Appendix 45-05

Appendix A

UNDERGRADUATE

Agricultural Sciences

45-05-001 Change. Add AGRO 423 to Additional Courses. Remove BE 303 from Additional Courses. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Off-Road Equipment Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (OFFRD)

This interdisciplinary minor complements several engineering, agricultural, and mining degrees, helping students understand some specific technological aspects of mobile equipment (from lawn tractors to large excavators). The minor would strengthen the program for students with machinery interests by exposing them to several of the technical aspects of off-road equipment such as electronics, power generation, power transmission, traction, ergonomics, and safety.

The minor in Off-Road Equipment requires 18-20 credits from the approved courses. Courses in the minor have prerequisites including calculus, physics, and, depending on the student’s major, at least one engineering or engineering technology type course (e.g., BRS 221). These courses should be completed prior to entering the minor.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses taken to satisfy the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18-20 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
ASM 420(3) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15-17 credits)
Select 3 credits from ASM 320(3) or ME 431(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from ASM 310(3); BE 306(3); ME 360(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3-4 credits from BE 305(3), BRS 428(3), or ME 345(4) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3-4 credits from ASM 424(3), AGRO 423(3), AGRO 425(3), HORT 408(4), or TURF 425(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from BE 461(3) or BRS 426(3) (Sem: 5-8)

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-05-002 ASM 320
Combustion Engines for Mobile Equipment
COMBUSTION ENGINES (3)
Operating principles of internal combustion engines; performance, selection, and maintenance aspects of engine systems in mobile equipment.
PREREQUISITE: ASM 310
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: After successful completion of ASM 320, students will explain and evaluate the theoretical and practical aspects of internal combustion engines. Students will evaluate and compare alternative engine thermodynamic cycles, alternative fuels (gasoline, diesel, biodiesel, compressed natural gas), performance enhancing attachments (turbochargers, intercoolers), and supporting systems (fuel injection, lubrication, starting, cooling, emissions cleansing). Students will be able to properly select engines and related systems for mobile applications. Students will employ important maintenance procedures required for economical useful life and proper operation. Students will be able to troubleshoot engine systems.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ASM 310; BE 306; ME 360
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-05-003 ASM 424
Selection and Management of Agricultural Machinery
SEL MGMT AG MACH (3:2:2)
Function and operation of field and farmstead machines; energy, quality, and loss considerations; selection and utilization; precision agriculture technology.
PREREQUISITE: or concurrent: BE 306 or ASM 320
APPROVED START:  FA2008

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: ASM 424 covers the many aspects of mobile agricultural machinery, precision agriculture, and fleet management. Integration of economic analysis and functional performance topics are the focus. Types of agricultural machinery available, optimization, precision agriculture technology, machine sizing criteria and cycle diagrams, repair and maintenance, and reliability of machinery are major topics covered. Global positioning and geographic information systems hardware and software will be used to demonstrate the use of these technologies within precision agriculture from planting through harvest. Laboratory exercises will involve full-scale equipment with instrumentation used to measure performance. While ASM 424 is not a prerequisite for any other course, it complements engineering and technology courses related to machinery provides precision agriculture familiarity.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: BE 306; ASM 310; ME 360
PROPOSED START: SP2018

Appendix A

UNDERGRADUATE

Arts and Architecture

45-05-004 Add. New Photography Minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Photography Minor

Contact: Keith Shapiro, kds3@psu.edu

Colege of Arts and Architecture

Students in the Photography Minor will gain access to skills and knowledge necessary to identify and create professional quality photographic images. The learning outcomes include technical and intellectual proficiency, creative skills and capabilities, commercially oriented skills and knowledge, collaborative and visual communication skills and experiences, cultural awareness and ethical understanding regarding the use of images and life-long learning skills. It will raise students’ overall level of proficiency and enhance their life-long learning skills in image making. Professional photographic skills are readily adaptable for use in a wide variety of majors and careers that rely on or benefit from the use of photography. The minor strengthens existing majors where making or using professional quality photographic imagery would be an advantage.

The minor is intended for students in any major who have a need or desire to acquire professional photographic skills and knowledge. The minor includes two prescribed classes, PHOTO 303 (3 cr.) and PHOTO 404 (4 cr.). These two courses focus students on client-based commercially oriented photographic skills and knowledge. Students are then free to choose the remaining 12 credits of additional PHOTO courses with the intent that with these courses they will tailor their curriculum to suit their specific need or interest. Students in the Photography Minor will thus benefit from access to the professionally oriented PHOTO courses developed for the Professional Photography (B.Des) major.

Entrance Requirements: Admission to the program includes acceptance to the University Park campus, application to the program, and a portfolio review by primary faculty members.

Retention Requirements: Retention will be determined through verification of sustained academic growth as demonstrated by earning of grades of C or higher within the Photography minor. Failure to do so is grounds for an academic warning, with clear written strategies and a time frame for the student to return to good standing. Should the student not address the issue, the faculty may advise the student into a different program or minor.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Some courses may require prerequisites.

For a Minor in Photography, a minimum of 19 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 19 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (7 credits)
PHOTO 303(3), PHOTO 404(4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 9 credits of PHOTO courses (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits of 400-level PHOTO courses (Sem: 5-8)

Appendix A

UNDERGRADUATE

Earth and Mineral Sciences

45-05-005 Change. Change name from Meteorology to Meteorology and Atmospheric Science. Change name of Atmospheric Sciences Option to Atmospheric Science Option. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Meteorology and Atmospheric Science

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (METEO)

PROFESSOR David Stensrud, Head of the Department

Meteorology is a rigorous scientific discipline devoted to the attainment of an increased understanding of the atmosphere and the development of methods for applying that knowledge to practical problems. Although this field is usually associated with weather prediction, it also has significance in environmental, energy, agricultural, oceanic, and hydrological sciences. For students wishing to pursue many of these areas, the department offers several options within the major.

The major requires a solid foundation in mathematics and the physical sciences, and it provides a comprehensive survey of the fundamentals of atmospheric science. It has sufficient flexibility to permit intensive advanced study in such related areas as mathematics, earth sciences, or engineering. The department has particular strengths in weather analysis and prediction, including forecast uncertainty and severe weather; physical meteorology, including radar meteorology, instrumentation and atmospheric measurements; and applied areas, including atmospheric diffusion, air pollution chemistry, dynamic meteorology, tropical meteorology, climate, weather risk, and remote sensing.

Graduating meteorologists are prepared for professional employment with industry, private consulting firms, government, and the armed forces or for further study toward graduate degrees normally required for research, university, or management positions.

The freshman and sophomore years are largely devoted to preparatory work in science, mathematics, and the liberal arts. The junior and senior years involve a core of basic courses in applied and theoretical topics and a choice of courses offering specialized training. The courses unique to each option are normally taken in the junior and senior years.

Entry to Major Requirements:

In addition to the minimum grade point average (GPA) requirements described in the University Policies, the Meteorology entrance-to-major requirement must also be completed with a minimum grade of C: MATH 140 GQ(4).

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE OPTION: This option challenges students to strengthen and broaden their understanding of the physics and chemistry of both the atmosphere and oceans. It helps prepare them for employment in the diverse field of the atmospheric sciences and for graduate study in the atmospheric or related disciplines. Students are encouraged to participate in undergraduate research projects under the supervision of atmospheric and oceanic scientists in the department college.

ENVIRONMENTAL METEOROLOGY OPTION: Environmental Meteorology prepares the student for understanding the impact of the weather and climate on the environment, which is to say the impacts of air and water on natural and human-altered ecosystems. In order to do this, the option establishes links between atmospheric physics and a variety of environmental disciplines pertaining to land, water, soils, and plants. Depending on his/her interests, the student will select courses in Air Quality and Dispersion, Ecology, Environmental Chemistry, Geographic Information Systems or Hydrology.

GENERAL OPTION: This option has sufficient flexibility to serve the needs of students who wish to pursue topics chosen broadly from subdisciplines of meteorology or from related areas in consultation with the academic adviser. The General option is appropriate both for students who intend to pursue postgraduate degrees and for students who want to emphasize a topic for which no option exists.

WEATHER FORECASTING AND COMMUNICATIONS OPTION: This option prepares students for careers in which their skills as weather forecasters are effectively used in a variety of ways, from science reporting and television broadcasting to web design and computer-based weather graphics production, and developing innovative applications of weather and climate data to industry.

WEATHER RISK MANAGEMENT OPTION: The option combines study of meteorology and atmospheric sciences with training in risk, finance, and quantitative decision-making. Weather affects a wide range of industries, including energy, agriculture, insurance, construction, retail, and transport, among others. Weather and climate variation play central roles in the availability of water resources, the spread of disease, and an array of other processes vital for human welfare. There are, consequently, many organizations that confront risks related to weather, and that have a demand for experts who can help them manage these risks. The option in Weather Risk Management is designed for students who wish to work professionally at this intersection of meteorology and risk management.

For a Meteorology course to serve as a prerequisite for any subsequent prescribed or supporting Meteorology course in the major, a grade of C or better must be earned in the prerequisite course.

For the B.S. degree in Meteorology, a minimum of 121 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(23-26 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6-7 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 93-95 credits
(This includes 23-26 credits of General Education courses: 8 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 0-3 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 66 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (47 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3), EMSC 100 GWS(3)[71], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
METEO 300(4)[1], METEO 411(4)[1], METEO 421(4)[1], METEO 431(3)[1], METEO 440(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
METEO 470(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19 credits)
ENGL 15 GWS(3) or ENGL 30 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
METEO 101 GN(3)[1], or METEO 200A(1.5)[1] and METEO 200B(1.5)[1], or METEO 201(3)[1] (Sem: 1-5)
METEO 273(3) or CMPSC 101 GQ(3) or CMPSC 200 GQ(3) or CMPSC 201 GQ(3) or CMPSC 202 GQ(3) (Sem: 2-4)
MATH 230(4)[1], or MATH 231(2) [1] and MATH 232(2) [1] (Sem: 3-4)
EBF 472(3) or STAT 301 GQ(3) or STAT 401(3) (Sem: 3-6)
CAS 100 GWS(3) or ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 27-29 credits

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE OPTION: (27-28 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
METEO 422(3) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21-22 credits)
Select 3-6 credits from METEO 473(3)[1] and METEO 474(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6-9 credits from METEO 436(3)[1], METEO 437(3)[1], and METEO 454(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6-13 credits from METEO 414(4), METEO 434(3), METEO 451(3), METEO 452(3), METEO 455(3), METEO 465(3), METEO 466(3), METEO 471(3), METEO 477(3), METEO 480W(3) (Up to 9 of these credits in relevant courses in Acoustics, Chemistry, Engineering, Mathematics, and Physics may be substituted with the approval of the student’s adviser.) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits of W courses or their equivalent in addition to METEO 440. (Sem: 7-8)

ENVIRONMENTAL METEOROLOGY OPTION: (27-29 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
CE 370(3), METEO 454(3)[1], METEO 455(3) (Sem: 2-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18-20 credits) (May apply to General Education)
Select 15-17 credits from BIOL 110 GN(4), CE 360(3), CE 461(3), CE 475(4), CE 479(3), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), CHEM 450(3), CHEM 457(2), CHEM 464(3), ERM 430(3), ERM 435(3), ERM 447(3), ERM 450(3), GEOG 111 GN(3), GEOG 311(3), GEOG 313(3), GEOG 361(3), GEOG 362(3), GEOG 363(3), GEOG 417(3), GEOG 463(3), ME 405(3), ME 433(3), METEO 419(3); METEO 437(3) (Sem: 2-8)
Select 3 credits from METEO 473(3)[1] or METEO 474(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

GENERAL OPTION: (27 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 3 credits from METEO 436(3)[1] or METEO 437(3)[1] or METEO 454(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from METEO 473(3)[1] or METEO 474(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
Select 21 credits in consultation with advisor from 400-level METEO courses and/or 300-, or 400-level courses from the Colleges of Agricultural Sciences, Earth and Mineral Sciences, Engineering, and/or Science. With the approval of a meteorology adviser, some 200-level courses from those Colleges may also be used.(Sem: 7-8)

WEATHER FORECASTING AND COMMUNICATIONS OPTION: (28 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
METEO 481(3), METEO 482(3) (Sem: 5-6)
METEO 414(4), METEO 415(3) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 3 credits from METEO 436(3)[1] or METEO 437(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3-6 credits from METEO 473(3)[1] and METEO 474(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6-9 credits from CAS 211(3), EE 477(3) or METEO 477(3); ENGL 416(3), GEOG 333(3), GEOG 361(3), GEOG 362(3), GEOG 363(3), GEOG 417(3), GEOG 467(3), GEOSC 402 IL(3), METEO 413(3), METEO 416(3), METEO 418(3), METEO 419(3), METEO 422(3), METEO 434(3), METEO 451(3), METEO 452(3), METEO 454(3), METEO 471(3), METEO 483(3), METEO 486(1-2, max 3), any two from METEO 495A(3), METEO 495B(3), METEO 495C(3), METEO 495D(3) or METEO 495E(3) (Sem: 5-8)

WEATHER RISK MANAGEMENT OPTION: (27 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
ECON 102 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
EBF 473(3) (Sem: 3-6)
METEO 460(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 6 credits from METEO 415(3), METEO 473(3)[1] or METEO 474(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from METEO 436(3)[1], METEO 437(3)[1] or METEO 454(3)[1]** (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from EBF 301(3); EBF 483(3), EBF 484(3); EGEE 437(3); EGEE 438(3); or EME 460(3) (Sem: 6-8)
Select 3 credits from ECON 490(3), STAT 318(3), STAT 319(3), STAT 414(3), STAT 415(3), STAT 460(3) or STAT 462(3) (Sem: 6-8)

**Preferred choice

Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology

The Department of Meteorology offers an integrated B.S./M.S. (IUG) Program that is designed to allow academically superior students to obtain both the B.S. and the M.S. degree in Meteorology in five years of study. In order to complete the program in five years, students interested in the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology must apply for admission to the Graduate School and the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program by the end of their junior year.

During the first three years, the student will follow the course scheduling of one of the options in the B.S. degree, normally the Atmospheric Sciences or the General option (see the Undergraduate Bulletin). Students who intend to enter the Integrated B.S./M.S. program are encouraged to take upper level classes during their first three years whenever appropriate. By the end of the junior year, students normally apply for admission to both the IUG program and to the Graduate School. Acceptance decisions will be made prior to the beginning of the senior year and M.S. advising committees appointed for successful applicants. During the senior year, IUG students follow the scheduling of the selected B.S. Meteorology option, with an emphasis on completing 500-level course work as appropriate. During the senior year, IUG students will start work on their theses or papers that are designed to meet the requirements of the M.S. degree in Meteorology. During the fifth year, IUG students take courses fulfilling the departmental M.S. degree requirements and complete their M.S. theses or papers. Typical scheduling plans for students pursuing the General or Atmospheric Sciences options are given on the departmental Web site http://www.met.psu.edu. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student receives financial support, for example, via an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition.

Admission Requirements

Students who wish to complete the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology should apply for admission to both the Graduate School and the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program by no later than the end of their junior year. In this case, successful students will be admitted formally into the graduate program in Meteorology just prior to their senior year, if their progress has been satisfactory. Admission prior to the senior year is also possible in some unusual circumstances. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the Graduate Admissions Officer for the Department of Meteorology, who will determine the necessary criteria for all applicants. These criteria include the setting of the minimum required scores on the GRE and the minimum cumulative GPA for consideration, the receipt of sufficiently strong recommendation letters from three faculty and a strong letter of support from the department head, and the writing of an excellent proposal for a workable research project with a specific adviser; normally, evidence of significant research progress must be provided in the application as well.

The details of the program requirements can be found in the Graduate Degree Programs Bulletin.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[71] The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered: CAS 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EMSC 100 GWS.

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-05-006 PNG 491
Reservoir Engineering Design
RESERVOR ENGR DSGN (1)
Application of the concepts of reservoir and drilling engineering to petroleum engineering design projects.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 102, PNG 410, PNG 450, PNG 490
APPROVED START: SP2011

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Capstone Design in Drilling and Completions
CHANGE SHORT TITLE: D&C DESIGN (1)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Application of the concepts of reservoir, production, drilling and completions and economics to petroleum engineering design projects. Engineering design by definition is the integration of knowledge and skills acquired through experience, reading and formal instruction into a final product, the design. To that end, this course is the second course of a 3-course, 3-semester, sequence that will result in a comprehensive capstone-engineering project. As such, PNG 491 will utilize the knowledge gained from PNG 450, 451, and 475 to the project design initiated in PNG 490. The class will be divided into teams and students will be evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the team effort. All reports and presentations will be presented as a product of the team.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: PNG 450, PNG 475, PNG 490
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

Appendix A

UNDERGRADUATE

Education

45-05-007 Number Not Assigned

COURSE ADDS

45-05-008 CI 387
Education, Culture, and Society in Brazil and Colombia
ED&SOC BRAZIL/ COL (3)
Given the increasing need to instill students with global perspectives, students from a range of backgrounds and academic majors will benefit from an in-depth exploration of the educational systems, cultures, and societies of Brazil and Colombia — additionally, the course may also prepare students for (optional) summer travel to Brazil and/ or Colombia (provided they are interested in either of both of those opportunities). Students are invited to use their emerging understandings to reflect upon the U.S. educational system, its culture, and its society.
PROPOSED START: SU2017

COURSE DROPS

45-05-009 CI 412W
Secondary Teaching
SECONDARY TCHG (3)
Study of the teacher’s responsibilities, steps in planning instruction, and various strategies for implementing and assessing teaching.
PREREQUISITE: CI 295, EDPSY 14, EDTHP 115
PROPOSED START: SP2018

Appendix A

UNDERGRADUATE

Engineering

COURSE ADDS

45-05-010 AE 405
Geotechnical Engineering
GEOTECH ENGR (4)
Course prepares students for understanding, analysis, evaluation, and design of the most commonly used shallow foundation systems to support buildings. All structural loads on buildings, most notably gravity loads and windseismic lateral loads, are transferred to the soil supporting the building. In order for the building to safely deliver these loads to the soil and avoid settlement issues and soil failure, a proper foundation system must be designed. Design of foundation systems is a function of soil material properties, foundation material, and the selected foundation system. This course educates the student on the basics of soil mechanics for foundation design, and educates the student on how to select and design the most commonly used types of foundation systems.
PREREQUISITE: AE 308; CE 340, AE 402; AE 404
PROPOSED START: SU2017

45-05-011 ME 103S
HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES (S)
HYBRID ELEC VEHCL (1)
Students in this first-year seminar will be exposed to the design, fabrication, and testing of advanced powertrain vehicles and other cutting-edge automotive technologies. This project-based, group-based course gives students the opportunity to become a member of one of the technical departments within the overall Penn State Advanced Vehicle student team and encourages students to interact with upper-class members of that department. In addition to technical skills, emphasis is placed on soft skills required of today’s professional engineers including: presentation creation, public speaking, and technical writing.
PROPOSED START: SU2017

45-05-012 ME 453
Powertrain System Modeling, Simulation, and Control
PWRTRN SYS (3)
This course introduces students to the control-oriented state-space and transfer function modeling of powertrain components and systems. Relevant application domains include conventional automotive powertrains, hybrid powertrains, locomotive propulsion systems, marine and submarine propulsion systems, and stationary power generation systems. The course introduces students to the use of fundamental principles from thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and rigid body mechanics for powertrain modeling. Simple, control-oriented models are emphasized. Model integration and simulation topics, including numerical stiffness, solver selection, and integration step size selection are emphasized. Applications of powertrain modeling and control covered in the course include servo-control problems (e.g., air-fuel ratio control) and supervisory power management in hybrid powertrains.
PREREQUISITE: ME 370
CONCURRENT: ME 357; ME 450
PROPOSED START: SU2017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-05-013 ME 440W
Mechanical Systems Design Project
MECH SYS DESIGN (3)
Design and analysis of mechanical components and systems. Application of fundamental design and analysis methods to open ended engineering problems.
PREREQUISITE: ME 340; ME 360; ME 370; Prerequisite or Concurrent: IE 312; ENGL 202C
APPROVED START:  SP2015

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ME 340
ADD CONCURRENT: IE 312, ENGL 202C
PROPOSED START: SP2018

OLD
45-05-014 ME 442W
Advanced Vehicle Design I
AVD LAB I (2)
Part one of a two course sequence; applications of design and analysis methods to open-ended advanced transportation vehicles.  Two semester course; satisfies Senior Design or ME Technical Elective requirements (when combined with M E 443W).
PREREQUISITE: ME 340; ME 360; ME 370 Prerequisite or concurrent: ME 410; IE 312;
ENGL 202C
APPROVED START: SP2015

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ME 340
ADD CONCURRENT: IE 312, ENGL 202C
PROPOSED START: SP2018

Appendix A

Undergraduate

Penn State Harrisburg

45-05-015 Change. Increase the number of credits required for the Major from 101 to 104 credits. Remove IE 303, 308, and MET 448 from Prescribed Courses for the Major. Add IET 321, MET 338, 370, and 458 to Prescribed Courses. Remove ET 323 and MCHT 214 from Additional Courses.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Mechanical Engineering Technology

Capital College (M E T)

PROFESSOR RICHARD CIOCCI, Associate Professor Mechanical Engineering

The goal of the Mechanical Engineering Technology program is to provide our students with the necessary training and education so that they can provide high-level technical support to a variety of industrial, commercial, consulting, and governmental organizations. The emphasis of our program is in the application of scientific and engineering principles. Technical communication in oral and written form is also emphasized. Our graduates are expected to appreciate the ethical and societal responsibilities of a technologist, the concepts of Continuous Quality Improvement and the continuing impact of globalization of design, manufacturing and marketing of technical goods and services. Our graduates are trained to deal with choice of materials and methods that are safe, environmentally and aesthetically acceptable and economically competitive. Typical responsibilities that may be assigned to our graduates are the development and evaluation of machines and mechanisms; development, organization and supervision of manufacturing processes and procedures; the instrumentation, control and testing of a process; quality control; technical marketing and sales; design of mechanical systems for heating and cooling and energy management.

The strengths of our program include: hands-on training; extensive laboratory experience; state of the art computer methods, excellent job placement and accreditation by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Graduates who wish to continue their professional development can take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam in Pennsylvania, a prerequisite for taking the Professional Engineering exam.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Mechanical Engineering Technology major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Re-enrollment:
Associate degree students should file a re-enrollment form during the final semester of their associate degree. Students re-enrolling from an associate’s degree into the bachelor’s degree should run a degree audit from LionPATH, using the M E T major code, to determine their curriculum requirements.

For a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology, a minimum of 128 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR course selection including Supporting Courses and Related Areas)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 100-108 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses, 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (49 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-5)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ENGR 320Y GS;US;IL(3)[1], IET 321(3), MET 321(2), MET 332(3)[1], MET 336(3)[1], MET 338(1), MET 341(3)[1], MET 358(3), MET 370(1), MET 431(3)[1], MET 438(3), MET 454(3), MET 458(1), MET 481(3), MET 486(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (34-38 credits)
Select 3 credits from: EDSGN 100(3) or EGT 120(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3-4 credits from: PHYS 150 GN(3) or PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from: EMCH 211(3) or ET 300(3) or MCHT 111(3) [1] (Sem: 2-3)
Select 3-4 credits from: PHYS 151GN(3) or PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 2-4)
Select 3 credits from: IET 101(3) or IET 311(3) (Sem: 2-5)
Select 3-4 credits from: IET 215(2) and IET 216(2) or IET 321(3) (Sem: 2-5)
Select 4 credits from: STAT 200 GQ(4) or MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 2-6)
Select 3 credits from: EMCH 212(3), ET 321(3), or MET 206(3) [1] (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from: EMCH 213(3), ET 322(3), or MCHT 213(3) [1] (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from: MET 210(3) or MET 365(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3-4 credits from: EET 101(3) and EET 109(1); or EET 320(3) (Sem: 3-7)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (17-21 credits)
Select 5-9 credits from the department approved list of courses. (Sem: 5-8)
Select 12 credits from 300-400 level technology and engineering elective courses in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student’s interests. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

45-05-016 HONOR 499
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: SU2017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-05-017 MET 481
Project Design
PROJECT DESIGN (1)
Design of system or machine, including decision making, engineering analysis, layout, detail drawings, specifications, construction.
PREREQUISITE: MET 365, MET 431, and senior standing
APPROVED START:  SP2007

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course is the first of a two-part course sequence that comprises the capstone design experience in the MET major (the second course is MET 486, Project Design). In this course students study the engineering design process, begin working on their senior design project, and learn about professional topics related to industry. Topics in the engineering design process include needs identification, concept generation, concept selection, costing, and project planning. Professional topics include communication, team work, ethics, safety, and sustainability. Engineering economics and its application to the capstone design project is a featured topic. Students are evaluated through assignments and quizzes. One major component of the course is to begin work on a capstone design project. Students typically work in teams of 3 to 4 on an industrially-sponsored project or other project approved by the faculty.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MET 365 or MET 210
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

FIVE YEAR COURSE DROPS

45-05-018 AMST 363
American Music
AMERICAN MUSIC (3)
A survey of all styles and types of American music from 1620 to the present.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits of AMSTD and MUSIC
PROPOSED START: SP2018

45-05-019 AMST 406
Contemporary America
CONTEMPORARY AMER (3)
A study of the historic and cultural currents of life in the United States during the recent past.
PREREQUISITE: HIST 021 or 6 credits of American Studies
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

45-05-020 CRIMJ 415
Drug Control Policy in Comparative Perspective
DRUG POLICY (3)
Examines the history of drug control policy in the United States; comparisons and contrasts with other countries’ experiences.
PREREQUISITE: CRIMJ 200 or PL SC 001 or PL SC 014 or SOC 001
CROSS LIST: PUBPL 415
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

45-05-021 MATH 441
Matrix Algebra
MATRIX ALGEBRA (3:3:0)
Determinants, matrices, linear equations, characteristic roots, quadratic forms, vector spaces. Students who have passed Math 436 may not schedule this course.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 220
PROPOSED START: SP2018

45-05-022 MATH 444
Mathematical Statistics and Applications I
MATH STAT & AP 1 (3)
Distributions of random variables, special distributions, limiting distributions, sampling, statistical inference, point and interval estimation, orthogonal polynomials, and least squares.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 141
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

45-05-023 PUBPL 415
Drug Control Policy in Comparative Perspective
DRUG POLICY (3)
Examines the history of drug control policy in the United States; comparisons and contrasts with other countries’ experiences.
PREREQUISITE: CRIMJ 200 or PLSC 001 or PLSC 014 or SOC 001
CROSS LIST: CRIMJ 415
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

 Appendix A

UNDERGRADUATE

Health and Human Development

45-05-024 Number Not Assigned

COURSE ADDS

45-05-025 HM 390
Corporate Social Responsibility in Hospitality
CSR HOSPITALITY (3)
This course introduces students to issues of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The course is taught from the hospitality perspective with the following foci. Specifically, this course addresses the general historical development of CSR in detail along with hospitality cases, fundamental concepts of CSR, different arguments for CSR, major frameworks of CSR, sustainability (environmental) issues, and hospitality cases and applications. The course will provide an opportunity to students to analyze CSR programs of major hospitality companies by applying the concepts and practices of CSR discussed in the course. Throughout the course, students will learn the significance of CSR initiatives, not only for the society, but also for the business. The course will discuss how a hospitality company’s CSR initiatives can be strategic so that they will improve brand image, reputation, and relationships with customers, employees and governments, which will result in improved performance for the company.
PREREQUISITE: HM 201
APPROVAL START: SU2017

45-05-026 RPTM 220
Sustainability, Society, and Well-being
SUST SOC WELLBEING (3)
We live in a world increasingly connected via global processes and social networks, and increasingly challenged by exponential growth in demands on our planet’s finite environmental resources. This makes sustainability more of an imperative each day. But what exactly is sustainability? How does it relate to your career in RPTM or to your studies in other departments at Penn State? This course is designed to provide students with strong foundational knowledge about sustainability and how it relates to their career in Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management. To develop students’ understanding of the concept of sustainability, the course explores how interconnected social, economic, and environmental systems have resulted in the contemporary sustainability challenges we face both globally and locally.
PROPOSED START: S12017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-05-027 CSD 301
Acoustic Principles in Communication Sciences and Disorders
ACOU PRIN IN CSD (3:3:0)
Explores the fundamental concepts of acoustics as applied to individuals with communicative disabilities; special emphasis is placed on the acoustic analysis of speech.
PREREQUISITE: CSD 311, CSD 331
APPROVED START:  FA2016

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 341
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: For Communications Sciences and Disorders majors, CSD 301 is a required course requiring a grade of “C” or better, and should be taken during the second or third year (semester standing 3-6). The educational objectives of the course are to introduce students to fundamental concepts of acoustics and to apply those concepts to individuals with communicative disabilities and to the acoustic analysis of speech. The course includes a detailed overview of the physics of sound, sound propagation, sound measurement, the generation, acoustic principles, measurement of speech sounds, and the acoustical analysis of speech for normal and disordered speakers. Students are required to have a scientific calculator capable of exponentiation, logarithms, and trigonometric functions.
PROPOSED START: SP2018

OLD
45-05-028 NUTR 386
Managing Quality in Food and Nutrition Services
MNG QUALITY IN FNS (3)
Application and integration of management theory to quality attainment in food and nutrition services.
PREREQUISITE: HM 329
CONCURRENT: HRIM 330
APPROVED START: FA2014

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: NUTR 386 Managing Quality in Food and Nutrition Services (3) This course is designed to foster the integration of management principles in the profession of nutrition and dietetics. Topics include strategic application of principles of management and systems in the provision of food and nutrition services to individuals and organizations, quality management, health care systems, leadership theory, corporate culture and communication, fiscal management in food and nutrition services, employee staffing, counseling and retention, and marketing. A business plan is also developed, incorporating key operating indicators for organizational structure, marketing and financial objectives.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: HM 329
REMOVE CONCURRENT
PROPOSED START: SP2018

5 YEAR COURSE DROPS

45-05-029 KINES 060
Principles and Practices of Healthful Living
HEALTHFUL LIVING (3:3:0)
Facts and principles as related and applied to the science of living serve as a basis for health instruction and student guidance.
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

45-05-030 NUTR 115
Theory of Exercise and Nutrition for Weight Control
EX NUTR WT CONTROL (1:1:0)
Nutrition application for responsible weight control.
CONCURRENT: ESACT 115
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

45-05-031 NUTR 380H
Leadership Principles in Nutrition Services
LDRSHP IN NUTR SERV (3)
Leadership in Nutritional Services.
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

Appendix A

UNDERGRADUATE

Information Sciences and Technology

45-05-032 Add. New Bachelor of Science in Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations

University Park, College of Information Sciences and Technology

PROFESSOR PENG LIU, Information Sciences and Technology
PROFESSOR CHAO-HSIEN CHU, Information Sciences and Technology

The Bachlor of Science in Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations in the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) is an interdisciplinary program that prepares students for careers as cybersecurity professionals. It educates students on the essential concepts of cyber-defense and the analytical fundamentals of cybersecurity, with a focus on the analytical and risk management underpinnings and associated cyber-defense techniques and strategies for ensuring the safety of online information stored in large and heterogeneous networks that are embedded within and across the complex socio-technical infrastructures that are pervasive in today’s business, government and military organizations. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills needed to critically assess and respond to modern information security threats, using approaches that are grounded in a holistic understanding of adversarial strategies and effective responses. More specifically, it will offer an in-depth and domain-independent approach to the development of skills in cyberdefense technologies, tools and processes; cybersecurity analytics and visualization; and cybersecurity risk analysis and management. The major draws from concepts and skills associated with a number of disciplines, including information science, management science, statistics and data science, human behavior, and law/policy. Graduates will be prepared to join the rapidly growing cybersecurity workforce deployed across organizations of diverse sizes and missions.

Entrance Requirements: To be eligible for the Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations major, students must:

  1. Have completed the following entrance-to-major requirements with a grade of C or better in each: CYBER 100S(3), CYBER 262(3), IST 140(3), IST 210(3), IST 220(3), IST 242(3), STAT 200(3)
  2. Have achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 prior to and through the end of the semester during which the entrance to major is requested.

For the B.S. degree in Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations, a minimum of 125 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in General Education Requirements)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 5 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 93 credits[1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (75 credits)
CAS 100 GWS(3), CYBER 100S(3)[1], CYBER 262(3)[1], IST 140(3)[1], IST 210(3)[1], IST 220(3)[1], IST 230(3)[1], IST 242(3)[1], IST 261(3)[1], MATH 110 GQ(4)[1], SRA 111 GS(3)[1], SRA 211(3)[1], SRA 221(3)[1], STAT 200 GQ(4)[1](Sem: 1-4)
CYBER 342W(3)[1], CYBER 362(3)[1], CYBER 366(3)[1], IST 451(3)[1], IST 454(3)[1], IST 495(1)[1], SRA 231(3)[1], SRA 311(3)[1], SRA 365(3)[1](Sem: 3-6)
CYBER 440(3)[1], IST 456(3)[1](Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 3 credits from: ENGL 15 GWS(3); ENGL 30 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: ENGL 202C GWS(3); ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 12 credits from one of the Application Focus course lists in Appendix B; at least 2 courses must be at the 400-level. Students may also complete a custom Application Focus sequence with approval from an academic advisor and a CYBER teaching faculty member. (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

45-05-033 CYBER 100S
Computer Systems Literacy
COMPSYS LIT (3)
This is an introductory university-level course in computer systems literacy. The history, architecture and operation of computing systems and underlying computing theory are covered. The intent of this course is to ensure that students with diverse backgrounds can gain the information technology fundamental skills and understanding to succeed with subsequent in-depth courses in the Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations curriculum. At the same time the general nature of the introduction may make it useful for other programs that involve education in concepts and skills relating to information and computing systems.
PROPOSED START: SU2017

45-05-034 CYBER 262
Cyber-Defense Studio
CYBER D STUDIO (3)
This studio course teaches four basic hands-on cyber-defense skills: configuring a firewall, implementing a host-based intrusion detection software tool, using the Metasploit tool to do penetration testing, and implementing a network intrusion detection tool.
PREREQUISITE: CYBER 100, IST 140
PROPOSED START: SU2017

45-05-035 CYBER 342W
Cyber Incident Handling and Response
CYBER INCID RESPON (3)
Cyber Incident Handling and Response is an intermediate course appropriate for students who are majoring in Cybersecurity. This course provides the student with the background, experience and perspective that is required to document organizational preparation for cyber incidents, document cyber incident impact and resolution, document response strategies, as well as integrate business continuity planning into the organization. This is a writing intensive course, which requires each student to individually document cyber security incidents and communicate the impact of those incidents to the organization. Peer writing evaluation will help students to consider how effective their written communication skills are.
PREREQUISITE: CYBER 262, SRA 221, SRA 231
PROPOSED START: SU2017

45-05-036 CYBER 362
Cybersecurity Analytics Studio
CYB ANALYT STUDIO (3)
Cyberattacks involve advanced and sophisticated techniques to infiltrate corporate computers, networks and enterprise systems and critical infrastructures. Types of attacks include advanced malware, zero day attacks and advanced persistent threats. Advance warning about attackers and intelligence about the threat landscape is considered by many security leaders to be essential features in cyber-defense. The massive increase in the rate of novel cyberattacks has made data-mining-based analytics techniques a critical component in detecting security threats.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 200, IST 261, CYBER 262
COREQUISITES: SRA 365
PROPOSED START:  SU2017

45-05-037 CYBER 366
Malware Analytics
MALWARE ANALYTICS (3)
Malware Analytics is an intermediate course required for students who are majoring in Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations. It is a three-credit hands-on course that teaches principles and practice of malware detection, analysis, and defense. The course begins by introducing the foundations of malware, including history, vulnerability, types, analysis methods, and defenses.
PREREQUISITE: IST 242, IST 261, CYBER 262
PROPOSED START: SU2017

45-05-038 CYBER 440
Cybersecurity Capstone
CYBER CAPSTONE (3)
Cybersecurity Capstone is an advanced, culminating course for students who are majoring in Cybersecurity. This course provides the student with a practical exercise, designed by the instructor. The initial weeks of the semester provide the student with an overview of several analytic frameworks that are used in cybersecurity shops and organizations.
PREREQUISITE: CYBER 342W, ENGL 202, 7th Semester Standing
PROPOSED START: SU2017

45-05-039 SRA 450
Cyber-Crime and Cyber-Warfare
CYBER CRIME/WAR (3)
​Cyber-crime and cyber-warfare are among the most critical areas facing information security professionals. Both have emerged as strategic issues facing the United States. This importance is recognized by NSA, DHS and industry. This course will familiarize students with the history, tools, methods, players, laws and policies regarding cyber-crime and cyber-warfare. This course will add to the offerings in the MPS Information Security and Forensics major as well as the SRA BS ICS and IAM options.​
PREREQUISITE: 5th Semester Standing or Later
PROPOSED START:  SU2017

Appendix A

UNDERGRADUATE

Liberal Arts

45-05-040 Change. Revise description. Remove AFAM 445, AGEC 430, ANTH 451, ANTH 455, BA 250, 321, CAS 352, 426, 450, CED 450, COMM 405, 410, 419, 489, 490, 491, 492, ECON 315, 333, 342, 390, 432, 436W, 447W, 472, 490, EBF 473, ENNEC 482, 483, FR 407, 408, GEOG 424, 439, 475, HPA 420, 445, HDFS 424, 425, HIST 423, 425, 430, 451, 458, 468, 475, IST 431, 432, 445, 452, LER 411, 445, 470, PHIL 407, 418W, 420, 431, PLSC 490, 441, 481, 487, 490, SOC 444, 447, 455, 456, STAT 220, 470, WMNST 426, and 456 from Additional Courses. Add BA 302, 303, 304, BLAW 243, CAS 403, 404, 470, 475, 426W, 450W, ENGL 460, FR 409, HIST 453, 458Y, 475Y, 486, IB 303, LA 495, LER 201, 414W, 424, 426, SPAN 412, and 413 to Additional Courses.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Business and the Liberal Arts Minor (BUSLA)

Contact: College of the Liberal Arts, Michael Berkman, mbb1@psu.edu

This minor offers fundamental courses in business, the opportunity for more advanced business courses, and Liberal Arts coursework emphasizing entreprenuership, ethics, and a range of perspectives on business.

Only courses in which the student earns a grade of C or better may be counted toward fulfillment of the requirements for the minor.

Students pursuing the Minor in Business and the Liberal Arts are encouraged to use ENGL 202D to satisfy their English 202 requirement. ECON 102 (3) is a required prerequisite for some of the business courses.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 25 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
ACCTG 211(4) (Sem: 3-8)
BA 301(3), PHIL 119 GH(3), LA 202(3) (Sem: 3-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following course list: BA 302(3); BA 303(3); BA 304(3); BLAW 243(3); COMM 385(3); COMM 424(3); COMM 473(3); COMM 493(3); IB 303 IL(3); LA 495(1-12); LER 100 GS(3); LER 201 GS(3); MGMT 100(3) or MGMT 301(3); MGMT 425(3), MGMT 426(3); MKTG 221(3) or MKTG 301(3); MKTG 302(3), MKTG 310(3), MKTG 327(3), MKTG 330(3), MKTG 342(3), SCM 301(3),

Select 6 credits from the following course list:
CAS 403(3); CAS 404(3); CAS 470(3); CAS 475(3); CAS 426W; CAS 450W(3); CAS 452(3); CAS 452W(3); CAS 471 US;IL(3), CRIM 467(3), CRIMJ 460(3), CRIMJ 467(3), ECON 402(3), ECON 412(3), ECON 428(3), ECON 433(3), ECON 434(3), ECON 443(3), ECON 444(3), ECON 445(3), ECON 463 IL(3), ECON 471(3), ENGL 419(3), ENGL 460(3); FR 409 IL(3); GER 308 IL(3), GER 408 IL(3), HIST 445 US(3), HIST 446 US(3), HIST 447 US(3), HIST 453(3); HIST 458Y(3); HIST 475Y(3); HIST 481 IL(3), HIST 486 IL(3); JAPNS 403Y IL(4), JAPNS 404 IL(4), LER 400 IL(3), LER 401(3); LER 414W(3); LER 424(3); LER 425(3); LER 426(3); LER 434(3); LER 437(3); LER 444(3); LER 458Y US(3); LER 460(3); LER 464(3); LER 465(3); PHIL 406(3); PHIL 418(3); PHIL 432(3); PLSC 412(3); PLSC 419(3); PLSC 426(3); PLSC 440 US;IL(3); PLSC 444(3); PLSC 445Y US(3); PLSC 474(3); PSYCH 482(3); PSYCH 484(3); PSYCH 485(3); SOC 420(3); SOC 422(3); SPAN 412(3); SPAN 413(3); SPAN 420(3); WMNST 420 US;IL(3); WMNST 472(3) (Sem: 3-8)


45-05-041 Add. New Creative Writing Minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Creative Writing Minor

Contact: Julia Spicher Kasdorf, jmk28@psu.edu

Abington College, Penn State Altoona, Behrend College, Berks College, Capital College, University Park – Liberal Arts, University College

This minor offers students not majoring in English the opportunity to explore different forms of creative writing–fiction, poetry, and nonfiction–or to focus primarily on one of them. Students receive instruction and practice the art and craft of writing in small, workshop courses.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Some courses may require prerequisites.

For a Minor in Creative Writing, a minimum of 18 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 6 credits of introductory-level courses (200-level): ENGL 212(3); ENGL 213(3); ENGL 214(3); ENGL 215(3); ENGL 281(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 12 credits of advanced -level writing workshop courses (400-level): ENGL 304 WAC(3-12); ENGL 412(3); ENGL 413(3); ENGL 414(3); ENGL 415(3); ENGL 422(3); ENGL 425(3); ENGL 401(3); ENGL 424(3); ENGL 429(3); ENGL 435(3); ENGL 436(3); ENGL 437(3); ENGL 439(3); ENGL 486 IL(3); ENGL 495(3-12) (Sem: 5-8)


45-05-042 Change. Increase the Requirements for the Major from 54-71 to 57-74 credits. Add FR 332 to Prescribed Courses for the Major. Remove FR 407 from Prescribed Courses in the French-Business Option. Add FR 409 to Prescribed Courses in the French-Business Option. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring Semester 2017

French and Francophone Studies

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (FR BS)

PROFESSOR BENEDICTE MONICAT, Head

The B.S. degree is designed to allow students to combine fluency in French with other academic disciplines. The Business option develops basic skills in French (speaking, understanding, reading, writing) and acquaints students with a number of fields essential to business, especially in the international area. The Engineering option has a required overseas study or work component. The Applied French option develops basic skills in French (speaking, understanding, reading, writing) as well as a basic knowledge of French literature and culture. At the same time, it provides a concentration in a professional area in which a command of French can be particularly relevant or useful. Courses in French culture and civilization are essential to all B.S. options, and students are encouraged to participate in the University’s International Studies programs in France.

For the B.S. degree in French and Francophone Studies (all options) a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-13 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 14-18 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 57-74 credits[1]
(This includes 0-13 credits of General Education courses. For the French-Business Option, 0-4 credits of GQ courses; 6-9 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 27 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (24 credits)
FR 201 IL(3), FR 202 IL(3), FR 331 IL(3), FR 332 IL(3), FR 351 IL(3), FR 352 IL(3) (Sem: 1-6)
FR 401 IL(3), FR 402 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from: FR 316(3) or FR 417 IL(3) or FR 418 IL(3) (Sem: 1-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 30-47 credits

FRENCH-BUSINESS OPTION: (47 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (31 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), BA 301(3), BA 303(3), BA 304(3), ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), FR 409 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
FR 430 IL(3), IB 303 IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
Select 4 credits from: SCM 200 GQ(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from: ECON 333 GS(3) or MKTG 445 IL(3), or MGMT 461 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from: MKTG 220(3) or IB 403(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 3 credits in French literature (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits in French at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

FRENCH-ENGINEERING OPTION: (33 credits)
(Open only to students enrolled in an engineering major.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
FR 409 IL(3), FR 430 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (27 credits)
Select 21 credits of engineering courses, including ENGR 295(1-3) and ENGR 395(1-3), in consultation with the engineering adviser (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits in French at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

Note:All French-Engineering majors are required to participate in a one-semester engineering internship in France, arranged by the College of Engineering, during which up to 9 credits in French and up to 12 credits in engineering may be earned. The work experience may take the form of a professional internship (ENGR 195I) or be part of a cooperative education sequence (ENGR 295I, ENGR 395I, or ENGR 495I).

APPLIED FRENCH OPTION: (30 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
FR 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (27 credits)
Select 18 credits in related areas such as Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management; Linguistics; Sociology; Economics; Science, Technology and Society, or in another professional areas where competency in French is desirable. The courses are to be selected in consultation with an adviser. At least six credits of such courses must be at the 400 level. (Sem: 1-8)
Select 9 credits in French at the 400 level. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


45-05-043 Change. Remove Prescribed Courses section. Add SPAN 100, 100A, 100B, 100C, 200, and 301 to Additional Courses. Remove SPAN 414, 415, 440, and 491 from Supporting Courses and Related Areas. Add SPAN 297, 299, 314, 316, 397, 399, 479, 488, and 499 to Supporting Courses and Related Areas. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Spanish Minor (SPAN)

Contact: Altoona College, Roselyn Costantino, rxc19@psu.edu; Behrend College, Soledad Traverso, sxt19@psu.edu; Berks College, Rosario Torres, rzt1@psu.edu; College of the Liberal Arts, Margaret (Peggy) Blue, mmb21@psu.edu

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor. Courses that do not require knowledge of Spanish may not be counted toward the minor.

Scheduling recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from:
SPAN 100(3); SPAN 100A*(3); SPAN 100B(3); SPAN 100C(3) (Sem: 2-6)
SPAN 200(3); SPAN 301*(3) (Sem: 2-6)
SPAN 215(3) or SPAN 253(3) (Sem: 3-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following: SPAN 210(3), SPAN 220(3), SPAN 297(3), SPAN 299 IL(3), SPAN 300(3), SPAN 305(3), SPAN 314(3), SPAN 316(3), SPAN 353(3), SPAN 354(3), SPAN 355(3), SPAN 356(3), SPAN 397(3), SPAN 399 IL(3) (Sem: 2-8)
Select 6 credits from the following: SPAN 410(3), SPAN 412(3), SPAN 413(3), SPAN 418(3), SPAN 420(3), SPAN 439(3), SPAN 472(3), SPAN 476(3), SPAN 479(3), SPAN 488(3), SPAN 490(3), SPAN 497(3), SPAN 499 IL(1-12) (Sem: 5-8)

SPAN 199, 299, 399, and 499 (Study Abroad – Spanish) and SPAN 197, 297, 397, 497 (Special Topics Courses) may also be applied to the Spanish minor and will be substituted for the appropriate course by the Spanish minor advisor. All courses taken abroad must be taught in Spanish.

NOTE: SPAN 130, 131, 230, 231 and any course that does not require a knowledge of Spanish. DO NOT count toward the Spanish minor.

* Heritage speakers (students with Spanish language in family background) and native speakers of Spanish should take SPAN 100A and SPAN 301 instead of SPAN 100 and SPAN 200. May not take SPAN 410.


45-05-044 Change. Remove SPAN 200 from Prescribed Courses. Add SPAN 100B, SPAN 100C, SPAN 200, SPAN 301, SPAN/LTNST 479, and SPAN 488 to Additional Courses. Remove SPAN 414, 415, and 491 from Additional Courses. Move SPAN 210, 220, 297, 299, 300, 305, 314, 316, 353, 354, 355, 356, 397, and 399 from Additional Courses to Supporting Courses and Related Areas. Remove SPAN 414, 415, 491 from Supporting Courses and Related Areas. Add SPAN 479 and 488 to Supporting Courses and Related Areas. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Spanish

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (SPNBA)

PROFESSOR PAOLA (GIULI) DUSSIAS, Head

This major is designed to develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish. In addition, the program aims to acquaint students with the literature and civilization of the Hispanic world and introduce them to the study of Hispanic linguistics. Enough flexibility is provided to permit a degree of concentration in either Hispanic literature or linguistics. Specialized courses are offered in translation techniques and in the use of Spanish for social services. Courses taken in the University’s Education Abroad Program in Spain and Mexico may be applied to the major. In conjunction with the College of Education, students may take work leading to certification as Spanish teachers in the secondary or elementary schools.

Combined with course work in business, social welfare, or bilingual education, the B.A. in Spanish can facilitate entry into a number of professional areas. In addition, it provides the traditional foundation for advanced degree work required for such careers as college teaching and government service. Students are eligible to participate in the University’s Education Abroad Programs.

For the B.A. degree in Spanish, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS course selections)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 18 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 36 credits[1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
SPAN 215(3) (Sem: 3-6)
SPAN 253(3) (Sem: 3-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 3 credits from: SPAN 100(3) or SPAN 100A(3)* or SPAN 100B(3) or SPAN 100C(3) (Sem: 2-6)
Select 3 credits from: SPAN 200(3) or SPAN 301(3) (Sem: 2-6)
Select 3 credits of 400-level Hispanic Literature: SPAN 439(3), SPAN 472(3), SPAN 476(3), SPAN/LTNST 479 GH;US(3); SPAN 488(3); SPAN 490(3), SPAN 497(1-9) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits of 400-level Hispanic Linguistics: SPAN 418(3), SPAN 497(1-9) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following 200- and 300-level course list: SPAN 210(3), SPAN 220(3), SPAN 297(3), SPAN 299 IL(3), SPAN 300(3), SPAN 305(3), SPAN 314(3), SPAN 316(3), SPAN 353(3), SPAN 354(3), SPAN 355(3), SPAN 356(3), SPAN 397(3), SPAN 399 IL(3) (Sem: 3-8)

Select 9 credits from the following 400-level course list: SPAN 410(3)*, SPAN 412(3), SPAN 413(3), SPAN 418(3), SPAN 420(3), SPAN 439(3), SPAN 472(3), SPAN 476(3), SPAN 479(3), SPAN 488(3), SPAN 490(3), SPAN 497(3), SPAN 499 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

* Heritage speakers (students with Spanish language in family background but not necessarily a native speaker) should take SPAN 100A and SPAN 301 instead of SPAN 100 and SPAN 110.

COURSE ADDS

45-05-045 ANTH  140 (GS;US;IL)
Anthropology of Alcohol
ANTH OF ALCOHOL (3)
This class provides a lively tour around the world and through the millennia, telling the compelling story of humanity’s quest for alcohol. Beginning about 10,000 years ago, humans in China and the Middle East became more sedentary and began to rely more on the food they grew than from hunting and gathering. The cereal grains these early societies relied upon, such as rice, wheat, and barley, soon formed the basis for the first alcoholic beverages. Relying on ethnographic, biological, linguistic, and archaeological data, the course will introduce students to what we now know about how humans created and currently use fermented beverages across cultures.
PROPOSED START: S12017

45-05-046 PLSC 477 (US)
Sex, Race, & Justice: The U.S. Supreme Court and Equality
SEX RACE & JUSTI (2)
The American judicial system has played an active role in policing the rights of disadvantaged groups in American history. In this course, we will draw upon political science and legal approaches to examine the judiciary’s approach to ensuring equality through an examination of cases involving same-sex rights, affirmative action, and voting rights. We will explore difficult questions such as: How does the Court define equality? Are justices’ decisions driven by law, ideology, or both? Is the current Supreme Court particularly activist? Readings include course cases, newspaper articles, and essays from political science and law journals.
PREREQUISITE: PLSC 1
PROPOSED START: S12017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-05-047 ENGL 304(M)
Honors Seminar in English: Creative Writing
HONORS COURSE (3-12)
Reading, group discussions, and oral and written reports on various specific authors and literary works.
APPROVED START:  FA2005
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015  or ENGL 030; approval of the departmental Honors Committee

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 411(M)
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 137, ENGL 138
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-05-048 ENGL 407
History of the English Language
HIST ENGL LANG (3:3:0)
Historical and structural study of developments in English sounds, forms, inflections, syntax, derivations, and meanings.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 100; ENGL 202A, ENGL 202B, ENGL 202C, or ENGL 202D
APPROVED START:  SP1987

NEW
ADD DESIGNATION: IL
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an accessible overview of the English language-from its earliest beginnings as an insular language to its current place as a global language. One central issue will be the ways in which the external history (culture, political power, geography) of the language has impacted its internal history (spelling, pronunciation, dialect) over time. In the process, we will examine several representative English texts which illustrate significant moments in this long process of language change.
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-05-049 ENGL 450
The Romantics
THE ROMANTICS (3:3:0)
Poets such as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron; also prose by writers such as Hazlitt, Lamb, and DeQuincey.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015  or ENGL 030
APPROVED START:  SP1995

NEW
ADD DESIGNATION: IL
CHANGE CREDITS: 3 per semester/max of 99
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Writers of the British Romantic period (roughly 1790 to 1832) often made sweeping claims for the power of poetry and imagination. Percy Bysshe Shelley contended that “poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world” while John Keats declared that “beauty is truth, truth beauty.” Against the background for political revolution in France, the rise of industrialization and empire, and increasing social instability, Romatic writers turned to nature as a source of the self and looked back to childhood as a site of both innocence and ambivalence. Others turned their efforts to the supernatural and the gothic, hoping to inspire what Samuel Taylor Coleridge called “that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment which constitutes poetic faith.” This course is designed to provide an introduction to the richness and diversity of Romantic-era literature.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 137, ENGL 138
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

OLD
45-05-050 ENGL  471
Rhetorical Traditions
RHET TRADITIONS (3 per semester, maximum of 6)
Introduces major traditions of rhetorical inquiry and their relevance for English studies.  (Section subtitles may appear in the Schedule of Courses.)
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
APPROVED START:  FA1997

NEW
ADD DESIGNATION: IL
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This class will introduce you to communication theories developed in classical Greece and China. Economic globalization and the increased world travel have brought Americans into direct contact with East Asian peoples and their cultures. At the same time, individuals with an East Asian linguistic and cultural background are making a strong presence in the United Sates. The urgency to understand East Asian peoples – their cultures, their languages, and their ways of reasoning – is being felt by a majority of Americans. This class will focus on the rhetorical traditions that have grown out of classical Greece and China. We will not only read ancient and modern texts but also watch movies produced in China and the United States to understand their philosophies, literatures, and communication arts. All readings are in English.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 137 and ENGL 138
PROPOSED START:  SP2018

Appendix A

UNDERGRADUATE

Nursing

COURSE ADDS

45-05-050A NURS 100
First Year Seminar in Nursing
NURS FYS (1)
First year seminars in Nursing will introduce the student to the University and the College of Nursing. The primary focus will be engaging students in learning and orienting them to the scholarly community from the outset of their undergraduate studies in a way that will bridge to later experiences in the nursing major and facilitate the high expectations, demanding workload and other aspects of transition to college life. The course content will focus on enhancing opportunities that enable students to provide a holistic focus on the promotion of human health and initiatives that enhance quality of life.
APPROVED START: S12017

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-05-050B NURS 407 
Drugs of Abuse and Mental Health Issues
DRUGS OF ABUSE (3)
Examines the health care needs across the lifespan of clients who have an alcohol or other drug disorder.
APPROVEED START: SP2017

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION DESIGNATION: (GHW)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: NURS 407 examines the issue of substance abuse in today’s society. It looks closely into the health care needs across the lifespan of clients who have an alcohol or other drug disorder in combination with a psychiatric disorder. Pharmacological, behavioral, biological, and sociocultural characteristics, along with factors and patterns of addiction, are discussed and then how these factors and characteristics relate to mental illnesses are further explored. The different classes of habit-forming drugs (alcohol, stimulants, marijuana, hallucinogens, inhalants and prescription drugs) are covered and various treatment options are examined.
ADD RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: BB H 143 OR PSYCH 100
PROPOSED START: SP2018

Appendix A

UNDERGRADUATE

Science

45-05-050C Change. Add EMSC 441, BIOL 406, 482, GESOC 410, WFS/ERM 436, WFS/ERM 450, WFS 452 and 453 to Supporting Courses and Related Areas. Remove METEO 22 from Supporting Courses and Related Areas. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2017

Marine Sciences Minor

Contact: Dr. Iliana Baums, ibb3@psu.edu

This program provides an excellent opportunity for undergraduates to pursue their interests in the study of the oceans and make more informed decisions about future graduate studies in marine sciences. Although Penn State does not award degrees in this field, a number of faculty pursue research interests in the marine sciences, and a varied selection of undergraduate courses in the marine sciences is available. The student can either complete the requirements for the minor at University Park (UP) or participate in an intensive semester-long oceanography experience at the Southampton, UK, Oceanography Centre (SOC) through education abroad:

The latter option may be of particular interest to students from non-UP locations. SOC has designed a program for PSU students that provides abundant opportunity to participate in shipboard oceanographic research, including a week of day-cruises in the spring and a 2-week series of cruises in June. Students who elect to pursue that minor at UP have the opportunity to receive training as scientific scuba divers through Penn State’s Science Diving Program and participate in a number of other field experiences in the marine sciences.

MARINE SCIENCES MINOR: The Marine Sciences Committee is authorized to award a minor certificate to any undergraduate student regularly enrolled in a degree program at the University who, in addition to satisfying the degree requirements of his or her baccalaureate major, satisfies the requirements for the Marine Sciences minor. The completion of the minor is reflected by a formal notation on the student’s official record at the time of graduation.

To enter the program, a student must have attained at least fourth-semester standing, completed CHEM 112, MATH 111 or MATH 141, and BIOL 110 or their equivalents, and have earned a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.50. To ensure adequate advising and record keeping, the student must apply for the minor in the Marine Sciences program office and must then complete the requirements shown below.

Courses offered by other institutions may be substituted for any of the required courses listed below, if accepted for transfer by the student’s major department and approved by the Marine Sciences Committee. This includes up to 16 transfer credits from SOC. Upon completion of the requirements and no later than the tenth week of the semester in which the student is to graduate, he or she must verify in the Marine Sciences program office that the requirements have been met.

In addition to the entrance requirements shown above, there are prerequisite credits required for courses listed under Supporting Courses and Related Areas.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 19 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
GEOSC 40 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (16 credits)
At least 6 credits of field studies from the following list: EARTH 240(3), EMSC 440(3), EMSC 441(4), BIOL 499A IL(3), BIOL 450(3-5), BIOL 482(4), GEOSC 410(3), or BIOL 496(1-6), ERM 496(1-6), GEOSC 496(1-6), METEO 496(1-6) with consent of instructor and Marine Science Minor (Sem: 5-8)
Students may also wish to transfer 6 credits of field-oriented course work from another institution with prior approval of the chair of the Marine Sciences minor.
Select 10 credits from the following list: BIOL 406(3), BIOL 417(4), GEOSC 410(3), GEOSC 419(3), GEOSC 440(3), METEO 451(3), WFS 435/ERM 435(3), WFS 436/ERM 436(3), WFS 450/ERM 450(3), WFS 452(2), WFS 453(2) (Sem: 5-8)


COURSE CHANGES

OLD
45-05-050D BIOL 400
Teaching in Biology
TEACH BIOL (1-3)
This course will train biology teaching assistants to teach in the laboratory/recitation setting with emphasis on critical thinking skills. Enrollment will be limited to students of at least fifth semester standing that have been accepted as teaching assistants for biology.
PREREQUISITE: Enrollment will be limited to students of at lease fifth semester standing who are or have been accepted as teaching assistants in a life science course.
APPROVED START: FA2006

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-6
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course will train biology teaching assistants to teach in the laboratory/ recitation setting with emphasis on critical thinking skills. Enrollment will be limited to students of at least fifth semester standing that have been accepted as teaching assistants for biology. BIOL 400 BIOL 400 Teaching in Biology (1-3) This course provides teaching assistants with the fundamentals they will need to be effective in the laboratory and/or recitation classroom. Students will learn the fundamental skills needed to; design lesson plans; facilitate class discussions; write effective quizzes; communicate learning expectations; grade fairly; and in the case of the laboratory setting, maintain a safe learning environment. Students enrolled in this course will also be serving as teaching assistants and consequently faculty who serve as course instructors and/or lab coordinators in the relevant course will provide the instruction. Through regular meetings the course instructors will help teaching assistants adjust to their duties and solve common problems that arise in the laboratory/recitation environment. Emphasis will be placed on how teaching assistants can facilitate active learning and help their students develop sound study skills. Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated on regular attendance, organization in and preparation for their teaching, and clarity in how they communicate with their students.
ADD PREREQUISITE: 5th semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2018

APPENDIX C
Medicine

45-05-051 DERM 740A
Clinical Elective in Dermatology
Clin Derm Electv (2.5)
The Clinical Dermatology elective is a TWO-week course that is designed to cover the skin conditions that are most germane to any general practitioner. The course will provide an introduction to several common diseases that affect the skin and their diagnosis, pathology, and treatment. This course is focused on the most common and most important diseases and therapies from a public health standpoint. This course is not suggested for students pursuing a career in dermatology (the 4-week elective [DERM 732] is suggested for these students).
Course material will be presented in the form of workplace teaching in the clinic, microscopic teaching in the dermatopathology practice site, and readings from textbooks and online learning modules. Central themes of the course are visual recognition of the cutaneous findings and the ability to accurately describe these findings. Patient care hinges upon first visualizing the abnormality after which the descriptive terminology can facilitate the generation of a differential diagnosis.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Phase I
APPROVED START:  SP2017

45-05-052 HMN 723
Communications
Communications (3)
This 12 week course during the second year of Phase I focuses on the application of verbal, nonverbal, and written communication skills in the context of patient care, team dynamics, and leadership. Communication builds on theoretical framework for communication skills presented in earlier humanities courses to help students construct a practical toolbox of skills as well as the opportunity for the application and rehearsal of skills in realistic patient-care related scenarios. There is heavy emphasis on self-reflection and self-assessment in order to provide students with the skills necessary to improve their communication skills lifelong.
During the course, students will progress through four modules: 1) Self, which focuses on self-assessment of internal bias, assumptions, and values, and how these individual characteristics impact the way we communicate as providers and team members, 2) Dyads, which is the most intensive portion of the course, and focuses on specific skills such as techniques for establishing rapport, nonverbal communication, silence, listening, asking/questions, and framing statements, 3) Teams, which expands the techniques and insights learned during modules 1 and 2 for application in scenarios involving interprofessional teams and families, and 4) Systems, which focuses on the role of good communication within a healthcare system, including a session on communication skills of effective leaders, and a case study that explores the impact of a patient-related communication breakdown on a health care institution. Each session may involve pre-reading, and will begin with a short large-group interactive session related to the day’s topic. The majority of each session will be devoted to small group workshops facilitated by trained faculty during which students can apply skills to a standardized patient care scenario.
The course will be offered once annually during Phase I of the Undergraduate Medical education Curriculum.
CONCURRENT: Head/Neck Anatomy FPCC 723, NBS 723, SHS 721
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-053 MSDR 713
Musculoskeletal System Dermatology Rheumatology
MSDR (3.5)
The Musculoskeletal System Dermatology Rheumatology (MSDR) course aims to give learners an organized educational experience that is broad yet practical, and integrates orthopedic, rheumatologic, and dermatologic diseases. The pathogenesis, recognition of clinical findings, diagnostic procedures and introduction to therapies pertinent to general medical practice will be prominent. Material will complement students’ work on clinical skills in Foundations of Patient Centered Care (FPCC) and the concurrent Anatomy course. This course is presented annually during Phase I (Foundational Medical Sciences – the first phase of medical school) of the medical school curriculum and is a required course for all medical students. Assessment methods are discussed in the Evaluation Methods section.
CONCURRENT: HMN 713, SHS 711, FPCC 713 Anatomy
APPROVED START: FA2016

45-05-054 PAS 759
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery I
Plastic Surgery I (5)
PAS 759 is an elective rotation in the clinical curriculum of the Penn State Physician Assistant Program. This rotation will provide students with the requisite knowledge and clinical experiences for preparing the student to care for patients with a plastic and reconstructive surgery complaint treated in the plastic and reconstructive surgery setting. Students may assist with procedures and will perform history and physical examinations and medical consultations for patients with a plastic and reconstructive surgery related complaint. Students may be part of the pre-treatment planning for a patient about to undergo plastic and reconstructive surgery which includes the identification of indications and contraindications for a patient about to undergo plastic and reconstructive surgery. Students may also play a role in the post treatment management of patients who have undergone plastic and reconstructive surgical procedures. These exposures that the students have during this rotation will prepare them for their clinical role in taking care of patients throughout their lifespan in various types of clinical settings which includes the care of the patient with a plastic and reconstructive surgery-related complaint or complication.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum. This is an elective course in the primary care sequence. This course will occur following the completion of at least 6 core clinical rotation courses.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth five credits.
APPROVED START: SP2017

45-05-055 PAS 760
Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgery I Elective Rotation
CT Surgery I (5)
PAS 760 Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgery I is an optional course offered as an elective Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgery rotation which involves the evaluation and management of patients who present for care in a Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgery setting. Students will gain experience in their ability to stabilize, evaluate, and manage patients in a Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgery setting. Students will gain proficiency in identifying patients with clinical presentations that need immediate attention and those conditions which can be treated in a less urgent manner. Students will gain an appreciation of how care is delivered in a Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgery setting which has significant differences from the care that is rendered in other health care settings, for example, the immediate availability of clinical interventions such as diagnostic imaging, electrocardiography, laboratory studies, and the availability of consultants such as surgeons and trauma personnel. Students will gain an appreciation of how Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgery departments function in the overall delivery of health care services within the US Health care delivery system. Students will be able to apply knowledge and skills from the pre-clinical curriculum to these patients who often have complex and urgent health care needs. Students will also gain exposure to the patient care mix for people who are presenting to a Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgery setting and may gain exposure to the typical roles that certified physician assistants play in the delivery of care in this setting.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth five credits. This rotation will be offered during rotations 4 through 9 during the fall and spring semesters.
APPROVED START: SP2017

45-05-056 PAS 761
Neurology I Elective Rotation
Neuro I (5)
PAS 759 is an elective rotation in the clinical curriculum of the Penn State Physician Assistant Program. This rotation will provide students with the requisite knowledge and clinical experiences for preparing the student to care for patients with a neurology complaint for a patient who is treated in the neurology setting. Students may assist with procedures and will perform history and physical examinations and medical consultations for patients with a neurology related complaint. Students may be part of the pretreatment planning for a patient about to undergo neurology which includes the identification of indications and contraindications for a patient with a neurological condition. Students may also play a role in the post treatment management of patients who have undergone neurological treatments. These exposures that the students have during this rotation will prepare them for their clinical role in taking care of patients throughout their lifespan in various types of clinical settings which includes the care of the patient with a neurological related complaint or complication.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum. This is an elective course in the primary care sequence. This course will occur following the completion of at least 6 core clinical rotation courses.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth five credits.
APPROVED START: SP2017

45-05-057 PAS 762
Critical Care Medicine I Elective Rotation
Critical Care Medi (5)
PAS 762 Critical Care Medicine I is as an elective rotation which involves the evaluation and management of patients who present for care in a Critical Care Medicine setting. Students will gain experience in their ability to stabilize, evaluate, and manage patients in a Critical Care Medicine setting. Students will gain proficiency in identifying patients with clinical presentations that need immediate attention and those conditions which can be treated in a less urgent manner. Students will gain an appreciation of how care is delivered in a Critical Care Medicine setting which has significant differences from the care that is rendered in other health care settings, for example, the immediate availability of clinical interventions such as diagnostic imaging, electrocardiography, laboratory studies, and the availability of consultants such as surgeons and trauma personnel. Students will gain an appreciation of how Critical Care Medicine departments function in the overall delivery of health care services within the US Health care delivery system.  Students will be able to apply knowledge and skills from the pre-clinical curriculum to these patients who often have complex and urgent health care needs. Students will also gain exposure to the patient care mix for people who are presenting to a Critical Care Medicine setting and may gain exposure to the typical roles that certified physician assistants play in the delivery of care in this setting.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth five credits. This rotation will be offered during rotations 4 through 9 during the fall and spring semesters.
APPROVED START: SP2017

45-05-058 PAS 764
Palliative Medicine I Elective Rotation
Palliative Medicin (5)
PAS 764 Palliative Medicine I is as an elective rotation which involves the evaluation and management of patients who present for care in a Palliative Medicine setting. Students will gain experience in their ability to stabilize, evaluate, and manage patients in a Palliative Medicine setting. Students will gain proficiency in identifying patients with clinical presentations that need immediate attention and those conditions which can be treated in a less urgent manner. Students will gain an appreciation of how care is delivered in an Palliative Medicine setting which has significant differences from the care that is rendered in other health care settings, for example, the immediate availability of clinical interventions such as diagnostic imaging, electrocardiography, laboratory studies, and the availability of consultants such as surgeons and trauma personnel. Students will gain an appreciation of how Palliative Medicine departments function in the overall delivery of health care services within the US Health care delivery system.  Students will be able to apply knowledge and skills from the pre-clinical curriculum to these patients who often have complex and urgent health care needs. Students will also gain exposure to the patient care mix for people who are presenting to a Palliative Medicine setting and may gain exposure to the typical roles that certified physician assistants play in the delivery of care in this setting.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth five credits. This rotation will be offered during rotations 4 through 9 during the fall and spring semesters.
APPROVED START: SP2017

45-05-059 PAS 765
Burn Surgery Elective Rotation
Burn I (5)
PAS 765 is an elective rotation in the clinical curriculum of the Penn State Physician Assistant Program. This rotation will provide students with the requisite knowledge and clinical experiences for preparing the student to care for patients with a burn injury or specific skin condition. Students may assist in the operating room and will perform history and physical examinations and medical consultations for patients with burn injuries. Students may be part of the preoperative planning for a patient about to undergo surgery which includes the identification of indications and contraindications for a patient about to undergo surgery. Students may also play a role in the postoperative management of patients who have undergone surgery. These exposures that the students have during this rotation will prepare them for their clinical role in taking care of patients throughout their lifespan in various types of
clinical settings which includes the care of the patient with a musculoskeletal complaint or complication.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth five credits. This is an elective rotation so it will ordinarily only occur during rotations four through nine.
APPROVED START: SP2017

45-05-060 PAS 766
Urgent Care I Rotation
Urgent Care I (5)
PAS 766 Urgent Care I is an optional course that falls under the ambulatory care rotation which involves the evaluation and management of patients who present for care in an urgent care setting. Students will gain experience in their ability to stabilize, evaluate, and manage patients in an urgent care setting. Students will gain proficiency in identifying patients with clinical presentations that need immediate attention and those conditions which can be treated in a less urgent manner. Students will gain an appreciation of how care is delivered in an urgent care setting which has significant differences from the care that is rendered in other health care settings, for example, the immediate availability of clinical interventions such as diagnostic imaging, electrocardiography, laboratory studies, and the availability of consultants such as surgeons and trauma personnel. Students will gain an appreciation of how urgent care departments function in the overall delivery of health care services within the US Health care delivery system.  Students will be able to apply knowledge and skills from the pre-clinical curriculum to these patients who often have complex and urgent health care needs. Students will also gain exposure to the patient care mix for people who are presenting to an urgent care setting and may gain exposure to the typical roles that certified physician assistants play in the delivery of care in this setting.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth five credits.
APPROVED START: SP2017

45-05-061 PAS 767
Urgent Care II Elective Rotation
Urgent Care II (5)
PAS 767 Urgent Care II is as an elective rotation which involves the evaluation and management of patients who present for care in an Urgent Care setting. Students will gain experience in their ability to stabilize, evaluate, and manage patients in a Urgent Care setting. Students will gain proficiency in identifying patients with clinical presentations that need immediate attention and those conditions which can be treated in a less urgent manner. Students will gain an appreciation of how care is delivered in an Urgent Care setting which has significant differences from the care that is rendered in other health care settings, for example, the immediate availability of clinical interventions such as diagnostic imaging, electrocardiography, laboratory studies, and the availability of consultants such as surgeons and trauma personnel. Students will gain an appreciation of how Urgent Care departments function in the overall delivery of health care services within the US Health care delivery system.  Students will be able to apply knowledge and skills from the pre-clinical curriculum to these patients who often have complex and urgent health care needs. Students will also gain exposure to the patient care mix for people who are presenting to an Urgent Care setting and may gain exposure to the typical roles that certified physician assistants play in the delivery of care in this setting.
PREREQUISITE: Penn State Graduate Physician Assistant Student enrolled in the Clinical Education Curriculum.
CONCURRENT: The student will be enrolled in three clinical preceptorships during each of the clinical educational semesters. Since students have their clinical preceptorships provided to them on an individual basis, the ordering of these rotational experiences will vary among the students with the commonality that each rotational experience is 5 weeks in length and worth five credits. This rotation will be offered during rotations 4 through 9 during the fall and spring semesters.
APPROVED START: SP2017

45-05-062 SURG 733
Plastic Surgery Elective for 3rd Year Students
MS3PLASTSURG1MO (5)
Plastic Surgery is a broad surgical specialty in which cosmetic surgery has a relatively small part. This independent one-month rotation has been designed to allow interested 3rd-year medical students at Penn State an in-depth exposure to the unique elements of academic plastic surgery. In addition to mastering specialized surgical techniques and applications, plastic surgeons also frequently collaborate with many other types of surgical specialists for specific problems. The duration of this rotation will improve the frequency of such interactions in addition to strengthening the students’ overall experience.
During their rotation, students will be expected to pre-round on patients whom they have been following, write notes, round with the Plastic Surgery team every morning, and present and help manage their patients. They will then report to the assigned clinic or OR. They will attend the division didactic sessions. Students will typically be expected to participate in weekend duties on two separate weekends including pre-rounding, rounding with the team, and presenting assigned patients to the on-call attending. Students may elect to participate in any emergencies that present over the weekends, as well.
Students should expect to gain exposure in many if not all of the major areas of Plastic Surgery including, but not limited to, oncologic breast reconstruction, general reconstructive surgery (e.g., traumatic and/or oncologic wound coverage, Mohs closures), pediatric craniofacial surgery (e.g., cleft lips and cranial vault remodeling), skin oncology (e.g., cancer resection and reconstruction), hand/wrist surgery (e.g., peripheral nerve decompression and fracture fixation), microsurgery, burn care, cosmetic surgery, treatment of facial fractures, and pressure sore care. To facilitate this experience, students will generally be assigned to 1week sub-rotations in the following categories: Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery, Hand/Upper Extremity Surgery, Reconstructive (General, Breast, and Trauma) Surgery, and Skin Oncology/Mohs reconstruction. Students can gain additional responsibilities as determined by their level of comprehension and should anticipate assisting in operations, as is feasible and appropriate.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of the first two years of medical school. Students will not be permitted to participate in both a 2-week Plastic Surgery rotation during their Surgery Clerkship and a 1-month third-year elective in Plastic Surgery (except by direct permission from the clerkship director).
APPROVED START: SP2017

45-05-063 THS 743
Translating Health Systems Science to the Clinical Setting
Health Systems Wk (2.5)
This course is designed to help apply concepts of patient safety, quality improvement, value, and teams to the clinical setting and build upon previous learned Public Health principles. The goal is to guide learning in these concepts so that the student will have base knowledge to help improve care of patients and the health system in which they will work during the fourth year of medical school, residencies, and beyond. The content of this course endeavors to help students become “systems thinkers”. By design, this course emphasizes teamwork, an essential component in providing quality care. Opportunities will be provided in this course to actively identify patient safety issues and develop a quality improvement project proposal. Additional resources will be provided so that students may continue their learning on health systems after the course is completed. This course is presented annually during Phase III-Discovery Phase, which typically bridges the third to fourth year for most medical students within the College of Medicine curriculum.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Phase I curriculum
APPROVED START: SP2017

APPENDIX D
Penn State Law

45-05-064 BUSLW 952
Secured Transactions
SECURED TRANS (3)
This course deals with the creation, enforcement, and priorities of personal property security interests under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and related statutes. It addresses:(a) encumbrances on consumer, commercial, and industrial goods, (b) inventory and receivables financing for manufacturers, distributors, and dealers, and (c) personal property agricultural financing. Relevant provisions of other Articles of the UCC and other state and federal statutes are integrated into the course as required
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-065 BUSLW 954
Nonprofit Organizations
NONPROFIT ORGS (3)
This course presents an overview of laws and policies that affect the nonprofit  sector, a vital component of national and international economies. Students will examine alternative legal structures (including how to form a nonprofit corporation under U.S. law), federal and selected state tax laws, fiduciary duties of governing boards, charitable gifting rules, restrictions on private inurement, and the important roles played by nonprofits nationally and globally. The course will permit students to examine specific legal issues relating to selected nonprofit organizations such as religious organizations, private schools, hospitals and long-term care facilities, social clubs, trade and professional organizations or political organizations. Students may engage in comparative examination of practices and foreign laws of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs).
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-066 BUSLW 955
Agency, Partnerships, and Limited Liability Entities
AGENCY&PARTNERSHIP (3)
This course surveys the law of unincorporated business entities. The agency law part of the course will focus on agents’ powers and responsibilities, liabilities of principals for acts of agents, and termination of the agency relationship. The partnership law part of the course will cover the fiduciary obligations of partners, partners’ management and property rights, and partnership dissolutions. The final part of the course will examine the “new” limited liability entities now provided for by the law of all states, with emphasis on the formation, organization, and dissolution of limited liability companies. Although not a prerequisite, this course is strongly recommended for students planning to enroll in Corporations.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-067 BUSLW 956
Agricultural Law
AGRICULTURAL LAW (3)
This course will introduce students to the range of current and emerging issues that confront agricultural producers, agri-business firms, and other segments of that broader sector of the economy referred to as the “food industry.” The course will address a variety of issues including the history and objectives of agricultural policy, land use planning for agricultural activities, resource use and allocation, industrialization in the agricultural sector, intergenerational transfers of farm businesses, international trade, and ethical issues that confront practitioners.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-068 BUSLW 958
Business Planning for Small Business Enterprises
BUS PLAN SMALL BUS (3)
Selected practical problems involving the planning of business transactions, with emphasis upon the small business enterprise, are examined. Topics include: organization of close corporations, partnerships and LLCs; employee compensation; sexual harassment and discrimination issues; executive hiring negotiations; and raising capital through the sale of securities. This course is strongly suggested for anyone who plans on representing businesses. NOTE: Due to course content overlap, students may not enroll in Representing the Entrepreneur (CCLAW 983) and this course.
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: TAXLW 949, BUSLW 963
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-069 BUSLW 961
Bankruptcy
BANKRUPTCY (3)
The rights, duties, and remedies of both debtor and creditor are examined. The course covers the collection process, enforcement of money judgments, and insolvency proceedings. Federal bankruptcy law is emphasized.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-070 BUSLW 962
The U.S. Law of Arbitration
US LAW ARBITRATION (3)
This course provides an introduction to the domestic law and practice of arbitration. It assesses the statutory and decisional law basis for arbitration, especially the provisions of the Federal Arbitration Act. It investigates the central doctrinal issues in the field: the enforceability of unilaterally-imposed arbitration agreements, the arbitrability of statutory rights — in particular, civil rights matters, and the use of contract to establish the law of arbitration between the arbitrating parties. Emphasis is placed upon practical problems that have emerged in the practice of arbitration law: the selection of arbitrators, the use of discovery and evidence-gathering in arbitral proceedings, and the content of arbitration agreements. The course also addresses the new uses of arbitration in consumer, health, and employment fields.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-071 BUSLW 963
Corporations
CORPORATIONS (3)
This course primarily addresses organization and operation of commercial organizations in the Anglo-American community. Preliminarily, sole proprietorships and partnerships are considered, after which corporations-for-profit are emphasized with some attention to business trusts and non-profit corporations. In the corporate context, duties of promoters, directors, officers, and other insiders are considered. Availability in the U.S. of the derivative action is treated in terms of both unincorporated and corporate forms of organization. Also treated are the basics of securities regulation at the federal and state levels in the U.S. and the provincial level in Canada.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-072 BUSLW 964
Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisitions I
BUS PLN FOR M&A I (3)
This course first focuses on various topics that are important in M&A transactions involving both closely-held and publicly-held corporations, including directors’ duties, shareholder voting and dissenters’ rights, basic issues under the Federal securities laws, fundamentals of Federal income taxation and accounting, use of modern valuation techniques, including DCF and CAPM, in M&A, and basic issues in antitrust and pre-merger notification. The course then turns to an analysis of various forms of negotiated acquisition, including acquisitions of stock and assets of closely-held corporations and acquisitions of publicly-held corporations in negotiated transactions. The course is based on the first half of Thompson, Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisitions: Corporate, Securities, Tax, Antitrust, International, and Related Aspects (2008).
PREREQUISITE: BUSLW 963
APRPOVED START: FA2017

45-05-073 BUSLW 968
Multinational Corporations
MULTINATIONAL CORP (3)
This course will introduce students to the multinational corporation as object and source of law and legal regulation, and the role of multinational corporations in world affairs. The course has been developed for both upper-class law students and students in the School of International Affairs who have completed their first year course work. Globalization is central to the study of the regulatory and policy framework of multinational corporations, and their relationships with states and other non-state actors. Since the early 1970s, with their huge market power and advanced R&D capabilities, MNCs have been seen by some astute observers as purveyors of global efficiency, while at the same time being accused by others of using their transnational leverage and largesse to foster economic and technological dependency, especially among the developing nations. Ironically, however, this once “highly politicized” latter view seems to have given way to a more balanced perspective; most nations are scurrying around to ensure their economies can secure high levels of foreign investment from MNCs so they can better integrate with the mainstream of the international economy. With globalization’s objectives of reducing the barriers to the movement of people, capital and technology across the globe, the MNC has been able to penetrate economies in virtually every part of the world. The result has been a fundamental shift in the relationship of multinational corporations to both law and public policy. With the deepening of the framework and legal structures of globalization, multinational corporations have been transformed from a mere object of law making, like individuals, to organizations that themselves now create law and legal structures. Additionally, the frameworks within which multinational corporations now serve as both objects and sources of law has expanded from relations only with the domestic legal orders of states to deep association with governance structures at the international level, including those of both public and private entities. Students will first consider the conceptual framework within which MNCs operate, including its business and legal forms, its relations with states and international organizations. Students will then consider MNC regulation by home and host states, and then examine the emerging system of international regulation by public bodies and through transnational systems of self regulation.
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: BUSLW 963
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-074 BUSLW 969
Insurance Law
INSURANCE LAW (3)
Many types of insurance such as auto, health, and homeowners insurance are mandatory. Consequently, insurance law, which developed from tort and contract law, impacts both the personal and professional lives of attorneys and it is an integral area of the law for numerous practice settings including personal injury, insurance defense, and in-house counsel. The course addresses the subject of insurance law from both a theoretical and practical perspective. It covers the fundamentals of all major lines of insurance: property, life, health, disability, liability and auto. It also covers “claims made” insurance, insurers’ defense obligations, insurer bad faith, broker liability, the rules of insurance policy interpretation, and the role of public policy in insurance law.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-075 BUSLW 976
Advanced Torts
ADVANCED TORTS (3)
This course focuses on torts not involving physical injury, such as misrepresentation, defamation, invasion of privacy, interference with business relations, and misuse of legal procedure. These subjects are not ordinarily covered in the four-hour Torts course required in the first year, but have become burgeoning areas of potential liability due to the emergence of electronic communications. An effort will be made to integrate substantive doctrine and practice implications with legal, economic, political and social theory.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-076 BUSLW 978
Payment Systems and Financial Transactions
PAY SYS/FIN TRANS (3)
Payment Systems and Financial Transactions is a general overview of the law of negotiable instruments (e.g., checks), and other mechanisms for making payments, including credit cards, debit cards, ACH payments, and wire transfers. The course also will cover credit enhancement systems such as guaranties and letters of credit. The course will address both uniform state law (UCC Articles 3, 4, 4A, and 5), and applicable federal statutes and regulations (such as the Expedited Funds Availability Act, the Truth-in-Lending Act, and the Electronic Fund Transfers Act).
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-077 BUSLW 979
Regulation of Financial Institutions
REG FINANCIAL INST (3)
This course will focus on the regulation of commercial banks in the U.S, and will include an overview of the regulation of other financial institutions, such as insurers, securities brokers-dealers and investment companies.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-078 BUSLW 980
International Commercial Transactions
INTL COMM TRANS (3)
In 1991 U.S. international trade (imports and exports) accounted for roughly 10% of the GDP in 2011 the same figure rose to approximately 16%, and the trend is toward greater relevance of international trade. This data does not include foreign direct investment and other international activities. A vast part of the American economy depends on international transactions. An understanding of the rules governing international commercial transactions is a fundamental tool for virtually any business lawyer, policy maker, judge or businessperson. Few legal professionals do not encounter international business transactions in their job, and a career in this area can be rewarding and exciting. This course offers an in-depth introduction to the regulation of international commercial transactions from the U.S. point of view, framing it in its complex economic, political, and historical contexts. The course has both practical and theoretical goals. From a practical point of view, to understand how to negotiate, draft, manage and litigate international contracts and transactions is obviously essential to practice law not only internationally, but also nationally. From a more theoretical point of view, the course has an interdisciplinary approach that considers, in particular, economic and political causes and consequences of trade regulations; and includes a comparative component that helps students to both understand better their own legal systems, and think “out of the box.” Course participants will embark in a journey around the world. More specifically, the course covers the following topics. First, it focuses on international sales of goods and services, examining in particular the Convention on the International Sales of Goods (also comparing it with the U.C.C.), documentary sales, countertrade, agency and distributorship agreements, regulations of imports and exports, and currency controls. We will then discuss licensing agreements for the use of intellectual property (trademarks and patents), and direct investments through the establishment of foreign subsidiaries and joint-ventures abroad. Issues arising in international business will be analyzed, such as corruption and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, violations of human rights by corporations doing business abroad, expropriation, sovereign immunity and act of state. A final part of the course will concentrate on fundamental contractual provisions, common in most international transactions and particularly relevant in case of litigation, such as choice of forum, choice of law, enforcement of foreign judgments, and international arbitration. The major international organizations that regulate trade and finance, such as the WTO and the IMF, will be considered. As mentioned, while the course focuses on technical legal issues, emphasis will be put also on economic and political considerations affecting the regulation of international business, therefore the course might appeal not only to law students, but also to students of economics, business administration, international affairs, and political science.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-079 BUSLW 981
Law Firm as a Business
LAW FIRM BUSINESS (2)
The finance topics will include the computation of profitability in a partnership, analysis of the common “American Lawyer” metrics, and the pricing of services. The HR topics will include promotion to partnership, categories of partnership and partnership compensation policies. The marketing segment will cover the increasing trends for companies to retain individual lawyers, not firms, and for firms to “pitch” for a significant portion of their work, and the IT portion will briefly review the importance of knowledge management and the movement of clients to perform “tech audits” of their lawyers. In addition, the course will review macro trends in the legal industry, including the use of so-called alternative pricing arrangements, globalization and mergers, stagnant demand for services of large law firms, shift of more work to in-house legal departments and other competitors, and the de-institutionalization of client relationships.
PREREQUISITE: PRORP 934
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-080 BUSLW 982
Products Liability
PRODUCTS LIABILITY (2)
This course incorporates and expands the concepts derived from the basic Torts, Contracts, and Uniform Commercial Code coverage of products liability. Emphasis will be on the substantive and procedural law of contract, negligence, and strict liability developed by courts and administrative tribunals. Proposals for legislative reforms will also be studied.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-081 BUSLW 984
Sales
SALES (3)
Article Two of the Uniform Commercial Code is an integrated body of statutory law that prescribes the rights and obligations of parties involved in transactions in goods. Although we will review general principles of contract law and contrast them with the approach adopted in Article Two, this course emphasizes the special techniques of statutory construction utilized in interpreting a code as opposed to an isolated statute. Classroom discussion is devoted almost exclusively to developing analyses of written problems distributed to the students in advance of the class. The problems require students to fashion arguments based on the statutory language. The problems also require students to develop an understanding of the legal and commercial context based on the assigned readings, and then to interpret the statutory language in light of this context. The course topics are: code methodology (including the history and jurisprudence of Article Two), contract formation and interpretation, performance obligations, breach and remedies.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-082 BUSLW 986
Federal Securities Regulation
FED SECURITIES REG (3)
This course is intended to provide an overview of the federal securities laws. Securities regulation plays a crucial role in many different fields of business law, and every lawyer should have at least a basic knowledge of its general principles. The course focuses on issues such as the offering of securities, civil liabilities connected with the sale and purchase of financial instruments, insider trading, proxy voting and M&As, takeovers, stock exchanges and brokers/dealers regulation. Specific attention is devoted to securities litigation aspects, including class actions.
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: BUSLW 963
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-083 BUSLW 989
Business and Financial Concepts
BUS & FIN CONCEPTS (1)
This course will introduce students to basic business and financial concepts. All law students should consider taking this course, particularly students who do not have extensive knowledge of or experience in business. Topics will include an overview of various common business entities, corporate governance, types of investors, securities, securities markets, insurance and banking. It will consider the basic legal environment of business enterprise, including taxation, securities and investor protection regulation. The course will also include an overview of basic business information, financial statements and basic accounting principles, valuation techniques and other financial tools for decision-making. The course is intended to provide students with a basic familiarity with business and financial concepts that regularly arise in the representation of a business enterprise, whether in litigation or transactional matters. The course will also provide information for law students about business issues that are common to legal practice but under-explored during the first year of law school.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-084 BUSLW 991
Antitrust
ANTITRUST (3)
This course is principally an examination of antitrust law and policy in the U.S. as evolved through prosecutions by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission. There is brief coverage of: (a) European Union and Canadian competition laws plus evolving proposals for supranational norms; and (b) leading market regulatory schemes such as those affecting marketing of foods, drugs, textiles, toxic substances, securities, and consumer products. In the antitrust area, commercial conduct alleged to violate price fixing, market allocation, tying, exclusive dealing, asset acquisition, and price discrimination norms are considered at length with some attention to state antitrust law.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-085 BUSLW 993
Merger Finance and Economics
Merger Fin & Econ (2)
The purposes of the course are to provide the student with (1) a fundamental understanding of the finance and economics of the M&A marketplace, and (2) the basic skills needed to succeed in various professional capacities in the M&A marketplace, such as investment banker, management consultant, strategic planner, and lawyer.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-086 COCR 900
45-05-000 BUSLW 994
Telecommunications Law and Regulation
TELECOM LAW & REG (3)
This course will examine and debate a series of legal and regulatory issues raised by spectrum management, broadcasting, cable television, common carrier, Internet, resource allocation, and technology planning topics.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-087 COCR 910
Member Arbitration Law Review
Member Arb Lw Rev (1)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-088 COCR 911
Member Journal of Law and International Affairs
Member JLIA (1)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-089 COCR 912
Member Penn State Law Review
Editor PSU Lw Rev (2)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-090 COCR 913
Editor Arbitration Law Review
Editor Arb Lw Rev (2)-
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-091 COCR 914
Editor Journal of Law and International Affairs
Editor JLIA (2)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-092 COCR 915
Editor Penn State Law Review
Editor PSU Lw Rev (2)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-093 CONLW 957
The Constitutional Law of Religion
CONST LAW/RELIGION (3)
This course examines current constitutional doctrine concerning religion under the First Amendment to the Constitution. The focus will be on the essential cases and principles of the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses of the First Amendment. These cases and principles are organized along three thematic lines: (1) the regulation of religious activity (free exercise and neutrality, governmental interests, legislative accommodation), (2) the funding of religious activity (establishment and neutrality, governmental support of religious institutions), and (3) the treatment of religion in government’s culture shaping activities (public schools, school curriculum, religious speech). The course ends with a discussion of the definition of “religion” for purposes of federal constitutional law.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-094 CONLW 958
Comparative Constitutional & Public Law
COMP CONST PUB LW (3)
The principal objective of this course is to provide students with a greater understanding of how each nation’s body of constitutional law is shaped by history, institutions, and current values. The comparative project, by focusing on narrow differences between similar countries, allows students to move beyond an acceptance of basic premises of constitutional law as “natural” or “inherent.” As an important dividend, students will gain basic knowledge of foundational concepts in the legal landscape of other nations, hopefully providing students with a comparative advantage in seeking employment with government offices and private firms whose clients engage in substantial crossborder transactions.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-095 CONLW 963
Constitutional Law II
CON LAW II (3)
This course studies the development of equal protection law under the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments, the state action issue, and the free exercise and establishment clauses of the First Amendment.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-096 CONLW 965
First Amendment — Free Speech
FIRST AMENDMENT (3)
This course examines the history, values and function of free expression, advocacy of illegal action, expression that provokes a hostile audience reaction, defamation, commercial advertising, obscenity, hate speech and pornography, expression in public places, symbolic speech, campaign finance laws, and speech in restricted environments.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-097 CRMLW 952
Federal Criminal Practice
FEDERAL CRIM PRAC (2)
This course is an in-depth examination of all stages of a federal criminal prosecution, commencing with the decision to charge, and continuing through trial and sentencing. Subjects will include the Bail Reform Act of 1984, investigative techniques, motions to suppress, immunity, privileges, trial techniques, and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines. Strategic decisions involving pre-trial proceedings, trials, and sentencing will be addressed via presentations by experienced judges, practitioners, and other participants in the process. The goal of the course is to provide students with practical advice and insightful topics regarding every aspect of federal criminal litigation.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-098 CRMLW 953
Advanced Criminal Procedure
ADV CRIM PRO (3)
This course examines the constitutional, statutory and rule-based issues that arise in the formal processing of a criminal case. Subject include the decision to charge, prosecutorial discretion, grand jury and preliminary hearing, joinder and severance, bail and pretrial release, discovery, plea bargaining and guilty pleas, speedy trial, jury composition and selection, pre-trial publicity, confrontation, cross-examination and the privilege against self-incrimination.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-099 CRMLW 970
International Criminal Law
INTL CRIMINAL LAW (3)
This course will concern the scope of international criminal law, the definition of international crimes, principles of jurisdiction, procedures for international criminal prosecutions, and examples of international criminal law.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-100 CRMLW 974
Juvenile Law
JUVENILE LAW (3)
This course examines the legal position of the child in society and the extent to which the child may be legally controlled by parent (s) or state. Subject matters include the right of the child to control reproductive decision-making, child support and paternity issues, child pornography and minors’ access to pornography, child abuse and neglect, foster care, termination of parental rights, adoption, medical treatment of juveniles, and medical experimentation on juveniles. The course also examines the delinquency jurisdiction of juvenile court, the constitutional protections afforded the child accused of criminal activity, adjudications of delinquency, punishment or placement of the child in the dispositional phase of juvenile proceedings, and treatment of the child as an adult offender.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-101 CRMLW 984
Post-Conviction Process
POST-CONV PROCESS (3)
This is a study of guilty pleas and sentencing alternatives, post-conviction remedies, parole, probation, commutation, and pardon. The course will also examine the law of corrections and prisoners’ rights.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-102 CRMLW 998
White-Collar Crime
WHITE-COLLAR CRIME (3)
This course will cover the substantive law and procedures of major white-collar crimes, including conspiracy, fraud, the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations law (RICO), money laundering, public corruption, and economic crimes. It will also examine their civil counterparts and civil and administrative consequences and analyze the theory and policies of these hybrid criminal statutes. Finally, the class will learn and practice skills associated with white-collar crime cases, for example, investigative techniques, negotiation, and development of effective theories of the case.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-103 ENVR 960
Environmental Law
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (3)
This course introduces some of the most important concepts, issues, and statutes in environmental law. After discussing the economic and ethical bases for environmental law and briefly reviewing the relevant principles of constitutional and common law, students examine a representative selection of federal statutes, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, “Superfund,” and the Clean Air Act.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-104 ENVR 965
Oil and Gas Law
OIL AND GAS LAW (3)
This course will address the basic concepts in oil and gas law within the United States as well as the specific legal issues associated with the development of the Marcellus Shale formation. The specific topics to be covered include the ownership or oil and gas, oil and gas leasing, oil and gas conservation laws, oil and gas interests, and government regulation of development.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-105 ENVR 966
Law and Policy of Shale Gas Development
W POLIDY GAS DEV (3)
This course will address current legal and policy aspects of shale oil and gas development. Students will focus on the major policy issues that are shaping – and have shaped – the development of the law in the early years of the so-called “Shale Revolution.” The topics that will be covered in this class include water quality, air quality, and other environmental issues; determining the appropriate regulatory entity to oversee developmental activities; managing economic benefits at the individual, community, and state level in the short and long term; construction of an appropriate infrastructure; government role in developing new technologies and expanding markets for product; international development; and the role of shale oil and gas in our national energy portfolio.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-106 ENVR 967
Water Law and Policy
WATER LAW & POLICY (3)
This course provides an overview of U.S.-focused law and policy related to water. This includes the allocation of water supplies under the riparian and prior appropriation doctrines, as well as the federal reserved rights doctrine, the Endangered Species Act, and cases testing the public interest. In addition, the course examines water quality concerns under the Clean Water Act, with a specific focus on the Chesapeake Bay. Finally, the course covers special topics related to water law and policy, including flooding, drought, and climate change; drinking water, wastewater, and infrastructure; energy and the development of Marcellus Shale; and trans-boundary/ international water issues.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-107 ENVR 988
Natural Resources Law
NAT RESOURCES LW (3)
This course provides a basic overview of federal and state regulations and of the common law affecting title to and exploitation of such resources as water, coal, oil, gas, and public lands. Common mineral leasing provisions are given particular emphasis.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-108 EXPR 947
The Modern In-House Counsel
MODERN IN-HSE CNS (2)
This course examines the unique aspects of working as a lawyer within a corporation. The course explores the key roles today’s in-house counsel play, including advising the Board of Directors and senior management, selecting and managing outside counsel, meeting corporate compliance and regulatory obligations, conducting internal investigations, drafting and negotiating commercial transaction agreements, managing litigation and balancing the dual roles of trusted business advisor and guardian of the ethical and reputational capital of the enterprise.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-109 EXPR 950
Advocacy
ADVOCACY (4)
This course introduces the fundamental skills of trial advocacy applicable in civil and criminal trials in any jurisdiction. In keeping with the theory that trial advocacy is best learned by “doing,” each student will conduct written and oral exercises concerning the various stages of the trial process-pleadings, pretrial motions, discovery, settlement negotiations, trial preparation, jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examination of lay witnesses, examination of expert witnesses, trial motions, and closing arguments. Students are able to evaluate their own progress through viewing videotapes of their performances. The class meets jointly for lectures, while the oral trial exercises are conducted in small sections.
PREREQUISITE: PROSK 955 Evidence may also be taken concurrently
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-110 EXPR 952
Strategic Legal Research
Strat Leg Research (3)
This course is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of ways lawyers use primary and secondary legal research sources and finding tools to successfully represent their clients. An emphasis is placed on the development of effective legal research strategies that take into account choice of format (e.g., the relative advantages and disadvantages of print and electronic sources), cost/benefit analysis of format choice, evolving approaches by law firms and private practitioners to billable research hours, use of computerized tools to organize research results, and presentation of research results to case supervisors. Course content will be presented in a hybrid format consisting of two hours per week of in-class meetings with the remaining credit to be completed by coursework outside scheduled class time through online and written assignments.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-111 EXPR 954
Representing the Professional Athlete
REP PROF ATHLETE (3)
This course will address relationships and responsibilities of representing the professional athlete. Students will also get an introduction and in-depth examination of Representation through group exercises, class discussions and professional contract analysis. There will be time dedicated to the NCAA Rules that affect Agent interaction with potential clients and individual State enacted laws governing the modern Agent.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-112 EXPR 964
Real Estate Negotiation and Drafting
REAL EST NEG/DRAFT (3)
The course covers transactional drafting techniques for any commercial matter, and negotiation exercises useful in all legal settings. It then addresses the structure and law of real estate transactions, including agreements of sale, title and survey matters, leasing, financing, easements, and development rights.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-113 EXPR 968
Judicial Opinion Writing
JUDICIAL OP WRTING (2)
Students will learn about the role of a judicial clerk and how to draft judicial opinions. Students will recognize the impact of written advocacy on judicial opinion writing as they switch roles from advocating as a lawyer to deciding issues raised by the advocates and writing opinions that implement subtle persuasive writing techniques. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the process for creation of legal precedent through opinions, including the impact of standards of review and procedural posture. The course will cover the common forms of judicial writing. With individualized feedback, students will develop precision in self-editing and revision skills and will practice producing concise, clear, and accessible written work.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-114 EXPR 972
Mediation of Environmental and Public Conflicts
MED ENV & PUB CNFL (3)
Conflicts between parties with different views of “the public good” are often difficult to resolve, especially in the environmental and natural resource arena. The judicial dispute resolution process is often not well-adapted to addressing conflicts among jurisdictions and meeting the interests of the public and private parties affected by the conflict. Mediation and other alternative dispute resolution techniques can be very useful tools in these cases. This experiential course uses case studies and simulations to explore techniques and strategies other than traditional litigation that lawyers can use to represent clients and resolve disputes in these settings.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-115 EXPR 974
Appellate Advocacy
APPELLATE ADVOCACY (3)
Following a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) enforcement action from inception through an appeal in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, and a subsequent appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, this course will teach students key concepts of appellate procedure, and provide students with practical experience in using persuasive advocacy skills when drafting appellate briefs and making an oral argument to an appellate court. Class discussions will explore the decision making processes of appellate lawyers so that students better understand (1) the thoroughness of the analytical skills that appellate lawyers must employ; (2) the knowledge of litigation and appellate procedure that appellate lawyers must possess; (3) the strategic and tactical decisions that appellate lawyers must make when writing appellate briefs; and (4) the ability to think and react quickly that appellate lawyers must have when arguing before an appellate court. The course will begin with some basic instruction in SEC enforcement actions, the basic substantive securities laws that govern the appellate case that will be studied, and appellate procedural rules. The course will then teach advocacy skills in writing and oral argument by following the SEC enforcement action through its principal phases, from the complaint, the motion to dismiss, and the appellate briefs and arguments before the D.C. Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-116 EXPR 983
Representing the Entrepreneur
Rep Entrepreneur (3)
This course considers legal issues typically arising in the course of representing an entrepreneurial venture, including choice of appropriate entity, naming and trade names, agreements among initial and early owners, operational management, governance, succession, equity and debt finance, intellectual property issues, employment arrangements and applicable employment statutes, executive compensation, typical operational contracts, risk management and ethical issues. This course will also review customary financial statements, business strategies in terms of long-term development or early exit, and common exit alternatives. The objective is to give participants an introduction to the diverse legal problems that they are likely to encounter in an entrepreneurial setting, either as lawyers for the enterprise or as owners of an equity position in the enterprise.
PREREQUISITE: BUSLW 963
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: TAXLW 949
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-117 EXPR 998
Higher Education Law Practice
HIGHER ED LAW PRAC (3)
This course is devoted to developing problem solving skills related to legal issues in higher education. Students will have a chance to confront problems the way university lawyers do, from the very beginning, before the facts are all known, before goals are clarified, before the full range of options is explored, and before a course of conduct is chosen. This course is intended to help prepare students for the actual practice of law by allowing them to actively engage in the sorts of discussions and activities that occupy lawyers every day, combining their knowledge of law with practical judgment to help clients. Topics include faculty and student rights and responsibilities; constitutional issues involving application of the guarantees of the First, Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments; civil rights issues including diversity and affirmative action, the rights of the disabled, and gender-based issues.
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: PRORP 934
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-118 GOVPL 952
Administrative Law
ADMIN LAW (3)
This course is an introduction to the law of the administrative state—to the constitutional, statutory and judge-made rules governing what agencies may do, the procedures they must follow, and how they can be held to account. Topics include mechanisms for control of agencies by the legislative and executive branches; the constitutional basis for, and limits on, governance by agencies; the availability and effects of judicial review over agency action; and the features of agency rulemaking and adjudication.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-119 GOVPL 954
Election Law
ELECTION LAW (2)
This course covers federal and state election law and will examine the constitutional basis for the regulation of elections, the development of the law in this area over the last 30 years, as well as criminal and civil enforcement of the law, the role of the Federal Election Commission, the formation and regulation of political action committees, as well as related federal tax law provisions impacting operation of political committees and advocacy organizations. The course will also examine the intersection of the election law with congressional ethics rules, lobbying regulations and representation of political candidates and entities in election law matters.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-120 GOVPL 987
State and Local Government Law
STATE/LOCAL GOVT (3)
Important issues in governmental organization and management are surveyed. Emphasis is placed on intergovernmental relations, the legislative process, personnel issues, financing, and contracting. The course will conclude with a consideration of recent trends toward metropolitan regionalism.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-121 HLTH 960
Food and Drug Regulation
FOOD & DRUG REG (3)
This survey course covers the federal regulation of food, human and animal drugs, medical devices, cosmetics, biologics, and agricultural biotechnology. The primary focus will be on the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the operations of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The course will also cover related statutes implemented by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the interaction between federal regulation and private tort litigation, and international trade in FDA-regulated products.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-122 HLTH 997
Special Topics
Special Topics (1-12)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-123 IHEAC 900
Entrepreneur Assistance Clinic
ENTPRNEUR ASST CLN (4)
Under the supervision of a faculty member/director of the clinic, students learn to represent entrepreneurs, start-ups and not-for-profit organizations in a setting that is similar to a small law firm. Issues most frequently encountered include choice of entity, entity formation, founder and initial investor agreements, shareholder agreements, loan arrangements, certain intellectual property protection, commercial real estate leasing and acquisition, operating agreements, employee management and compliance with regulatory requirements. Students will learn the basic skills necessary to attract and interview potential clients, organize a business plan, communicate orally and in writing with a client and third parties, conduct research, draft transactional documents, prepare for and manage closings. Students will learn basic principles of law office administration and will be expected to comply with law office protocols (e.g. conflict screens, client confidentiality, and time and expense record keeping) and will learn and conform to the professional responsibilities of lawyers engaged in business transactional practice. The faculty member will hold weekly class sessions for presentation and discussion of client projects, skill development, and legal issues affecting entrepreneurs and counsel for entrepreneurs.
PREREQUISITE: BUSLW 963, Corporations may also be taken concurrently. CCLAW 972; BUSLW 958
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: BUSLW 900 TAXLW 949 IPLAW 952
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-124 IHIMC 900
Center for Immigrants’ Rights
CNTR IMMIGRNTS RTS (5)
The course component of the Center teaches students the skills necessary to be effective immigration advocates and attorneys. Principally through representation of organizations, students will work on innovative advocacy and policy projects relating to U.S. immigration policy and immigrants’ rights. Students should expect to put in as much time as is required to complete project work successfully, which will be an average of twenty hours per week. Working primarily in teams, students will build professional relationships with government and non-governmental policy makers, academics, individual clients, and others. Students earn 5 credits and are limited to one semester of enrollment.
PREREQUISITE: INTR 961; INTR 965, Faculty Approval Required
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-125 IHIMC 901
Advanced Immigration Clinic
ADV IMMIGR CLINIC (2)
This two-credit clinical experience will be open to students who have previously enrolled in the 5 credit Center for Immigrants’ Rights Course and will build upon the skills they have learned. The course will involve a senior role in pending cases at the Center; involvement in new initiatives undertaken by the clinic; and possible writing and editing of publishable material in the area of immigrants’ rights. There will be no classroom component.
PREREQUISITE: Faculty Approval Required INTR 961, IHIMC 900
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-126 IHRDC 900
Rural Economic Development Clinic
Rural Econ Dev Cln (4)
The Rural Economic Development Clinic will provide students with practical legal experience representing individuals and entities in Pennsylvania’s rural communities, primarily within the broad fields of agricultural, food, and energy law. Students will work with agricultural producers, businesses, landowners, and nonprofit organizations on specific projects that will involve transactional work such as preparing/reviewing contracts, addressing basic business entity issues, and providing general legal counsel.
Students will receive instruction on basic skills associated with legal practice including those required to interact with clients. Students also will receive instruction in any substantive area necessary to represent their clients. This instruction will be provided in a group and individual setting. As part of their clinic responsibilities, students will interact directly with clients to ascertain the legal issues presented, advise the clients on the recommended legal strategy, and prepare or review any necessary legal documentation to effectuate the legal strategy. Visit the Rural Economic Development Clinic for more information.
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: BUSLW 956
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-127 INTR 952
Law of the Sea
LAW OF THE SEA (2)
The course aims to offer thorough instruction on the foundations and sources of the law of the sea, the principle types of maritime jurisdiction, the principles of resource management, and approaches to the settlement of maritime disputes.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-128 INTR 953
Law of Treaties
LAW OF TREATIES (2)
Treaties are the foundation of public and private international law and national foreign affairs law. This course examines: historical development of law of treaties; concept of treaty; treaty as source of international and national law; stages of concluding treaty; reservations; accession to treaties, functions of depositary; publication of treaties; breach of treaty obligations; invalidity, termination, and suspension of treaties; denunciation and other withdrawal from treaties; treaties and jus cogens; treaties and customary rules of international law; treaties and third States; treaties and municipal law; interpretation of treaties; languages and authentic texts of treaties. Texts: A. Aust, Modern Treaty Law and Practice ( Cambridge University Press, 2000); W. E. Butler, The Law of Treaties in Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States (Cambridge University Press, 2002).
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-129 INTR 961
Asylum and Refugee Law
ASYLUM REFUGEE LAW (3)
This class surveys the laws of political asylum and related protection for those fleeing danger in their home countries. It examines asylum and refugee law and policy in the United States, and sets forth the legal grounds for barring someone from asylum. It also explores the politics driving immigration policy, including asylum and refugee policy, and the federal agencies that implement those policies.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-130 INTR 965
Immigration Law
IMMIGRATION LAW (3)
This course is intended to provide students with a general knowledge of immigration law, including such critical subjects as the constitutional powers of the federal government over immigration matters, admission and exclusion, entry, deportation, and political asylum.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-131 INTR 966
International Litigation and Arbitration
INTER LIT AND ARBI (3)
This course is intended to acquaint students with the impact of globalization upon the process of litigation. It focuses upon the adjudicatory resolution of disputes created by international contracts and global business transactions through the standard legal trial process and arbitration. Various basic topics are treated, including (1) the certification and training of international lawyers; (2) the liability exposure of multinational enterprises; (3) the State as an actor in global commerce; (4) problems of comparative jurisdiction, service of process and evidence-gathering, proof of foreign law, and the enforcement of foreign judgments; (5) the extraterritorial application of national law; and (6) attempts to establish a transborder law and legal process. The course also provides a thorough introduction to international arbitration and investor-state arbitration.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-132 INTR 971
International Law
INTERNATIONAL LAW (3)
This course introduces students to key concepts and doctrines of international law. It examines the sources of international law such as custom and treaty, the bases of international jurisdiction, issues of statehood, recognition and succession, nationality, international agreements, and U.S. participation in the international legal system. The course provides students with the basics needed for both public and private international law practice.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-133 INTR 973
International Trade Law
INTL TRADE LAW (3)
This course examines the legal framework for international trade and its potential for growth and conflict with other areas of international law. It focuses on the North American Free Trade Agreement and the World Trade Organization family of agreements, including the General Agreement of Tariffs and Trade. The course explores the fundamental principles embodied in international trade law, the expansion of trade agreements into new areas such as investment and intellectual property rights, and the potential conflicts between such agreements and efforts to protect labor rights and the environment. The course will analyze decisions by international trade tribunals as well as the texts of the treaties themselves.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-134 INTR 984
International Commercial Arbitration
INTL COMM ARB (3)
This course explores the legal frameworks, as well as the strategic considerations, practical skills and policy considerations that are implicated in international arbitration law and practice. International arbitration is the default means by which international commercial disputes are resolved. The effectiveness of its processes and outcomes are assured through a complex interaction of international treaties, national laws, contractual agreements, specialized procedural rules, and international customs and practice norms. The regime is designed to strike an appropriate balance between party autonomy with the sovereign and transnational regulatory interests implicated in disputes. In addition to the doctrinal and practical aspects of international arbitration, this course will also explore the larger trends and theoretical questions raised in contemporary debates about the future of international arbitration. This course is one that will satisfy the prerequisite for participation in the Vis Moot Competition.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-135 IPLAW 951
Internet Law
INTERNET LAW (3)
This course presents the range of legal issues arising from the emergence of cyberspace. The course considers how the law has reacted to challenges posed by the Internet as well as how the law is shaping its future. Specific areas covered include jurisdictional analysis, First Amendment/free speech, digital copyrights, trademarks and domain names, electronic privacy, ecommerce, and Internet governance.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-136 IPLAW 952
Introduction to Intellectual Property
INTRO TO IP (3)
This course will survey the protection of proprietary rights in inventions, writings, creative expression, trade secrets, and other intangible intellectual products by federal patent, copyright, trademark and unfair competition law, and by state trade secrecy and unfair competition law. A central theme will be the challenges to traditional legal paradigms posed by new technologies and the shift to an information-based economy. The course is intended for all students who anticipate having corporate clients and seek a basic understanding of the laws applicable to key assets of most businesses, as well as for students interested in becoming intellectual property specialists. This course does not replace (and is not a prerequisite for) Copyrights, Patent Law, Trademarks, or any other intellectual property course.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-137 IPLAW 960
Copyrights
COPYRIGHTS (3)
The course addresses the legal protection afforded to authors and artists under common law and statutory copyright. It considers the rights granted, procedure for their procurement, and protection through litigation. The course also deals with international rights, conveyancing, and interface with the antitrust laws.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-138 IPLAW 980
Patent Law
PATENT LAW (3)
This course is an examination of the legal requirements for obtaining patent protection for an invention. The statutory foundations of United States patent law are examined through an analysis of patent prosecution practice and patent litigation. The course also considers United States patent practice in the context of international intellectual property law.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-139 IPLAW 982
Licensing of Intellectual Property
LICENSING OF IP (3)
The retention of the intellectual property or the absolute transfer of such interests to others for purposes of economic exploitation is, however, declining in use and popularity. Rather, it has evolved that maximization of the holder’s value in the intellectual property may, in some circumstances, be better achieved by sharing some of the rights, while retaining others. This is the topic of the course in the licensing of intellectual property. The offering explores the myriad business, legal, and negotiating issues involved in the drafting and use of intellectual property licensing agreements.
PREREQUISITE: IPLAW 960; IPLAW 985; IPLAW 980
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-140 IPLAW 985
Trademarks
TRADEMARKS (2)
The law of trademarks is central to the concept of fair dealing in the commercial environment. The history of common law and statutory trademarks is explored as well as registration, conveyancing and foreign rights. The course deals with the duty of the merchant to compete honestly and remedies for failure to do so.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-141 LABR 962
The Employment Relationship
EMPLY RELATIONSHIP (3)
This course covers common law employment doctrines (at-will employment, contract and tort erosions of at-will employment, employee duties, including the duty of loyalty and trade secrets), noncompetition agreements, and employee rights in inventions, and workplace injuries (including workers compensation, OSHA, and criminal and tort approaches to promoting a safe workplace).
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-142 LABR 964
Employment Discrimination
EMPLOYMENT DISCRIM (3)
This course will provide an overview of significant doctrinal issues in employment discrimination law, and will seek to develop students’ skills through a rigorous examination of statutory law, regulations and court decisions. It will introduce students to the fundamental legal theories underlying the substantive coverage of the most significant federal equal employment opportunity laws, and legal issues regarding their application.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-143 LABR 965
Workers’ Compensation Law
WORKERS COMP LAW (3)
This course will explore the history and development of, public policy considerations for, and state and federal systems for delivery of medical and wage benefits to injured workers.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-144 LABR 966
The Law of Employee Benefits
LW EMPLOY BENEFITS (3)
Employer-provided pension and health care programs play a critical role in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. They also affect corporations, financial markets, and the economy as a whole. Employee benefit programs are, in short, an important staple of modern law practice. This course surveys the Employee Retirement Income Security Act and relevant portions of the Internal Revenue Code. Classes examine what benefit plans must do regarding reporting and disclosure, accrual, vesting, funding, and fiduciary standards. The course covers health care reform, the shift from defined benefit to defined contribution programs, and the effect of stock market volatility on benefit programs. Throughout the semester, students examine the policy goals underpinning federal benefits law. The course surveys major issues in ERISA litigation, including that statute’s claims and remedies provisions, as well as its preemption of state law.
APPROVED START:FA2017

45-05-145 LABR 970
Labor Law
LABOR LAW (3)
This course is an extended study of the federal National Labor Relations Act focusing on the right to form and join labor organizations, strikes, boycotts and picketing, collective bargaining, and the enforcement of collective bargaining agreements.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-146 LLM 900
Introduction to the United States Legal System
Intro US Legal Sys (2)
To develop a good foundation for the LL.M. students’ other course work, this course introduces the United States court system, the role of the Constitution in the United States legal system, and other foundation materials in United States law. The goal is to introduce students to distinctive aspects and/or fundamental principles in U.S. law.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-147 LLM 901
LL.M. Legal Analysis, Writing and Research
LLM LEG AN WR RES (2)
This course explores U.S. common law analytical methods and discourse. Students will analyze cases and statutes to solve client problems. Students will draft objective memoranda and other documents to communicate their legal analysis in writing. Students will also learn the basics of U.S. legal research.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-148 LLM 902
Advanced LL.M. Legal Analysis, Writing and Research
ADV LLM LAWR (2)
Building on the Introduction to U.S. Legal Systems course, students will continue to develop legal analysis, writing and research skills in the persuasive writing context. Students will study and practice effective client letter writing to help students learn to craft good correspondence in a U.S. legal setting. The final portion of the course will cover contract drafting.
PREREQUISITE: LLMLW 900
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-149 LLM 911
Pre-Writing Process for Lawyers
PRE-WRITING PROCES (3)
This course introduces students to a framework for pre-writing and analyzing a client problem. The course will assist students in developing reading comprehension skills, case briefing skills, legal analysis and synthesis skills, increased proficiency in Legal English, and basic research and citation skills. Course is required for the Legal English Certificate Program.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-150 LWIND 996
Independent Study
INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
In the Independent Study course the student, under the supervision of a full-time member of the faculty, will be permitted to do research and write a paper of a substantial nature on a significant subject.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-151 LWPER 948
Law and Sexuality
LAW AND SEXUALITY (3)
This course will explore the different ways in which the law regulates and accounts for sexuality in general and sexual orientation in particular. Topics to be covered will include rights to privacy and their impact on the ability of the state to regulate sexual conduct; rights to equal protection by lesbians and gay men; the movement for relationship recognition, marriage equality, and other family rights; rights to free speech and associations of lesbians and gay men (and of those who do not want to associate with them); employment discrimination; and legal issues involving transgendered individuals.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-152 LWPER 952
Energy Law and Policy
ENERGY LW & POL (3)
This course is the introductory course in the regulation of energy in the United States. It also considers some of the international impact of U.S. energy policy. The course examines each significant form of energy (oil, natural gas, nuclear power, electricity, coal and renewables) in terms of the manner in which each form is regulated by various government institutions. To understand the various forms of regulation, we will also consider a substantial amount of economic, political and socio/psychological information. Each segment of the course will be presented in terms of specific problems that participating students will help analyze and solve. At each stage of the course, we will consider the current policies and attempt to develop regulatory goals and positions that will improve those policies. The syllabus for this course is designed to avoid significant overlap with the course in oil and gas law and the course in energy, international security and the global economy.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-153 LWPER 955
Disability Law
DISABILITY LAW (3)
This course will address legal issues and concepts for people living with disabilities. It will cover issues surrounding civil rights discrimination, and public benefits ranging from employment, housing, income supplements, health, and education. Students will review legislation, case law, and rules, and will focus on the practical, and social concerns of individuals living with disabilities.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-154 LWPER 999
Sports Law
SPORTS LAW (3)
This course explores how various areas of the law impact the sports industry. The “law” that is used by most sports lawyers is principally the application of settled principles of other legal fields to the sports industry: contract law, labor law, tax law, products liability law, intellectual property law, etc.
The Sports Law course, then focuses on important areas that provide the foundational principles that drive the outcome of most legal disputes arising in the sports industry. The course also examines certain areas of the law such as antitrust, labor, and constitutional law, that have specific and unique applications to sports.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-155 PRORP 934
Professional Responsibility
PRO REP (3)
Through the use of hypothetical situations, this course attempts to generate student sensitivity to ethical problems faced by lawyers in various kinds of practice. The ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the older Code of Professional Responsibility are the basic tools, but discussion centers as well on case law, ABA opinions and standards, statutes, and the dictates of conscience. Discipline and professional malpractice are also treated.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-156 PROSK 949
Higher Education Law
HIGHER ED LAW (3)
This course examines the legal issues applicable to American colleges and universities. Topics include academic freedom and tenure, affirmative action in admissions decisions, intercollegiate athletics, issues of student privacy, sexual harassment, and intellectual property.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-157 PROSK 955
Evidence
EVIDENCE (3)
This course presents evidence in trials under the Federal Rules of Evidence, at common law and in equity and with reference to administrative bodies. The reasoning from which rules arise in areas including relevancy, competency, privilege, examination of witnesses, writing, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, burden of proof, presumptions, judicial notice, and constitutional evidence problems is also addressed.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-158 PROSK 958
Conflict of Laws
CONFLICT OF LAWS (3)
In modern business and personal life, significant events frequently involve more than one state or nation. What law applies to multijurisdictional transactions? Which court has the authority to adjudicate any dispute that develops? When can a judgment—or a marriage—in one state create legal rights in another? Can one state make it illegal to do something—like pay bribes—in the territory of another?
This course examines the legal rules that have developed for resolving these conflict-of-law problems. Specific topics include: domestic jurisdiction, international jurisdiction, domestic choice of law, extraterritorial application of national law, conflicts between state and federal law, and enforcement of judgments. Course time is split roughly equally between domestic and international topics.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-159 PROSK 960
Negotiation/Mediation
NEGOTIA/MEDIAT (3)
This course combines the law and ethics of negotiation, mediation and settlement with economic and psychological bargaining theory and regular hands-on practice in representing clients in negotiation and mediation. Bargaining theory (including distributive and integrative bargaining), relevant socio-psychological research, negotiation and mediation ethics, the law of settlement, and the basics of contract drafting are all introduced. Instruction consists of assigned reading, a series of simulations and exercises (including drafting a resulting contract), written negotiation planning and self-evaluation, feedback, and group discussion. The course also may involve participation in a full-day Saturday program, and students should be prepared to experiment with various means to maximize their facility in using videoconferencing and other technologies to negotiate and represent clients in mediation.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-160 PROSK 965
Federal Courts
FEDERAL COURTS (3)
This course involves elements of constitutional law and civil procedure, addressing the relationship of federal courts to administrative agencies, state courts and private and ad hoc dispute resolution forums (e.g., arbitration, mediation, 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund). Building on the foundational knowledge of federal subject matter jurisdiction addressed in Civil Procedure, this course examines in greater detail advanced problems in standing, mootness, and ripeness. Building on the foundational knowledge of separation of powers and federalism addressed in Constitutional Law, this course examines the power of Congress to allocate judicial power among federal courts, federal agencies, and States. The heart of the course, however, consists of advanced topics including the power of federal courts to create common law, limitations (and complications) in suits against the federal and state governments and their officials, problems arising when administrative agencies or state courts are addressing matters related to the subject of a pending case in federal court, and limitations on federal appellate jurisdiction. This course should prove especially useful to students who anticipate clerking for a federal or state judge, or who plan to litigate before federal or state courts, administrative agencies, arbitral forums or other private or ad hoc dispute resolution entities.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-161 PROSK 967
Federal Court Practice
FEDERAL COURT PRAC (2)
This course introduces contemporary issues in several topical areas of particular interest to litigating in federal courts. The course topics are varied, with the unifying theme being that each topic possesses either particular prominence or exclusive jurisdiction within the country’s federal court system. These topics include: the history and organization of the federal courts, the courts’ relationship with Congress, the arguments for and against diversity jurisdiction, the practical dynamics of federal procedure, strategic considerations involved in a litigant’s choice of federal court, ADR proceedings in federal courts, securities, bankruptcy, intellectual property, antitrust, employment discrimination, review of administrative agency decisions, immigration issues, federal criminal matters, sentencing, civil rights cases, and habeas.
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: PROSK 965 PROSK 955
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-162 PROSK 969
Legal Journalism
LEGAL JOURNALISM (2)
Students will learn journalistic writing styles to prepare them to contribute accurate and accessible legal information and analysis to general interest and legal trade media as legal analysts or professional journalists. For legal trade publication work, the emphasis will be on readability and appropriate depth for a professional audience. Students will learn journalistic standards of truth and interviewing techniques for print and broadcast media. Live broadcast techniques, including live interview hosting, will also be covered.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-163 PROSK 973
Spanish and Bilingual Communication in Law Practice
Span Bilingal Comm (2)
Designed for students who want to improve their ability to understand and communicate with Spanish-speaking clients and colleagues in legal settings. Includes practical reading, speaking, and writing exercises using real documents from Spanish speaking courts, attorneys, and statutes. Encompasses an introduction to research resources, citation norms, and other tools related to practicing law in Spanish, and includes discussions of regional variations in law, ethics, and language in the Spanish legal world. Guest speakers or other contact with native Spanish-speakers in the profession will also be scheduled.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-164 PROSK 986
Remedies
REMEDIES (3)
Remedial devices focusing on the theory and application of legal and equitable relief are analyzed comparatively. The course covers the procedural and substantive law elements of damages, specific performance, injunctions, declaratory judgments, reformation, rescission, and restitution.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-165 PSLFY 900
Civil Procedure
CIVIL PROCEDURE (4)
Civil Procedure concerns the rules and principles that govern the litigation of a civil case. The course addresses systemic issues related to how and where a lawsuit is filed, including: personal and subject matter jurisdiction; venue; the notice required once a lawsuit has been filed; and which substantive law-state or federal-should apply in federal court. The course also familiarizes the student with the stages of a lawsuit, including: pleading; structuring the lawsuit; discovery; termination of a lawsuit without trial; trial; and actions that may be taken after a jury verdict or bench trial. Although reference is made to state laws, the course concentrates on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-166 PSLFY 903
Constitutional Law I
CON LAW I (3)
The course examines the roles of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches in determining limits of national and state powers and protection of the individual and civil rights provided in the United States Constitution.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-167 PSLFY 905
Contracts
CONTRACTS (4)
Contracts is concerned with the formation of contracts. The traditional offer and acceptance are analyzed in light of problems presented by modern bargaining techniques. Voidability of contracts formed by fraud, mistake, illegality, and unconscionable advantage is also stressed. The performance of contracts and the parol evidence rule are discussed.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-168 PSLFY 907
Criminal Procedure
CRIMINAL PROCEDURE (3)
Criminal Procedure explores part of the interface between the criminal justice system and the United States Constitution. It introduces students to constitutional analysis by examining key provisions of the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments as they apply to police investigation and interrogation as well as to the circumstances under which indigent defendants are guaranteed the assistance of counsel.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-169 PSLFY 908
Legal Research Tools and Strategies
LEG RES TLS & STRT (2)
The primary goal of the Legal Research Tools and Strategies course is to familiarize first year students with the process of discovering, evaluating, critically analyzing, and applying sources of American legal authority used by lawyers to understand facts and resolve issues. While much of the course necessarily focuses on students developing a comfortable facility for the discovery phase of the legal research process in which they learn to find law and legal commentary in its various publication formats, an equally important outcome of the course is to provide students with opportunities to evaluate, analyze and apply the legal authority they discover in the context of the legal matters they will be expected to handle as law students and lawyers.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-170 PSLFY 910
Criminal Law
CRIMINAL LAW (3)
This course deals with what is called substantive criminal law, i.e., crimes. Numerous crimes such as homicide, theft, and conspiracy are examined, and defenses such as self-defense and insanity are scrutinized. A primary focus of the course is the utilization and interpretation of criminal statutes.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-171 PSLFY 912
Applied Legal Analysis and Writing I
APP LEG ANL & WR I (3)
Applied Legal Analysis & Writing (ALAW) I introduces first year law students to analyzing and writing about clients’ legal issues. Throughout the semester, students will represent fictional clients. To assist those clients, students must learn to conduct accurate and in-depth legal analysis to help the clients with particular legal issues, and students must learn to communicate that in-depth legal analysis in both written and oral communications. In ALAW I, the focus of the semester is on objective analysis, fact-finding, and writing. Students will conduct a client interview to uncover legally relevant facts, and they will learn to draft formal and informal office memoranda, which are fundamental tools for communicating objective analysis. Students receive significant individual feedback on writing assignments.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-172 PSLFY 914
Applied Legal Analysis and Writing II
APP LEG AN & WR II (2)
Students will be learning to be an advocate for a fictional client. Students continue to analyze clients’ problems using various sources of legal authority and to further refine their writing style. However, ALAW II focuses on persuasive writing, so students will learn to draft client letters as a transitional exercise into persuasive writing. Further, students will draft trial court briefs or memoranda of law that, in practice, would be filed with a court. Students also will learn other communication skills, including presenting an oral argument to a court. ALAW II continues to implement the problem-solving approach to teach persuasive writing, and students continue to receive significant individualized feedback.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-173 PSLFY 920
Property
PROPERTY (4)
This course introduces the basic concepts and principles in the law of property. Topics include: acquisition and allocation of property rights; restrictions on owners’ rights to use, limit access to, and sell or dispose of their property; and the relationships among multiple owners of rights in the same property. The emphasis is on real property, although the course also addresses intellectual property and other types of personal property.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-174 PSLFY 925
Torts
TORTS (4)
Tort law seeks to remedy civil wrongs that result in harm to person or property. The class will focus on basic concepts such as the intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, and products liability.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-175 SALAW 900
Study Abroad
Study Abroad (1-17)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-176 SJD 900
SJD Dissertation
SJD Dissertation (1-12)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-177 SJD 902
Research Methods Seminar
Res Methods Sem (2)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-178 SJD 903
SJD Dissertation
SJD Dissertation (1)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-179 SJD 904
SJD Candidacy
SJD Candidacy (1-12)
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-180 TAXLW 949
Basic Federal Income Taxation
BASIC FED INC TAX (3)
This course examines the basic substantive provisions of the federal income tax law. Included are the following general topics: gross income, exclusions, deductions, depreciation, basis, tax accounting, and other provisions affecting situations encountered by attorneys in general practice.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-181 TAXLW 988
State and Local Taxation
STATE/LOCAL TAX (2)
Beginning with historical and constitutional aspects, students will analyze in detail recent developments in state and local taxation and their impact on client representation. Attention will be concentrated on corporate, sales and use and other business taxes, death duties, and property taxes and exemptions.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-182 TAXLW 992
International Tax
INTERNATIONAL TAX (2)
This course treats the unique problems concerning U.S. taxation of the foreign income and operations of U.S. persons and enterprises and the incidence of U.S. taxation on foreign persons and enterprises, including the following basic topics: the tax treatment of international business and investments, sales and financing, the sourcing of income, inclusions and exclusions, the foreign tax credit, controlled foreign corporations, and tax avoidance. This course stresses the role of international tax treaties and examines, on a comparative basis, the tax rules of other countries in order to better understand our own system and to gain an understanding of the overall impact of taxation in the international setting.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-183 ULWR 907
The Supreme Court in Comparative Perspective Seminar
SUPRM CT COMP SEM (3)
This course examines the contribution of the judiciary to political governance in comparative perspective. It focuses on the Supreme Court and the European Court of Justice, which is the highest court of the European Union. It also takes into account selectively judgments of other constitutional courts. It seeks to explore the function of judicial review in modern democracy through a study of judicial decisions in selected areas. It examines the relationship between the judiciary and the other organs of government and the role of courts in protecting the citizen. It focuses on the following areas: federalism, the protection of human rights, the principles of democracy, non-discrimination, equality, proportionality, legitimate expectations, and fair hearing; Locus standi, remedies for the protection of constitutional rights, and the liability of public bodies and state agencies.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-184 ULWR 913
European Union Law Seminar
EURO UNION LW SEM (3)
This seminar examines the main elements of European Union (EU) law. It covers the institutional structure of the EU and its lawmaking process and compares it with US government and federalism. It explores the judicial architecture of the EU and the role of the European Court of Justice. It looks at the legal framework covering EU inter-state trade, corporate mobility, and free movement of persons within the EU. It also examines trade between the EU and third states, in particular the US, and foreign relations law of the EU.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-185 ULWR 914
Federal Regulatory and Legislative Practice Seminar
FED REG & LEG SEM (2)
The seminar will utilize a separation of powers analysis to examine federal regulatory and legislative practice. Topics covered will include congressional investigations, federal regulatory agency jurisdiction and procedure, and areas of federal criminal law that are most relevant to legal practice in Washington, DC. The seminar’s primary focus will be those areas of Washington legal practice in which administrative and regulatory law, federal criminal law, politics, and public relations intersect to create special problems and challenges for attorneys in government and private practice. A “case study” approach will be used to analyze these topics from both perspectives, examining the legal obligations and professional responsibilities of both government lawyers and private counsel. Highlights of the course include analysis of the Watergate, ABSCA, Iran-Contra, Whitewater, and Clinton-Lewinsky scandals.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-186 ULWR 916
Class Actions Seminar
CLASS ACTIONS SEM (2)
This seminar explores the class action device, tracing its historical origins from the earliest forms of aggregate litigation through various amendments to Rule 23 and passage of the Class Action Fairness Act. Although other non-class aggregation techniques are discussed, they are addressed only for comparative purposes. The unique nature of representative litigation and the special issues that arise during the course of a class action are the subject of discussion and student presentations during seminar sessions. Considerable discussion is devoted to the roles of the various “players” in a class action: the qualifications of the class representative, the qualifications and interest of class counsel, and the fiduciary role of the district judge.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-187 ULWR 925
Jurisprudence Seminar
JURISPRUDENCE SEM (2)
This seminar will investigate basic themes in constitutional jurisprudence from the perspectives of legal and political theory. A tentative list of topics includes separation of powers, the rule of law, sovereignty, democracy, civil and religious liberties and constitutional interpretation. This seminar will emphasize theoretical, as well as historical, dimensions of these topics, and also consider some of their contemporary implications.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-188 ULWR 927
Law of Artistic Persons and Properties Seminar
LAW & ARTS SEMINAR (2)
The objectives of this course include an examination of the interface between law and the arts with an eye to both theoretical and practical implications and a striving to identify creative and serviceable solutions to the problems that have frustrated the growth and harvest of the creative effort. The investigation will be directed toward subject areas that reflect functional divisions within the arts; i.e., the visual arts, dance, music, the literary arts, and areas such as television and film. The course includes a mandatory overnight field trip to New York City at the student’s expense.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-189 ULWR 934
Race, Racism, and American Law Seminar
RACE AM LAW SEM (2)
The purpose of this seminar is to facilitate discussion and understanding of the role law has played in both the subordination and promotion of the rights of people of color in America. Subjects for discussion will include race and the American criminal justice system, hate speech and the First Amendment, affirmative action policies, and the quest for effective schools.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-190 ULWR 938
The Supreme Court Seminar
SUPREME COURT SEM (2)
The Supreme Court, including procedure and practice, principles of adjudication, and history, as well as the topics of the current term are studied. Students are required to present analyses of current cases as well as an analytical paper on approved topics of constitutional law.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-191 ULWR 941
The United Nations and International Law Seminar
U.N./INTL LAW SEM (2)
The inexorable paces of globalization and interdependence have made the need for international cooperation more acute. The role of the United Nations in these processes has become both more relevant and controversial. Notwithstanding the critical voices that have questioned the relevance or usefulness of the world body from certain national perspectives and points of view, the United Nations, through its activities and programmes, continues to have a considerable impact on countries and societies around the world, in such areas as conflict prevention and resolution, control of population displacements, humanitarian action, and social and economic development. These considerations, among others, make a study of the United Nations and International law more important today than it has ever been.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-192 ULWR 943
International Justice Seminar
INTL JUSTICE SEM (2)
The seminar will address international trial investigative techniques, tribunal jurisdiction and procedure, and areas of international civil and criminal law that are most relevant to legal practice before international tribunals.
PREREQUISITE: Faculty Approval Required
CONCURRENT: EXTRN 901
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-193 ULWR 946
Policy Issues in Corporate Crime Seminar
POL ISS CRP CRM SM (2)
This seminar is designed to improve students’ understanding of the theoretical and policy justifications underlying the prosecution of white collar crime. Students will examine current issues in the debate over corporate criminal liability, prosecutorial discretion, the use of plea agreements to achieve structural reform of corporations, and the federalization of crime. In addition, the class will examine white collar crime in particular industries such as health care and securities regulation. Students will examine these issues both theoretically and practically by reviewing law review articles, Department of Justice policies, pleadings, and case studies on some of the most notorious white collar crime cases in recent years.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-194 ULWR 948
International Financial Law Seminar
INTL FIN LAW SEM (3)
This seminar examines selected aspects of international financial, securities, and banking law. It covers broadly four areas: First, it provides elements of financial law. This includes legal aspects of banking, securities, and money; the objectives of regulations and supervision; an overview of US regulation; and the public and private law of international monetary obligations. Secondly, it examines aspects of international financial and securities regulation. This includes an examination of the financial crisis of 2008 and the regulatory reforms resulting from it; selected comparative aspects of regulation in the US and the EU through a detailed discussion of legislation and case law (e.g. institutional structure, insider trading, rating agencies). Thirdly, it discusses economic and monetary union in the EU and the eurozone crisis. Finally, it provides an overview of the law of the IMF and the international financial architecture.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-195 ULWR 949
Comparative Constitutional Law Seminar
COMP CON LAW SEM (3)
This seminar explores constitutional law differences in the U.S., Canada, Australia, and South Africa.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-196 ULWR 950
Evidence Seminar: Testimonial Privileges
EVIDENCE SEMINAR (2)
This Seminar will examine the testimonial privileges that permit or require professionals, family members, individuals, companies, and governmental actors to withhold testimony in furtherance of a competing public interest. We will evaluate the policy considerations justifying these privileges, the burdens they impose, and the relative competence of courts and legislatures to recognize and define them.
PREREQUISITE: PROSK 955
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: PRORP 934
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-197 ULWR 964
Intensive Legal Writing & Drafting
INT LEG WRITE/DRFT (2)
This course develops students’ skills in common legal writing formats other than memos and briefs. Not intended as a remedial course, this course rather provides an opportunity for students to sharpen legal writing skills with an emphasis on clarity and precision of expression. Weekly writing assignments include a few fully drafted documents (e.g., a short will, a short contract, a statute), as well as letters, short pleadings, jury instructions, and other short pieces. Students will concentrate on re-writing and editing their work.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-198 ULWR 968
International Uniform Enforcement of Human Rights Seminar
INTL HMN RTS SEM (3)
A study and analysis of the world’s major United Nations-sponsored international human rights treaties with an eye toward measuring the relative treaty compliance of the nations that drafted, adopted and ratified them. Do the citizens of ratifying nations have appreciably less to fear from their governments than they had before the multilateral human rights treaties entered into force?
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-199 ULWR 969
Electronic Evidence Seminar
ELEC EVIDENCE SEM (3)
The seminar will cover the case law, procedural rules, evidence rules, and rules of professional conduct implicated by the unique attributes of information created and/or stored electronically, as well as the filing and courtroom presentation of documents in electronic format. There are three components to the course. The first part concerns the discovery of ESI, and covers the nature, sources, and terminology of ESI; the different formats of ESI and the implications for preservation and production of ESI attributable to the different formats; the evolution of the rules and case law regarding discovery of ESI; and the obligations of counsel with respect to the preservation of ESI.
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-200 ULWR 996
Individual Research and Writing Seminar
IND RES WRT SEM (2-3)
The Individual Research and Writing Seminar is used to meet the Upper-Level Writing Requirement for the J.D. degree.
PREREQUISITE: Supervising Faculty and Associate Dean Approval Required
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-201 ULWR 997
Special Topics
Special Topics (1-12)
Special Topics
APPROVED START: FA2017

45-05-202 VISAW 903
Visiting Away Semester
Visiting Away Sem (1-17)
APPROVED START: FA2017