Appendices

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Abington

43-05-001 Change. Revise program description – remove reference to University Park only for concentration in new media and photography.

Proposed Effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Art

Abington College (ARTAB)
University Park, College of Arts and Architecture (ARTBA)

PROFESSOR GRAEME SULLIVAN, Director, School of Visual Arts

The B.A. degree in art provides a comprehensive liberal education coupled with professional resident instruction in art. Depending on each student’s objectives and course choices, this degree provides preparation for a professional career, a foundation for graduate studies, or a liberal arts education in art. Each student must elect an area of concentration from one of the following: ceramics, drawing and painting, new media, photography, printmaking, or sculpture.

For a B.A. degree in Art, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(6 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR. See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 51 credits
(This includes 6 credits of General Education GA courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)[1]
ART 110S(3), ART 111(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ART 122Y US(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ART H 111 GA;IL(3), ART H 112 GA;IL(3) (these credits may also be counted toward the General Education Arts requirement) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)[1]
Select 15 credits from ART 201(3), ART 203(3), ART 211 US(3), ART 217(3), ART 220(3), ART 223(3), ART 230(3), ART 240(3), ART 250(3), ART 251(3), ART 260(3), ART 280(3), ART 296(3), ART 297(3), ART 299 IL(3), PHOTO 100 GA(3), or PHOTO 201(3) (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
(Include at least 15 credits at the 300 or 400 level.)
Select 15 credits from one of the following areas of concentration: ceramics, drawing and painting, new media, photography, printmaking, and sculpture[1] (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits in art history (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Agricultural Sciences

43-05-002 Change. Drop Leadership Development and Communication Option.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Agricultural and Extension Education

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (AEE)

PROFESSOR JOHN C. EWING, Program Coordinator

This major helps prepare students for positions in education in agriculture, including schools and colleges, Cooperative Extension, business, trade and professional associations, and government agencies. The Department administers a program approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education for the preparation of agriculture teachers in public school systems. This includes programs in agricultural production, mechanics, supplies, resources, products, forestry, horticulture, and other agricultural areas.

Students take courses in agricultural and natural resource sciences, leadership and communications, natural science, social science and general education. Students seeking teacher certification schedule professional courses in education and psychology.

Pennsylvania Teacher certification regulations require students to have a GPA of 3.0; satisfactorily complete any basic-skills or entrance testing requirements as specified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education in force at the time of application for entrance to the major; and complete an approved Educator Preparation Program. The Educator Preparation Program at Penn State includes documentation of at least 80 hours of volunteer or paid education work experience with learners of the age group the candidate plans to teach. At least 40 of these age-appropriate 80 hours must be with learners whose cultural, social, or ethnic backgrounds differ from the candidate’s own; completion of an early field experience specified by the certification program; completion of at least 48 semester credit hours, including ENGL 015 or ENGL 030, 3 credits of literature, and 6 credits of quantification and secure occupational experience in the requested area of certification. (See also: Teacher Education Programs)

For students seeking teacher certification, the B.S. degree in Agricultural and Extension Education, a minimum of 125-129 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(13-22 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin for additional information)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 2-14 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 76-104 credits
(This includes 13-22 credits of General Education courses: 22 for the teacher certification options–6 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 4 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses; and 13 credits for the non-teacher certification option–6 credits of GS courses; 4 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 19 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (19 credits)
AG BM 101 GS(3), BIOL 110 GN(4), ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
AEE 311(3), INTAG 100 GS;IL(3) (Sem: 5-6)
AEE 495(3) (Sem: 7-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 57-85 credits

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE OPTION: (85 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (48 credits)
AGRO 028(3), AN SC 201(4), ASTRO 001 GN(3), CHEM 101 GN(3), CHEM 202(3), PHYS 001 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
EDPSY 014(3)[1], EDTHP 115 US(3)[1], WF ED 413(3) (Sem: 2-7)
AEE 100(3), AEE 295(1)[1], SOILS 101 GN(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
AEE 313(2)[1], AEE 412(4)[1], AEE 413(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
BIOL 220W GN(4), BIOL 230W GN(4), or BIOL 240W GN(4) (Sem: 2-7)
A S M 101(3) or A S M 217(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (30 credits)
Select 3 credits of W courses offered in the College (Sem:1-7)
Select 6 credits in biological, physical ecosystems (Sem: 1-7)
Select 6 credits in environmental impact management (Sem: 1-7)
Select 6 credits in environmental learning (Sem: 1-7)
Select 6 credits in social, political, and legal aspects of environmental science (Sem: 1-7)
Select 3 credits in agricultural systems management (Sem: 3-4)

PRODUCTION OPTION: (80 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (41 credits)
ASTRO 001 GN(3), CHEM 101 GN(3), CHEM 202(3), PHYS 001 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
AEE 100(3), AEE 295(1)[1], STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
EDPSY 014(3)[1], EDTHP 115(3)[1], SOILS 101 GN(3), WF ED 413(3) (Sem: 2-7)
AEE 313(2)[1], AEE 412(4)[1], AEE 413(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
BIOL 220W GN(4), BIOL 230W GN(4), or BIOL 240W GN(4) (Sem: 2-7)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (35 credits)
Select 3 credits of W courses offered in the College (Sem: 1-7)
Select 14 credits in agriculture (Sem: 1-7)
Select 6 credits in animal science (Sem: 1-7)
Select 6 credits in plant/soil science (Sem: 1-7)
Select 6 credits in agricultural systems management (Sem: 3-6)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-05-003 Change. Add new Plant Genetics and Biotechnology Option.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Plant Sciences

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (PLANT)

PROFESSOR RICH MARINI, Head, Department of Horticulture

The Plant Sciences Major is an applied biological science program designed for students seeking careers in agronomic and horticultural crop production systems and enterprise management, agroecology, sustainable and organic managed and natural ecosystems, crop protection, applied plant physiology, plant science research, and plant biotechnology. Students will secure: (1) a working knowledge of basic plant biology, soils, pests, and pathogens with emphasis on growth, development, and physiology in an ecological and agricultural context, (2) the scientific, technical, and computational approaches to problem solving in an ecological and agricultural context, individually and in teams, (3) the ability to analyze ethical issues regarding ecosystem sustainability, business practices and plant science, and critically evaluate and respect different viewpoints in making management decisions, and (4) a high level of proficiency in written and oral communication, particularly with regard to critical evaluation of scientific issues.

There are five options in the major, providing flexibility for concentrations in areas including production and management systems related to agronomic and horticultural crops, plant biotechnology and breeding, crop physiology, ecology, agroecology, and other aspects of general plant science. Students can choose from diverse course offerings in designing a program of study suited to their needs and professional goals.

AGROECOLOGY OPTION:
This option applies an ecological approach to understanding and managing cropping systems to meet societies’ needs while enhancing environmental protection and resource conservation. Students will develop skills to manage agroecosystems for sustainable productivity, profitability and environmental protection by studying plant and soil sciences, ecology, and pest management from a systems perspective. The curriculum prepares students for a wide range of careers in agricultural and ecological fields, sustainable food production, and for graduate studies.

CROP PRODUCTION OPTION:
This option provides students with practical and field-related skills in Agronomy (field crop production and soil management). Students will focus on techniques and knowledge necessary to efficiently and economically manage soils, crops and other farm resources with additional emphasis on pest management and commodity marketing. Courses stress the skills and information needed to work with current production technologies such as seed traits, crop protection chemicals, and fertilizers to improve yield and productivity.

HORTICULTURE OPTION:
This option prepares students to enter the horticultural industry by providing a broad background in courses related to production and physiology of horticultural crops. Additional courses in pest management and business are required. Graduates may work as orchard, greenhouse, garden center, nursery or farm managers, with horticultural and landscape service providers, suppliers, and brokers, with cooperative extension and other government and non-governmental agencies and public and private gardens, or continue with graduate studies.

PLANT GENETICS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY OPTION:
This option is a combination of basic science and technology-based classes designed for students who are seeking careers in agricultural sciences, plant breeding, plant molecular genetics and plant biotechnology based industries. It provides students with maximum flexibility in selecting a program of study suited to their needs and to achieve professional goals related to advanced degrees or immediate job placement in the industry. The option provides theoretical and practical skills of plant genetic manipulation relevant to plant biotechnology, plant breeding and genome research
.

PLANT SCIENCE OPTION:
This option emphasizes the application of the biological sciences to problem-solving in agronomic and horticultural ecosystems. Topic areas include plant biology, plant pathology, plant microbiology, plant biotechnology, plant-insect interactions, horticulture, crop science, plant ecology, and bioenergy. Graduates may find employment in industry, government and academic research programs as technicians and research assistants, or pursue graduate degrees.

For the B.S. Degree in Plant Sciences, a minimum of 120 credits are required.

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21-24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTIONS)

ELECTIVES: 0-13 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 83-99 credits
(This includes 21-24 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses and 3 credits of GWS courses; plus 3 GH in Crop Production.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 33-36 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (19 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1) (Sem: 1-4)
SOILS 101 GN(3)[1], ENT 313(2) (Sem: 5-6)
AGECO 457(3)[1], AGECO 461(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (14-17 credits)
Select 3-5 credits from MATH 022 GQ(3), MATH 026 GQ(3), MATH 040 GQ(5), MATH 041 GQ(3-4), MATH 110 GQ(4), MATH 111 GQ(2), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), or MATH 141B GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3-4 Credits from STAT 200 GQ(4), STAT 240 GQ(3) or STAT 250 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from AG BM 101 GS(3), ECON 014 GS(3), ECON 102 GS(3), or ECON 104 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 1 credit from ENT 314(1) or ENT 316(1) (Sem: 5-7)
Select 1 credit from AGECO 495(1-18), AGRO 495(1-5), HORT 495(1-13), or HORT 496(1-18) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 50-63 credits

AGROECOLOGY OPTION: (60-61 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (18 credits)
SOILS 102(1) (Sem: 1-5)
AGECO 201(3)[1] (Sem: 2-6)
AGECO 295(1) (Sem: 2-8)
AGECO/AGRO 438(4) (Sem: 5-7)
PPATH 405(3) (Sem: 5-8)
SOILS 401(3), SOILS 402(3) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24-25 credits)
Select 3 credits from AGECO/METEO 122 GN(3), AGECO/R SOC 134 GN(3), AGECO 144 GN(3), AGECO 154(2) or AGECO 496(1) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from AG 160 GH(3), GEOG 030 GS;IL(3), PHIL 013 GH(3), PHIL 103 GH(3), or PHIL 132 GH(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from AGRO 028(3)[1] or HORT 101 GN(3)[1] (Sem: 1-5)
Select 3 credits from AGECO 121 GN(3) or BIOL 127 GN(3) (Sem: 3-5)
Select 6 credits from AGRO 423(3), AGRO 425(3), HORT 202(3), HORT 315(3), HORT 431(3), HORT 432(3), HORT 433(3), HORT 450(3), or SOILS 418(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from BIOL 222(3) or HORT 407(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3-4 credits from AGRO 410W(4), HORT 412W(3), or SOILS 412W(3) (Sem: 6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 18 credits of supporting courses in consultation with adviser. (Sem: 5-8)

CROP PRODUCTION OPTION: (61-63 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (29 credits)
SOILS 102(1) (Sem: 2-5)
AGECO 201(3)[1], AGECO 295(1) (Sem: 2-6)
PPEM 405(3) (Sem: 3-7)
AGECO 429(2), AGRO 423(3), AGRO 425(3) (Sem: 3-8)
AGECO/AGRO 438(4) (Sem: 5)
HORT 407(3) (Sem: 5-7)
SOILS 401(3), SOILS 402(3) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (23-25 credits)
Select 3 credits from AGRO 028(3)[1] or HORT 101 GN(3)[1] (Sem: 1-3)
Select 3 credits from AG 160 GH(3), PHIL 013 GH(3), PHIL 103 GH(3), or PHIL 132 GH(3) (Sem: 2-7)
Select 3 credits from AGECO 121 GN(3) or BIOL 127 GN(3) (Sem: 3-5)
Select 3 credits from AG BM 102(3), AG BM 106(3), AG BM 200(3) or AG BM 407(3) (Sem: 3-7)
Select 3 credits from AEE 201 GS(3), AEE 360(3), AEE 460(3), or AEE 465(3) (Sem: 3-7)
Select 2 credits from AGECO 154(2) or SOILS 403(2) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3-4 credits from AGECO/AN SC/SOILS 418(3), AN SC 201(4), GEOG 160 GS(3), or SOILS 450(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3-4 credits from AGRO 410W(4), HORT 412W(3), or SOILS 412W(3) (Sem: 6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits of supporting courses in consultation with adviser (Sem: 4-8)

HORTICULTURE OPTION: (54-57 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (30 credits)
HORT 101 GN(3)[1], HORT 202(3)[1], HORT 232(3), HORT 315(3)[1], HORT 402W(3), HORT 407(3), HORT 412W(3)[1], HORT 420(3), HORT 445(3), HORT 455(3) (Sem: 1-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24-27 credits)
Select 3 credits from HORT 131(3), HORT 137(3), HORT 138(3), HORT 431(3)*, HORT 432(3)*, or HORT 433(3)* (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from PPEM 300(3) or PPEM 405(3) (Sem: 4-8)
Select 6-7 credits from HORT 408(4), HORT 431(3), HORT 432(3), HORT 433(3), HORT 450(3), or HORT 453(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3-4 credits from AGRO 438(4) or HORT 238(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9-10 credits from AG 301W(3), AG BM 200(3), AG BM 407(3), B LAW 243(3), FIN 100(3), MKTG 221(3), SPAN 001(4), SPAN 002(4), SPAN 003(4) or SPAN 105(4) (Sem: 5-8)

PLANT GENETICS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY OPTION: (55-61 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (34 credits)
PHYS 250(4) (Sem: 3-4)
BIOL 127(3)[1], BIOL 222(3) (Sem: 3-5)
CHEM 210(3 ) (Sem: 4-5)
PPEM 405(3)[1] (Sem: 5)
CHEM 212(3) (Sem: 5-6)
HORT 407(3) (Sem: 5-7)
AGRO 410W(4), HORT/BIOTC 459(3) (Sem: 6)
B M B 400(2) (Sem: 7)
AGRO/BIOTC 460(3) (Sem: 8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21-27 Credits)
Select 3 credits from AGRO 028(3) or HORT 101 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4-6 credits from BIOL 230W GN(4); BIOL 240W GN(4); B M B 211(3) and B M B 212(1); MICRB 201(3) and MICRB 202(2); MICRB/B M B 251(3) and MICRB 252(3) (Sem: 4)
Select 3-4 credits from BIOL 412(3), BIOL 414(3), BIOL 427(3), BIOL 428(3), BIOL 436(3), BIOL 448(3), ENT 420(3), HORT 445(3), or PPEM 425(4) (Sem: 7)
Select 2-3 credits from BIOL 439(3), BIOTC 479 (3), HORT 497B(3), IBIOS 571(2), or IBIOS 593(3) (Sem: 7)
Select 3-4 credits from ENT/VB SC 402W(3), ENT 410(3), PPEM 416(3), or PPEM 425(4) (Sem: 8)
Select 3-4 credits from BIOL 407(3), BIOL 424(3), BIOL 441(3), HORT 402W(3), HORT 412W(3), HORT 420(3), IBIOS 591(1), PPEM 417(3), or PPEM/E R M 430(3) (Sem: 8)
Select 3 credits from AGRO 423(3), AGRO 425(3), HORT 202(3), HORT 315(3), HORT 431(3), HORT 432(3), HORT 433(3), HORT 450(3), or SOILS/AGECO/AN SC 418(3) (Sem: 8)

PLANT SCIENCE OPTION: (50-56 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (24 credits)
CHEM 112(3) (Sem: 2-3)
BIOL 127 GN(3)[1], PHYS 250(4) (Sem: 3-6)
CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213B(2) (Sem: 4-5)
BIOL 222(3) (Sem: 5-6)
PPEM 405(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (26-32 credits)
Select 3 credits from AGRO 028(3) or HORT 101 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 1 credit from CHEM 113(1) or CHEM 113B(1) (Sem: 2-3)
Select 4-6 credits from B M B 211(3) and B M B 212(1), or BIOL 230W GN(4), or BIOL 240W GN(4), or MICRB 201(3) and MICRB 202(2), or MICRB 251(3), or MICRB 252(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3-4 credits from BIOL 439*(3), ENT 402W(3), ENT 410(3), PPEM 416(3), PPEM 417*(3), or PPEM 425*(4) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3-4 credits from BIOL 412(3), BIOL 414(3), BIOL 427(3), BIOL 428(3), BIOL 436(3), BIOL 448(3), ENT/VB SC 402W(3), ENT 420(3), HORT 445(3), or PPEM 425*(4) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from AGRO 460(3), BIOL 439(3), HORT 407*(3), or HORT 459(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6-7 credits from AGRO 410W(4), AGRO 460(3), BIOL 407(3), BIOL 441(3), BIOL 424(3), HORT 402W(3), HORT 407*(3), HORT 412W(3), HORT 420(3), PPEM 417*(3), or PPEM/E R M 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3-4 credits from AGRO 410W(4), HORT 412W(3), or SOILS 412W(3) (Sem: 6)

*Students cannot use the same course more than once as an additional course
[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


 COURSE ADDS

43-05-004 E R M 299  (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-005 E R M 399  (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-006 PLANT 220  (GN)
Gardening for Fun and Profit
GARDEN FUN PROFIT (3)
Fundamentals of designing, planting and maintaining residential landscapes and edible gardens for students with minimal/intermediate horticulture knowledge.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-05-007 AEE   412
Methods of Teaching Agriculture and Environmental Science
METHS TCHG AG&ENV (4)
Instructional strategies and media; directing individual and group learning activities; assessing student performance and quality of instruction in vocational agriculture.
APPROVED START:  S12013

NEW
ADD PREREQUISITE: AEE 100, AEE 295, and AEE 311
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Arts and Architecture

COURSE ADDS

43-05-008 A&A   324
Arts Entrepreneurship and the Law
ART E-SHIP & LAW (1)
Course surveys general legal considerations in the arts and pertinent issues for monetizing creative work.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-009 A&A   424
Arts Entrepreneurship Capstone Research Project
CAP ARTS E-SHIP (3)
Mentored research on an arts venue idea equips students for immediate, informed, individually specific action upon completion of the program.
PREREQUISITE: A&A 322 and A&A 323
PROPOSED START:  S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-05-010 ART H 140  (GA;IL)
Introduction to Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture
PRE-COLUMBIAN ART (3)
This course examines the artistic and architectural production of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica and the Andes.
APPROVED START:  S12011

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Introduction to the Art and Architecture of the Mayas, Aztecs, and Incas (MAYA/AZTEC/INCA)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course examines the artistic and architectural production of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica and the Andes.
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Behrend

43-05-011 Change. Add Entrance to Major requirements; Increase the number of credits for the Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior Option from 55 to 56 credits; Increase the number of credits for the General Biology Option from 55 to 56 credits; Increase the number of credits for the Genetics and Developmental Biology Option from 55 to 56 credits; Increase the number of credits for the Medical Technology Option from 55-57 to 56-58 credits; Decrease number of credits required for the major from 42 to 41 credits; Add BIOL 402W, STAT 461, 462, 464, 466 to Additional Courses for Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Option; Remove STAT 301, 401 from Additional Courses for Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Option; Remove BIOL 223 from Prescribed Courses; Add C or higher grade requirement to BIOL 110; Add C or better grade requirement to 400-level courses in the Supporting Courses and Related Areas for all options; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Biology

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (BIOBD)

The curriculum in Biology is designed to provide students with a strong background in the biological sciences. It provides preparation for students who intend to secure advanced degrees through graduate study, students who intend to prepare for careers in medicine or health-related fields, and students preparing for careers with companies or agencies requiring employees with biological backgrounds. The curriculum has six options allowing students to choose an area of specialization that will best meet their career goals. In addition to selecting an option, students are strongly encouraged to participate in faculty-supervised research. The options are: General Biology – various areas of modern biology; Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior – theoretical, practical, and applied ecology and evolution of plants and animals; Genetics and Developmental Biology – genetics and developmental biology of plants and animals; Molecular and Cellular Biology and Biochemistry – molecular and cellular mechanisms of biology; Medical Technology – prepares students for careers in clinical laboratories; and Health Professions– prepares students for careers in medicine and veterinary sciences; this option also allows exceptional students, who gain early admission to a professional school, to fulfill option requirements with a set number of academic credits taken during the first professional year.

Entrance Requirement: In order for entrance to the Biology major, a student must have: 1) attained at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average; 2) completed BIOL 110 GN(4) and earned a grade of C or better; and 3) completed at least one of the following courses with a grade of C or better: BIOL 220W GN(4), or BIOL 240W GN(4).

For the B.S. degree in Biology, a minimum of 124 credits is required. Each student must earn at least a grade of C in each 200-, 300-, and 400-level BIOL, B M B, MICRB, PPEM and W F S course in the major field.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 97-99 credits
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 41 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (41 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1) (Sem: 1-2)
BIOL 110 GN(4)[1], BIOL 220W GN(4)[1], BIOL 230W GN(4)[1], BIOL 240W GN(4)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), STAT 250 GQ(3) (Sem: 3-6)
BIOL 322(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 56-58 credits

ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND BEHAVIOR OPTION: (56 credits)
Students can select courses in theoretical or applied ecology, evolution, field biology and animal behavior to build strength in ecological science. The option prepares students for graduate study in ecology and evolution, or careers in zoo science, environmental consulting, environmental management, environmental education or positions with regulatory agencies.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
BIOL 427(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (26-30 credits)
BIOL 402W(3) or STAT 461(3) or STAT 462(3) or STAT 464(3) or STAT 466(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6-8 credits from one of the following sequences:
a. CHEM 202(3), CHEM 203(3) (Sem: 3-4)
b. CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 8-10 credits from one of the following sequences:
a. PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 5-8)
b. PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4); PHYS 213 GN(2) or PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits from the following:
BIOL 428(3)[1], BIOL 429(3)[1], BIOL 435(3)[1], BIOL 438(3)[1], BIOL 446(3)[1], BIOL 463(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (23-27 credits)
Select 7 credits in GEOG 160 GS(3), GEOG 161(1), and GEOG 363(3) and 10-14 credits from school approved list (Sem: 1-8)
OR
Select 17-21 credits from school approved list (Sem: 1-8)
Select 6 credits of 400-level BIOL, B M B, MICRB, PPEM, or W F S[1] courses excluding BIOL 400 and any courses numbered 494, 495, 496, 497, 498, or 499 (Sem: 5-8)

GENERAL BIOLOGY OPTION: (56 credits)
Students can select courses from a variety of areas of contemporary biology. The option provides the flexibility to enable students to tailor their program for graduate study in many fields of biology or careers requiring broad backgrounds and diverse skills in the biological sciences.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
BIOL 427(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (14-18 credits)
Select 6-8 credits from one the following sequences:
a. CHEM 202(3), CHEM 203(3) (Sem: 3-4)
b. CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 8-10 credits from one of the following sequences:
a. PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 5-8)
b. PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4); PHYS 213 GN(2) or PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (35-39 credits)
Select 20-24 credits from school approved list (Sem: 1-8)
Select 15 credits of 400-level BIOL, B M B, MICRB, PPEM, or W F S[1] courses excluding BIOL 400 and any courses numbered 494, 495, 496, 497, 498, or 499 (Sem: 5-8)

GENETICS AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OPTION: (56 credits)
Students can select courses to develop strengths in various areas of transmission, medical, population or molecular genetics and/or study the developmental process at the organismal, histological or molecular levels. The option prepares students for admission to professional programs in the health sciences, graduate programs in genetic counseling, plant or animal breeding, developmental biology, or careers in research or biotechnology.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (16 credits)
CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2) (Sem: 3-4)
MICRB 201(3)[1], MICRB 202(2)[1] (Sem 3-6)
BIOL 427(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (17-19 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following:
B M B 406(3)[1], BIOL 410(3)[1], BIOL 422(3)[1], BIOL 428(3)[1], BIOL 430(3)[1], BIOL 460(3)[1], (Sem: 5-8)
Select 8-10 credits from one of the following sequences:
a. PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 5-8)
b. PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4); PHYS 213 GN(2) or PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21-23 credits)
Select 15-17 credits from school approved list (Sem: 1-8)
Select 6 credits of 400-level BIOL, B M B, MICRB, PPEM, or W F S[1] courses excluding BIOL 400 and any courses numbered 494, 495, 496, 497, 498, or 499 (Sem: 5-8)

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION: (56-58 credits)
Students spend approximately twelve months at an affiliated hospital[12] during their senior year to complete the clinical phase of their baccalaureate studies. A fixed number of spaces are available on a competitive basis of grade-point average and hospital approval. The Bachelor of Science degree in Biology is awarded upon successful completion of the clinical study. The graduate is also eligible to take the national examination for certification and registry as a medical technologist.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (44 credits)
MICRB 201(3)[1], MICRB 202(2)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 5-6)
MICRB 405A(8)[1], MICRB 405B(1)[1], MICRB 405C(6)[1], MICRB 405D(5)[1], MICRB 405E(7)[1], MICRB 405F(3)[1], MICRB 408(1)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (8-10 credits)
Select 8-10 credits from one the following sequences:
a. CHEM 202(3), CHEM 203(3), CHEM 221(4) (Sem: 3-4)
b. CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (4 credits)
Select 1 credit from approved list (Sem: 1-6)
Select 3 credits of 400-level B M B, BIOL, MICRB from:
B M B 402(3)[1], B M B 406(3)[1], BIOL 460(3)[1], BIOL 472(3)[1], or MICRB 415(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION: (56 credits)
Students can select courses to develop strengths in the study of biology at the cellular and molecular levels, including basic metabolism and its regulations, DNA recombinant technology, bioinformatics and genomics. The option prepares students for admission to professional programs in the health sciences, graduate study, or careers in biotechnology or research.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (26 credits)
CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2), MICRB 201(3)[1], MICRB 202(2)[1] (Sem 3-6)
B M B 401(3)[1], B M B 402(3)[1], B M B 403(1)[1], B M B 406(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
BIOL 427(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (11-13 credits)
Select 8-10 credits from one of the following sequences:
a. PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 5-8)
b. PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4); PHYS 213 GN(2) or PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from B M B 465(3)[1], BIOL 404(3)[1], BIOL 439(3)[1], BIOL 441(3)[1], MICRB 410(3)[1], MICRB 412(3)[1], or MICRB 415(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (17-19 credits)
Select 14-16 credits from school approved list (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits of 400-level BIOL, B M B, MICRB, PPEM, or W F S[1] courses excluding BIOL 400 and any courses numbered 494, 495, 496, 497, 498, or 499 (Sem: 5-8)

HEALTH PROFESSIONS OPTION: (56 credits)
Students can prepare for the rigors of advanced health professions education by following the course of study outlined in this option. This option is also provided for exceptional students who are admitted into a “3+4” accelerated or early acceptance program at an approved or affiliated professional school. Students are granted 21 credits toward the Bachelor of Science degree following the successful completion of the first professional academic year. The Health Professions Committee will work with such students to develop an appropriate program of study.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (29 credits)
MICRB 201(3)[1], MICRB 202(2)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2) (Sem: 3-4)
B M B 402(3)[1], B M B 403(1)[1], BIOL 421(4)[1], BIOL 472(3)[1], BIOL 473(2)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
BIOL 427(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (11-13 credits)
Select 8-10 credits from one of the following sequences:
a. PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 5-8)
b. PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4); PHYS 213 GN(2) or PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from: B M B 401(3)[1] or CHEM 472(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (14-16 credits)
Select 11-13 credits from school approved list (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits of 400-level BIOL, B M B, MICRB, PPEM, or W F S[1] courses excluding BIOL 400 and any courses numbered 494, 495, 496, 497, 498, or 499 (Sem: 5-8)

[1]A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[12]Current affiliation is with St. Vincent Health Center, School of Medical Technology, Erie, PA.


COURSE ADDS

43-05-012 DIGIT 110
Text Encoding Fundamentals
TEXTENCODING (3)
DIGIT 110 teaches students standardized encoding techniques for archival quality data creation, storage, and analysis.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-013 DIGIT 210
Large Scale Text Analysis
TEXTANALYSIS (3)
Course teaches students programmatic and algorithmic techniques and tools for accessing and analyzing unstructured text.
PREREQUISITE: DIGIT 100
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-014 DIGIT 400
Digital Project Design
DIGITPRODESIGN (3)
This course will introduce students to the tools and resources available to design and implement digital project.
PREREQUISITE: DIGIT 100, DIGIT 110, DIGIT 210
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-015 DIGIT 410
Data Visualization
DATA VIS (3)
In-depth understanding of techniques and software for data visualization. Students will be introduced to complex data sets and learn how to present findings in interactive and innovative ways.
PREREQUISITE: PSYCH 200 or STAT 200
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-016 DIGIT 430
Simulations of Human Behavior
SIMUL HUM BEHAV (3)
In Modeling and Simulation, students will develop an understanding of the systems, processes, tools, and implications of this field.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits of programming; 3 credits of mathematics
CROSS LIST:GAME  430
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-017 DIGIT 494
Senior Project
SENIOR PROJECT (3)
DIGIT 494 is a senior capstone course that allows students to design, complete, and present an independent digitally based project.
PREREQUISITE: DIGIT 100, DIGIT 110, DIGIT 400
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-018 DIGIT 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (3)
A professional internship opportunity with a business, organization, or non-profit agency.
PREREQUISITE: DIGIT 100, DIGIT 110, DIGIT 400
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-019 GAME  430
Simulations of Human Behavior
SIMUL HUM BEHAV (3)
In Modeling and Simulation, students will develop an understanding of the systems, processes, tools, and implications of this field.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits of programming; 3 credits of mathematics
CROSS LIST: DIGIT 430
PROPOSED START:  S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-05-020 PL ET 205
Introduction to Plastics
INTRO PLASTICS (3:3:0)
Introduction to the plastics industry including fundamental aspects of plastic materials and processing; introduces the chemical influence on mechanical and flow properties of plastic materials.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 040, MATH 082, MATH 140 . Prerequisite or concurrent: CHEM 110
APPROVED START:  S12007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATH 081, MATH 041, or MATH 140; Prerequisite or concurrent: CHEM 110
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-021 PL ET 222
Introduction to Plastics Processing
INTRO PL PROCESS (4:3:3)
Introduction to plastic processing methods, materials, tooling, design, and equipment.  Safe operation and practices are emphasized.
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
ADD CONCURRENT: PL ET 205
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-022 PL ET 227
Plastics Processing & Statistical Methods
PL PROC & STATS (4:2:6)
Study of advanced issues in plastics processing, such as design of experiments and SPC/SQC will be covered.
PREREQUISITE: PL ET 205, PL ET 222; Prerequisite or concurrent: PL ET 225
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: PL ET 050 or EDSGN 100S, PL ET 205, PL ET 222
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-023 PL ET 232
Introduction to Part and Tool Design
PART & TOOL DESIGN (3:1:5)
CAD techniques for designing plastic products and related tooling.
PREREQUISITE: EG T 121, Prerequisite or concurrent: PL ET 222
APPROVED START:  SP2007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: PL ET 222; Prerequisite or concurrent: EG T 121
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-024 PL ET 235
Tool Design & Machining
TOOL DESIGN & MACH (2:1:3)
Study of the methods used to create the tooling used in plastics fabrication and the methods of maintaining tooling.
PREREQUISITE: PL ET 222; Prerequisite or concurrent: PL ET 232
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: PL ET 232
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

COURSE DROPS

43-05-025 PL ET 225
Instrumentation, Control, & Automation for Plastics
INSTR CONT & AUTO (2:1:3)
Instrumentation, control and automation basics & strategies for plastics processing.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 081; Prerequisite or concurrent: PL ET 222
PROPOSED START:  S12015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Capital

43-05-025A Change. Add new Integrated B.S./M.S. in Electrical Engineering.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Electrical Engineering

Capital College (E ENG)

AB SHAFAYE, Program Chair, School of Science, Engineering, and Technology

The Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering provides a solid background in electrical engineering sciences. It also provides an opportunity for students to pursue interests in electrical and electronic circuits, including digital circuits and VLSI and its fabrication, microprocessors and their applications, electromagnetics, communications, control systems, and digital image processing and computer vision. Through participation in a senior capstone design, the curriculum emphasizes written as well as verbal communication and teamwork approach among the students to attain a common goal.

This program helps its graduates develop capabilities to analyze and design a variety of electrical and electronic systems found in many industrial and government settings as well as provide a foundation for further graduate studies. A strong background in the fundamentals is built through a broad base core in basic sciences (physics and chemistry) and mathematics as well as engineering sciences.

For a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering a minimum of 134 credits is required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Electrical Engineering major requires that the student has completed: MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), and CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1). A 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-4 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 110-113 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (87 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), EDSGN 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
SSET 295(1) (Sem: 4)
MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), MATH 220 GQ(2-3), MATH 230(4), MATH 250(3), PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), PHYS 213 GN(2), PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
CMPEN 271(3)[1], CMPEN 275(1)[1], E MCH 211(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
CMPEH 472(4), E E 310(4)[1], E E 330(4), E E 341(3), E E 352(4)[1], E E 485(3) (Sem: 5-6)
CMPSC 436(3), E E 311(3), E E 405(1), E E 406W(3)[1], E E 461(4), E E 481(4) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (14-17 credits)
Select 3 credits from: ECON 102 GS(3) or ECON 104 GS(3) or ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: CMPSC 201 GQ(3), or CMPSC 121 GQ(3), or CMPSC 202 GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits from MATH 444(3)[1] or MATH 446(3)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 4-6)
Select 5-7 credits from E E 315(5)[1]; or E E 210(4)[1] and E E 314(3)[1] (Sem: 4-5)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student’s interests. (Sem: 7-8)

Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Electrical Engineering

The Electrical Engineering program offers a limited number of academically superior Bachelor of Science candidates the opportunity to enroll in an integrated, continuous program of study leading to both the Bachelor of Science and the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables students to earn the two degrees in five years.

Students in the IUG program must satisfy the degree requirements for both Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees. However, the total course load is reduced due to the maximum of 12 credits that can count towards both degrees. A minimum of 7 credits proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted. The fourth year of the IUG program differs from the fourth year of the Bachelor of Science program due to the courses that count toward the Master of Science Degree requirements. Student performance will be monitored on an on-going basis. In addition, a formal evaluation of student’s academic performance will be conducted at the end of the first semester of the senior year for a typical student in the program. Students who have not maintained a 3.4 GPA in their Math and Electrical Engineering courses will be put on probationary status with respect to the IUG program. Their ability to continue in the IUG program will be based on academic performance in the last semester of their senior year. As part of the review in the senior year, students will be advised about the thesis requirement in the graduate program.

Students have the choice of receiving the B.S. degree at the end of the fourth year or waiting until the end of the fifth year to receive both degrees. Students who elect to receive the B.S. degree at the end of the fourth year will pay graduate tuition for courses taken in the fifth year; students opting to receive both degrees at the end of the fifth year will pay undergraduate tuition for all five years. If for any reason a student admitted to the IUG program is unable to complete the requirements for the Master of Science degree, the student will be permitted to receive the Bachelor of Science degree assuming all the undergraduate degree requirements have been satisfactorily completed. If students successfully complete courses listed in the recommended schedule, they will satisfy the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree by the end of their fourth year.

Admission Requirements

To initiate the application process, students must submit an Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) Degree in Electrical Engineering Application Form, an official transcript, three letters of professional recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential, and a personal statement of technical interest and goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) degree program. In order to apply for the IUG program, students must have completed a minimum of 81 credits; therefore a typical student would apply after completing the fifth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For consideration for acceptance into the program, students must have cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.4 or better and collective GPA of 3.4 or better in the following courses: CMPEN 271, CMPEN 275, E E 315 (or equivalent), E E 341, CMPEH 472 and all the designated MATH, PHYS, and CMPSC courses. Applications will be evaluated based on students’ overall academic performance, in addition to the above requirements. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the Graduate Admissions Committee of the Electrical Engineering program.

Degree Requirements

Students in the IUG program must satisfy the degree requirements for both Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees. The total course load is reduced due to the maximum of 12 credits that can count towards both degrees. The minimum of 7 credits double-counted must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

B.S. Degree Portion:

TOTAL B.S. REQUIREMENTS: 134 credits
(12 double-counted with the M.S. Requirements)

General Education: 45 credits
(21 of these are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR)

Electives: 0-4 credits

Requirements for the Major: 110-113 credits

Prescribed Courses: 87 credits
As listed by the B.S. E ENG bulletin with the following change
CMPSC 436 can be replaced by an EEO 400 or System 400 Elective

Additional Courses: 14-17 credits
Select 3 credits from ECON 102 GS(3) or ECON 104 GS(3) or ECON 014 GS(3)
Select 3 credits from CMPSC 201 GQ(3) or CMPSC 121 GQ(3) or CMPSC 202 GQ(3)
Select 3-4 credits from MATH 444(3)or MATH 446(3) or STAT 200 GQ(4)
Select 5-7 credits from E E 315(5) or E E 210(4) and E E 314(3)

Supporting Courses and Related Areas: 9 credits
E MCH 524A (3), and
Electronics-Electromagnetics- Optics Option: one EEO 400-level (3) and One EEO 500-level (3), or

Systems Option: one System 400 (3) and One System 500-level (3).

M.S. Degree Portion:
TOTAL M.S. REQUIREMENTS: 31 credits
(12 double-counted with B.S. Requirements)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


 

43-05-026 Change. Change name of program from Interdisciplinary Humanities to Humanities; Change degree from B.HUM to B.A.; Add Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements; Decrease number of credits required for the Major from 60-64 to 51 credits; Add HUM 100, 200, 300W, 400 to Prescribed Courses; Add C or better requirement to Prescribed Courses; Add Additional Course area; Revise Supporting Courses and Related Areas; Remove I HUM 300W, I HUM 400 from Prescribed courses; Revise program description; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Humanities

Capital College (HUM)

PROFESSOR PATRICIA E. JOHNSON, Program Coordinator, School of Humanities

This major helps students appreciate, understand, and interpret relationships among the arts, ideas, media, and values that have shaped Western and world cultures. Students are taught to become active learners who can synthesize, interpret, and communicate knowledge and experience through writing, speaking, and creative expression in a variety of media. The School helps students meet these goals by offering a range of interdisciplinary and discipline-based courses in the arts, art history, communication studies, English, history, literature, music, philosophy, theatre, and writing. The course of study includes interdisciplinary courses which examine topics and time periods from the perspectives of multiple Humanities disciplines. These courses engage students in cross-disciplinary critical thinking and analysis and prepare them for work in an increasingly interdisciplinary world. Students also choose three Humanities subfields to investigate in greater depth, choosing from history and global cultures; the visual and performing arts; philosophy and religious studies; and literature and writing. Students are also encouraged to combine this major with a minor in such fields as business administration, writing, and communications. The Humanities major prepares students for careers in the arts, arts administration, business, corporate communications, government, teaching, museum work, and law, as well as providing a foundation for graduate study in a liberal arts field.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Humanities major requires the completion of 27.1 or more credits and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

For a B.A. degree in Humanities, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-15 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 51 credits
(At least 36 of the last 60 credits must be earned at Penn State, according to University Policy 83-80.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)[1]
HUM 100 GH(3), HUM 200 GH(3), HUM 300W(3), HUM 400(3) (Sem: 1-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits) [1]
Select 6 credits from Humanities (HUM) courses: HUM 150(3), HUM 311(3), HUM 410(3), HUM 430(3), HUM 453(3), HUM 460(3), HUM 461(3), HUM 491(3), HUM 494(3), HUM 495(3), HUM 496(3), HUM 497(3), HUM 499(3) (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (33 credits)
(At least 15 credits of supporting courses must be at the 400 level.)
Select 12 credits in one of the four following areas; select 9 credits in a second area: (Sem: 1-8)
a. History and global cultures: select from  CMLIT, HIST, SPAN (all courses with those prefixes), CAS 271 US;IL(3), COMM 350 IL(3), ENGL 486 IL(3), ENGL 488 IL(3), INTST 100 GS;IL(3)
b. Performing and visual arts and art history: select from ART, ART H, INART, MUSIC, THEA (all courses with those prefixes), COMM 215(3), COMM 241(3), COMM 242(3), COMM 250 GA(3)
c. Philosophy and religious studies: select from PHIL, RL ST (all courses with those prefixes)
d. Literature and writing: select from CMLIT, ENGL (all courses with those prefixes), COMM 230W(3), COMM 260W(3), COMM 332(3), COMM 346(3), COMM 474(3)
Select 12 credits from AM ST, ART, ART H, CAS, CHNS, CMLIT, COMM, ENGL, FR, HIST, HUM, INART, MUSIC, PHIL, RL ST, SPAN, or THEA and/or 12 credits that can be used toward a minor in an area of the student’s interests. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-05-027 Add. New Mechatronics Minor.

Proposed Effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Mechatronics Minor

Capital College, School of Science, Engineering and Technology

Mechatronics is an interdisciplinary engineering field that combines mechanical, electrical, electronics, control and computer engineering. The field deals with the design, development, control, and application of advanced electro-mechanical systems. Such systems will include sensors, actuators, microprocessors, controllers, software, computer, and mechanical hardware components. The purpose of the minor is to provide undergraduate students an opportunity to take relevant courses that will sequentially build on their knowledge and understanding of mechatronic systems and to provide recognition to those who do so.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 19-22 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (4 credits)
E E 210(4) (Sem: 4-5)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15-18 credits)
Select 3 credits from: CMPSC 121(3), CMPSC 200(3), or CMPSC 201(3) (Sem: 2-4)
Select 6-8 credits from the following:
(Students graduating with a M E major should take 7-8 credits from Group A; students graduating with an EE major should take 7 credits from group B; all other students should take 6-8 credits from both A and B.)

Group A:
CMPEN 270 (4) or CMPEN 271(3) and CMPEN 275(1) (Sem: 3-4)
CMPEN 331(3) or E E 310(4) or E E 387(3) (Sem: 5-6)

Group B:
M E 345(4) or M E 345W(4) (Sem: 5-6)
M E 357(3) (Sem: 5-6)

Select 6-7 credits from the following (one course each from Category I and II):

Category I:
CMPEH 472(4), CMPEN 472(3), E E 485(3), E E 487(3), M E 445(4) (Sem: 5-8)

Category II:
E E 483(3), M E 455(3), M E 456(3) (Sem: 5-8)


43-05-028 Add. New Mechatronics Technology Minor.

Proposed Effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Mechatronics Technology Minor

Capital College, School of Science, Engineering and Technology

Mechatronics is an interdisciplinary technical discipline that combines mechanical, electrical, electronics, control and computer engineering technology. The field deals with the design, development, control, and application of advanced electro-mechanical systems. Such systems will include sensors, actuators, microprocessors, controllers, software, computer, and mechanical hardware components. The purpose of the mechatronics technology minor is to provide undergraduate students an opportunity to take relevant courses that will sequentially build on their knowledge and understanding of mechatronic systems and to provide recognition to those who do so.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18-23 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
E MCH 211(3) or ET 300(3) or MCH T 111(3) (Sem: 3-4)
EET 311(4) or EET 315(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12-16 credits)
Select 6-8 credits from the following:
(Students graduating with an MET major should take 8 credits from Group A; students graduating with an EET major should take 6-7 credits from Group B; all other students should take one course from each group, totaling 7-8 credits.)

Group A:
E E 310(4) or EET 212W (4) (Sem: 5-6)
CMPEN 271(3) and CMPEN 275(1) or CMPET 117(3) and CMPET 120(1) (Sem: 5-6)

Group B:
EET 341(3) or EMET 330(3) or M E 345(4) or M E 345W(4) or MET 341(3)(Sem: 5-6)

Select 6-8 credits from the following (one course from category I and II):
Category I:
CMPEH 472(4) or E E 485(3) (Sem: 6-8)

Category II:
EET 433(4) or EET 440(3) or EMET 410(3) or MET 454(3) or MET 455(3) (Sem: 7-8)

 


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Earth and Mineral Sciences

COURSE ADDS

43-05-029 E B F 411
Petroleum and Natural Gas Geology for Land Professionals
LAND PNG GEOLOG (3)
This course provides energy land students with a knowledge base, as well as a set of notes and references, that they can draw on during a career in the petroleum industry.
PREREQUISITE: GEOSC 001
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-030 METEO 480M
Undergraduate Research
METEO 480M (3)
Undergraduate Research
PREREQUISITE: junior or senior standing as a Meteorology Major
PROPOSED START:  S12015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Education

43-05-031 Change. Add new Mathematics Education 4-8 Option; Reduce the number of credits required for the major from 109-111 to 108-109 credits; Move EDPSY 101, STAT 100, 200 from Additional Courses for the major to the Additional Courses in the Early Education PK-4 Option, English 4-8 Option, Social Studies Option; Move MATH GQ Additional Courses for the major to the Supporting Courses and Related Areas in the Early Education PK-4 Option, English 4-8 Option, Social Studies Option; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Childhood and Early Adolescent Education

Pen State Abington
Penn State Altoona
Penn State Berks
Penn State Erie, The Behrend College
University College: Penn State Lehigh Valley
University Park, College of Education (CEAED)

PROFESSOR STEPHANIE SERRIERE, Director

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

CHILDHOOD AND EARLY ADOLESCENT EDUCATION. Students successfully completing this major will have met all of the requirements for the PK-4, ENGLISH EDUCATION 4-8, MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 4-8, or SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION 4-8 College Instructional 1 certificate issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Students must apply for admission to the major. Students interested in the major should contact their advisor and enroll in a C I 295 field experience, which features participation in the classroom.

Baccalaureate degree candidates must meet the following requirements 1-3 by the end of their third semester:
1. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00.
2. Satisfaction of any basic-skills or entrance testing requirements as specified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education in force at the time of application for entrance to the major.

Requirements 3-8 must be met by the end of the fourth semester when students typically participate in the Entrance to Major process.

3. A grade of “C” or better in all specified courses.
4. Completion of an early field experience specified by the certification program.
5. Completion of a core of Education courses specified by the certification program.
6. Completion of additional credits as specified by the certification program.
7. Completion of at least 48 semester credit hours, including ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3), six credits of quantification, and three credits of natural science, as well as three credits of literature for Early Education PK-4 Option , three credits of literature for Mathematics Education 4-8 Option, three credits of literature for Social Studies 4-8 Option or six credits of literature for English 4-8 Option.
8. Approval from the professional education adviser or the head of the pertinent certification program.

For the B.S. degree in Education with an option in Early Education PK-4, a minimum of 127 credits is required; with an option in English 4-8, a minimum of 128 credits is required; with an option in Mathematics Education 4-8, a minimum of 126 credits if required; or with an option in Social Studies Education 4-8, a minimum of 127 credits is required. (See also Teacher Education Programs.)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: 1 credit
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 108-109 credits [1]
(This includes 27 credits of General Education courses: Early Education PK-4 Option – 6 credits of GH courses, 9 credits of GN courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GS courses. English 4-8 Option – 6 credits of GH courses, 9 credits of GN courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GS courses. Mathematics Education 4-8 Option – 6 credits of GH courses, 9 credits of GN courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GS courses. Social Studies 4-8 Option – 6 credits of GH courses, 9 credits of GN courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 58 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (55 credits)
C I 280 GH(3), EDPSY 014(3), EDTHP 115 US(3), MATH 200 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)
C I 495D(12), C I 495F(3), KINES 126(1.5), KINES 127(1.5), LL ED 400(3), LL ED 401(3), LL ED 402(3), MTHED 420(3), SCIED 458(3), SPLED 400(4), SPLED 403A(3), SS ED 430W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits in literature (GH) (Sem: 1-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 50-53 credits

EARLY EDUCATION PK-4 OPTION: (51-52 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)
C I 295A(3), HD FS 229 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
A ED 303(3), C I 495A(3), E C E 451(3), E C E 479(3), MUSIC 241(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3-4 credits)
STAT 100 GQ(3), STAT 200 GQ(4), or EDPSY 101 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (27 credits)
Select 3 credits of Economic Geography (GS;US;IL) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits of US History (GS;US;IL) (Sem: 1-4)
Any MATH GQ course (Sem: 1-4)
Select 9 credits: 3 credits each (including one course with a lab) from biological science, earth science, and physical science (GN courses) (Sem: 1-6)

Select 3 credits of family and relationships from:
E C E 453(3), HD FS 315(3), HD FS 415(3), HD FS 418(3), HD FS 424 US(3), HD FS 431(3), HD FS 469U IL(3), SOC 030 GS(3), or WL ED 444(3) (Sem: 1-4)

Select 6 credits of educational selections from:
APLNG 493 IL(3), E C E 452(3), E C E 454(3), HD FS 250 US(3), HD FS 330(6), HD FS 415(3), HD FS 427(3), HD FS 428(3), HD FS 429(3), HD FS 430(6), HD FS 432(3), LL ED 450(3), LL ED 467(3), WL ED 400(3), or WL ED 483(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ENGLISH 4-8 OPTION: (52-53 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (19 credits)
C I 295B(3), HD FS 239 GS(3), SOC 119 GS;US(4) (Sem: 1-4)
C I 495B(3), LL ED 412W(3), LL ED 450(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3-4 credits)
STAT 100 GQ(3), STAT 200 GQ(4), or EDPSY 101 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (30 credits)
Any MATH GQ course (Sem: 1-4)
Select 9 credits: 3 credits each (including one course with a lab) from biological science, earth science, and physical science (GN courses) (Sem: 1-6)

Select 3 credits of British Literature from:
ENGL 221(3), ENGL 222(3), ENGL 440(3), ENGL 441(3), ENGL 442(3), ENGL 443(3), ENGL 444(3), ENGL 445(3), ENGL 446(3), ENGL 447(3), ENGL 448(3), ENGL 449 US;IL(3), ENGL 450(3), ENGL 451(3), ENGL 452(3), ENGL 453(3), ENGL 454(3), ENGL 455(3), ENGL 456(3), ENGL 457(3), or ENGL 458(3) (Sem: 1-6)

Select 3 credits of American Literature from:
ENGL 231(3), ENGL 232(3), ENGL 432(3), ENGL 433(3), ENGL 434(3), ENGL 435(3), ENGL 436(3), ENGL 437(3), ENGL 438(3), or ENGL 439(3) (Sem: 1-6)

Select 3 credits of Comparative Literature from:
ENGL 135 GH;US(3), ENGL 139 GH;US(3), ENGL 194 GH;US;IL(3), ENGL 226 GH;US;IL(3), ENGL 235 US(3), ENGL 245 GH;US(3), ENGL 431 US(3), ENGL 461 US(3), ENGL 462 US(3), ENGL 463 US(3), ENGL 466 US(3), ENGL 467 US(3), ENGL 468 US(3), ENGL 469 US(3), CMLIT 101 GH;US;IL(3), CMLIT 109 GH;US;IL(3), CMLIT 110 GH;US;IL(3), CMLIT 111 GH;IL(3), CMLIT 404 IL(3), CMLIT 422 IL(3), or CMLIT 423 IL(3) (Sem: 1-6)

Select 3 credits of Writing from:
ENGL 212(3), ENGL 213(3), ENGL 215(3), ENGL 281(3), ENGL 412(3), ENGL 413(3), ENGL 414(3), or ENGL 415(3) (Sem: 1-6)

Select 6 credits of Media Literacy from:
COMM 100 GS(3), COMM 120(3), COMM 150 GA(3), COMM 180 GS(3), COMM 205 US(3), COMM 250 GA(3), COMM 453 IL(3), COMM 454(3), CAS 211(3), CAS 213(3), CAS 215(3), CAS 250(3), CAS 271 US;IL(3), CAS 280W(3), CAS 375(3), CAS 422 US(3), or CAS 480(3) (Sem: 1-6)

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 4-8 OPTION: (50 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (35 credits)
C I 295B(3), HD FS 239 GS(3), MATH 140(4), MATH 141(4), MATH 201 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 311W(3) (Sem: 4-6)
MTHED 428(3), MTHED 429(3) (Sem: 5-6)
MTHED 431(3), MTHED 433(3) (Sem: 6-7)
C I 495B(3) (Sem: 7)

COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 9 credits: 3 credits each (including one course with a lab) from biological science, earth science, and physical science (GN courses) (Sem: 1-6)

Select 3 credits from humanities GH (Sem: 1-3)
Select 3 credits from social and behavioral sciences GS (Sem: 1-3)

SOCIAL STUDIES 4-8 OPTION: (51-52 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (24 credits)
C I 295B(3), PL SC 001 GS(3), HIST 020 GH;US(3), GEOG 010 GN(3), GEOG 020 GS;US;IL(3), HD FS 239 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
C I 495B(3), LL ED 412W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3-4 credits)
STAT 100 GQ(3), STAT 200 GQ(4), or EDPSY 101 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)
Any MATH GQ course (Sem: 1-4)
Select 6 credits: 3 credits each (including one course with a lab) from biological science, and physical science (GN courses) (Sem: 1-6)
Select 15 credits from social sciences with at least 6 credits taken at the 100-level or above:

At least 3 credits in Economic Policy Issues from:
ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), ECON 014 GS(3), GEOG 123 GS;IL(3), GEOG 126 GS;US;IL(3), HIST 155 GS;US(3), HIST 156 US(3), PL SC 135 GS(3), or WMNST 456(3) (Sem: 3-8)

At least 6 credits in Civics and Society from:
AF AM/RL ST 145 GH;US;IL(3), AF AM/ENGL 235 US(3), AF AM/SOC 409 US(3), GEOG 130 GS(3), HIST 158 US;IL(3), PL SC 002(3), PL SC 003 GS;IL(3), PL SC 007 GS(3), PL SC 014 GS;IL(3), PL SC 017 GS(3), PL SC 110 GS;US(3), PL SC 123 GS;US;IL(3), PL SC 125(3), PL SC 130 GS;US(3), SOC 119 GS;US(3), S T S 130(3), S T S/PL SC 135 GS(3), S T S 151 GS;US(3), S T S 200S GS(3), WMNST/AM ST 104 GH;US(3), WMNST/AM ST 430 US(3), WMNST 432 US(3), or WMNST 466 US;IL(3) (Sem: 3-8)

At least 6 credits in Historical and Geographical Perspectives from:
AF AM 100 GS;US(3), AF AM/WMNST 101 GH;US(3), AF AM/HIST 210 GH;US(3), GEOG 030 GS;IL(3), GEOG 040 GS;IL(3), GEOG 110 GN(3), GEOG 115 GN(3), GEOG 122 GH;US(3), GEOG 160 GS(3), HIST 010 GH;IL(3), HIST 011 GH;IL(3), HIST 012 (3), HIST 021(3), HIST 100(3), HIST 101(3), HIST 104(3), HIST 107(3), HIST 115(3), HIST 120 GS;IL(3), HIST 121 GH;IL(3), HIST 127 US(3), HIST 130 GH;US(3), HIST 144 GH;US;IL(3), HIST 150 US(3), HIST 152 GH;US;IL(3), HIST 153 GH;US(3), HIST 158 US;IL(3), HIST 161 US(3), HIST 165 IL(3), HIST 174 GH;IL(3), HIST 175 GH;IL(3), HIST 176 GH;IL(3), HIST 179 GH;IL(3), HIST 180 GH;IL(3), HIST 181 GH;IL(3), HIST 191 GH;IL(3), S T S/HIST 123 GH(3), WMNST/AAA S 102 GH;IL(3), WMNST/HIST 117 GH;US;IL(3), WMNST/GEOG 426Y US;IL(3) (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-05-032 Change. Increase number of credits required for the Degree from 121 to 122 credits; Change credits for SPLED 418 from 2 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Special Education

University Park, College of Education (SPLED)

PROFESSOR KATHLEEN McKINNON, Coordinator of Teacher Education in Special Education

The emphasis throughout the Special Education program is upon a broad clinical teaching model. Course work and practicum experiences focus upon the diagnosis and management of a wide range and degree of educational and behavioral problems of students with disabilities between the ages of 3 and 21. A core of Special Education courses aimed at general skill development in the areas of diagnosis, prescription, development of materials and teaching strategies, implementation, and evaluation is required of all students.

This major focuses on teaching principles and methodologies, classroom and behavioral management, and the development of teaching materials for children and youths with mild, moderate, and severe disabilities. This program helps prepare special education teachers to meet the needs of students enrolled in elementary and secondary public school special education programs.

Baccalaureate degree candidates must meet the following requirements 1-3 by the end of their third semester:
1. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00
2. Either qualifying scores from the PECT PAPA for Reading, Writing and Mathematics; or qualifying SAT scores for the combined and individual Critical Reading, Writing, and Mathematics sections; or qualifying American College Test Plus Writing composite and individual English/Writing score and Math score as specified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.
3. Documentation of at least 80 hours of volunteer or paid education work experience with learners of the age group the candidate plans to teach. Candidates for Special Education must document two separate 40-hour experiences in two different settings, with learners who have special needs. One experience should include learners with a different level of severity or functioning (e.g., mild/severe, young/adult) from those learners in the other experience. One experience should also include learners with cultural, social, or ethnic backgrounds different from the candidates own.

Requirements 4-9 must be met by the end of the fourth semester when students typically participate in the Entrance to Major process.

4. A grade of “C” or better in all specified courses.
5. Completion of an early field experience specified by the certification program.
6. Completion of a core of Education courses specified by the certification program.
7. Completion of additional credits as specified by the certification program.
8. Completion of at least 48 semester credit hours, including ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3), three credits of literature, and six credits of quantification.
9. Approval from the professional education adviser or the head of the pertinent certification program.

For the B.S. degree in Special Education, 122 credits are required. (See also Teacher Education Programs.)

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12-15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 3 credits[19]

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 86 credits[21]
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (86 credits)
EDPSY 010 GS(3), EDPSY 014(3), EDPSY 101 GQ(3), EDTHP 115 US(3), MATH 200 GQ(3), PSYCH 100 GS(3), PSYCH 212 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Red Cross Certification in First Aid and CPR(0) (Sem: 1-8)
EDPSY 421(3), SPLED 395W(3), SPLED 401(4), SPLED 404(3), SPLED 408(3), SPLED 411(3), SPLED 412(4), SPLED 425(4), SPLED 454(4), SPLED 495E(3) (Sem: 5-6)
SPLED 409A(3), SPLED 409B(3), SPLED 409C(3), SPLED 418(3), SPLED 495F(15), SPLED 495G(4) (Sem: 7-8)

Integrated B.S. in Special Education – M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction

The Special Education and Curriculum and Instruction with Emphasis in Language and Literacy Education Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (SE/CI-LL ED IUG) Degree Program consists of integration of required courses for a B.S. in Special Education with courses required for certification as a Reading Specialist and a M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction with emphasis in Language and Literacy Education. The five-year, SE/CI-LLED IUG is an option for highly qualified students seeking certification to teach Special Education in Pennsylvania in grades K-12. Completion of the IUG (along with earning a passing score on PDE required PRAXIS tests) leads to a B.S. in Special Education, certification in Special Education and as a Reading Specialist in the state of Pennsylvania, and a M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction. Students are expected to complete courses required for the graduate level K-12 reading specialist concurrent with their undergraduate experiences and coursework in Special Education and will complete a capstone Special Education teaching experience in their final semester.

Time of Admission to SE/CI-LLED IUG

Students wishing to apply for admission to the SE/CI-LLED IUG initiate application during the semester in which they complete SPLED 495E. They finalize the application process at the end of the semester with a grade of B or better in SPLED 412. While this is typically the end of the junior year of study, it may fall sooner or later.

Joint Admission Process

Special Education and Curriculum and Instruction are located in the College of Education, with Reading Specialist certification offered through the Department of Curriculum and Instruction’s emphasis area in Language and Literacy Education. Admission to the SE/CI-LLED IUG will be based upon having attained a minimum GPA of 3.5 or higher, with a grade of B or better in SPLED 412.

Admission will be based on a recommendation by the Reading Specialist Program Coordinator in consultation with the Coordinator of Teacher Education in Special Education.

Students will be expected to maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 throughout the IUG program of study. Failure to do so will result in the student being placed on academic probation for one semester; after which time, if the GPA is not 3.0 or higher, the student will be dropped from the IUG.

If the student decides not to continue enrollment in the joint SE/CI-LLED IUG, the student may, contingent upon fulfilling all other requirements for the B.S. in SPLED, complete SPLED 495 (the traditional capstone field experience) in their final semester and graduate with a B.S. in Special Education.

Advising

Beginning during the application process, as well as subsequent to admission, students should communicate with both their SPLED program adviser and the program adviser for the C I Reading Specialist program to ensure requirements of both programs are met.

Reduced Course Load

EDPSY 421 and LL ED 595A may be double counted for the M.Ed. as well as the B.S. degree.

Tuition Charges

Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student receives financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring payment of graduate tuition (from “Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Programs” – approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

[19] Students may apply 3 credits of ROTC.
[21] A grade of C or better per course is required for all Special Education prerequisites and teacher certification.


COURSE ADDS

43-05-033 MTHED 428
Fundamentals of Middle Grades Mathematics 1
FUND MIDDLE MATH I (3)
This course develops essential understanding of number and algebra for teaching middle grades mathematics and builds on earlier mathematics courses.
PREREQUISITE: formal admission to CEAED major or permission of program
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-034 MTHED 429
Fundamentals of Middle Grades Mathematics 2
FUND MIDDLE MATH 2 (3)
This course develops essential understanding of geometry and probability for teaching middle grades mathematics and builds on earlier mathematics courses.
PREREQUISITE: formal admission to CEAED major or permission of program
PROPOSED START:  S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-05-035 SCIED 411
Teaching Secondary Science I
TCHG SEC SCI I (3:2:2)
Introduction to teaching secondary school science, including curriculum, learning theory, media, evaluation as they relate to student progress.
PREREQUISITE: C I 295; appropriate courses for certification option and approval of department
APPROVED START:  SP1994

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 411W
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Engineering

43-05-036 Add. New Residential Construction Minor.

Proposed Effective date: Summer Session 2015

Residential Construction Minor

University Park, College of Engineering

The objective of the Residential Construction Minor is to provide an opportunity for students to gain an understanding of the residential building construction topics and issues with emphasis on sustainable land development, design and construction of residential buildings, as well as construction management of residential projects. Residential building construction is a unique interdisciplinary field that draws upon civil and architectural engineering, architecture, real estate, management, finance, and marketing disciplines, and design principles including economical, safe, and serviceable structural design, green building systems design, sustainable land development, and construction management. This minor is expected to be primarily of interest to student from Civil and Environmental Engineering, Architectural Engineering, and Architecture majors, but students from other majors can also enroll in this minor. This minor will help students to increase their competitiveness for employment in residential market and construction industry.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 22 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10 credits)
A E 470(3), A E 471(3), ARCH 412(3), C E 411(1) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)

  • Architecture Track – Take 12 credits from the following: A E 211(3), A E 421 (3), A E 422(3), FIN 100(3), or R M 303(3) (Sem: 3-8)
  • Architectural Engineering Track – Take 12 credits from the following: A E 202(3), A E 372(3), A E 402(3), A E 404(3), A E 454(3), A E 456(3), A E 542(3) or B E 462(3) (Sem: 3-8)
  • Civil Engineering Track – Take 12 credits from the following: A E 432(3), A E 542(3), B E 462(3), C E 332(3), C E 341(3), or C E 410W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

COURSE ADDS

43-05-037 A E 471
Construction Management of Residential Building Projects
CONST MGMT RES BLD (3)
Understanding residential project planning, management, contracts, budget, administration, and execution; discussion of the life cycle of a residential construction business.
PREREQUISITE: 6th semester standing
PROPOSED START: S12015

43-05-038 CH E  230
Computational Tools for Chemical Engineering
COMP TOOL FOR CH E (1)
This 1-credit course will cover the key computational tools needed by Chemical Engineering students.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 251
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-039 E SC  386
Engineering Principles of Living Organisms
ENGR PRINC LIV ORG (3)
This course will explore how engineering principles apply to living organisms.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 110, MATH 251 and PHYS 214
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-040 NUC E 441
Nuclear Security Threat Analysis and Assessments
NUCL THREAT ANLY (3)
Nuclear threat assessment and analysis for non-state actors to nuclear and radiological facilities and supply lines.
PREREQUISITE: NUC E 301
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-041 NUC E 442
Nuclear Security System Design
NUCL SECURITY DSGN (3)
Science and engineering associated with the design, evaluation, and implementation of systems to secure nuclear and radiological materials.
PREREQUISITE: NUC E 302
PROPOSED START:  S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-05-042 I E   424
Process Quality Engineering
PROC QUAL ENGR (3:2:2)
Statistical methods for engineering process characterization and improvement. For non-Industrial Engineering majors.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 141 and either MATH 220 or B E 301
APPROVED START:  FA2013

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATH 141
ADD CONCURRENT: MATH 220 or B E 301
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-043 M E   360
Mechanical Design
MECHANICAL DESIGN (3:3:1)
Specification of components such as shafts, bearings, and power transformers; optimal designs for operational, environmental, and manufacturing requirements.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 200  Prerequisite or concurrent: E MCH 315
APPROVED START:  FA2012

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 200 and Prerequisite or concurrent: E MCH 315
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-044 M E   450
Modeling of Dynamic Systems
MODELING DYN SYS (3:3:0)
Modeling and analysis of dynamic interactions in engineering systems. Classical and state variable methods; digital simulation; stability and dynamic response.
PREREQUISITE: M E 370, M E 345
APPROVED START:  FA2007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: M E 370; Prerequisite or concurrent: M E 345
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-045 NUC E 301
Fundamentals of Reactor Physics
REACTOR PHYSICS (4:4:1)
Nuclear reactions and interactions relevant to nuclear engineering including fission, cross-sections, reaction rate calculations, energy depositions rates, and radioactive decay.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 230, MATH 251, PHYS 214
APPROVED START:  SP2001

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATH 230, MATH 251; Prerequisite or concurrent: PHYS 214
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-046 NUC E 430
Design Principles of Reactor Systems
DES OF REACTOR SYS (3:3:0)
Nuclear power cycles; heat removal problems; kinetic behavior of nuclear systems; material and structural design problems.
PREREQUISITE: M E 410; NUC E 301  or NUC E 401
APPROVED START:  FA2007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: NUC E 302; Prerequisite or concurrent: M E 410
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-047 NUC E 431W
Nuclear Reactor Core Design Synthesis
NUC REACT CORE DSG (4:4:0)
Technical and economic optimization of nuclear systems.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 202C; NUC E 403, NUC E 430
APPROVED START:  SP1994

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: NUC E 403, NUC E 430; prerequisite or concurrent: ENGL 202C
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Health and Human Development

COURSE ADDS

43-05-048 HM 203
Hospitality Pre-Professional Development Seminar
HOSP PRE-PROF DEV (1)
Professional development preparation to help students obtain quality work experience.
PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: HM 201
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-049 HM 485
Advanced Meeting and Event Planning
MEETING & EVENT II (3)
Students will plan and execute event functions building on content from the introductory course, HM 384.
PREREQUISITE: a grade of “C” or better in HM 201 and HM 384
PROPOSED START:  S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-05-050 NUTR  370
Profession of Dietetics
PROF OF DIETETICS (1:1:0)
Introduction to the profession of dietetics including laws, regulations and standards affecting practice, and preparation for post-baccalaureate degree training.
PREREQUISITE: senior standing in Nutrition or Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management
APPROVED START:  SP1992

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Professional Issues in Nutrition and Health Careers (PROF ISSUES NUTR)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to nutrition career decisions in context with current public health policy, industry, professional and consumer trends.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: junior standing in Nutrition or Hospitality Management
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Information Sciences and Technology

43-05-051 Change. Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Add GEOG 461W, 464, 485, MATSE 419, METEO 474 to Additional Courses; Remove EM SC 468, ECEEM 425 from Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology for Earth and Mineral Sciences Minor

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (ISEMS)

Information Systems are a core component of any research, educational or industrial enterprise in the Earth and Materials Sciences. In addition, the science and engineering disciplines represented in the College have a particular focus on numerical modeling and simulation systems, and on the analysis and management of very large data sets. The EMS – IST minor provides students a basic introduction to information sciences and information technology through courses in the core curriculum of the School of Information Sciences and Technology. Students then select from a group of interdisciplinary EMS courses that focus on the particular interests of the College.

Students must apply for entrance to the minor no later than the beginning of their seventh semester. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
IST 110 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
IST 210(3) (Sem: 3-4)
IST 220(3), GEOG 463(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from GEOG 461W(3), GEOG 464(3), GEOG 485(3), MATSE 419(3), METEO 473(3), METEO 474(3), P N G 430(3) (Sem:5-8)


43-05-052 Change. Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology for Telecommunications Minor

University Park, College of Communications(ISTLC)

This minor offers students an opportunity to examine the opportunities and challenges presented by convergence of telecommunications and information processing. Internet-mediated services have the potential of fundamentally changing how we communicate and engage in commerce. This convergence offers faster, better, cheaper, smarter, and more convenient services, but also raises a variety of legal, regulatory, political, social, economic, and technology management issues. The IST/Telecommunications minor offers students enrolled in majors outside the College of Communications and the College of Information Sciences and Technology an opportunity to examine how telecommunications and information processing technologies and services will impact society as well as their individual circumstances.

The Telecommunications requirements of this minor constitute three courses (nine credit hours). Students can fulfill this requirement by completing COMM 180 offered by the Telecommunications Department in the College of Communications and by completing two additional courses from the following list: COMM 479(3), COMM 484(3), COMM 490(3), COMM 491(3) and COMM 492(3). Three IST courses (nine credit hours) constitute the other part of this minor.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendations by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
IST 110 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
IST 210(3) (Sem: 3-4)
IST 220(3), COMM 180 GS(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following: COMM 479(3), COMM 484(3), COMM 490(3), COMM 491(3), COMM 492(3) (Sem: 7-8)


COURSE ADDS

43-05-053 IST 240
Introduction to Computer Languages
INTRO COMP LANG (3)
Introduction to the specification and application of languages and language paradigms that interact with computers.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 101
CONCURRENT: IST 230
PROPOSED START: S12015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Nursing

COURSE ADDS

43-05-054 NURS  200M
Understanding and Applying Nursing Research – Honors Section
ADV NURSE RESEARCH (3)
Introduction to methods and philosophy of empirical inquiry as applied to research in nursing and application to practice.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 200 or STAT 250, NURS 225; or STAT 250 and NURS 390 for NURN majors
PROPOSED START:  S12015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Liberal Arts

43-05-055 Add. New Korean Language Minor.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Korean Language Minor

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (KOR)

The Korean Language Minor is intended to provide students with a good working knowledge of the Korean language, culture, and society in order to broaden their horizons and sharpen their awareness of Korea in this era of internationalism and globalization. Students undertake two to three years of language study (or equivalent); education abroad can be included.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (8 credits)
KOR 002(4), KOR 003(4) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
Select 4 credits from KOR 110(4), KOR 296(1-18), KOR 299 IL(1-12) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 6 credits from KOR 401 IL(4), KOR 402 IL(4), KOR 496(1-18), KOR 498(1-9), KOR
499 IL(1-12) (Sem: 5-8)


COURSE ADDS

43-05-056 CAMS  425W
Books of the Bible: Readings and Interpretation
BIBLICAL BOOK (3 per semester/maximum of 12)
Study of a biblical book/topic in terms of literary, historical, and cultural contexts, history of interpretation, and critical scholarship.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in CAMS or J ST or RL ST, recommended CAMS/J ST/RL ST 110 or 120; or ENGL 104.
CROSS LIST: J ST  425W, RL ST 425W
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-057 CMLIT 116  (GH;IL)
Jewish Great Books
JEWISH GREAT BOOKS (3)
Historical and cultural survey of key texts of the Jewish Tradition, from The Bible to the present.
CROSS LIST: J ST  116
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-058 J ST  116  (GH;IL)
Jewish Great Books
JEWISH GREAT BOOKS (3)
Historical and cultural survey of key texts of the Jewish Tradition, from The Bible to the present.
CROSS LIST: CMLIT 116
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-059 J ST  425W
Books of the Bible: Readings and Interpretation
BIBLICAL BOOK (3 per semester/maximum of 12)
Study of a biblical book/topic in terms of literary, historical, and cultural contexts, history of interpretation, and critical scholarship.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in CAMS or J ST or RL ST, recommended CAMS/J ST/RL ST 110 or 120; or ENGL 104
CROSS LIST: CAMS 425W, RL ST 425W
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-060 LER   409
Leadership Development: A Life-Long Learning Perspective
LEADERSHIP DEV (3)
The course examines the continuing influence of social and environmental factors in shaping leadership and leadership development.
PREREQUISITE: 6th semester standing
CROSS LIST: OLEAD 409
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

43-05-061 RL ST 425W
Books of the Bible: Readings and Interpretation
BIBLICAL BOOK (3 per semester/maximum of 12)
Study of a biblical book/topic in terms of literary, historical, and cultural contexts, history of interpretation, and critical scholarship.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in CAMS or J ST or RL ST, recommended CAMS/J ST/RL ST 110 or 120; or ENGL 104
CROSS LIST: CAMS 425W,  J ST  425W
PROPOSED START:  S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-05-062 CAMS  121
Jesus the Jew
JESUS THE JEW (3)
A historical critical examination of the life of Jesus of Nazareth within the context of first century Palestinian Judaism.
CROSS LIST: RL ST 121,  J ST  112
APPROVED START:  FA2013

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION DESIGNATION: GH
ADD UNITED STATES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES DESIGNATION: IL
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-063 J ST  112
Jesus the Jew
JESUS THE JEW (3)
A historical critical examination of the life of Jesus of Nazareth within the context of first century Palestinian Judaism.
CROSS LIST: CAMS  121,  RL ST 121
APPROVED START:  FA2013

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION DESIGNATION: GH
ADD UNITED STATES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES DESIGNATION: IL
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-064 OLEAD 409
Leadership Development: A Life-Long Learning Perspective
LEADERSHIP DEV (3)
The course examines the continuing influence of social and environmental factors in shaping leadership and leadership development.
PREREQUISITE: 6th semester standing
APPROVED START:  S12012

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: LER   409
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-065 RL ST 121
Jesus the Jew
JESUS THE JEW (3:3:0)
A historical critical examination of the life of Jesus of Nazareth within the content of first century Palestinian Judaism.
CROSS LIST: CAMS 121,  J ST 112
APPROVED START:  FA2013

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION DESIGNATION: GH
ADD UNITED STATES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES DESIGNATION: IL
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

43-05-065A Change. Add new Integrated B.S./M.S. in Electrical Engineering; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Electrical Engineering

Program Home Page

SEDIG S. AGILI, Program Coordinator
Penn State Harrisburg
777 W. Harrisburg Pike
W211 Olmsted Building
Middletown, PA 17057
717-948-6109
meee@psu.edu

Degrees Conferred:

M.Eng., M.S.
Integrated B.S./M.S.

The Graduate Faculty

M.Eng. (E E)

Admission Requirements

A prospective graduate student in Electrical Engineering at Penn State Harrisburg must fulfill the admission requirements as set forth by Graduate Council, and have a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering or its equivalent from an institution that is accredited by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET). An undergraduate cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale is required for admission. Exceptions to this will be based on professional experience and other factors such as GRE scores. In addition, a student who does not meet the overall 3.0 grade-point average may be considered for admission if the student has a 3.0 junior/senior grade-point average. Up to 15 credits earned in three semesters or fewer, as a special nondegree student, may be applied toward the master’s degree. Those applying for admission as a master of engineering candidate without an electrical engineering degree may be admitted with the stipulation that deficiencies in background, if any, will be remedied early in the program and that these courses will be in addition to the required number of credits for the degree.

Applicants should submit the following:

  • a graduate online application with the application fee;
  • official copies of undergraduate transcripts;
  • test scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) (preferable, but not required);
  • three (3) letters of reference, especially those from faculty who can evaluate academic potential;
  • a personal statement of technical interest, goals, and experience.

Test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) are required ONLY for those applicants indicating interest in an assistantship. 

Degree Requirements

A total of 33 credits is required for a Master of Engineering degree, of which at least 24 must be taken through Penn State Harrisburg engineering graduate programs. Up to 9 credits of graduate work may be transferred from other institutions provided (a) credits are suitable for the particular engineering discipline, and (b) students have earned a grade of B or better. At least 18 credits must be at the 500 level, which includes 3 credits of ENGR 594.

Generally, students enrolled in the program for the Master of Engineering degree in Electrical Engineering must earn 12 credits in the required core courses (i.e., courses with the E E prefix).

Master of Engineering Paper: A candidate for the master of engineering degree in Electrical Engineering must write a scholarly report or engineering paper and defend it before three faculty members. The paper is intended to be a relatively short document compared with a thesis. A published paper may be used to meet this requirement. The paper should be written according to the standards set for an IEEE publication.

The engineering paper may be initiated by taking the 1-credit ENGR 594 course. This should be done approximately halfway through the program. Once the proposal is approved and the work well under way, the student should register for ENGR 594 with his/her paper adviser. Work will proceed as planned under the direction of the paper adviser, though changes may be made with the consent of the master’s paper committee.

Up to 9 credits of graduate work may be transferred from other institutions provided (a) credits are suitable for the particular engineering discipline, and (b) students have earned a grade of B or better.

Students must have a 3.00 grade-point average in both prescribed and supporting courses approved by the program to graduate. Students pursue the program on a part-time basis. A student can complete the program within two years, based on completion of two courses a semester.

M.S. (E ENG)

Admission Requirements

Admission into the Master of Science (M.S.) Electrical Engineering program will be granted only to candidates who demonstrate high potential for success in graduate studies.

Applicants should have undergraduate degrees in engineering or technology-related fields from an accredited university and must meet the admission requirements as set by Penn State’s Graduate Council. An applicant must hold either (1) a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or (2) a tertiary (postsecondary) degree that is deemed comparable to a four-year bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. This degree must be from an officially recognized degree-granting institution in the country in which it operates.

An undergraduate cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale, and scores from the GRE are required for admission.

Applicants must submit the following:

  • a completed Graduate School online application with the application fee;
  • official copies of undergraduate transcripts;
  • three (3) letters of professional recommendations from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential;
  • a personal statement of technical interest, goals, and experience;
  • test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE); and
  • statement of interest in graduate assistantship, if desired.

English Proficiency – The language of instruction at Penn State is English. International applicants must take and submit scores for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System), with the exceptions noted below. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL is 550 for the paper-based test, 213 for the computer-based test, or a total score of 80 with a 19 on the speaking section for the internet-based test. Applicants with IBT speaking scores between 15 and 18 may be considered for provisional admission, which requires an institutional test of English proficiency upon first enrollment and, if necessary, remedial course work. The minimum composite score for the IELTS is 6.5.

International applicants are exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement if they have received a baccalaureate or a master’s degree from a college/university/institution in any of the following countries: Australia, Belize, British Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), England, Guyana, Republic of Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States, and Wales.

Completed International Application material must be submitted by the following deadlines: May 31 for the fall semester; September 30 for the spring semester; February 28 for the summer session. Applications received after these deadlines will be processed for the following semester.

Degree Requirements

All graduate students in Electrical Engineering are required to adhere to the requirements of the Graduate Council, as found in the Graduate Degree Programs Bulletin. The requirements of the Graduate Council, however, are minimum requirements and the policies, procedures, and regulations listed below are additional and more specific for graduate students pursuing the MS in Electrical Engineering degree at Penn State Harrisburg. Advisers will call pertinent regulations to the attention of their advisees, but it should be understood that it is the student’s personal responsibility to see that all requirements are satisfied.

The MSEE program at Penn State Harrisburg is structured into two areas of concentration to fully take advantage of the specialty areas represented in the E E graduate faculty. The areas are Electronics- Electromagnetics-Optics (EEO) and Systems. The program requires 31- credits, including 24 course credits with at least 15 credits at the 500 level, one colloquium credit, and 6 thesis credits (600-level). All students are required to take a 500-level analysis course (EMCH 524A) in addition to prescribed courses in one of the two concentration areas. The prescribed courses are intended to establish the fundamentals of the technical areas. To incorporate some breadth into the program, students are required to take at least one course in the second concentration area. A maximum of three 400-level courses (9 credits) may be taken for the MSEE degree

Original research, usually requiring at least two semesters of work (nominal 6 credits), is expected for a thesis. Students must write and submit a thesis. The thesis work should be an in-depth investigation intended to extend the state of knowledge in some specialty area. The thesis committee consists of three graduate faculty members, including the thesis adviser. For thesis guidelines and timelines, students are referred to the Penn State Graduate School web site (http://www.gradschool.psu.edu/).

The E E program has established a six-year time limit for completion of the M.S. degree. Any extension beyond six years requires the approval of the E E program Graduate Faculty.

The student must maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 or better on a 4.00 scale in 500- and 400-level courses listed on his/her Plan of Study.

Penn State Harrisburg’s MSEE program is distinct and independent of the MSEE program offered at the University Park campus.

Integrated B.S./M.S. in Electrical Engineering

The Electrical Engineering program offers a limited number of academically superior Bachelor of Science candidates the opportunity to enroll in an integrated, continuous program of study leading to both the Bachelor of Science and the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables students to earn the two degrees in five years.

Students in the IUG program must satisfy the degree requirements for both Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees. However, the total course load is reduced due to the maximum of 12 credits that can count towards both degrees. A minimum of 7 credits proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted. The fourth year of the IUG program differs from the fourth year of the Bachelor of Science program due to the courses that count toward the Master of Science Degree requirements. Student performance will be monitored on an on-going basis. In addition, a formal evaluation of student’s academic performance will be conducted at the end of the first semester of the senior year for a typical student in the program. Students who have not maintained a 3.4 GPA in their Math and Electrical Engineering courses will be put on probationary status with respect to the IUG program. Their ability to continue in the IUG program will be based on academic performance in the last semester of their senior year. As part of the review in the senior year, students will be advised about the thesis requirement in the graduate program.

Students have the choice of receiving the B.S. degree at the end of the fourth year or waiting until the end of the fifth year to receive both degrees. Students who elect to receive the B.S. degree at the end of the fourth year will pay graduate tuition for courses taken in the fifth year; students opting to receive both degrees at the end of the fifth year will pay undergraduate tuition for all five years. If for any reason a student admitted to the IUG program is unable to complete the requirements for the Master of Science degree, the student will be permitted to receive the Bachelor of Science degree assuming all the undergraduate degree requirements have been satisfactorily completed. If students successfully complete courses listed in the recommended schedule, they will satisfy the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree by the end of their fourth year.

Admission Requirements

To initiate the application process, students must submit an Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) Degree in Electrical Engineering Application Form, an official transcript, three letters of professional recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential, and a personal statement of technical interest and goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) degree program. In order to apply for the IUG program, students must have completed a minimum of 81 credits; therefore a typical student would apply after completing the fifth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. Students will be admitted no later than the end of the second week of the semester preceding the semester of expected conferral of the undergraduate degree, as specified in the proposed IUG plan of study. For consideration for acceptance into the program, students must have cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.4 or better and collective GPA of 3.4 or better in the following courses: CMPEN 271, CMPEN 275, E E 315 (or equivalent) , E E 341, CMPEH 472 and all the designated MATH, PHYS, and CMPSC courses. Applications will be evaluated based on students’ overall academic performance, in addition to the above requirements. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the Graduate Admissions Committee of the Electrical Engineering program.

Degree Requirements

Students in the IUG program must satisfy the degree requirements for both Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees. The total course load is reduced due to the maximum of 12 credits that can count towards both degrees. The minimum of 6 credits double-counted must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

M.S. Degree Portion:

TOTAL M.S. REQUIREMENTS: 31 credits
(12 double-counted with B.S. Requirements)

All graduate students in Electrical Engineering are required to adhere to the requirements of the Graduate Council, as found in the Graduate Degree Programs Bulletin. The requirements of Graduate Council, however, are minimum requirements and the policies, procedures, and regulations listed below are additional and more specific for graduate students pursuing the MS in Electrical Engineering degree at Penn State Harrisburg. Advisers will call pertinent regulations to the attention of their advisees, but it should be understood that it is the student’s personal responsibility to see that all requirements are satisfied.

The MS E ENG program at Penn State Harrisburg is structured into two areas of concentration to fully take advantage of the specialty areas represented in the E E graduate faculty. The areas are Electronics-Electromagnetics-Optics (EEO) and Systems. The program requires 31 credits, including 24 course credits with at least 15 credits at the 500 level, one colloquium credit, and 6 thesis credits (600-level). All students are required to take a 500-level analysis course (E MCH 524A) in addition to prescribed courses in one of the two concentration areas. The prescribed courses are intended to establish the fundamentals of the technical areas. To incorporate some breadth into the program, students are required to take at least one course in the second concentration area. A maximum of three 400-level courses (9 credits) may be taken for the MS E ENG degree.

Original research, usually requiring at least two semesters of work (nominal 6 credits), is expected for a thesis. Students must write and submit a thesis. The thesis work should be an in-depth investigation intended to extend the state of knowledge in some specialty area. The thesis work should be an in-depth investigation intended to extend the state of knowledge in some specialty area. The thesis committee consists of three graduate faculty members, including the thesis adviser. For thesis guidelines and time lines, students are referred to the Penn State Graduate School website (http://www.gradschool.psu.edu/)
The E E program has established a six-year time limit for completion of the M.S. degree. Any extension beyond six years requires the approval of the E E program’s Graduate Faculty.

Students must maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 or better on a 4.00 scale in 500- and 400-level courses listed on their Plan of Study.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 699 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

For course information specific to the Electrical Engineering M.S. and M.Eng. programs at Penn State Harrisburg, refer to the program home page.


 

COURSE ADDS

43-05-066 ADTED 543
Comparative and International Trends in Adult Literacy Education
COMP TRENDS AD LIT (3)
This course critically examines the broad contemporary issues and interdisciplinary trends of literacy education with an international and comparative framework.
CROSS LIST: AFR   543,  CI ED 543
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-067 AFR   543
Comparative and International Trends in Adult Literacy Education
COMP TRENDS AD LIT (3)
This course critically examines the broad contemporary issues and interdisciplinary trends of literacy education with an international and comparative framework.
CROSS LIST: ADTED 543,  CI ED 543
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-068 BIOE  518
Organic NanoBiomaterials
NANOBIOMATERIALS (3)
A foundation course on the synthesis, fabrication, and characterization of nanobiomaterials and their applications in biomedical engineering.
PREREQUISITE: MATSE 403 or BME 443 or MATSE 443 or MATSE 441 or BME 446
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-069 C E 535
Integrated Project Management for Civil Engineers
INTEG PROJ MGMT (3)
Apply the project management process to civil and environmental engineering projects.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-070 CI ED 543
Comparative and International Trends in Adult Literacy Education
COMP TRENDS AD LIT (3)
This course critically examines the broad contemporary issues and interdisciplinary trends of literacy education with an international and comparative framework.
CROSS LIST: ADTED 543, AFR   543
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-071 E MCH 541
Structural Health Monitoring
STRUCT HEALTH MON (3)
Technology development to address maintenance and safey concerns related to the aging aerospace/mechanical/civil infrastructure.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-072 E SC  551
High Power Energy Storage
HI PWR ENERGY STOR (3)
High-power energy storage technologies including advanced batteries, ultracapacitors, and flywheels.
CROSS LIST: M E 551
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-073 HLS   540
Comparative Homeland Security and Related Methods
COMPAR HMLND SECUR (3)
The course will address international cooperation in Homeland Security and compare select national approaches as well as teach related practical methods of analysis.
PREREQUISITE: HLS 801, HLS 803, HLS 805, P ADM 401, and P ADM 802
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-074 HRER  801
Comparative and International Employment and Labor Law
COMP & INT LABOR (3)
Survey of employment and labor laws around the world that shape the practice of international human resource management (IHRM).
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-075 I E   533
Workforce Engineering
WORKFORCE ENGR (3)
Methods and applications for selecting, assigning, scheduling, and planning for workforce operations in the manufacturing and service industries.
PREREQUISITE: I E 405 and I E 425
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-076 INTAF 815
Dynamics of International Economic Order: Law, Politics, and Power
DYN INTL ECON ORD (3)
This course examines the cross-cutting relationship between political power and global economic governance.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-077 M E   551
High Power Energy Storage
HI PWR ENERGY STOR (3)
High-power energy storage technologies including advanced batteries, ultracapacitors, and flywheels.
CROSS LIST: E SC  551
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-077A PL SC 805
Violence, Threats, Terror, and Insurgency
VIOLENCE & THREATS (3)
This course examines political violence committed by non-state groups as it applies to homeland security from both a domestic and global perspective.
CROSS LIST: HLS   805
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

43-05-078 SPLED 504
Classroom and School-Wide Management Practices in Special Education
CLASSRM MNGT (3)
Developing function-based individual interventions as well as class-wide behavior supports for students with disabilities.
PREREQUISITE: SPLED 400 or SPLED 401; C I 495F
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-079 SPLED 509A
Seminar in Literacy Skills Instruction for Students with Disabilities
LIT INSTR DISAB (3)
Review of research in reading instruction for students with disabilities and analysis of implications for classroom practice.
PREREQUISITE: SPLED 400; SPLED 403A or SPLED 403B
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-080 SPLED 509B
Seminar in Writing and Content Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities
WRIT INSTR DISAB (3)
Evidence-based methods for designing and implementing writing and content literacy instruction for learners with special needs across content areas.
PREREQUISITE: SPLED 400; SPLED 403A or SPLED 403B
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-081 SPLED 509C
Seminar in Mathematics and Science Instruction for Students with Disabilities
MATH & SCI INSTR (3)
Explore advanced methods of effective mathematics and science instruction for students with disabilities.
PREREQUISITE: SPLED 400; SPLED 403A or SPLED 403B
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-082 SPLED 512
Advanced Instructional Design and Delivery for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities
ADV INS HIGH-INCID (3)
Explore research underlying effective instruction for students with high-incidence disabilities and use information to design and deliver class lessons.
PREREQUISITE: SPLED 403A or SPLED 403B
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-083 SPLED 521
Capstone Seminar in Special Education
SPLED CAP SEM (3)
Seminar dealing with advanced research analysis, interpretation, synthesis, and presentation in special education.
PREREQUISITE: SPLED 573
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-084 SPLED 803
Evidence-Based Assessment for Teaching Learners with Special Needs
SPLED ASSESSMENT (3)
Overview of special education assessment law, the assessment process, monitoring academic progress, classroom behavior, and assessing learners with severe disabilities.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-085 STAT  592
Teaching Statistics
TEACHING STAT (1)
This course is designed to help students become better teachers and communicators of  statistics.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-05-086 ACS   501
Fundamentals of Acoustics I
ACOUSTICS I (2)
Vibrational concepts of acoustics:  natural frequency and modes, resonances of lumped parameter systems, strings, elastic rods, beams and membranes.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 202, PHYS 203; engineering mathematics including differential equations
APPROVED START:  SP1991

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Elements of Acoustics and Vibration (ACOUSTICS VIBRATIO)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Vibrational acoustics including mechanical oscillation, forced and damped response, vibration of strings, membranes, rods, bars, and plates.
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-087 ACS   502
Fundamentals of Acoustics II
ACOUSTICS II (2)
Acoustical wave phenomena:  propagation, transmission, reflection and energy; periodic and transient waves; plane, spherical, and standing waves.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 202, PHYS 203; engineering mathematics including differential equations
APPROVED START:  SP1991

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Elements of Waves in Fluids (WAVES IN FLUIDS)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Thermodynamic and hydrodynamic foundations of linear acoustics in fluids with applications to lumped-elements, reflection, refraction, radiation, attenuation, enclosures, and waveguides.
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-088 BMMB  511
Molecular Immunology
MOL IMMUNOL (2)
The study of molecular and biochemical events that influence immune responses and define current questions in immunology.
PREREQUISITE: B M B 400, MICRB 410
CROSS LIST: IBIOS 511  VB SC 511
APPROVED START:  SP2008

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: MCIBS 511  VB SC 511
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-089 BMMB  551
Genomics
GENOMICS (3)
Structure and function of genomes including use of some current web-based tools and resources for studies and research in genomics.
CROSS LIST: IBIOS 551
APPROVED START:  S12007

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: MCIBS 551
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-090 BMMB  554
Foundations in Data Driven Life Sciences
BIOINFORMATICS I (3)
Expanded overview of current developments and technique in computational biology and genomics.
CROSS LIST: IBIOS 554
APPROVED START:  S12014

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: MCIBS 554
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-091 CRIM  805
Violence, Threats, Terror, and Insurgency
VIOLENCE & THREATS (3)
This course provides an overview of the domestic and global issues related to homeland security.
CROSS LIST: HLS   805
APPROVED START:  S12010

NEW
REMOVE CROSS LIST
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-092 EA  870
Applied Research Methods for Enterprise Architecture
EA APPLD RESEARCH (3)
Foundations, methods and conduct for EA Research Methodologies.
APPROVED START:  SP2013

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 877
ADD PREREQUISITE: EA 874
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-093 EA  874
Enterprise Information Technology Architecture
EA IT ARCHITECTURE (3)
Theoretical foundations and practice of the enterprise information technology architecture.
PREREQUISITE: EA 870 and EA 872
APPROVED START:  FA2014

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: EA 872, EA 873
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-094 EA    875
Enterprise Architecture Leadership
EA LEADERSHIP (3)
Develops additional capabilities for leading, communicating, and implementing Enterprise Architecture.
PREREQUISITE: EA 874
APPROVED START:  FA2014

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 878
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: EA 877
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-095 HLS   805
Violence, Threats, Terror, and Insurgency
VIOLENCE & THREATS (3)
This course provides an overview of the domestic and global issues related to homeland security.
CROSS LIST: CRIM  805
APPROVED START:  S12010

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course examines political violence committed by non-state groups as it applies to homeland security from both a domestic and global perspective.
CHANGE CROSS LIST: PL SC 805
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-096 IBIOS 511
Molecular Immunology
MOL IMMUNOL (2)
The study of molecular and biochemical events that influence immune responses and define current questions in immunology.
PREREQUISITE: B M B 400, MICRB 410
CROSS LIST: BMMB  511  VB SC 511
APPROVED START:  SP2008

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: MCIBS
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-097 IBIOS 551
Genomics
GENOMICS (3)
Stucture and function of genomes including use of some current web-based tools and resources for studies and research in genomics.
CROSS LIST: BMMB  551
APPROVED START:  S12007

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: MCIBS
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-098 IBIOS 554
Foundations in Data Driven Life Sciences
BIOINFORMATICS I (3)
Expanded overview of current developments and technique in computational biology and genomics.
CROSS LIST: BMMB  554
APPROVED START:  S12014

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: MCIBS
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-099 PSY   542
Psychopathology
PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (3-4)
Theories of pathological behavior with reference to clinical and experimental data.
PREREQUISITE: PSYCH 470
APPROVED START:  SP2007

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Lifespan Development and Psychopathology – Adulthood (AD DEV PSYPATH)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course covers knowledge about typical development in adulthood and about atypicality and the development of adult psychological disorders.
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-100 PSY   566
Cultural Psychology
CULTURAL PSY (3)
Experimental and descriptive research on culture and behavior in both Western and  non-Western settings.
PREREQUISITE: PSYCH 420, PSYCH 438, and 6 credits of statistics
APPROVED START:  SP2007

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Multicultural Perspectives in Clinical Psychology (MULTICULTURAL PSY)
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-101 PSY   575
Clinical Child Psychopathology
CLIN CHLD PSYPATH (3)
Overview of developmental clinical child psychopathology; emphasis on social-emotional development, with review of abnormal development andsocial-emotional maladjustment.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing in clinical psychology or 18 credits of graduate course work in psychology, I F S, or a related field
APPROVED START:  S11988

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Lifespan Development and Psychopathology – Childhood and Adolescence (CH DEV PSYPATH)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course covers knowledge about typical development in childhood and about atypicality and the development of child psychological disorders.
REMOVE PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-102 VB SC 511
Molecular Immunology
MOL IMMUNOL (2)
The study of molecular and biochemical events that influence immune responses and define current questions in immunology.
PREREQUISITE: B M B 400, MICRB 410
CROSS LIST: BMMB  511  IBIOS 511
APPROVED START:  SP2008

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: BMMB  511  MCIBS 511
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

OLD
43-05-103 WF ED 806
Program and Facilities Management for Career and Technical Educators
PGM FACILITY MGT (3)
This course examines advanced learning laboratory organization and management processes to facilitate learning and skill development in a safe environment.
PREREQUISITE: WF ED 495C
APPROVED START:  SP2014

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Program and Facilities Management for Work Force Development Professionals
PROPOSED START:  SP2016

COURSE DROPS

43-05-104 APLNG 511
Applied Linguistics and Health Sciences
APPLIED LING HLTH (3)
A theoretical and practical introduction to concepts and methods associated with multilingualism and health care services and research.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-105 ECON  511
Econometrics II
ECONOMETRICS II (3)
Stochastic regressors, distributed lag models, pooling cross-section and time-series data, simultaneous equation models.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 510
PROPOSED START:  S12015

43-05-106 ECON  516
Labor Economics II
LABOR ECON II (3)
Earnings differentials, unemployment, and related policy. Institutional aspects of labor economics, including dual labor markets, collective bargaining, and unionism.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

APPENDIX D
Dickinson School of Law

COURSE ADDS

43-05-107 CORE  908
Legal Research Tools and Strategies
LEG RES TLS & STRT (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
The primary goal of the Legal Research Tools and Strategies course is to familiarize first year students with the process of discovering, evaluating, critically analyzing, and applying sources of American legal authority used by lawyers to understand facts and resolve issues.
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

43-05-108 LLMLW 910
Legal English and Common Law Practice
LEG ENG COM LW PRC (6) CRDT ONLY: Y ANON GR: N
This course is designed to teach students to think, write and speak like a lawyer and to introduce them to legal practice through field trips to courts, etc.
PROPOSED START:  S12015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-05-109 CORE  914
Legal Analysis, Research and Writing II
LEG AN RES WR II (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
LARW II continues to build on the skills learned in LARW I.  Students continue to analyze clients’ problems using various sources of legal authority, to use additional research sources, and to further refine their writing style. However, LARW II focuses on persuasive writing, so students will learn to draft documents that are submitted to a court called “briefs” or “memoranda of law.”  Students also will learn to present an oral argument to a court. LARW II continues to implement the problem-solving approach to teach persuasive writing, and students continue to receive individualized feedback throughout the course.
PREREQUISITE: CORE 912
APPROVED START:  S12011

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Applied Legal Analysis & Writing II (APP LEG AN & WR II)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: ALAW II continues to build on the skills learned in ALAW I, but now students will be learning to be an advocate for a fictional client.
PROPOSED START:  FA2015