Appendix B

Graduate

42-01-121 Change. Add Integrated B.A./M.A. in American Studies; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2014

American Studies (AMSTD)

Program Home Page

SIMON J. BRONNER, Program Coordinator
Penn State Harrisburg
777 W. Harrisburg Pike
Middletown, PA 17057-4898
Phone: 717-948-6201
email: amstd@psu.edu

Degrees Conferred:

M.A., Ph.D.
Integrated B.A./M.A.

The M.A. Degree Program

The M.A. degree program, offered at Penn State Harrisburg, emphasizes the study of American society and culture. It serves students who want to investigate the American experience and apply their studies in a variety of professions, including education, government, communications, and museums. It is the distinguishing characteristic of the program that the large majority of its course offerings are taught by faculty trained in the discipline of American Studies and these courses have the AM ST prefix for “American Studies.” The program offers a number of concentrations including folklore, cultural history (politics, popular culture, media studies), international American Studies, material and visual culture (art, architecture, craft, landscape, food, clothing, medicine), public heritage (museums, historic preservation, archiving, cultural resource management), race and ethnicity, and regional studies.

The campus is located in a rich cultural region, which includes Amish Farmlands, Gettysburg, Hershey, Steelton, Ephrata, Carlisle, York, and Harrisburg. Additionally, proximity to the major cities of Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and New York offer a host of research options for students. Strong ties with local educational and cultural institutions, including the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, State Museum of Pennsylvania, Landis Valley Museum, Hershey Museum, National Civil War Museum, and the Dauphin County Historical Society, Cumberland County Historical Society, and other public heritage resources provide excellent learning opportunities for students.

The M.A. degree can be earned by full- or part-time study. Most 500-level courses are offered in the evening as the program strives to meet students’ needs.

Admission Requirements

The M.A. degree program in American Studies accepts students from a wide array of disciplines–particularly art, history, English, sociology, and anthropology–but recommends educational preparation related to the interdisciplinary study of American culture. An applicant must hold either (1) a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or (2) a tertiary (postsecondary) degree that is deemed comparable to a four-year bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. This degree must be from an officially recognized degree-granting institution in the country in which it operates. All applicants must submit: a completed Graduate School online application form with the application fee; two official transcripts of all colleges and universities attended (minimum of 2.75 junior/senior grade-point average on a 4.00 scale); two letters of recommendation from individuals who can attest to the student’s ability to handle graduate study; a statement of intent (approximately 500 to 1,000 words outlining their preparation for study, proposed fields of study, and career goals); and a sample of written work (seminar paper or equivalent research paper) as evidence of their American research and writing skills.

Students applying for scholarships and assistantships are requested to submit general examination scores of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken within five years previous to the date of application. The GRE is recommended, but not required, for admission.

The language of instruction at Penn State is English. All international applicants must take and submit scores for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International Language Testing System), with the exceptions noted below. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL is 550 for the paper-based test, or a total score of 80 with a 19 on the speaking section for the Internet-based test (iBT). Applicants with iBT speaking scores between 15 and 18 may be considered for provisional admission, which requires completion of specified remedial English courses ESL 114G (American Oral English for Academic Purposes) and/or ESL 116G (ESL/Composition for Academic Disciplines) and attainment of a grade of B or higher. The minimum acceptable composite score for the IELTS is 6.5.

International applicants are exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement who have received a baccalaureate or a graduate degree from a college/university/institution in any of the following: Australia, Belize, British Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), England, Guyana, Republic of Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States, and Wales.

Degree Requirements

The student is required to take a minimum of 30 credits (non-thesis)-33 (thesis) in American Studies, including at least 18 credits in the 500 series; AM ST 500, 591, and AM ST 580 or 600 are required. AM ST 500 should be taken within the first two semesters of study; AM ST 591 should be taken in the last two semesters of study. Usually in the last semester of study, students are required to complete their program with a major paper by taking AM ST 580 (Project) or thesis, in which case AM ST 600 is taken. The choice of AM ST 580 to fulfill graduation requirements is for an original scholarly master’s paper or project. One to 6 credits in AM ST 580 can be earned; the typical number of credits for the culminating project is 3. The choice of AM ST 600 is for a thesis and is taken for 6 credits. The thesis must follow the guidelines established by the Thesis Office of the Graduate School (see http://www.gradsch.psu.edu/current/thesis.html).

Advanced undergraduate courses (400-level) that have not counted toward a student’s undergraduate degree may be considered for transfer into the graduate student’s requirement of 30 credits of American Studies with permission of the program and approval of the Graduate School. At least 20 of the 30 credits must be earned at the Harrisburg location where the program is offered. Courses not having an American Studies designation but which are relevant to American Studies may be considered for inclusion in the student’s requirement of 30 credits of American Studies with permission of the program.

Integrated B.A./M.A. in American Studies

The American Studies Program offers an integrated B.A./M.A. program that is designed to allow academically superior baccalaureate students enrolled in the American Studies major to obtain both the B.A. and the M.A. degrees in American Studies within five years of study. The first two years of undergraduate coursework typically include the University General Education requirements and lower-level courses. In the third year, students typically take upper-division coursework in American Studies and define areas of interest. The fourth year involves graduate-level American Studies coursework including required courses in American Studies Theory and Methods (AM ST 500). The fifth and final year of the program typically consists of graduate coursework in American Studies including Seminar (AM ST 591) and identification of a research project that will culminate in the completion of a M.A. project (AM ST 580) or thesis (AM ST 600).

By encouraging greater depth and focus in the course of study beginning in the third undergraduate year, this program will help the student more clearly define his/her area of interest and expertise in the broad field of American Studies. As a result, long-range academic planning for exceptional students pursuing doctoral degrees or other professional goals after leaving Penn State will be greatly enhanced. For most students, the total time required to reach completion of the higher degree will be shortened by about a year. The student will have earlier contact with the rigors of graduate study and with graduate faculty. The resources of the Graduate School are accessible to students accepted into the IUG program. Students in their third and fourth year of study with IUG status benefit from their association with graduate students whose level of work parallel their own.

For the IUG American Studies B.A./M.A. degree, a minimum of 123 credits are required for the B.A. and a minimum of 30–33 credits for the M.A. (30 for non-thesis; 33 for thesis). Twelve credits at the 400 level or higher, in consultation with the adviser, can apply to both the B.A. and M.A. degrees; at least 6 of these 12 credits must be at the 500 level.

If for any reason a student admitted to the B.A./M.A. program is unable to complete the requirement for the Master of Arts degree program in American Studies, the student will be permitted to receive the B.A. degree assuming all degree requirements have been satisfactorily completed.

Admission Requirements

The number of openings in the integrated B.A./M.A. program is limited. Admission will be selective based on specific criteria and the unqualified recommendation of faculty. Applicants to the integrated program:

  1. Must be enrolled in the American Studies B.A. program and meet the admission requirements of the American Studies M.A. program.
  2. Must apply and be admitted to the Graduate School.
  3. Shall be admitted no earlier than the beginning of the third semester of undergraduate study at Penn State (regardless of transfer or AP credits accumulated prior to enrollment) and no later than the end of the second week of the semester preceding the semester of expected conferral of the undergraduate degree, as specified in the proposed IUG plan of study.
  4. Must have completed at least one 400-level American Studies course (AM ST prefix) with a grade of A.
  5. Must submit transcript(s) of previous undergraduate work, recommendations from two faculty members, writing sample, and statement of goals.
  6. Must have an overall GPA at or above 3.3 (on a 4.0 scale) in undergraduate coursework and a GPA at or above 3.5 in all coursework completed for the American Studies major.
  7. Must present a plan of study approved by the student’s adviser in the application process.

Course Load

As many as 12 of the credits required for the master’s degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The courses to be double counted are:

AM ST 491W (two seminars on different topics)—6 credits during the student’s fourth (senior) year
AM ST 500 –3 credits during the student’s fourth (senior) year
AM ST 591—3 credits during the student’s fifth year

With the approval of the student’s adviser, students may take American Studies courses from the 100 to 400 levels at Penn State campuses other than Harrisburg, but 500-level courses must be taken at the Harrisburg campus.

Sample Sequence of Coursework

A typical sequence of coursework for the integrated program would appear as follows (AM ST 491W, AM ST 500, and AM ST 591 are applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs):

YEAR FALL SPRING  
3rd (Junior) AM ST 100 3 AM ST supporting course 3
AM ST supporting course 3 400-level AM ST course 3
BA Requirement: Other Cultures 3 400-level AM ST course 3
BA Requirement: Knowledge Domain 3 Elective 3
Elective 3 Elective 3
Total 15 Total 15
4th (Senior) AM ST 491W* 3 AM ST 491W* 3
400-level AM ST course 3 400 level AM ST course 3
400-level AM ST supporting course 3 AM ST 500* 3
Elective 3 500 level AM ST course 3
Elective 3 Elective 3
Total 15 Total 15
5th (Graduate) 500-level AM ST course 3 500-level AM ST course 3
500-level AM ST course 3 AM ST 580 or AM ST 600 3-6
500-level AM ST course 3 AM ST 591* 3
Total 9 Total 9-12

*Satisfies requirements for both the undergraduate and graduate program for a total of 12 credits

As stated in the Graduate Bulletin, a minimum grade-point average of 3.00 for work done at the University is required for graduation and to maintain good academic standing. See http://bulletins.psu.edu/bulletins/whitebook/degree_requirements.cfm?section=masters.

The Ph.D. Program

The Doctor of Philosophy Program in American Studies represents the study of the United States as an academic field with its own developed theories, methods, and applications. Taking advantage of its location in a capital region with internationally known heritage sites and American Studies resources such as the Gettysburg Battlefield, Three-Mile Island, Hershey, Steelton, Anthracite Coal Region, and Amish Country, it emphasizes critical cultural inquiry and the application of American Studies to public heritage, public policy, and cultural resource management–including governmental work, museums, cultural agencies, education, archives and records management, public policy, and communications. A foundation for this application is an understanding of the American experience developed within the intellectual legacy of American Studies.

Graduates of the program are typically oriented toward public practice as well as scholarship in American Studies–integrating perspectives on United States history, culture, and society. Students have opportunities for internships and field experiences outside the classroom. In addition to preparation for academic teaching and writing, the program is distinctively concerned among other doctoral departments of American Studies with the production of public scholars and leadership careers outside of academe. The program strives to cover America broadly in its national and international contexts, work with local resources and institutions, and to develop a focus on cultural expression and identity, including areas of material and visual culture; folk and popular culture; race, ethnicity, and gender; and literature, performance, and media.

The program requires enrollment as a full-time student for at least two consecutive semesters–9 credits per semester (summer sessions not included). A doctoral student is required to complete the program, including defense and acceptance of the doctoral dissertation, within eight years after admission to candidacy.

Admission Requirements

Applicants for the Doctor of Philosophy in American Studies must hold a master’s degree in American Studies, or a related field emphasizing American cultural scholarship and public heritage work such as history, English, sociology, political science, folklore, cultural studies, performance studies, ethnic studies, gender studies, communications, art history, museum and library studies, education, and cultural resource management.

Students are required to submit the following:

  • a completed Graduate School online application with the application fee;
  • two transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course work;
  • scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE);
  • three letters of reference attesting to both academic and professional capabilities. (At least two of these letters should be from academic sources, such as professors or academic advisers);
  • a letter of 500 to 1000 words outlining significant scholarly and applied experience, career goals, commitment to American Studies as a field, and academic objectives;
  • a recent personal curriculum vitae;
  • a paper from a graduate course taken previously or publication demonstrating research and compositional skills.

Admission is highly competitive and the best-qualified students will be admitted subject to space availability and compatibility of the student with the program’s research mission. Successful applicants with an M.A. typically have a GPA of 3.5 or above (on a 4.0 scale) in their graduate work.

International Students

International applicants must hold the equivalent of an American master’s degree. They must submit official or attested university records, with certified translations if the records are not in English. Notarized copies are not sufficient.

The language of instruction at Penn State is English. All international applicants must take and submit scores for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International Language Testing System), with the exceptions noted below. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL is 500 for the paper-based test, or a total score of 80 with a 19 on the speaking section for the Internet-based test (iBT). Applicants with iBT speaking scores between 15 and 18 may be considered for provisional admission, which requires completion of specified remedial English courses ESL 114G (American Oral English for Academic Purposes) and/or ESL 116G (ESL/Composition for Academic Disciplines) and attainment of a grade of B or higher. The minimum acceptable composite score for the IELTS is 6.5.

International applicants are exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement who have received a baccalaureate or a graduate degree from a college/university/institution in any of the following: Australia, Belize, British Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), England, Guyana, Republic of Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States, and Wales.

Residency

Over some twelve-month period during the interval between admission to the Ph.D. program and completion of the Ph.D. program, the candidate must spend at least two semesters (summer sessions are not included) as a registered full-time student (9 credits per semester) engaged in academic work at Penn State Harrisburg.

The Curriculum

Students progress through the following phases and take courses designated by their doctoral committee as part of their study for the Ph.D.

Candidacy

In this initial phase, the student must (1) make up any deficiencies in graduate courses in American Studies noted in the letter of acceptance, and (2) complete with a grade of B or better the following courses–AM ST 500 (Theory and Method), two sections of AM ST 502 (Problems in American Studies) on different topics, AM ST 591 (Seminar), and (3) pass a candidacy examination. Admitted students who have met all course prerequisites begin the core courses with AM ST 500 (Theory and Method). Students who have already taken AM ST 500 within three years of admission may begin their program of study with AM ST 502 (Problems in American Studies).

The candidacy examination is administered by a special committee appointed by the director of the doctoral program. After the exam is passed, a student is advanced to doctoral candidacy. General guidance of a doctoral candidate is the responsibility of a doctoral committee consisting of four or more active members of the Graduate Faculty, which includes at least two faculty members in the major field of American Studies. The dissertation adviser must be a member of the doctoral committee. The dissertation adviser usually serves as chair, but this is not required. If the candidate is also pursuing a dual-title field of study, a co-chair representing the dual-title field must be appointed. In most cases, the same individual (e.g., dissertation adviser) is a member of the Graduate Faculty in both the major and dual-title fields, and in such cases may serve as sole chair.

At least one regular member of the doctoral committee must represent a field outside the candidate’s major field of study in order to provide a broader range of disciplinary perspectives and expertise. This committee member is referred to as the “Outside Field Member.” In cases where the candidate is also pursuing a dual-title field of study, the dual-title representative to the committee may serve as the Outside Field Member.

Additionally, in order to avoid potential conflicts of interest, the primary appointment of at least one regular member of the doctoral committee must be in an administrative unit that is outside the unit in which the dissertation adviser’s primary appointment is held (i.e., the adviser’s administrative home; in the case of tenure-line faculty, this is the individual’s tenure home). This committee member is referred to as the “Outside Unit Member.” In the case of co-advisers, the Outside Unit Member must be from outside the administrative home(s) of both co-advisers. In some cases, an individual may have a primary appointment outside the administrative home of the student’s dissertation adviser and also represent a field outside the student’s major field of study; in such cases, the same individual may serve as both the Outside Field Member and the Outside Unit Member.

If the candidate has a minor, that field must be represented on the committee by a “Minor Field Member.” The doctoral committee is appointed by the Graduate School dean through the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services, upon recommendation of the head of the major program, soon after the student is admitted to candidacy. The dean may on occasion appoint one or more members of the committee in addition to those recommended by the head of the program.

A person who is not a member of the Graduate Faculty (and may not be affiliated with Penn State) who is otherwise qualified and has particular expertise in the candidate’s research area may be added as a “Special Member,” upon recommendation by the head of the program and approval of the dean of the Graduate School (via the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services). A Special Member is expected to participate fully in the functions of the doctoral committee. If the Special Member is asked only to read and approve the doctoral dissertation, that person is designated a Special Signatory. Occasionally, Special Signatories may be drawn from within the Penn State faculty in particular situations.

Graduate Faculty officially appointed by the Graduate School to a doctoral committee who then leave Penn State may maintain that committee appointment for up to one year if the student’s graduate program and the Graduate School dean, through the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services, approve the request for this exception. A retired or emeritus faculty member may serve as a doctoral committee chair if, and only if, he/she was officially appointed and began chairing the committee prior to retirement and has the continuing approval of the program head and the Graduate School dean, through the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services. Otherwise, the committee must be revised to either remove the faculty member from the committee or change the individual’s appointment to a Special Member.

The membership of doctoral committees should be periodically reviewed by the head of the program to ensure that all members continue to qualify for service on the committee in their designated roles. For example, if type of appointments, employment at the University, etc., have changed since initial appointment to the committee, changes to the committee membership may be necessary. If changes are warranted, they should be made as soon as possible to prevent future problems that may delay academic progress for the student (e.g., ability to conduct the comprehensive or final examinations).

The graduate program head must also periodically review the Graduate Faculty listing for his/her program on both the Graduate School’s website and the graduate program’s listing in the Graduate Bulletin to ensure that those listings are accurate.

The chair or at least one co-chair must be a member of the graduate faculty of the specific doctoral program in which the candidate is enrolled. A retired or emeritus faculty member may chair a doctoral committee if he/she was officially appointed and began chairing the committee prior to retirement and has the continuing approval of the head of the graduate program. The primary duties of the chair are to: (1) maintain the academic standards of the doctoral program and the Graduate School and assure that all procedures are carried out fairly, (2) ensure that the comprehensive and final examinations are conducted in a timely fashion, (3) arrange and conduct all meetings, and (4) ensure that requirements set forth by the committee are implemented in the final version of the dissertation.

The doctoral committee is responsible for approving the broad outline of the student’s program and should review the program as soon as possible after the student’s admission to candidacy. Moreover, continuing communication among the student, the committee chair, the research supervisor, and the members of the committee is strongly recommended, to preclude misunderstandings and to develop a collegial relation between the candidate and the committee.

The Comprehensive Examination

Students must be registered as a full-time or part-time degree student for the semester (excluding summer session) in which the comprehensive examination is taken. The timing of the examination is after coursework in subfields is completed. The written examination consists of three parts and is administered by the student’s doctoral committee. One is in the area of Theory and Method and an additional two subfields of study from a list of five areas covered in the program. The five subfields of specialization are:

  1. Public Heritage, Cultural Resource Management, and Museum Studies;
  2. Folk and Popular Culture (material and visual culture, literature and media, language, performance, media, and music);
  3. Interdisciplinary History and Politics (history of ideas, philosophy, and politics; biography and oral history; everyday life and socioeconomic studies; government, public policy, and diplomacy);
  4. Society and Ethnography (race, ethnicity, class, gender, age; religion and belief; comparative culture and transnationalism);
  5. Regional, Environmental, Urban, and Local Studies.

Additional subfields of study within American Studies may be selected with the approval of the student’s doctoral committee. An oral defense of the comprehensive examination is scheduled after the written examination, at which time it is customary for the candidate to present the dissertation proposal.

Although the exact number of courses required in each subfield may vary among students, typically four per subfield are required. Doctoral committees meet with students at least once each academic year. Written and oral comprehensive examinations in the three areas are given at the end of the study period.

The Dissertation

Under guidance from the doctoral committee, the candidate prepares a detailed research proposal that serves as the basis for the written dissertation covering an aspect of American Studies. The dissertation should represent a significant contribution to knowledge, show familiarity with the intellectual heritage of American Studies, be presented in a scholarly manner, reveal an ability on the part of the candidate to do independent research of high quality, and indicate considerable experience in using a variety of research techniques and forms of primary evidence. The contents and conclusions of the dissertation must be defended at the time of the final oral examination. Once the research proposal is approved, the student can enroll in AM ST 600 (Thesis in American Studies) for on-campus work or AM ST 610 (Thesis Research Off-Campus). The writing and defense of this original contribution to the theory and practice of American Studies is the capstone to the Ph.D. program. A student must be registered continuously for each Fall and Spring semester, beginning with the first semester after the comprehensive examination requirement and residency requirement have been met, until the dissertation is accepted and approved by the dissertation committee. To maintain continuous registration, candidates may register for noncredit AM ST 601 (Ph.D. Dissertation Full-Time) or 611 (Ph.D. Dissertation Part-Time), with payment of the special dissertation preparation fee; students who want to combine course work with dissertation preparation must register for AM ST 600 or 611 (not 601 which is for full-time dissertation preparation) plus course registration at the regular per-credit fee. For more information on academic procedures, see http://bulletins.psu.edu/bulletins/whitebook/academic_procedures.cfm

The final examination of the doctoral candidate is an oral examination (defense) administered and evaluated by the entire doctoral committee. This oral defense is open to the public and related in large part to the dissertation, but it may cover the candidate’s whole program of study. The Committee may restrict part of the defense to its members and the candidate. The candidate must be registered as a full-time or part-time degree student for the semester in which the oral defense is held.

Grade-Point Average and Time Limit

A minimum grade-point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) for work done in the American Studies doctoral program at the University is required for doctoral candidacy, for admission to the comprehensive examination, the final oral examination, and for graduation.

A doctoral student is required to complete the program, including acceptance of the doctoral dissertation, within eight years from the date of successful completion of the candidacy examination. Extensions may be granted by the Director of Graduate Enrollment Services in appropriate circumstances.

Financial Aid

A limited number of scholarships, loans, and grants are available from the University. In many cases, employers have a tuition-reimbursement plan paying for partial or full tuition. To find available options from the University, contact the Financial Aid Office at 717-948-6307. For more information, see php.scripts.psu.edu/dept/iit/hbg/academics/gradaid.php

Graduate School Funding Programs

Full-time incoming doctoral students starting in the fall semester with a record of scholarly excellence may qualify for a University Graduate Fellowship, Bunton-Waller Graduate Scholar Awards, and other programs. Interested students should contact the program chair, who is responsible for nominating students. For more information, see www.gradsch.psu.edu/prospective/funding/programs.html

Capital College Funding Programs

Full-time incoming graduate students may qualify for a Capital College Assistantship and other programs. Students must be nominated for an assistantship by the program chair. For more information, see php.scripts.psu.edu/dept/iit/hbg/academics/gradaid.php

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 699 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

42-01-122 Change. Add Integrated B.A. in Anthropology and B.A. in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies/M.A. in Anthropology.

42-01-123 Change. Add Integrated B.S. in Archaeological Science and B.A. in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies /M.A. in Anthropology.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2014

Anthropology (ANTH)

Program Home Page

GEORGE R. MILNER, Head
Department of Anthropology
409 Carpenter Building
814-865-2509
814-863-1474 (fax)
anthropology@psu.edu

Degrees Conferred:

Ph.D., M.A.
Integrated B.A. in Anthropology/B.A. in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies and M.A. in Anthropology
Integrated B.S. in Archaeological Science/B.A. in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies and M.A. in Anthropology

The master’s program is designed to train students in general anthropology. The doctoral program is structured to train students in the following areas of specialization: ethnology (with subspecialization in social anthropology, demographic anthropology, cultural evolution, and ecology); archaeology (with subspecialization in cultural ecology, analytical approaches, technological methods, and culture areas); biological anthropology (with subspecialization in human adaptability, genetics, biological demography, human evolution, and the behavioral biology of human and non-human primates).

Admission Requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), or from a comparable substitute examination accepted by a graduate program and authorized by the dean of the Graduate School, are required for admission. At the discretion of a graduate program, a student may be admitted provisionally for graduate study in a program without these scores. Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Undergraduate preparation must include 12 credits in anthropology and archaeology or their equivalent. A student with an excellent record but who does not meet these requirements may be admitted provided course deficiencies are made up without graduate credit. Students with a 3.00 or higher junior/senior average (on a 4.00 scale) and with appropriate course backgrounds who have research interests directly related to the special anthropological competencies within the department will be considered for admission. The best-qualified applicants will be accepted up to the number of spaces that are available for new students. Exceptions to the minimum 3.00 grade-point average may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests.

Master’s Degree Requirements

M.A. candidates may submit either a thesis or a term paper. If the latter is chosen, 6 credits in 500-level courses in the major field must be scheduled in lieu of thesis credits. The M.A. degree may be bypassed by exceptional candidates for the Ph.D. degree.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

For the Ph.D. degree, students must conduct significant original research that demonstrates the student’s mastery of the field. The Ph.D. requirements include successful completion of coursework as stipulated by the department and doctoral committee, passing the candidacy and comprehensive exams, preparing a proposal prior to initiating doctoral-level research, and writing and defending the subsequent dissertation. A doctoral committee minimally consists of three faculty from the department and one external member, all part of the Graduate Faculty. The committee administers the comprehensive exam and evaluates the doctoral proposal, subsequent dissertation, and its defense. At least one regular member of the doctoral committee must represent a field outside the candidate’s major field of study in order to provide a broader range of disciplinary perspectives and expertise. This committee member is referred to as the ‘Outside Field Member.’ In cases where the candidate is also pursuing a dual-title field of study, the dual-title representative to the committee may serve as the Outside Field Member. In order to avoid potential conflicts of interest, the primary appointment of at least one regular member of the doctoral committee must be in an administrative unit that is outside the unit in which the dissertation adviser’s primary appointment is held (i.e., the adviser’s administrative home; in the case of tenure-line faculty, this is the individual’s tenure home). This committee member is referred to as the ‘Outside Unit Member.’ In the case of co-advisers, the Outside Unit Member must be from outside the administrative home(s) of both co-advisers.

The communication and foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. degree includes a reading knowledge of a foreign language plus an option from among additional foreign languages, field languages, linguistics, or statistics.

Integrated B.S. in Archaeological Science and B.A. in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies/M.A. in Anthropology; B.A./M.A in Anthropology Degree Requirements

The Department of Anthropology offers integrated undergraduate-graduate (IUG) degree programs (B.A./B.A./M.A. or B.A./B.S./M.A.) designed to allow academically superior students to obtain either a B.A. degree in Anthropology or a B.S. degree in Archaeological Science, a B.A. degree in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies (CAMS), and an M.A. degree in Anthropology in five years of study. To complete the program in five years, students interested in either of the IUG programs in Anthropology must apply for admission to the Graduate School and the IUG program by the end of their junior year.

During the first three years, the student will follow course scheduling for the B.A. degree in CAMS and either the B.A. degree in Anthropology or the B.S. degree in Archaeological Science (see the Undergraduate Bulletin). Students who intend to enter the IUG program are encouraged to take upper level classes during their first three years whenever appropriate. By the end of the junior year, students normally apply for admission to both the IUG program and to the Graduate School. Acceptance decisions will be made prior to the beginning of the senior year and M.A. advisors will be appointed for successful applicants. During the senior year, IUG students follow the scheduling of the selected options for their B.A. or B.S. majors, with an emphasis on completing 500-level course work as appropriate. During the senior year, IUG students will start work on their thesis or scholarly paper research to meet the M.A. thesis or scholarly paper requirements. During the fifth year, IUG students take courses fulfilling the M.A. degree requirements and complete their M.A. theses.

Admission Requirements

Students who wish to complete the Integrated Undergraduate and Graduate Program in Anthropology should apply for admission to both the Graduate School and the IUG Anthropology Program. Students shall be admitted to an IUG program no earlier than the beginning of the third semester of undergraduate study at Penn State (regardless of transfer or AP credits accumulated prior to enrollment) and no later than the end of the second week of the semester preceding the semester of expected conferral of the undergraduate degree, as specified in the proposed IUG plan of study. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the joint Anthropology-CAMS admission committee. Criteria for admission include a minimum overall GPA of 3.4 in their majors, strong recommendation letters from faculty, and an excellent proposal for a research project with a specific adviser who has agreed to guide the student through to the completion of the M.A. thesis or scholarly paper.

Graduate Coursework

Requirements for the M.A. portion of the IUG Program include 30 credits in coursework and a written thesis or scholarly paper. Coursework includes:

  • ANTH 493, 588, plus 6 credits in ANTH 545 and 2 credits in ANTH 521
  • 4 required credits in ANTH 494 or CAMS 494
  • 6 required credits in ANTH 594, ANTH 596, ANTH 599, CAMS 592, CAMS 593, or CAMS 596

6 required credits of Thesis Research, ANTH 600 (thesis option), or 6 additional credits of coursework (paper option).

Dual-Title Ph.D. in Anthropology and Bioethics

Degree Requirements

Anthropology Ph.D. students may pursue additional training in bioethics through the dual-title Ph.D. program in Bioethics. To qualify for the dual-title degree, students must satisfy the requirements of the Anthropology Ph.D. program. In addition, they must satisfy the requirements described below, as established by the Bioethics program committee. Within this framework, final course selection is determined by the student, their Anthropology advisor and their Bioethics program advisor.

Additional Course Work
The dual-title Ph.D. in Anthropology and Bioethics requires eighteen credits of course work, as follows:

  • Seven required credits (BIOET 501, BIOET 502, and BIOET 590), plus at least three additional BIOET credits at the 500 level.
  • Eight additional credits from a list of approved electives at the 400 and 500 level, with at least two credits at the 500 level. The list of elective courses will be maintained by the Director of the Bioethics Graduate Program in consultation with the Bioethics Program Committee.

Candidacy
In order to be admitted to doctoral candidacy in the dual-title degree program, students must meet the Ph.D. candidacy requirements specified by Anthropology. During the candidacy process, the student will also be assessed for candidacy to the Bioethics program, and at least one member of the candidacy committee must come from the Bioethics program.

Comprehensive Exam
At least one member of the doctoral committee will be a faculty member affiliated with the Bioethics Program. The faculty member (or members) affiliated with the Bioethics Program will be responsible for administering a portion of the comprehensive exam that will require the student to demonstrate an understanding of various theoretical and methodological approaches to bioethics, and an ability to apply them to issues and problems (including, where appropriate, practical problems) in their primary field.

Dissertation and dissertation defense
A dissertation on a bioethics-related topic or with a substantial bioethics component is required of students in the dual-title Ph.D. program. The bioethics-related topic of the dissertation or the bioethics component will be approved by the student’s committee.

Student Aid

In addition to the fellowships, traineeships, graduate assistantships, and other forms of financial aid described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin, the following award typically has been available to post-comprehensive graduate students in this program:

HILL FELLOWSHIPS FOR STUDY IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Details available from Professor Nina G. Jablonski, Department of Anthropology, 409 Carpenter Building, University Park campus.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 699 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

42-01-124 Change. Add Dual-Title graduate degree in African American and Diaspora Studies.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2013

History (HIST)

Program Home Page

MICHAEL KULIKOWSKI, Head of the Department
DAVID ATWILL, Director of Graduate Studies
108 Weaver Building
814-865-1367

Degrees Conferred:

Ph.D., M.A.
Ph.D., M.A. Dual-Title Graduate Degree in History and Asian Studies
Ph.D., M.A. Dual-Title Graduate Degree in History and Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies
Ph.D., M.A. Dual-Title Graduate Degree in History and Women’s Studies
Ph.D., M.A. Dual-Title Graduate Degree in History and African American and Diaspora Studies
Integrated B.A./M.A.

Graduate instruction at the master’s and doctoral degree level is offered in the following areas: United States (19th and 20th century), Europe (Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern and Modern), Asia (Ancient, Late Imperial and 20th century), Latin America (Colonial and Modern). Only students focusing their course of study on the department’s four primary areas of strength (Latin America, Early Modern Global, 19th-century United States, and Late Imperial and Republican China) are admitted into the graduate program. Courses in all other areas are offered on a regular basis and encouraged as secondary areas of focus.

Admission Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate Council requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Applicants to the doctoral program must hold or be near completion of the master’s degree (or its equivalent); all others will be considered for admission to the master’s program, even if it is their ultimate intention to pursue a doctoral degree at Penn State.

Applicants must hold either (1) a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or (2) a tertiary (postsecondary) degree that is deemed comparable to a four-year bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. This degree must be from an officially recognized degree-granting institution in the country in which it operates.

To be considered for admission, applicants must submit a completed online Graduate School application and payment of the application fee. In addition, applicants must submit transcripts that show (1) substantial coursework in history, (2) a minimum GPA of 3.50 (on a 4.0 scale), (3) at least three semesters of college-level work in a foreign language (additional language training appropriate to the fields in which the applicant proposes to work may also be required for admission) and (4) where applicable, a minimum GPA of 3.50 for all graduate work previously undertaken. Each applicant must submit the scores of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken within five years previous to the date of application; the general examination scores are mandatory, the history examination is optional. Successful applicants typically have minimum scores of 160 (or 650 old scoring) on the verbal and quantitative sections, and 5.0 on the analytical writing section of the general examination.

The language of instruction at Penn State is English. All international applicants must take and submit scores for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System), with the exceptions noted below. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL is 550 for the paper-based test, or a total score of 100 with a 19 on the speaking section for the Internet-based test (iBT). Applicants with iBT speaking scores between 15 and 18 may be considered for provisional admission, which requires completion of specified remedial English courses ESL 114G (American Oral English for Academic Purposes) and/or ESL 116G (ESL/Composition for Academic Disciplines) and attainment of a grade of B or higher. The minimum acceptable composite score for the IELTS is 6.5.

International applicants are exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement who have received a baccalaureate or a graduate degree from a college/university/institution in any of the following: Australia, Belize, British Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), England, Guyana, Republic of Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States, and Wales.

The Department of History further requires all applicants to submit directly to the department a statement of intent outlining their proposed fields of study and career goals, as well as a sample of their written work (undergraduate history thesis, master’s thesis, seminar paper or equivalent research paper) as evidence of their historical research and writing skills. Three letters of recommendation are required; it is strongly preferred that at least two of them be from historians.

Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Bachelor/Master’s Degree Admission Requirements

In addition to all the admission requirements noted above (excepting the TOEFL), admission to the History IUG will be based upon students’ having:

  1. completed at least one 400-level history course in a primary area of interest (with a B grade or higher) and attained a minimum GPA of 3.5 in all courses.
  2. completed at least 60 credits (but no more than 100 credits).
  3. submitted a proposed program plan directly to the Department of History’s Director of Graduate Studies prior to the fall application deadline.

Admission will be based on application to and acceptance by the Graduate School and the Department of History (in consultation with the Department of History graduate admissions committee).

Master’s Degree Requirements

(1) Candidates for the M.A. degree must earn a minimum of 36 credits of coursework that can be counted towards a graduate degree, of which 12 credits will be in the student’s primary area and 6 credits each in two secondary areas. At least 30 credits must be at the 500 level, with no more than 6 credits of HIST 596. The only required course is HIST 500 – Theory, Method and the Practice of History. Coursework offered by outside departments may be scheduled as part of the student’s program with approval of the student’s academic committee and the Director of Graduate Studies. In some cases, students may be required to take additional credits in order to make up deficiencies in foreign language skills and/or undergraduate coursework.

(2) Reading proficiency in at least one foreign language must be demonstrated no later than the beginning of the second year of residence.

(3) Students are required to convene two separate, formal meetings with their advisers and master’s committees: Committee Formation Meeting and the Master’s oral examination. The convening of the student’s master’s committee must take place no later than the end of the first master’s year in the program. Every student should, in consultation with the permanent adviser, select at least two other members of the graduate faculty to serve on their master’s committee (for a minimum total of three faculty members). There must be faculty representation of each of the students’ two fields (selected from the department’s list of officially recognized fields). At this first meeting there should be a discussion and approval of the general program plan (seminars, courses and other requirements)

(4) Students must hold a Master’s oral examination. The examination consists of an oral defense of two research papers written while in the M.A. program in two department- defined fields of study (e.g., 19th century US and Modern Europe). The research papers must be of a length, substance, and quality that the committee deems to be of journal article-caliber. Students must submit the papers to the committee a minimum of two weeks prior to the oral examinations; the papers then must be orally presented and successfully defended before the committee in the M.A. examination.

Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Bachelor/Master’s Degree Requirements

Similar to the requirements for the Master’s degree noted above, the History IUG will be based upon the following :

  1. Students for the IUG M.A. degree must complete 123 credits for the B.A. degree (and meet all the B.A. History requirements) as well as the 36 credits for the M.A. degree. Of these credits, 12 credits may be “double counted” to both the credit totals (with at least 6 of the 12 credits at the 500 level).
  2. History IUG students should compose their committee and convene a committee meeting with all members present in the semester immediately following admission to the IUG (typically the sixth semester). At this first meeting there should be a discussion and approval of the general program plan (seminars, courses and other requirements)
  3. History IUG students must hold a Master’s oral examination. The examination consists of an oral defense of two research papers written while in the M.A. program in two department-defined fields of study (e.g., 19th century U.S. and Modern Europe). The research papers must be of a length, substance, and quality that the committee deems to be of journal article-caliber. Students must submit the papers to the committee a minimum of two weeks prior to the oral examinations; the papers then must be orally presented and successfully defended before the committee in the M.A. examination.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

(1) CREDIT & COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Candidates for the Ph.D. degree in History must complete at least 27 credits of graduate-level work at the 500-600 level (with no more than one HIST 596 per academic year), of which 12 credits will be in the student’s primary area and 6 credits each in two secondary areas. The only required course is HIST 500 – Theory, Method and the Practice of History. The remainder of a student’s doctoral program, including foreign language requirements, should be determined in consultation with the doctoral committee. Coursework offered by outside departments may be scheduled as part of the student’s program with approval of the student’s doctoral committee and the Director of Graduate Studies.

(2) FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIRMENTS: Reading proficiency in at least one foreign language must be demonstrated no later than the third semester of residency (not including summer semester).

(3) ENGLISH COMPETENCE: A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in History is required to demonstrate high-level competence in the use of the English language, including reading, writing, and speaking. At the end of the first year of enrollment all students who are non-native speakers of English must submit a portfolio which includes at least two pieces of written work from every seminar.  In addition, the Director of Graduate Studies will solicit evaluations from their advisor(s) and seminar instructors in order to identify any deficiencies.  Students with any identified deficiencies will be directed into appropriate remedial activities.  The deficiencies must be met before the candidacy examination.  Competence must be formally attested by the program before the doctoral comprehensive examination is scheduled. (International students should note that passage of the minimal TOEFL or IELTS requirement does not demonstrate the level of competence expected of a Ph.D. from Penn State.)

(4) COMMITTEE COMPOSITION: By the end of the first master’s year in the program, every student should, in consultation with the permanent adviser, select at least two other members of the graduate faculty to serve on their doctoral committee. Doctoral committees typically have no fewer than four members: four professors whose seminars a student has taken (or will take) together with a fifth additional outside member.

At least one regular member of the doctoral committee must represent a field outside the candidate’s major field of study in order to provide a broader range of disciplinary perspectives and expertise. This committee member is referred to as the “Outside Field Member.” In cases where the candidate is also pursuing a dual-title field of study, the dual-title representative to the committee may serve as the Outside Field Member.

Additionally, at least one regular member of the doctoral committee must have a primary appointment in an administrative unit outside the primary appointment administrative home of the student’s dissertation adviser (e.g., for tenure-line faculty, the tenure home) in order to avoid the potential for conflicts of interest. This committee member is referred to as the “Outside Unit Member.” In some cases, an individual may have a primary appointment outside the administrative home of the student’s dissertation adviser and also represent a field outside the student’s major field of study; in such cases, the individual may serve as both the Outside Field Member and the Outside Unit Member.

Only those faculty who have been approved and designated by the Graduate School as members of the Graduate Faculty in History can serve as representatives of the three primary and secondary fields on any doctoral committee. The list of Graduate Faculty can be found in the Graduate School Bulletin and online on the Graduate School’s Graduate Faculty list. For students who have been admitted to a dual-title degree partner program it is recommended that one member of the committee have their primary graduate faculty affiliation (their “home appointment”) in the dual-title partner program (Women’s Studies, Asian Studies or Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies).

(5) CANDIDACY: The candidacy examination may be taken after the completion of at least 18 credits of acceptable graduate work at Penn State and must be taken by the third semester of full-time study in the graduate program. Following successful passage of the candidacy exam, a program plan will be submitted to the Departments of History and the participating program after consultation with members of the student’s doctoral committee.

(6) FORMAL MEETINGS: Students are required to convene two separate, formal meetings with their advisers and doctoral committees for: 1) a discussion and approval of the general program plan (seminars, courses and other requirements) and 2) their Ph.D. comprehensive examinations.

(7) DOCTORAL DISSERTATION DEFENSE: Upon the researching, writing, and completion of the doctoral dissertation, the candidate must pass a doctoral examination (i.e. dissertation defense).

Other Relevant Information

The Director of Graduate Studies, who supervises the overall graduate program in history and maintains student records, will assign newly admitted graduated students to advisers on the basis of each student’s expressed area of interest. Advisers provide assistance in planning courses of study, guidance in choosing scholarly papers and dissertation topics, direction in conducting research, and career counseling. Students who serve as graduate assistants will be given a variety of experiences as they assist different professors, ranging from paper-grading and administering exams, to preparing and delivering occasional lectures, to conducting review or discussion sections for large lecture courses. Advanced doctoral students may hold lectureships while working on their dissertations; lecturers have complete instructional responsibility for one or two sections of an undergraduate course in their area of specialization.

Student Aid

In addition to the fellowships, graduate assistantships, and other forms of financial aid described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin, the following awards typically have been available to graduate students in this program:

JAMES HAMILTON HARTZELL AND LUCRETIA IRVINE BOYD HARTZELL HISTORY AWARD
A $200 to $300 award made annually to a graduate student in the Department of History whose field of interest is Pennsylvania history.

JAMES LANDING FELLOWSHIP ADN THE WARREN HASSLER FELLOWSHIP FOR STUDY IN THE CIVIL WAR
Each fellowship is available each year to doctoral candidates who are working on their dissertations. The award consists of a stipend that earns the successful candidate one semester of release time for research and writing. No tuition waiver is offered.

HILL FELLOWSHIPS FOR STUDY IN HISTORY
Awarded annually by the Department of History to doctoral candidates who are working on their dissertations. The amount of the award varies, but it generally supports one semester free of duties.

EDWIN ERLE SPARKS FELLOWSHIP IN THE HUMANITIES
One fellowship is available each year to doctoral candidates in the Department of History who are working on their dissertations.

MARK AND LUCY MACMILLAN STITZER AWARD
Awarded by the Department of History each year to support graduate student travel for the purpose of research. The number and value of these awards depends on the quality of proposals received, the level of funding required by each meritorious project, and the funds available in the endowment. Preference is given to request for doctoral dissertation research.

THE E-TU ZEN SUN AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING TEACHING BY A GRADUATE ASSISTANT
One award is made each year to recognize excellence in teaching by a History graduate assistant in the conduct of discussion sections, review sessions, or lecture presentations. The value of the award varies depending on funds available, but it is normally about $500.

Dual-Title Graduate Degree in History and Asian Studies

Graduate students with research and educational interests in international education may apply to the History/Asian Studies Degree Program. The goal of the dual-title degree History and Asian Studies is to enable graduate students from History to acquire the knowledge and skills of their major area of specialization in History while at the same time gaining the perspective of Asian Studies.

In order to prepare graduate students for the competitive job market, this program provides them with a solid disciplinary foundation that will allow them to compete for the best jobs in their field. For such students the dual-title Ph.D. in Asian Studies will add value to their degree and their status as candidates. It will produce excellent historians who are experts in Asian Studies as well. The dual-title degree in History and Asian Studies will build curricular bridges beyond the student’s major field so as to provide a unique training regime for the global scholar.

Additional details of the dual degree program are available in separate documentation and from the Asian Studies Program (see http://asian.la.psu.edu/graduate.shtml ).

Admission Requirements

In addition to the admission requirements set forth by the Graduate School and the Department of History, students will be admitted to the dual-title degree program in Asian Studies by an admissions committee of Asian Studies faculty. Students can apply to the dual-title program in one of two ways. First, they can apply to the dual-title program when they apply to Penn State’s History Department, following that department’s admission requirements and writing a statement of purpose that addresses the ways in which their scholarly interests reflect an interest in interdisciplinary and work on Asia. Second, students who are already enrolled in the History Department can apply directly for admission to the dual-title degree before their admission to candidacy; application requirements are available on the Asian Studies Program website.

General Graduate School requirements are stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

The doctoral degree in History and Asian Studies is awarded only to students who are admitted to the History doctoral program and admitted to the dual-title degree in Asian Studies. The minimum course requirements for the dual-title Ph.D. degree in History and Asian Studies are as follows:

  • HIST 592 (Pre-Modern China) and HIST 581 (Late Imperial and Modern China)
  • ASIA 501 and 502 (the required proseminar sequence in Asian Studies).
  • An additional three credits in an Asia-related course (400-level and above)  in Asian Studies or in any department other than History.

Foreign Language and English Competency Requirements

All-skills proficiency in one Asian language and two years’ college study (or equivalent knowledge) of another Asian language or alternative proficiency appropriate to the student’s field.

Committee Composition

For a dual-title Ph.D., a minimum of two members of the committee will be members of the Graduate Faculty in Asian Studies.

Candidacy

In order to be admitted to doctoral candidacy in the dual-title degree program, students must meet the Ph.D. candidacy requirements specified by the History department. In addition, the student will be required to present a portfolio of work in Asian Studies to their committee. Such a portfolio would minimally include a statement of the student’s interdisciplinary research interests and a program plan.

Comprehensive Exams

The Asian Studies affiliated faculty members on the student’s committee are responsible for ensuring that Asian Studies content constitutes a portion of the student’s comprehensive exams. The Asian Studies’ content will focus on the following areas: theory, methodology, transnationalism, and interdisciplinary material related to the student’s discipline.

Dissertation

A dissertation on an Asian Studies’ topic approved in advance by the student’s committee must be written by students in the dual-title degree program and orally defended to the student’s doctoral committee.

Dual-Title Graduate Degree in History and Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies

This dual-title degree program will increase the intellectual rigor, breadth, and depth of graduate work in history through immersion in the disciplinary fields covered by the Department of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies: the philology and literature of ancient Mediterranean languages; the history and material cultures of those societies.

This dual-title program will thus provide a context in which history graduate students will learn how to synthesize knowledge within and across traditional disciplinary boundaries. In addition, this dual-title degree program will provide qualified history graduate students opportunities for instructional training encouraging an interdisciplinary approach to teaching.

The primary advantages of this dual-title program include the intellectual and academic advantages and benefits of interdisciplinary study, as well as the enhancement of the reputation of the history department through an innovative program, leading to recruitment of highly qualified history graduate students, and an improved placement of doctoral graduates in the highly-competitive field of ancient history.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the admission requirements set forth by the Graduate School and the Department of History, an admissions committee of CAMS faculty will admit students to the dual-title degree program in CAMS. Students can apply to the dual-title program in one of two ways. First, they can apply to the dual-title program when they apply to Penn State’s History Department, following that department’s admission requirements and writing a statement of purpose that addresses the ways in which their scholarly interests reflect an interest in interdisciplinary and graduate work in history through immersion in the disciplinary fields covered by the Department of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies: the philology and literature of ancient Mediterranean languages; the history and material cultures of those societies. Second, students who are already enrolled in the History Department can apply directly for admission to the dual-title degree before their admission to candidacy.

General Graduate School requirements are stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Degree Requirements

M.A. Degree

In addition to the History Department requirements listed above, students in the M.A. degree must take 9 credits of coursework in CAMS including: CAMS 592 (CAMS Proseminar) and CAMS 593 (Research Seminar). Students must complete 3 additional credits of Women’s Studies coursework. Students must complete a master’s paper on a CAMS-related topic approved by the student’s committee.

Ph.D. Degree

In addition to the History Department requirements listed above, students in the dual-title doctoral degree must take CAMS 592 (CAMS Proseminar) and CAMS 593 (Research Seminar). An additional 9 credits (a minimum of 6 should be at the 500-level) in CAMS or courses relevant to the student’s research interests. Students must attain 1) a reading knowledge of a second ancient language–proficiency to be demonstrated through 400/500 level coursework in that language as instructed by CAMS language faculty–or competence, demonstrated in coursework or field study as approved by the student’s dual-title doctoral committee, 2) facility in a research technique in a technical field relevant to the dual-title program: e.g., archaeology, art history, anthropology, historical linguistics, literary studies and analysis.

Committee Composition

For a dual-title Ph.D., a minimum of two members of the committee will be members of the Graduate Faculty in Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies.

Foreign Language and English Competency Requirements

Master’s students will fulfill a requirement of reading knowledge of one ancient language; Ph.D. candidates will fulfill a requirement of reading knowledge of two ancient languages or of one ancient language and competence in a research technique. Language proficiency will be demonstrated through 400/500 level work in the languages concerned, as instructed by CAMS faculty. Students will be expected to acquire and demonstrate reading proficiency in those modern foreign languages (e.g., but not exclusively, French, German, Italian) appropriate to their research interests, as identified in consultation with their dual-title master’s and/or doctoral committee.

Candidacy and Comprehensive Exams

Dual-title students must successfully pass a comprehensive examination, as required by History. A representative of the CAMS program will serve on the student’s doctoral committee, and who will ensure appropriate CAMS content in the student’s comprehensive examinations and in the dissertation.

Dissertation

A dissertation on a CAMS topic approved in advance by the student’s doctoral committee must be written by students in this dual-title degree program and orally defended to the student’s doctoral committee.

Dual-Title Graduate Degree in History and Women’s Studies

Dual-title degrees in History and Women’s Studies foster interdisciplinary scholarly work that is grounded in historical study, research, and teaching. A dual-title program will enhance the intellectual rigor and breadth of graduate work through core courses in feminist theory and methodologies; by exposure to a range of interdisciplinary approaches to scholarship that focuses on the intersections of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nation, and citizenship; and by offering students a pedagogical framework that encourages an interdisciplinary approach to teaching.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the admission requirements set forth by the Graduate School and the Department of History, students will be admitted to the dual-title degree program in Women’s Studies by an admissions committee of Women’s Studies faculty. Students can apply to the dual-title program in one of two ways. First, they can apply to the dual-title program when they apply to Penn State’s History Department, following that department’s admission requirements and writing a statement of purpose that addresses the ways in which their scholarly interests reflect an interest in interdisciplinary and feminist work. Second, students who are already enrolled in the History Department can apply directly for admission to the dual-title degree before their admission to candidacy; application requirements are available on the Women’s Studies website.

General Graduate School requirements are stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

M.A. Degree

In addition to the History Department requirements listed above, students in the dual-title M.A. degree must take 9 credits in Women’s Studies core courses (WMNST 501: Feminist Perspectives in Research and Teaching (3 credits); WMNST 507: Feminist Theory (3 credits); and WMNST 597: Special Topics in Women’s Studies). Students also must complete 3 additional credits of Women’s Studies course work chosen in consultation with the Women’s Studies Graduate Officer.

Ph.D. Degree

In addition to the History Department requirements listed above, students in the dual-title M.A. degree must take 9 credits in Women’s Studies core courses (WMNST 501, WMNST 507, and WMNST 597) as well as 9 credits of Women’s Studies elective courses (at least 6 credits at the 500-level) chosen in consultation with the Women’s Studies graduate officer.

Foreign Language and English Competency Requirements

The student will fulfill the language requirement specified by the cooperating department through which the student is admitted to the dual-title degree program.

Committee Composition

For a dual-title M.A. or Ph.D., a minimum of two members of the committee will be members of the Graduate Faculty in Women’s Studies.

Candidacy

In order to be admitted to doctoral candidacy in the dual-title degree program, students must meet the Ph.D. candidacy requirements specified by the History department. In addition, the student will be required to present a portfolio of work in Women’s Studies to their committee. Such a portfolio would include a statement of the student’s interdisciplinary research interests, a program plan, and samples of writing that indicate the student’s work in Women’s Studies.

Comprehensive Exams

The Women’s Studies affiliated faculty members on the student’s committee are responsible for ensuring that Women’s Studies content constitutes a portion of the student’s comprehensive exams. The Women Studies’ content will focus on the following areas: feminist theory, feminist methodology, global feminism, and feminist studies.

Dissertation

A dissertation on a Women’s Studies topic approved in advance by the student’s committee must be written by students in the dual-title degree program and orally defended to the student’s doctoral committee.

Dual-Title Graduate Degree in History and African American and Diaspora Studies

Admission Requirements

In addition to the admission requirements set forth by the Graduate Council and the Department of History, students will be admitted to the dual-title degree program in African American and Diaspora Studies by an admissions committee of African American and Diaspora Studies faculty. Students can apply to the dual-title program in one of two ways. First, they can apply to the dual-title program when they apply to Penn State’s History Department, following that department’s admission requirements and writing a statement of purpose that addresses how the student’s research and professional goals intersect with the objectives of the dual-title graduate degree program in History and African American and Diaspora Studies. Second, students who are already enrolled in the History Department can apply directly for admission to the dual-title degree before their admission to candidacy.
General Graduate Council requirements are stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

GPA and GRE Requirements

Applicants entering with only an undergraduate degree should have a junior/senior cumulative average of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale), and, where applicable, a minimum GPA of 3.50 for all graduate work previously undertaken. Exceptions to the minimum GPA requirement may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests. Each applicant must submit the scores of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken within five years previous to the date of application.

Ph.D. Degree
In addition to the History Department requirements listed above, the minimum course requirements for this dual-title Ph.D. degree are as follows:

15 credits of coursework related to African American and Diaspora Studies, all at the 500 level or above. Of these 15 credits, 9 must come from the required core course sequence in African American and Diaspora Studies, which comprises the following courses:

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES (AF AM)

501. Seminar in African American and Diaspora Studies (3)
502. Blacks in the African Diaspora (3)
503. Sexual and Gender Politics (3)


Students must also take 6 elective credits, all of which must come either from the list below or otherwise have the prior approval of African American and Diaspora Studies supervising faculty. Over time, additional courses may be added to the list of acceptable electives. The director of graduate studies in the Department of African American Studies will maintain a comprehensive list of approved courses. A maximum of ten (10) credits of high-quality graduate work done at a regionally accredited U.S. institution or an officially recognized degree-granting international institution may be applied toward the requirements for a master’s or doctoral degree. However, credits earned to complete a previous master’s degree, whether at Penn State or elsewhere, may not be applied to a second master’s or doctoral degree at Penn State.

AFR 501. Key Issues in African Studies (3)
ENGL 565. Period Studies in African-American Literature (3)
ENGL 566. Genre Studies in African-American Literature (3)
ENGL 567. Thematic Studies in African-American Literature (3)
ENGL 568. Gender Issues in African-American Literature (3)
HIST 547. Slavery in the Americas (3)
HIST 549. Topics in African-American History (3)
HIST 551. The African American Freedom Struggle in the Twentieth Century (3)
HIST 572. Race and Empire in the Americas, Caribbean & Pacific (3)
PHIL 539. Critical Philosophy of Race (3)

Foreign Language Requirements

As required by the Department of History, students must demonstrate reading proficiency in at least one foreign language no later than the third semester of residency (not including summer semester).

Candidacy

The dual-title field must be fully integrated into the candidacy exam for the doctoral program. In addition, candidates for the dual-title Ph.D. in African American and Diaspora Studies will be required to present to their committee a portfolio of work in African American and Diaspora Studies which includes a statement of the student’s interdisciplinary research interests, a program plan, and samples of writing that indicate the student’s interest in questions taken up by scholars of African American and Diaspora Studies.

Doctoral Committee Composition

For the dual-title Ph.D. degree, at least one member of the committee must be a member of the African American and Diaspora Studies graduate faculty. The doctoral committee for a dual-title doctoral degree student must include a minimum of four faculty members, i.e., a chair and at least three additional members, all of whom must be members of the Graduate Faculty, and one of which must be on the Graduate Faculty in the Department of African American Studies. If the chair is not faculty in African American Studies, then the committee member representing African American Studies must be appointed as co-chair.

At least one regular member of the doctoral committee must represent a field outside the candidate’s major field of study in order to provide a broader range of disciplinary perspectives and expertise. This committee member is referred to as the “Outside Field Member.” In cases where the candidate is also pursuing a dual-title field of study, the dual-title representative to the committee may serve as the Outside Field Member.

Additionally, in order to avoid potential conflicts of interest, the primary appointment of at least one regular member of the doctoral committee must be in an administrative unit that is outside the unit in which the dissertation adviser’s primary appointment is held (i.e., the adviser’s administrative home; in the case of tenure-line faculty, this is the individual’s tenure home). This committee member is referred to as the “Outside Unit Member.” In the case of co-advisers, the Outside Unit Member must be from outside the administrative home(s) of both co-advisers. In some cases, an individual may have a primary appointment outside the administrative home of the student’s dissertation adviser and also represent a field outside the student’s major field of study; in such cases, the same individual may serve as both the Outside Field Member and the Outside Unit Member.

Comprehensive Exams

The African American and Diaspora Studies graduate faculty member on the student’s committee is responsible for developing and administering the African American and Diaspora Studies portion of the student’s comprehensive exams. The exam must incorporate written and oral components in African American and Diaspora Studies based on the student’s thematic or regional area of interest and specialization in African American and Diaspora Studies. The African American and Diaspora Studies portion of the exam will include the following components: broad history of the field, contemporary theory and debates, and either sexual and gender politics or a topic related to the student’s specific area of interest.

Dissertation

The candidate must complete a dissertation and pass a final oral defense of that dissertation on a topic that reflects their original research and education in both the History and African American and Diaspora Studies in order to earn the dual-title Ph.D. degree.

Student Aid

Graduate assistantships are available to students in this program and other forms of student aid are described in the STUDENT AID section above.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 699 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

COURSE ADDS

42-01-125 MUSIC 896
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9 per semester/maximum of 18)
Creative projects with a professional orientation, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: S12013

42-01-126 WF ED 806
Program and Facilities Management for Career and Technical Educators
PGM FACILITY MGT (3)
This course examines advanced learning laboratory organization and management processes to facilitate learning and skill development in a safe environment.
PREREQUISITE: WF ED 495C
PROPOSED START: SP2014

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
42-01-127 AAA S 530
Globalization in Africa
GLOBALIZ IN AFRICA (3)
Students will examine globalization and its socioeconomic implications in Africa.
APPROVED START: FA2008

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2014

OLD
42-01-128 EDPSY 506
Advanced Techniques for Analyzing Educational Experiments
ADV ANAL ED EXPS (3)
Analytical and experimental control considerations for designs involving nested and/or crossed subjects. Analysis of variance and multiple comparisons via computers.
PREREQUISITE: EDPSY 406 or PSYCH 400
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: EDPSY 505 or PSYCH 400
PROPOSED START: FA2014

OLD
42-01-129 EDPSY 507
Multivariate Procedures in Educational Research
PRCDS IN ED RES (3)
Introduction to matrix algebra, computer programming, multiple regression analysis, multiple and canonical correlation, multiple discriminant analysis, classification procedures, factor analysis.
PREREQUISITE: EDPSY 406 or PSYCH 400
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: EDPSY 505 or PSYCH 400
PROPOSED START: FA2014

COURSE DROPS

42-01-130 ENT 595
Internship
INTERNSHIP (10-12)
Supervised field experience and study related to the student’s major professional interest. Written and oral critique of activity required. Limited to Master of Agriculture degree in entomology.
PREREQUISITE: approval of proposed assignment by adviser prior to registration; cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher; completion of entomology core courses
PROPOSED START: SP2014


Post-Baccalaureate Credit Certificate Programs

42-01-131 Add. New Graduate Credit Certificate in Geodesign.

Proposed Effective date: Fall Semester 2013

Geodesign

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Kelleann Foster, Lead Faculty
121 Stuckeman Family Building
University Park
Telephone: 814-865-9511
Fax: 814-863-8137
email: kxf15@psu.edu

The purpose of the graduate certificate in Geodesign is to provide students with a foundation in geospatially-oriented design through investigating interdisciplinary methods and the collaborative nature of the Geodesign process.  This program is for current or aspiring practitioners, from a variety of professional backgrounds, employed in government agencies, businesses, and non-profit organizations, who see limitations in how regional and urban planning and design challenges are currently addressed.  The program is designed for professional practitioners who wish to advance their careers, and for those seeking to make career changes, while remaining in their current location or maintaining full-time professional responsibilities.  The certificate consists of a five-course, 14-credit curriculum that can be completed in one year and is delivered online through the World Campus.  Students must earn a “C” or better in each course that is intended to count toward the certificate.

Admission Requirements:
Individuals wishing to enroll in this graduate certificate program must hold either (1) a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or (2) a tertiary (postsecondary) degree that is deemed comparable to a four-year bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. This degree must be from an officially recognized degree-granting institution in the country in which it operates. Applicants are expected to have achieved a 3.0 (B) or higher undergraduate grade point average. The language of instruction at Penn State is English. All international applicants must take and submit scores for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System), with the exceptions noted below. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL is 550 for the paper-based test, or a total score of 80 with a 19 on the speaking section for the Internet-based test (iBT). The minimum acceptable composite score for the IELTS is 6.5.

International applicants are exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement who have received a baccalaureate or a graduate degree from a college/university/institution in any of the following: Australia, Belize, British Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), England, Guyana, Republic of Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States, and Wales.

Required:
GEODZ 511 (3): Geodesign History, Theory, Principles
GEODZ 822 (3): Geodesign Models: Decision and Evaluation

GEODZ 824 (3): Geodesign Models: Impact and Process*
OR
GEODZ 826 (3): Geodesign Models: Change and Representation*
* Students will take one of these two “Models” courses; placement is dependent on previous experience.

Electives:
In addition to the 9 required credits specified above, students must select at least 5 credits of GEOG courses at the 400 level or higher; courses must be approved in advance by the student’s adviser. A list of acceptable electives is maintained by the program office.

42-01-132 Add. New Graduate Credit Certificate Program in Systems Engineering.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2013

Systems Engineering

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

James A. Nemes, D.Sc.
School of Graduate Professional Studies
30 E. Swedeford Rd
Malvern, PA 19355
Telephone: 610-648-3335
email: jan16@psu.edu

The goal of this graduate certificate program is to prepare students to apply systems engineering principles across the product development or acquisition lifecycle. To be awarded the Graduate Certificate in Systems Engineering, students must successfully complete 12 credits of course work. All courses must be completed with a grade of C or better and a grade-point average of 3.0 to be awarded the certificate.

Admission Requirements:
Applicants must hold either (1) a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or (2) a tertiary (postsecondary) degree that is deemed comparable to a four-year bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. This degree must be from an officially recognized degree-granting institution in the country in which it operates. The successful applicant will possess a degree in science or engineering or a closely aligned field and is generally expected to have a minimum combined junior/senior grade-point average of 3.0 (B) on a 4.0 scale.

Required courses (9 credits)
SYSEN 520 (3): Systems Engineering
SYSEN 522 (3): Systems Verification Validation & Testing
SWENG 586 (3): Requirements Engineering

Elective courses (Select at least 3 credits; each course listed is worth 3 credits.)
SYSEN 530 (3): Systems Optimization
SYSEN 531 (3): Probability Models and Simulation
SYSEN 533 (3): Deterministic Models and Simulation
SYSEN 536 (3): Decision and Risk Analysis in Engineering
SYSEN 550 (3): Creativity and Problem Solving I