.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-137 ELECT 919
Law and Medicine
Law and Medicine (3)
This course focuses on the law concerning the physician-patient relationship as well as bioethical issues that arise in that relationship. It covers the duty to treat, informed consent, confidentiality, medical malpractice, refusal of life-sustaining medical treatment, physician-assisted suicide, experimental medical treatment, and more.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-138 ELECT 920
Law of Individuals with Disabilities
Disabilities Law (3)
This course will address legal issues and concepts for people living with disabilities. It will cover issues surrounding civil rights discrimination, and public benefits ranging from employment, housing, income supplements, health, and education. Students will review legislation, case law, and rules, and will focus on the practical and social concerns of individuals living with disabilities.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-139 ELECT 921
Law of the Sea
Law of the Sea (2)
The course aims to offer thorough instruction on the foundations and sources of the law of the sea, the principle types of maritime jurisdiction, the principles of resource management, and approaches to the settlement of maritime disputes.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-140 ELECT 922
Law of Treaties
Law of Treaties (2)
Treaties are the foundation of public and private international law and national foreign affairs law. This course examines: historical development of law of treaties; concept of treaty; treaty as source of international and national law; stages of concluding treaty; reservations; accession to treaties, functions of depositary; publication of treaties; breach of treaty obligations; invalidity, termination, and suspension of treaties; denunciation and other withdrawal from treaties; treaties and jus cogens; treaties and customary rules of international law; treaties and third States; treaties and municipal law; interpretation of treaties; languages and authentic texts of treaties.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-141 ELECT 923
Law Practice Management
Law Practice Manag (3)
This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the management of a legal services organization. Attention is paid to the operation of a law practice as a business, including entity formation, internal organization, quality control, business development and finance. The course also is designed to provide a complement to other parts of the curriculum in which students can continue to develop their professional identities.
PREREQUISITE: REQ 911
COREQUISITES: BAR 906
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-142 ELECT 924
Poverty Law
Poverty Law (2)
This course is an introduction to law relevant to assisting people in poverty including law addressing public benefits, housing, consumer issues, custody, domestic violence, and private rights of action. It will also address realities of existence for people in poverty and consider historical and policy perspectives. Finally, the course will focus on some practical skills, and students will participate in mock hearings and/or mock interviews.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-143 ELECT 925
Products Liability
Products Liability (2)
This course incorporates and expands the concepts derived from Torts and Contracts regarding injuries to people or property caused by defective products. The course will focus on the substantive and procedural law of torts (with emphasis on the Restatement) and contracts, as developed by courts and administrative regulation, while also addressing affirmative defenses.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-144 ELECT 926
Sports and Entertainment Law
Sports/Entertainmt (3)
This course explores how various areas of the law impact the sports and entertainment industry. The “law” that is used by most sports lawyers is principally the application of settled principles of other legal fields to the sports industry: contract law, labor law, tax law, products liability law, intellectual property law, etc. The course then focuses on important areas that provide the foundational principles that drive the outcome of most legal disputes arising in the sports and entertainment industry. The course also examines aspects of antitrust, labor, and constitutional law, that have specific and unique applications to sports and entertainment.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-145 ELECT 927
State and Local Taxation
State/Local Taxatn (2)
Beginning with historical and constitutional aspects, students will analyze in detail recent developments in state and local taxation and their impact on client representation. Attention will be concentrated on corporate, sales and use and other business taxes, death duties, and property taxes and exemptions.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-146 ELECT 928
Veterans Law
Veterans Law (2)
This course is intended to ground the student in the history, tradition, and modern practice of the American system of veterans law. Each session will contain specific legal concepts relevant to the subject matter. The student may expect to have a broad appreciation for the importance of the principles of veterans law and the practical application of the veterans benefits system, and how to analyze issues.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-147 ELECT 929
Workers’ Compensation Law
Workers’ Comp Law (3)
This course will explore the history and development of, public policy considerations for, and state and federal systems for delivery of medical and wage benefits to injured workers.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-148 ELECT 930
Writing and Editing for Lawyers
Writing & Editing (2)
The goal of this course is to improve the legal reading, writing, and editing skills of students. The course will reinforce rules of grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, usage, voice, tone, style, and organization. The emphasis will be on the application of these rules in the context of legal writing. Students will learn how to craft sentences that are accurate, brief, clear, precise, and sometimes persuasive.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-149 ELECT 931
Writing Workshop
Writing Workshop (2)
The goal of this course is to improve the legal writing and editing skills of students. By engaging in the process of directed writing and editing, students will learn to write clearly, succinctly, precisely, and sometimes persuasively. Emphasis will be given to organization and integration of procedural and substantive aspects of cases. Students will be required to submit a writing sample and statement of interest to the instructor before enrollment in the course is approved.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-150 EXPCL 901
Children’s Advocacy Clinic
Chldns Advocy Clnc (4)
The course will provide instruction to students in the legal representation of children in various civil matters, including dependency, adoption and custody actions. Students will be managing a caseload of clients. Students will meet directly with their clients, and correspond with agencies and opposing counsel. Students will appear at all court appearances with a supervising attorney. The supervising attorney will meet with students individually on a regular basis for case reviews. The classroom component of the course will focus on various substantive and skills issues, including lectures on child interviewing skills and lectures from physicians on the medical aspects of child abuse.
PROPOSED START FA2017

45-06-151 EXPCL 902
Community Law Clinic
Community Law Clnc (4)
The Community Law Clinic represents individuals living near or below the poverty line in matters of family law, disability law, housing, public benefits, and other areas deemed appropriate by the supervising attorneys. Law students represent clients through every level of either the state common pleas court system or the requisite federal court system. The clinic provides students with the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on training serving a segment of the population that is generally underserved because of financial hardship.
PROPOSED START FA2017

45-06-152 EXPCL 903
Legislative and Regulatory Advocacy Clinic
Leg/Reg Advcy Clnc (4)
The Legislative and Regulatory Advocacy Clinic will focus on legal analysis and problem solving in the area of legislative and regulatory practice.  The clinic’s primary goal is to provide students experience with the legislative and regulatory processes by which policy is made and implemented at the state level, and to prepare them to advocate a particular policy position. Using the Pennsylvania legislature and Commonwealth agencies as the prime focuses, clinical students gain experience in how to draft legislation; comment on proposed regulations; work with the state’s legislative leadership, legislative committees, and executive branch agencies; represent interest groups in advancing public policy agendas; influence public opinion on contemporaneous policy issues; effectively deal with opponents; and earn the support of officials and staff from across the political spectrum.
PROPOSED START FA2017

45-06-153 EXPCL 904
Medical Legal Partnership Clinic
Med Leg Ptnshp Cln (4)
Students in the MLP Clinic will work to reduce health disparities and improve health in vulnerable communities through joint medical-legal advocacy with the Penn State Hershey Medical Group in Harrisburg. The Clinic will address the health-harming legal needs of the community, which may include public benefits, advance care planning, housing, and/or immigration matters; as well as policy and institutional projects that arise from its collaboration with medical partners.
PROPOSED START FA2017

45-06-154 EXPCL 905
Advanced Clinic
Advanced Clinic (4)
Students who have successfully completed a clinic course may be eligible to apply for Advanced Clinic, with faculty approval. This second-semester clinic course is designed to significantly advance the student’s knowledge of the subject matter area studied in the first semester of clinic and to expand students’ knowledge of areas of practice in other clinics. Class sessions are devoted to case rounds discussions, and students take significant responsibility in crafting their own learning agendas. Acceptance to this course is limited and only permitted with faculty approval.
PROPOSED START FA2017

45-06-155 EXPIN 901
Field Placement/Internship
Internship (3)
Internship placements offer students the opportunity to integrate classroom knowledge and practical work experience in a wide range of different placement opportunities. Students work at the placement site under the supervision of a judge or an attorney. Internship placements are in federal and state judicial chambers, public service and nonprofit offices, state administrative agencies, non- profit, and corporate entities. Students work with experienced supervisors in these offices to develop stronger research and writing skills, judicial memorandum and opinion drafting, client counseling and interviewing skills, statutory and regulatory analysis interpretation and application, criminal practice, public interest and corporate compliance work. Through their work and classroom assignments and discussions, students are expected to develop a heightened awareness of the methods and functions of judicial, legislative, regulatory, public service and public interest, and corporate entities. Students in litigation placements will have the opportunity to obtain student intern certification and appear in court under the supervision of an attorney.
PROPOSED START FA2017

45-06-156 EXPIN 902
International Justice Program (Externship, The Hague)
Intl Justice Progr (12)
The International Justice Program allows students to work on cases before one of international courts with jurisdiction over international crimes such as the International Criminal Court and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Students will work under the direct supervision of an experienced international prosecutor or within the judicial chambers of the court.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-157 EXPIN 903
Semester in DC
Semester in DC (10)
The Semester in Washington Program allows students to spend a semester in Washington, D.C. earning academic credit for approximately 32 hours per week of supervised legal work at an approved federal government agency, nonprofit organization or public interest group during the third year of law school. The program provides advanced study in federal law and serves as a capstone experience for students interested in federal practice.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-158 EXPIN 904
Semester in Harrisburg
Semester in Harrisburg (9)
The Semester in Harrisburg Program allows students to spend a semester in the Pennsylvania state capital earning academic credit for approximately 24 hours per week of supervised legal work at an approved state government agency, the state legislature, or a nonprofit group that focuses on state government affairs. The program is recommended for students who are interested in pursuing a career in state government or a particular regulatory area, such as banking regulation, environmental law, or securities regulation. The program provides advanced study in state government law and serves as a capstone experience for students interested in a state governmental practice.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-159 EXPSK 901
Advanced Appellate Advocacy
Adv Appellate Advc (2)
The primary goal of this course is to prepare students to be effective appellate lawyers, in any practice setting as well as in moot court competitions. This upper-level advanced skills course focuses on appellate theory, standard of review, advanced appellate brief writing, and the art of appellate oral argument. The course is designed to build upon the legal research and writing skills learned in the 1L curriculum; to hone and refine writing, research, and oral advocacy skills; and to develop the judgment necessary to be exceptional appellate advocates. Students will work with a partner to prepare a simulated appeal, and will be responsible for analyzing a record on appeal, developing core themes, telling a persuasive story, crafting persuasive arguments, and presenting those stories and arguments in both an appellate brief and in an oral argument. Student work will culminate in a final appellate brief and a series of oral arguments.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-160 EXPSK 902
Advocacy I (Trial Advocacy)
Advocacy I (4)
This course introduces the fundamental skills of trial advocacy applicable in civil and criminal trials in any jurisdiction. In keeping with the theory that trial advocacy is best learned by “doing,” each student will conduct written and oral exercises concerning the various stages of the trial process-pleadings, pretrial motions, discovery, settlement negotiations, trial preparation, jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examination of lay witnesses, examination of expert witnesses, trial motions, and closing arguments. Students are able to evaluate their own progress through viewing videotapes of their performances. The class meets jointly for lectures, while the oral trial exercises are conducted in small sections.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-161 EXPSK 903
Advocacy II (Advanced Trial Advocacy)
Advocacy II (3)
Every week the entire class meets for a lecture and demonstration session, and also breaks into small group courtroom section meetings during which every student will present a trial exercise. The goals of the course are 1) to improve confidence in public speaking, 2) to learn how to prepare documents that conform to multiple sources of rules, and 3) to implement the unique protocol for factual, as opposed to legal,  persuasion.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-162 EXPSK 904
Client Counseling
Client Counseling (2)
This course introduces students to the dynamics of a productive attorney-client relationship, the goals of interviewing and counseling, and structures and techniques that can be used to achieve those goals. The focus is on developing students’ skills in interviewing and counseling. Instruction consists of assigned reading, problem-solving exercises, group discussion, and practice through simulations.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-163 EXPSK 905
Death Penalty Practice
Death Penalty Prac (3)
This course examines the death penalty from a trial lawyer’s perspective. Three main topics will be featured with an in-depth examination of death as the “ultimate punishment”; the relevant constitutional provisions and death-penalty case law; the theoretical research associated with the cost, demographics, and imposition of the death penalty; and the death-penalty trial strategy, from the initial notice of intent to seek the death penalty to the final appeal. Students will engage in mock trial exercises to simulate the lawyer’s decision-making process in a capital murder trial.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-164 EXPSK 906
Negotiation/Mediation
Negotiation/Mediation (3)
Negotiation/Mediation combines the law and ethics of negotiation, mediation and settlement with economic and psychological bargaining theory and regular hands-on practice in representing clients in negotiation and mediation. Bargaining theory (including distributive and integrative bargaining), relevant socio-psychological research, negotiation and mediation ethics, the law of settlement, and the basics of contract drafting are all introduced. Instruction consists of assigned reading, a series of simulations and exercises (including drafting a resulting contract), written negotiation planning and self-evaluation, feedback, and group discussion. The course also may involve participation in a full-day Saturday program, and students should be prepared to experiment with various means to maximize their facility in using videoconferencing and other technologies to negotiate and represent clients in mediation.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-165 EXPSK 907
Strategic Legal Research
Strategc Lgl Resch (3)
This course emphasizes the development of effective legal research strategies that take into account choice of format (e.g., the relative advantages and disadvantages of print and electronic sources), cost/benefit analysis of format choice, evolving approaches by law firms and private practitioners to billable research hours, use of computerized tools to organize research results, and presentation of research results to case supervisors. Course content will be presented in a hybrid format consisting of two hours per week of in-class meetings with the remaining credit to be completed by coursework outside scheduled class time through online and written assignments.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-166 EXPSK 908 
Transactional Writing and Drafting
Trans Writng/Draft (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the techniques and best practices involved in general writing and operative document creation in a transactional law practice. The course involves a series of written exercises completed against the background of readings and lectures describing best practices in written communication and operative document creation.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-167 EXPSK 909
Entrepreneurship Law: Company Creation
Company Creation (3)
Students survey the legal issues confronted by entrepreneurs and develop the practical skills to effectively and ethically represent them. Students study how to interview, counsel, plan, draft, and negotiate, by critiquing relevant readings and putting this to use in the context of client interactions and classroom simulations. Students also will draft relevant client correspondence and memoranda typical of those that surface in small business and entrepreneur representation.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-168 EXPSK 910
Entrepreneurship Law: Operational Issues
Operational Issues (3)
Students will learn about problems that entrepreneurs and small businesses encounter during the operation of the business. Topics include: Legally hiring and firing employees; employee privacy; governmental intervention and compliance; handling governmental agency issues (IRS, SEC, DoL, etc.); business expansion; cessation of a business; business divorce and transition planning. The course will provide practical experience for students who wish to represent entrepreneurs or become transactional attorneys. Practical assignments are designed to allow students to identify relevant issues and draft documents resolving those issues. This course is strongly recommended for anyone who plans to represent entrepreneurs and small businesses.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-169 INDEP 901
Independent Study
Independent Study (1-3)
In the Independent Study course the student, under the supervision of a full-time member of the faculty, will be permitted to do research and write a paper of a substantial nature on a significant subject.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-170 REQ 901
Civil Procedure
Civil Procedure (4)
Civil Procedure concerns the rules, statutes, Constitutional provisions, and principles that govern the litigation of a civil case in federal court. The course begins with procedural due process, then familiarizes the student with the stages of a civil lawsuit including: pleading; structuring the lawsuit; discovery; termination of a lawsuit without trial (including settlement and use of dispute resolution processes); trial; and actions that may be taken after a jury verdict or bench trial. The course then addresses systemic issues related to how and where a lawsuit is filed including: personal and subject matter jurisdiction; venue; notice; removal; and which substantive law– state or federal — should apply in federal court. Although reference is made to state rules and laws, the course concentrates on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-171 REQ 902
Constitutional Law I
Constitutional Law (3)
Course examines the roles assigned by the Constitution to the executive, legislative and judicial branches of the federal government and how federalism limits state and local authority.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-172 REQ 903
Contracts
Contracts (4)
Contracts is concerned with the formation of contracts. The traditional offer and acceptance are analyzed in light of problems presented by modern bargaining techniques. Voidability of contracts formed by fraud, mistake, illegality, and unconscionable advantage is also stressed. The performance of contracts and the parol evidence rule are discussed.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-173 REQ 904
Criminal Law
Criminal Law (3)
Criminal Law is an introduction to the legal principles of criminal law. The course is taught by analyzing actual criminal cases involving crimes including: murder, conspiracy, hate crimes and crimes of sexual violence. The course also examines legal defenses such as justification and psychiatric excuse defenses. The course also incorporates principles of statutory interpretation.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-174 REQ 905
Legal Argument & Factual Persuasion
Leg Arg & Fact Per (3)
This course systematically introduces how lawyers develop a legal argument using a) case precedents, and b) statutes, including various interpretive tools beyond the language of the statute. The course also will instruct how to find these authorities through legal research. Students also will learn the very different protocols a lawyer uses when attempting the persuade the judge or jury to accept their version of disputed facts, culminating in every student presenting a closing argument to the jury.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-175 REQ 906
Practicing Law in a Global World: Competencies
Competencies (2)
While U.S. law schools generally do an excellent job of teaching students to “think like a lawyer,” there is a growing consensus that legal education has not provided students with the knowledge and skills they will need to help clients address multi-faceted issues in an interdisciplinary world. The goal of this course is fill this gap by introducing students to topics that typically are not taught in the required law school curriculum but that are important for lawyers to know. The “extra-legal competencies” that will be covered in this course include topics such as “how to read a financial statement,” project management, negotiation theories, and cultural competency. The goal of the course is to help make lawyers better problem-solvers for their clients.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-176 REQ 907
Practicing Law in a Global World: Contexts
Contexts (3)
Most law students come to law school in order to become a lawyer. But what does it mean to be a lawyer? Are there qualities, characteristics, and competencies that lawyers have in common? Is all of the work performed by lawyers the same? If not, how can a student determine those practice settings for which the student’s skills, interests, and attributes would be a good fit? This course focuses on professional identity, which has been called the underdeveloped “third apprenticeship” of legal education. Students will hear from a number of speakers who work in different practice settings. Students will be required to conduct informational interviews with lawyers and prepare a portfolio. They will have numerous opportunities for reflection about the competencies that make one a good lawyer. This course will help students make more informed choices while in law school and will help prepare them for life after law school.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-177 REQ 908
Problem Solving I: The Lawyer & Client
Prob Solving I (2)
Problem Solving I introduces first-year students to cases in the manner that a case would unfold in the real world. The course is based on two simulated civil case files. Students work through a litigation file and a transaction file to practice skills that lawyers use to begin and maintain relationships with clients. The clients may be individuals, corporations, or government. Working with law school faculty and practicing lawyers, students interview a client to determine the facts of the case and to understand the client’s goals, interview a witness, conduct a deposition and participate in a negotiation. In addition, students work collaboratively to discover the relevant law, to assess the client’s options and to communicate the legal strategy to the client.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-178 REQ 909
Problem Solving II: The Lawyer as Writer
Prob Solving II (2)
In Problem Solving II, students continue to hone and practice essential lawyering skills: analyzing a client’s case by researching the relevant law, including cases, statutes, constitutional provisions, and administrative regulations; explaining and applying the law to the client’s situation using two of the most common written forms (objective or predictive writing in an office memorandum, and persuasive writing in a trial brief); and presenting oral arguments. Because research, analysis, writing and oral argument skills improve only with practice, students will work through a variety of exercises and client problems, receiving individualized feedback from their professor during the course. Throughout the semester, we will remain mindful of the relationship between the concepts of law, order and justice – and will continually examine the role of the lawyer in that relationship.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-179 REQ 910
Problem Solving III: The Lawyer as Persuader
Prob Solving III (2)
Lawyers must be able to advocate effectively both orally and in writing. In Problem Solving III, students learn the essential skills of advocacy by using research and writing tools to craft arguments that are powerful, fair, well-reasoned, clearly-stated, and respectful of their adversaries and the court. Students communicate their arguments in both written briefs and in oral arguments to the court, at the trial and appellate levels. Students practice the skills of effective advocacy by exploring a variety of client problems, and they receive individualized instruction throughout the process. As the course progresses, students explore the principles of fairness, order and justice in the context of the lawyer’s duties and responsibilities as an advocate.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-180 REQ 911
Professional Responsibility
Pro Rep (3)
This course focuses on the regulation of lawyers. Although we will study other law, the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct will be the primary focus of the course. The class will be taught primarily through the hypotheticals found in the casebook. The class discussions will focus on what the ABA Model Rules require, state variations that are common, and other sources of law that regulate lawyers’ behavior. The class discussions will explore whether students agree with the policy choices reflected in ABA Model Rules, how the rules might apply in particular fact settings, the pressures that might cause a lawyer to ignore regulatory
rules, and the steps that a lawyer might take to better serve his or her clients and to minimize the chance of a regulatory violation.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-181 REQ 912
Property
Property (4)
The course examines the nature of property. While intellectual property and personal property are explored, the focus of the course is on real property—i.e., land. The course explores what real property ownership entails, estates and future interests, concurrent ownership, marital property, leasing property, selling property, private land use planning, public land use regulation, eminent domain, and regulatory takings.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-182 REQ 913
Torts
Torts (4)
Tort law seeks to remedy civil wrongs that result in harm to people or their property. The course will focus on the elements and proof of intentional, negligence, and strict liability causes of action, along with affirmative defenses.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-183 SEMNR 901
Child Welfare Law & Policy Seminar
Child Welfare Sem (2)
This seminar will provide critical analysis of child welfare policy, law and practice related to abused and neglected children. The course will also include analysis of other disciplines that work with abused and neglected children, through participation of faculty members of related Penn State units, such as psychology, human development and medicine. The course will review the role of federal, state and local agencies, as well as non-governmental organizations in addressing the needs of abused and neglected children and their families. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of social welfare policies which address child abuse
and neglect in a historical and cultural context. Students will develop an understanding of how policy is formulated. There will be an emphasis on critical thinking and analysis of policy processes, policy implementation, and impacts on diverse populations.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-184 SEMNR 902
Comparative International Law Seminar: U.S. and Russia
Comp Intl Law Sem (2)
This seminar is concerned with the development of the law, legal system, and legal institutions of what is popularly known as Russia but also correctly and officially known as the Russian Federation within the boundaries presently occupied and, historically, within the boundaries of the Russian Empire. By “law” we mean formal legislation, customary rules, relevant international legal rules, legal doctrine, and anything else regarded by the Russian State or by Russian jurists as comprising part of the “law.” For our purposes “legal institutions” encompasses all law enforcement agencies or any other agencies of the State or empowered by the State which are concerned with the law in any manner whatsoever, including educational institutions.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-185 SEMNR 903
Congressional Investigations Seminar
Congrs Invest Sem (2)
This seminar will examine the law and procedures governing congressional investigations through a series of case studies. Case study topics will include the Teapot Dome scandal, the 1929 stock market crash Pecora hearings, the House Un-American Activities and Senate McCarthy committees, Watergate, Iran-Contra, and Whitewater, as well as an examination of special investigative commissions which will include the Roberts Commission’s investigation of the Pearl Harbor attack, the Warren Commission’s investigation of President Kennedy’s assassination, and the 9-11 Commission’s investigation of the 9-11 terrorist attacks. These case studies will be the vehicles for studying the substantive law and legal procedures that govern the conduct of congressional investigations, including congressional subpoena power and its limits, privileges available to witnesses, testimonial immunity grants, assertions of executive privilege, contempt sanctions, perjury and false statements sanctions, and the role of counsel in congressional investigations. In addition to making a case study presentation, students will write a seminar paper on a legal topic relating to congressional investigations and will make an in-class presentation on their seminar paper topic.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-186 SEMNR 904
Cross-Border Legal Practice Seminar
Cross-Bord Leg Sem (2)
This seminar examines globalization’s impact on the legal profession. It begins by exploring the cross border legal practice phenomenon. It then introduces students to the similarities and differences among U.S. lawyers and lawyers elsewhere. Students will learn about developments outside the U.S. that already have or that may affect the U.S. policy and the U.S. legal profession. By the end of the course, students will be prepared to participate in policy discussions regarding the regulation of cross border legal practice. They will also have acquired tools that are useful when encountering their own cross border legal practice issues.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-187 SEMNR 905
Procedural Legal Systems Seminar
Proc Leg Sys Sem (2)
This seminar is for students who: have closely examined at least one dispute resolution system (e.g., civil or criminal litigation, administrative adjudication, investment treaty arbitration, contractual tiered systems for the provision of negotiation, mediation and
arbitration); seek to gain an empirically-grounded understanding of the lifecycle and dynamics of conflict, conflict resolution and the pursuit of justice; and will use such understanding to propose the creation or reform of a public, private or hybrid dispute resolution system. Students will conduct original legal and (if possible) empirical research, using the principles, theories, research and dispute system law and procedure studied in the seminar.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-188 SEMNR 906
Electronic Evidence Seminar
Elect Evid Sem (3)
The seminar will cover the case law, procedural rules, evidence rules, and rules of professional conduct implicated by the unique attributes of information created and/or stored electronically, as well as the filing and courtroom presentation of documents in electronic format. There are three components to the course. The first part concerns the discovery of ESI, and covers the nature, sources, and terminology of ESI; the different formats of ESI and the implications for preservation and production of ESI attributable to the different formats; the evolution of the rules and case law regarding discovery of ESI; and the obligations of counsel with respect to the preservation of ESI.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-189 SEMNR 907
Federal Indian Law Seminar
Fed Indian Law Sem (2)
This introductory course surveys the body of Federal Indian Law, focusing on the legal relationship between native nations and the United States, including implications of this relationship for states and individual citizens. The course covers the historical origins of federal Indian common law, the development of federal Indian policy, and tribal sovereignty in the modern era (tribal property, jurisdiction, criminal and civil governance, and economic development including gaming). Students are required to develop a thesis into a research paper on a topic covered in the course.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-190 SEMNR 908
History of International Law Seminar
Hist Intl Law Sem (2)
The general historical introduction and seminar presentations and projects are designed to accentuate problems and issues which enable students to better understand the foundations of the law of nations and encourage independent research skills.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-191 SEMNR 909
International Human Rights Law Seminar
Intl Hum Rigts Sem (2)
International Human Rights Law: History and Challenges is an introductory course in the field of human rights. The course explores the development of our modern human rights system and the contemporary challenges it faces.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-192 SEMNR 910
Law & Aging Seminar
Law & Aging Sem (2)
This seminar offers students the opportunity to explore advanced legal issues, financial concerns and health care coverage issues faced by families planning for the future. This class will include nationally recognized experts as guest lecturers on retirement planning, disability planning (including special needs planning), Medicare and Medicaid, specialized trusts including pooled asset trusts or charitable remainder trusts.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-193 SEMNR 911
Lawyering & Ethics for the Business Attorney Seminar
Law Ethics Bus Sem (2)
This seminar provides students with an opportunity to analyze and discuss ethical and legal issues relating to representation of business entities. Issues covered include (1) who is the client for the lawyer who represents a business entity; (2) what special rules govern confidentiality and information sharing in the representation of a business entity; (3) how should a lawyer respond to evidence of client fraud or other illegal activities; (4) what are the potential liabilities for furnishing legal advice or providing legal opinions for business transactions that are later found to have been fraudulent or illegal; (5) when is a business entity required or permitted to reimburse employees for legal expenses relating to their employment activities; and (6) what special obligations and responsibilities are imposed on “in-house” attorneys who are full-time employees of a business entity. Each student will make a case study presentation to the class, write a seminar paper, and make a presentation to the class on their seminar paper topic.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-194 SEMNR 912
Protection of Individual Rights under State Constitutions Seminar
Prot Indv Rgts Sem (2)
This course analyses the theory and practice of arguing for and against greater protection of individual rights under state constitutions than is afforded by the floor of rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution. Students will apply each of the individual concepts covered in the course to a brief and oral argument before the state supreme court in a case of their choosing.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-195 SEMNR 913
Race, Racism & American Law Seminar
Race & Racism Sem (2)
This course explores the role law has played in both the subordination and promotion of the rights of people of color in America. Subjects for discussion will include: how law helped create the social construct of race, race and the American criminal justice system, affirmative action policies, and the quest for effective schools. This course examines critical race theory which posits that we all harbor at least subconscious racial bias, and that due to our racist past as a nation, racial inequality has been locked into American institutions. Students are required to research and write a paper on a professor-approved topic that is at the intersection of race and law.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-196 SEMNR 914
Regulatory & Legislative Practice Seminar
Reg & Leg Prac Sem (2)
This seminar examines the unique aspects of federal and state regulatory and legislative practice. The course will focus on those areas of federal and state legal practice in which criminal and administrative law, regulatory regimes, (including lobbying regulations, ethics-in-government rules and criminal code provisions restricting gifts to officials), litigation and exercise of governmental powers and the public relations and media aspects of these areas intersect to create special problems and challenges for attorneys in the government and private sectors. The context in which these cases are managed will also involve an examination of the principles of governmental separation of powers set out in the federal and state Constitutions, how they work in practice and the role they play in developing legal strategies for representing clients before the government. Some of the “case studies” presented during the course will involve actual cases from federal and state practice and will be used to explicate the above principles.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-197 SEMNR 915
Tax Policy Seminar
Tax Policy Sem (2)
This seminar examines fundamental issues in tax policy, focusing on trends and current legislative proposals.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-198 VISIT 901
Visiting Away Semester
Visit Away Sem (1-17)
Student approved by Dickinson Law to visit away for the semester. Course work successfully completed will transfer as progress toward the Dickinson Law degree.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

Penn State Law 

COURSE ADDS

45-06-199 AULWR 997
Special Topics
Adv Leg Writg Sem (2-3)
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-200 COCR 904
Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot Court Team
VIS Intl Moot Team (1)
This course will involve preparation for and participation in the Vis Moot Court competition, including participation in the completion and submission of two team briefs, preparation and participation in an inter- and intra-school pre-moot competition, and preparation and travel to Vienna to participation in the Vis Moot Court competition.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-201 IHCLI 997
Special Topics
Special Topics (1-12)
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-202 LLM 912
U.S. Common Law Methods for Criminal Law
Com Lw Mth Crim Lw (3)
This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of U.S. legal analysis and helps them develop essential skills for success in case analysis courses. The course is structured as a companion course to Criminal Law, introducing students to the use of case briefs, exam-writing skills, and outlines while helping students develop faster reading speeds and techniques for focusing their reading and listening. The course uses hypotheticals and client problems to build students’ legal analysis skills gradually over the course of the semester. Students will enroll concurrently in Criminal Law.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-203 LLM 913
U.S. Common Law Analysis and Skills
Com Lw Analys Skls (3)
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts of U.S. common law analysis and methods. The course will explore the function of case law within a common law system. Students will consider how judicial opinions interact with other sources of law, and the methods common law lawyers use to analyze cases. Students will apply this knowledge to legal problems and build English language skills for clear legal communication.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-204 LLM 914
U.S. Common Law Methods for Constitutional Law
Com Lw Mth Con Lw (3)
The course is structured as a companion course to Constitutional law, introducing students to the use of case briefs, exam-writing skills, and outlines while helping students develop faster reading speeds and techniques for focusing their reading and listening. Throughout the course students will also improve their legal English vocabulary. The course uses hypotheticals and current constitutional law cases to build students’ legal analysis skills gradually over the course of the semester. Students will enroll concurrently in Constitutional Law.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-205 LLM 915
U.S. Common Law Methods for Criminal Procedure
Com Lw Mth Crm Pro (3)
This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of U.S. legal analysis and helps them develop essential skills for success in case analysis courses. The course is structured as a companion course to Criminal Procedure, introducing students to the use of case briefs, exam-writing skills, and outlines while helping students develop faster reading speeds and techniques for focusing their reading and listening. The course uses hypotheticals and client problems to build students legal analysis skills gradually over the course of the semester. Students will enroll concurrently in Criminal Procedure.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-206 TRTM 900
AAJ Trial Team
AAJ Trial Team (2)
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-207 TRTM 901
Gourley Trial Competition Team
Gourley Trial Team (2)
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-208 TRTM 902
BLSA Mock Trial Team
BLSA Mock Trial Tm (2)
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-209 COCR 900
Appellate Moot Court
APPELLATE MT CT BD (1)
Name change from Moot Court Board to Appellate Moot Court Board
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-210 COCR 912
Member Penn State Law Review
Member PSU Lw Rev (2)
Change abbreviated title from PSU Lw Rev to Member PSU Lw Rev
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-06-211 EXPR 950L
Trial Advocacy
Advocacy
Course number change from 950 to 950L
Title change from Advocacy to Trial Advocacy
Prerequisite change to add: Course is available to J.D. students only.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-212 EXPR 983
Representing the Entrepreneur
Rep Entrepreneur (3)
Prerequisite change to add: OR Concurrent
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-213 EXTRN 901
Externship Placement — International Justice Program
INTL JUSTICE PROG (10)
Prerequisite change to CRMLW 971OR ULWR 968; 986 OR ULWR
941 OR Equivalent course approved by the program supervisor. AND Faculty approval required.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-214 EXTRN 903
Washington D.C. Externship
D.C. Externship (10)
Prerequisite change to add: PRORP 934 AND Faculty approval required.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-214A EXTRN 904
Externships Everywhere
Extern Everywhere (1-12)
PREREQUISITES: PRORP 934 , PRORP 934 and Faculty Approval Required
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-215 HLTH 960
Food and Drug Regulation
Food and Drug Reg (3)
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: from HLTH to HLTLW
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-216 IHEAC 900
Entrepreneur Assistance Clinic
ENTPRNEUR ASST CLN (4)
Prerequisite change to: EXPR 983 OR BUSLW 958 AND BUSLW 963 may be taken concurrently AND Faculty approval required.
Recommended Preparations add: BUSLW 955 AND TAXLW 949 AND IPLAW 952
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-217 IHASC 900
Arts, Sports and Entertainment Law Clinic
ARTS SPORTS CLINIC (1-2)
Prerequisite change to: ULWR 927 , AND IPLAW 960 OR Either may be taken concurrently
AND Faculty approval required
PROPOSED START: FA2017

45-006-218 IPLAW 982
Licensing of Intellectual Property
LICENSING OF IP (3)
Prerequisite change to: IPLAW 960; OR IPLAW 985 OR IPLAW 980 OR receive specific permission of the faculty member after demonstrating special qualifications for the subject matter.
PROPOSED START: FA2017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-06-219 ULWR 964
Intensive Legal Writing & Drafting
INT LEG WRITE/DRFT (2)
This course develops students’ skills in common legal writing formats other than memos and briefs. Not intended as a remedial course, this course rather provides an opportunity for students to sharpen legal writing skills with an emphasis on clarity and precision of expression. Weekly writing assignments include a few fully drafted documents (e.g., a short will, a short contract, a statute), as well as letters, short pleadings, jury instructions, and other short pieces. Students will concentrate on re-writing and editing their work.
APPROVED START: FA2017
NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: from ULWR to AULWR
PROPOSED START: FA2017

OLD
45-06-219A ULWR 941
The United Nations and International Law Seminar
U.N./INTL LAW SEM (2)
The inexorable paces of globalization and interdependence have made the need for international cooperation more acute. The role of the United Nations in these processes has become both more relevant and controversial. Notwithstanding the critical voices that have questioned the relevance or usefulness of the world body from certain national perspectives and points of view, the United Nations, through its activities and programmes, continues to have a considerable impact on countries and societies around the world, in such areas as conflict prevention and resolution, control of population displacements, humanitarian action, and social and economic development. These considerations, among others, make a study of the United Nations and International law more important today than it has ever been
APPROVED START: FA2017
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The inexorable paces of globalization and interdependence over the past few decades have made the need for international cooperation among states more acute. The role of the United Nations, the premier global intergovernmental organization, in these processes has become more relevant, as has that of international law in general. Notwithstanding the critical voices that have sometimes questioned the relevance or usefulness of the world body, and international law itself, on the basis of certain perspectives and points of view, the United Nations and its Specialized Agencies continue to have a considerable impact around the world, in such areas as the use of force, conflict prevention and resolution, refugees, human population displacement and forced migrations, humanitarian action, human rights, international trade, and economic and social development. These considerations, among others, make the study of the United Nations and international law more important today than it has ever been.
PROPOSED START: FA2017