Appendix 46-03

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Agricultural Sciences

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-001 ANSC 107 (3)
Title: Introduction to Equine Science and the Equine Industry
Abbreviated Title: Intro Eq Sc and Ind
Description: Facilitate participants’ exploration of equine science and industry; providing knowledge that will allow effective participation and communication in this field. This web based course provides students with basic knowledge about the equine industry to prepare them to be more effective communicators with educators and industry personnel. Inductive and deductive reasoning are introduced as a part of the scientific method and its application in critically evaluating products and concepts important to equine science and the industry.
Equine science topics include basics of equine evolution, genetics and breeds, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, and nutrition. While these topics focus on the horse as a target, each topic also allows for comparisons to other mammalian species. Equine industry topics include history of use, disciplines, organization of the industry, components and careers; and prepare students to proceed into further studies in equine science. The course features presentations and interaction with industry professionals and instructors of higher level equine science courses at Penn State. In addition to the academic topics addressed, the course introduces students to using the university course management system, and the utilization of web based communication tools as individuals and as a team.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
ADD GENED DESIGNATION GN
CHANGE Abbreviated Title: INTRO EQ SC & IND
CHANGE Description: This web based course provides students with basic knowledge about equine science and its application to the industry to prepare them to be more effective communicators with industry personnel. Inductive and deductive reasoning are introduced as a part of the scientific method and its application in critically evaluating products and concepts important to equine science and the industry. Equine science topics include basics of equine evolution, genetics and breeds, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, and nutrition. While these
topics focus on the horse as a target, each topic also allows for comparisons to other mammalian species. Equine industry topics include history of use, disciplines, organization of the industry, components and careers; and prepare students to proceed into further
studies in equine science. The course features presentations and interaction with industry professionals and instructors of higher level equine science courses at Penn State. In addition to the academic topics addressed, the course introduces students to using the university course management system, and the utilization of web based communication tools as individuals and as a team.
Proposed Start: SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Altoona College

COURSE ADDS

46-03-001A ENVST 428 (3)(BA)
Title: Environmental Economics and Policy
Abbreviated Title: ENV ECON POLICY
Description: Our free market system has brought us tremendous increases in productivity and innovation over the last century. However, at times the production or consumption of goods or services generates side effects that can lower the welfare of society, or even threaten
society’s very existence. What should be done? Environmental economics provides one tool to examine this question. There are four broad areas in the field of environmental economics: benefit-cost analysis including the valuation of the environment and the cost of environmental regulation; institutional design in the regulation of the environment; and exhaustible and renewable resource management. This course will provide an overview of these four areas and will examine several applications of the techniques found in the environmental economics literature.
Proposed Start SP2018
Prerequisites: ( ECON 102; ECON 104 ) AND ( STAT 200; STAT 250 )

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Arts and Architecture

COURSE ADDS

46-03-002 JAZZ 100 (1-1:8)
Title: Jazz Performance Studies
Abbreviated Title: Jazz Perf
Description: Jazz Performance provides individual instruction for vocal and instrumental musicians to develop theoretical, technical, and aural skills required by selected jazz performance styles. The style(s) to be studied are agreed upon between the student and instructor; these are drawn from Blues, Dixieland, Swing, Bebop, Cool Jazz, Modal Jazz, Jazz-Rock Fusion. The initial third of the semester is devoted to studying the technical norms of a given style: melodic materials (scales, modes), harmonic structure (vocabulary, norms of harmonic
motion), characteristic rhythmic practices (with particular attention to syncopation), special aural requirements (the ability to connect musical hearing and musical thought) and typical frameworks of contrapuntal organization in the appropriate types of ensemble. The
final two thirds of the course then deal with applications of these materials in improvisational contexts, with a short section during the last two weeks devoted to developing keyboard skills, an important area of musical competence for any jazz performer. This course is appropriate for any music major or minor with an interest in jazz. Instruction will be delivered in one half-hour lesson per week. Occasional performance in a combo will be a regular part of the course. Applied music fees are required for individualized instruction: $175 for 1-credit course; $250 for a 2-credit course
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-003 JAZZ 110 (2-2:16)
Title: Jazz Performance Studies
Abbreviated Title: Jazz Perf
Description: Jazz Performance provides individual instruction for vocal and instrumental musicians to develop theoretical, technical, and aural skills required by selected jazz performance styles. The style(s) to be studied are agreed upon between the student and instructor; these are drawn from Blues, Dixieland, Swing, Bebop, Cool Jazz, Modal Jazz, Jazz-Rock Fusion. The initial third of the semester is devoted to studying the technical norms of a given style: melodic materials (scales, modes), harmonic structure (vocabulary, norms of harmonic
motion), characteristic rhythmic practices (with particular attention to syncopation), special aural requirements (the ability to connect musical hearing and musical thought) and typical frameworks of contrapuntal organization in the appropriate types of ensemble. The final two thirds of the course then deal with applications of these materials in improvisational contexts, with a short section during the last two weeks devoted to developing keyboard skills, an important area of musical competence for any jazz performer. This course is appropriate for any music major or minor with an interest in jazz. Instruction will be delivered in one hour-long lesson per week. Occasional performance in a combo will be a regular part of the course. Applied music fees are required for individualized instruction: $175 for a 1-credit course; $250 for a 2-credit course
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-004 LARCH 121 (1)

Title: Landscape Architecture Orientation Seminar
Abbreviated Orientation Sem
Description: Introductory seminar involving readings on significant issues in landscape architecture. LARCH majors only. LARCH 121S Landscape Architecture Orientation Seminar (1) LARCH 121S is a seminar course, the first of many in an entering student’s Penn State career.
Seminar classes offer the opportunity to read, think, share ideas through informal discussion, and refine personal thoughts reflection. The seminar is a common and useful tool to explore important ideas and develop critical thinking skills. The design and theory sequence begins with the freshman seminar, LARCH 121S, which introduces students to landscape architecture issues.In this seminar students read and discuss the challenges and opportunities faced by contemporary landscape architects. This is the first of a ten seminar sequence addressing theory and issues. As an introductory course, LARCH 121S is a “stand-alone” seminar – all those in the professional core of the program are linked to design studios.To support student explorations, the class undertakes a series of readings of seminal works in landscape architecture and allied field that students carefully consider, question, and discuss. As a major part of student evaluation, they maintain a journal of their evolving ideas about the course content.Entering landscape architecture majors sometimes have a restricted notion of the wide variety of career directions that face them within the field of landscape architecture. This
class proposes that the principal role of the landscape designer and planner is to make “place” – a combination of physical, cultural and compositional cues that imbue built and natural forms with meaning. The goal of this first-year seminar class is for students to understand the type, or types, of place that landscape can be. The course introduces students to concepts of landscape as place, and asks them to ponder, explore, and respond to ideas about various perspectives on landscape “place.” This introduces them to the broad range of issues and activities that are addressed in the seemingly simple term, “landscape architecture.”Course Objectives: a) To become familiar with important issues in contemporary landscape architecture. b) To exercise and hone skills in critical thinking. c) To exercise and hone skills in speaking and writing persuasively. d) To begin to explore roles as future “place makers.”
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER:  125
CHANGE Description: Introductory seminar involving readings on significant issues in landscape architecture. LARCH majors only. LARCH 125 Landscape Architecture Orientation Seminar (1) LARCH 125 is a seminar course, the first of many in an entering student’s Penn State career.
Seminar classes offer the opportunity to read, think, share ideas through informal discussion, and refine personal thoughts reflection. The seminar is a common and useful tool to explore important ideas and develop critical thinking skills. The design and theory sequence begins with the freshman seminar, LARCH 125, which introduces students to landscape architecture issues.In this seminar students read and discuss the challenges and opportunities faced by contemporary landscape architects. To support student explorations, the class undertakes a series of readings of seminal works in landscape architecture and allied field that students
carefully consider, question, and discuss. As a major part of student evaluation, they maintain a journal of their evolving ideas about the course content. Entering landscape architecture majors sometimes have a restricted notion of the wide variety of career directions that face them within the field of landscape architecture. This class proposes that the principal role of the landscape designer and planner is to make “place”; – a combination of physical, cultural and compositional cues that imbue built and natural forms with meaning. The goal of this first-year seminar class is for students to understand the type, or types, of place that landscape can be. The course introduces students to concepts of landscape as place, and asks them to ponder, explore, and respond to ideas about various perspectives on landscape “place”; This introduces them to the broad range of issues and activities that are addressed in the seemingly simple term, landscape architecture. Course Objectives: a) To become familiar with important issues in contemporary landscape architecture. b) To exercise and hone skills in critical thinking. c) To exercise and hone skills in speaking and writing persuasively. d) To begin to explore roles as future place makers.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-005 LARCH 382 (3)
Title: Professional Practice
Abbreviated Title: Prof Pract
Description: An investigation of current professional and business practices in the field of landscape architecture. For Landscape Architecture majors only. LARCH 382 Professional Practice (3) LARCH 382 has a three-part role. It comprises an introduction to the variety of
practice opportunities in landscape architecture, their opportunities and drawbacks; it provides an introduction to critical office management practices; and it assists students in the employment application process through coaching on interview technique and guidance on the preparation of supporting material.It is the overarching intent of this course to help students understand what it will mean to be a professional practicing in the new millennium and in a constantly changing marketplace of ideas. Topics covered include ethics, public relations, office and project-related practices, personal and professional development, and legal aspects of practice: contracts, specifications, liability insurance. Through active participation in the course, students will come to realize the diversity inherent in the profession.Course objectives: • To introduce a range of practice types—small, private practice, large-scale corporate practice, federal and state agencies, not-for-profit organizations, and other non-governmental organizations; • To discuss relations with other professionals, including the formation of teams and other strategic alliances, and negotiation of professional fees; • To outline and illustrate the various roles and responsibilities individuals might have both in and outside of an office, including situations of personal vs corporate responsibility; and • To investigate the inherent values or point of view of principals and others that effect how decisions are made and change occurs.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER:  386
CHANGE Description: An investigation of current professional and business practices in the field of landscape architecture. For Landscape Architecture majors only. LARCH 386 Professional Practice (3) LARCH 386 has a three-part role. It comprises an introduction to the variety of practice opportunities in landscape architecture, their opportunities and drawbacks; it provides an introduction to critical office management practices; and it assists students in the employment application process through coaching on interview technique and guidance on the preparation of supporting material.It is the overarching intent of this course to help students understand what it will mean to be a professional practicing a constantly changing marketplace of ideas. Topics covered include ethics, public relations, office and project-related practices, personal and professional development, and legal aspects of practice: contracts, specifications, liability insurance. Through active participation in the course, students will come to realize the diversity inherent in the profession. Course objectives: – To introduce a range of practice types, including: small, private practice, large-scale corporate practice, federal and state agencies, not-for-profit organizations, and other non-governmental organizations; – To discuss relations with other professionals, including the formation of teams and other strategic alliances, and negotiation of professional fees; – To outline and illustrate the various roles and responsibilities individuals might have both in and outside of an office, including situations of personal vs corporate responsibility; and – To investigate the inherent values or point of view of principals and others that effect how decisions are made and change occurs.
Proposed Start: SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Behrend College

PROGRAM CHANGES

46-03-006 Change. Move MGMT 410 from Prescribed Courses to Additional Courses. Add BA 321, 322, 421, 422W, IB 303 and MIS 301 to Additional Courses. Remove MIS 390 from Additional Courses. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Project and Supply Chain Management

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (PSCM)
Penn State Harrisburg, Capital College (PSMCA)
University College: Penn State Beaver, Penn State Fayette, Penn State Greater Allegheny, Penn State Lehigh Valley, Penn State New Kensington, and Penn State Shenango

The Project and Supply Chain Management major concentrates on developing knowledge, skills, and abilities in both project and supply chain management, dynamic and important disciplines in modern corporations. Project management skills include the development of new projects, and coordinating procurement and project delivery systems. Supply chain management emphasizes the integration of manufacturing and service operations, logistics, purchasing, and distribution that enable organizations to develop value-creating supply chain networks. The major provides students with an opportunity to develop the quantitative and people skills necessary to design and operate today’s complex management systems.Students learn how to manage critical components in organizational supply chains, and apply business analytic methods for organizing and fully integrating supply chain practices throughout the organization.

Graduates are uniquely well-prepared for careers in some of the highest in-demand professions in the modern business and government environments, managing the supply chain and project initiatives in world-class business firms, public sector organizations, construction, IT organizations, third-party logistics providers, and goods and services distribution operations.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Management major requires the completion of 5 entry-to-major courses: ACCTG 211(4); ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 15 GWS(3) or ENGL 30 GWS(3); MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4); STAT 200 GQ(4) or SCM 200(4), and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

For the B.S. degree in Project and Supply Chain Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required. Each student must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course in the major field.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 2 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 88 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (40 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
FIN 301(3)[1], MGMT 301(3)[1], MIS 204(3), MKTG 301(3)[1], SCM 301(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
MGMT 341(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
MGMT 418(3)[1], SCM 445(3)[1], SCM 460(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (36 credits)
Select 4 credits from: MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 4 credits from: SCM 200 GQ(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 4 credits from: BA 241(2) and BA 242(2); or BA 243(4) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from: MGMT 410(3)[1]; BA 421(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from: BA 364(3)[1], ECON 470(3)[1], FIN 471(3)[1], MGMT 461 IL(3)[1], MKTG 445 IL(3)[1], IB 303 IL(3)[1], or other 400-level international business courses[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits of 300- or 400-level courses in one business supporting area or PSCM electives from MGMT 420(3)[1], MGMT 431(3)[1], MGMT 432(3)[1], MGMT 433(3)[1], MGMT 440(3)[1], MGMT 453(3)[1], MGMT 466(3)[1], or MGMT 483(3)[1], BA 321(3)[1], or BA 322(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from ECON 481(3)[1] or MIS 336(3)[1] or MIS 301(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)
Select 3 credits from: MGMT 415(3)[1] or SCM 416(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)
Select 3 credits from: SCM 320(3)[1] or SCM 455(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)
Select 3 credits from: BA 462(3)[1] or MGMT 471W(3)[1], BA 422W(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits of approved electives courses from any area (see school list of suggested courses) (See the admission section in the general information section in this bulletin for the placement policy for Penn State foreign language courses.) (Sem: 1-8)

Integrated B.S. in Project and Supply Chain Management and M.B.A. in Business Administration, Penn State Harrisburg

The School of Business Administration offers a limited number of academically superior Bachelor of Science in Project and Supply Chain Management candidates the opportunity to enroll in an integrated, continuous program of study leading to both the Bachelor of Science in Project and Supply Chain Management and the Master of Business Administration. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the students to earn both degrees in five years. Specifically, as many as twelve of the credits required for the master’s degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Program reduces the total number of credits needed to earn both degrees from 150 to 138.

Students in the IUG program must satisfy the requirements for both the Bachelor of Science in Project and Supply Chain Management and Master of Business Administration degrees. The total course load is reduced due to courses that can count towards both degrees. The first two years of the IUG program are indentical to the first two years of the Bachelor of Science program. Students in the IUG program take three additional credits in their third year, and three fewer credits in their fourth year. The courses that count toward the Master of Business Administration degree requirements are included in the fourth year.

Student performance will be monitored on an on-going basis. In addition, a formal evaluation of student academic performance will be performed when the students have completed 100 to 105 credits, which is at the end of the first semester of the senior year for typical students in the program. Students who have not maintained a 3.0 GPA in their graduate courses will be put on probationary status with respect to the IUG program. They will receive a warning letter regarding probationary status. Their ability to continue in the IUG program will be based on their academic performance in the last semester of their senior year.

Students have the choice of receiving the B.S. in Project and Supply Chain Management degree at the end of the fourth year or waiting until the end of the fifth year to receive both degrees. Students who elect to receive the B.S. degree at the end of the fourth year will pay graduate tuition for courses taken in the fifth year; students opting to receive both degrees at the end of the fifth year will pay undergraduate tuition for all five years.

If for any reason students admitted to the IUG program are unable to complete the requirements for the Master of Business Administration degree, the students will be permitted to receive the Bachelor of Science in Project and Supply Chain Management degree assuming all the undergraduate degree requirements have been satisfactorily completed. If the students successfully complete courses listed in the recommended schedule, they will satisfy the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree by the end of their fourth year.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

To initiate the application process, students must submit a resume, a personal statement including career goals and how MBA will enhance their career goals, transcripts of courses taken outside Penn State, two letters of recommendation, with at least one from the School of Business Administration faculty, and a plan of study that integrates both undergraduate and graduate requirements. A graduate faculty adviser in collaboration with the Director of MBA Program will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) degree program.

The number of openings in the IUG program is limited. Applicants to the IUG program must have completed a minimum of 60 credits. Typical students would apply after completing between 60 and 90 credits, that is, after the fifth semester and before the end of the seventh semester. In addition, the applicants must earn a minimum of cumulative grade point average of 3.5 and complete the following Entry to Major courses or equivalent: ACCTG 211(4), ECON 102(3), ENGL 15 or 30(3), FIN 301(3), MATH 110 or 140(4), MGMT 301(3), MKTG 301(3) and STAT 200(4) or SCM 200(4).

To formally apply, students must submit a completed graduate school application. The students should mention in the notes section that the application is for the IUG program in Business Administration. The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required for admission into the program; however, if students are interested in applying for a graduate assistantship, GMAT or GRE scores must be submitted by the end of the eighth semester.

Student applications will be evaluated based on their overall portfolio, in addition to the above requirements. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the Graduate Admissions Committee in Business Administration.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Students in the IUG program must satisfy the degree requirements for both Bachelor of Science in Project and Supply Chain Management and Master of Business Administration degrees. The total course load is reduced due to the maximum of 12 credits that can count towards both degrees. All courses counted for both degrees must be at the 500- or 800-level.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Capital College

46-03-006A Add. New Integrated B.S. in Information Systems and M.S. in Information Systems. Changes indicated by underlining.

Information Systems

Capital College (INFSY)

JANE S. KOCHANOV, Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration

This major prepares students to enter rapidly expanding fields associated with technology. This includes programming, systems analysis and design, database administration, network management, support services and training, and management of information resources. Students obtain competence both in information technology and in business theory. Thus, the curriculum combines technical content with managerial aspects of information systems. Each student’s background is complemented with basic business instruction in accounting, marketing, management, and finance. With business and non-business electives, the program is designed to develop necessary skills to be an effective Information Systems employee. Because the Harrisburg area is the center of industry and economic development for South Central Pennsylvania, students are provided with many opportunities to experience the exciting and challenging world of business.

Students will obtain:

  • Knowledge in technologies that support the information environment.
  • Knowledge in business or organizational processes that are supported by technology.
  • General skills and abilities that promote good communication, problem-solving and analytical abilities, and the ability to work in a team environment.
  • Skills to participate in and lead multidisciplinary teams in the development, implementation, and management of information technology solutions.

The program meets the objectives through varied experiences and an emphasis on good communication skills.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Information Systems major requires the completion of 8 entry-to-major courses: ACCTG 211(4); ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 15 GWS(3) or ENGL 30 GWS(3); FIN 301(3); MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4); MGMT 301(3); MKTG 301(3); SCM 200 GQ(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4); and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average. Additional information about this major is available in the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration at Penn State Harrisburg.

For a B.S. in Information Systems, a minimum of 120 credits is required. Consistent with Senate policy, at least 24 credits of course work in the major and the capstone course must be completed at the Capital College to earn the degree.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 8 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 79 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (49 credits)
ACCTG 211(4) (Sem: 1-4)
ECON 102 GS(3), FIN 301(3), MGMT 301(3), MKTG 301(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
BA 364 US;IL(3), BA 462(3), ECON 104 (3), MIS 204(3), MIS 307(3)[1], MIS 390(3)[1], MIS 448(3)[1], MIS 450(3)[1], MIS 465(3)[1], SCM 301(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24 credits)
Select 3 credits from CMPSC 101 GQ(3) or CMPSC 121 GQ(3) or IST 140(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from SCM 200 GQ(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from BA 243(4) or BA 241(2) and BA 242(2) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 9 credits from one of the following three areas of concentration A, B, or C:
A. Application Development Concentration
IST 302(3)[1]; MIS 413(3)[1]; MIS 466(3)[1]; MIS 489(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8).
B. Network Security Concentration
IST 302(3)[1]; IST 451(3)[1]; IST 456(3)[1]; MIS 489(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
C. Individualized Concentration
IST 302(3)[1]; IST 451(3)[1]; IST 456(3)[1]; MIS 413(3)[1]; MIS 446 (3)[1]; MIS 461(3)[1]; MIS 466(3)[1]; MIS 489(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from 200-400 level business courses from: ACCTG, BA, ECON, FIN, MGMT, MIS, MKTG, or SCM in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student’s interests. (Sem: 3-8)

Integrated B.S. in Information Systems and M.B.A. in Business Administration

The School of Business Administration offers a limited number of academically superior Bachelor of Science in Information Systems candidates the opportunity to enroll in an integrated, continuous program of study leading to both the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems and the Master of Business Administration. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the students to earn both degrees in five years. Specifically, as many as twelve of the credits required for the master’s degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Program reduces the total number of credits needed to earn both degrees from 150 to 138.

Students in the IUG program must satisfy the requirements for both the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems and Master of Business Administration degrees. The total course load is reduced due to courses that can count towards both degrees. The first two years of the IUG program are identical to the first two years of the Bachelor of Science program. Students in the IUG program take five additional credits in their third year, and five fewer credits in their fourth year. The courses that count toward the Master of Business Administration degree requirements are included in the fourth year.

Student performance will be monitored on an on-going basis. In addition, a formal evaluation of student academic performance will be performed when the students have completed 100 to 105 credits, which is at the end of the first semester of the senior year for typical students in the program. Students who have not maintained a 3.0 GPA in their graduate courses will be put on probationary status with respect to the IUG program. They will receive a warning letter regarding probationary status. Their ability to continue in the IUG program will be based on their academic performance in the last semester of their senior year.

Students have the choice of receiving the B.S. in Information Systems degree at the end of the fourth year or waiting until the end of the fifth year to receive both degrees. Students who elect to receive the B.S. degree at the end of the fourth year will pay graduate tutition for courses taken in the fifth year; students opting to receive both degrees at the end of the fifth year will pay undergraduate tuition for all five years.

If for any reason students admitted to the IUG program are unable to complete the requirements for the Master of Business Administration degree, the students will be permitted to receive the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems degree assuming all the undergraduate degree requirements have been satisifactorily completed. If the students successfully complete courses listed in the recommended schedule, they will satisfy the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree by the end of their fourth year.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

To initiate the application process, students must submit a resume, a personal statement including career goals and how MBA will enhance their career goals, transcripts of courses taken outside Penn State, two letters of recommendation, with at least one from the School of Business Administration faculty, and a plan of study that integrates both undergraduate and graduate requirements. A graduate faculty adviser in collaboration with the Director of MBA Program will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) degree program.

The number of openings in the IUG program is limited. Applicants to the IUG program must have completed a minimum of 60 credits. Typical students would apply after completing between 60 and 90 credits, that is, after the fifth semester and before the end of the seventh semester. In addition, the applicants must earn a minimum of cumulative grade point average of 3.5 and complete the following Entry to Major courses or equivalent: ACCTG 211(4), ECON 102(3), ENGL 15 or 30(3), FIN 301(3), MATH 110 or 140(4), MGMT 301(3), MKTG 301(3) and STAT 200(4) or SCM 200(4).

To formally apply, students must submit a completed graduate school application. The students should mention in the notes section that the application is for the IUG program in Business Administration. The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required for admission into the program; however, if students are interested in applying for a graduate assistantship, GMAT or GRE scores must be submitted by the end of the eighth semester.

Students applications will be evaluated based on their overall portfolio, in addition to the above requirements. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the Graduate Admissions Committee in Business Administration.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Students in the IUG program must satisfy the degree requirements for both Bachelor of Science in Informatin Systems and Master of Business Administration degrees. The total course load is reduced due to the maximum of 12 credits that can count towards both degrees. All courses counted for both degrees must be at the 500- or 800-level.

Integrated B.S. in Information Systems/MSIS Program

The School of Business Administration offers a limited number of academically superior Bachelor of Science in Information Systems candidates the opportunity to enroll in an integrated, continuous program of study leading to both the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems and the Master of Science in Information Systems. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the students to earn both degrees in five years. Specifically, as many as twelve of the credits required for the master’s degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Program reduces the total number of credits needed to earn both degrees from 150 to 138.

Students in the IUG program must satisfy the requirements for both the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems and Master of Science in Information Systems degrees. The total course load is reduced due to courses that can count towards both degrees. The first two years of the IUG program are identical to the first two years of the Bachelor of Science program. Students in the IUG program take five additional credits in their third year, and five fewer credits in their fourth year. The courses that count toward the Master of Science in Information Systems degree requirements are included in the fourth year.

Student performance will be monitored on an on-going basis. In addition, a formal evaluation of student academic performance will be performed when the students have completed 100 to 105 credits, which is at the end of the first semester of the senior year for typical students in the program. Students who have not maintained a 3.0 GPA in their graduate courses will be put on probationary status with respect to the IUG program. They will receive a warning letter regarding probationary status. Their ability to continue in the IUG program will be based on their academic performance in the last semester of their senior year.

Students have the choice of receiving the B.S. in Information Systems degree at the end of the fourth year or waiting until the end of the fifth year to receive both degrees. Students who elect to receive the B.S. degree at the end of the fourth year will pay graduate tuition for courses taken in the fifth year; students opting to receive both degrees at the end of the fifth year will pay undergraduate tuition for all five years.

If for any reason students admitted to the IUG program are unable to complete the requirements for the Master of Science in Information Systems degree, the students will be permitted to receive the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems degree assuming all the undergraduate degree requirements have been satisfactorily completed. If the students successfully complete courses listed in the recommended schedule, they will satisfy the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree by the end of their fourth year. 

Admission Requirements

To initiate the application process, students must submit a resume, a personal statement including career goals and how MBA will enhance their career goals, transcripts of courses taken outside Penn State, two letters of recommendation, with at least one from the School of Business Administration faculty, and a plan of study that integrates both undergraduate and graduate requirements. A graduate faculty adviser in collaboration with the Director of MSIS Program will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) degree program.

The number of openings in the IUG program is limited. Applicants to the IUG program must have completed a minimum of 60 credits. Typical students would apply after completing between 60 and 90 credits, that is, after the fifth semester and before the end of the seventh semester. In addition, the applicants must earn a minimum of cumulative grade point average of 3.5 and complete the following Entry to Major courses or equivalent: ACCTG 211 [4], ECON 102 [3], ENGL 15 or 30 [3], FIN 301 [3], MATH 110 or 140 [4], MGMT 301 [3], MKTG 301 [3] and STAT 200 [4] or SCM 200 [4].

To formally apply, students must submit a completed graduate school application. The students should mention in the notes section that the application is for the IUG program in Business Administration. The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required for admission into the program; however, if students are interested in applying for a graduate assistantship, GMAT or GRE scores must be submitted by the end of the eighth semester.

Student applications will be evaluated based on their overall portfolio, in addition to the above requirements. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the Graduate Admissions Committee in Business Administration.

Degree Requirements

Students in the IUG program must satisfy the degree requirements for both Bachelor of Science in Information Systems and Master of Science in Information Systems degrees. The total course load is reduced due to the maximum of 12 credits that can count towards both degrees. All courses counted for both degrees must be at the 500- or 800-level.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

46-03-007 AMST 423 (3)
Title: Folk Groups and Genres
Abbreviated Title: Folk Grps & Genres
Description: We live surrounded by folklore. From the jokes and stories we tell, to the ways we cook and eat, work and dress, even how we interact using digital media, much of what we do in our lives involves tradition. This course will provide students with detailed study of American folklore through an in-depth focus on a specific social group or creative genre. Topics covered may include group-based material such as ethnic folklore; the folklore of age groups; folklore, gender and sexuality; and occupational folklore; as well as units on genre categories such as folk narrative (folktale, legend, myth), verbal genres (proverbs, rhymes, jokes), customary forms
(parades, festivals, dancing, games), material culture (dress, folk art, foodways), and musical forms (folk song, folk music). At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to explain key concepts in the study of folklore such as tradition, folk group, genre, performance, and practice, as well as how these concepts can be applied in the analysis and interpretation of culture. Students will also develop practical skills in ethnography, including participant observation, interviewing, audio and video recording, field note taking, fieldwork ethics, and folklore archiving. As part of this course, students will undertake a significant ethnographic research project, culminating in a comprehensive portfolio of field materials and an analytical or interpretive paper.
Prerequisites: (AMST 105; OR ENGL 105) AND (AMST 196; OR ENGL 196)
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-008 EET 402 (4)

Title: High-Frequency Circuit Design
Abbreviated Title: H F Circuit Des
Description: Electromagnetic theory as applied to the design of antennas, waveguides, and high-frequency components.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE Description: This course provides students in Electrical Engineering Technology with fundamentals of high frequency (RF and microwave) circuit design concepts. The main objective is that students gain familiarity with the high frequency circuits design topics including but not
limited to: limitations of lumped elements at high frequencies, parasitic effects, transmission line and distributed circuits, Smith Chart, impedance matching, resonators and filters, scattering parameters, multiport networks, power divider and combiners, directional couplers, and RF and microwave circuit modeling through computer aided design (CAD). The lab portion of the course provides the students with the opportunity to learn the operation of high frequency test equipment such as network analyzer and spectrum analyzer, and be able to build and test high frequency and transmission line based circuits. The course topics are supported by weekly CAD or experimental labs.
CHANGE Prerequisites: EET 312
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-009 EET 408 (4)
Title: Communication System Design
Abbreviated Title: Comm Sys Design
Description: Communication system principles including modulation techniques, encoding and decoding, noise, and elementary probability.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course is for students in Electrical Engineering Technology to gain understanding of the fundamental concepts and components of communication systems, supported by hands on experiments. Fundamentals of communication systems are covered and include signal analysis, noise, main building blocks and circuit components, effect of nonlinearities, signal generation, concepts of modulation and demodulation, analog modulation schemes such as AM, DSB, SSB, FM, and PM, transmitter and receivers architectures, and, if
time permits, an introduction to digital communication schemes. After overviewing basic terminology and concepts such as signal spectrum, bandwidth, filtering, harmonics, power, and signal to noise ratio in communication systems, this course, in two parts, will expose students to two distinct aspects of communication technology. In the first part, the students will learn about the main components such as filters, resonators, amplifiers, mixers, oscillators, and phase locked loops. The second part will cover the main amplitude and angle modulation schemes and familiarize the students with modulator and demodulator circuits for those schemes.
Topics covered in the course are supported by hands on labs performed each week during a lab session.
CHANGE Prerequisites: EET 312 Remove: senior standing in Electrical Engineering Technology
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-010 EET 419 (1)
Title: Project Proposal Preparation
Abbreviated Title: Proj Proposal Prep
Description: Performing the initial research needed for the senior project course, and the preparation of the written project proposal.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course is required for all senior students in the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology (BSEET) program. It is the first course in a two-semester sequence that comprises the capstone design experience. In this course, students work in teams to develop an idea for an innovative product or system, including the determination and weighting of customer requirements, design constraints, applicable standards, engineering specifications, a functional decomposition (block diagram), work breakdown structure (WBS), project schedule, and proposed project budget. The culmination of the course is a proposal that guides the project into the second semester, which is the implementation phase. In the proposal, students will also provide background information on the history of relevant technologies, state of the practice in similar products and the life cycle of related products. Weekly presentations focus on important components of the proposal and drafts of these components are submitted for review on a regular basis.
CHANGE Prerequisites: ENGL 202C, CAS 100
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-011 PUBPL 475 (3)
Title: Critical Infrastructure Protection
Abbreviated Title: Crit Infrastruc
Description: This course provides knowledge about protection of critical infrastructure as an aspect of homeland security. PUBPL 475 Critical Infrastructure Protection (3) Critical Infrastructure Protection provides a definition of critical infrastructure and examines the importance of protecting it in the post-9/11 era. The course focuses on policies and programs designed to prevent catastrophic events and to protect and maintain the nation’s critical infrastructure. It examines such activity through an understanding of the network of
organizations at all levels of government and in the private sector responsible for protecting infrastructure. Case examples are provided of catastrophic events to provide an understanding of risks involved in infrastructure protection. Understanding key principles will be measured through preparation of a written analysis of a key homeland security/defense issue with alternative strategies consistent with current policy and legal constraints.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course provides knowledge about protection of critical infrastructure as an aspect of homeland security. PUBPL 475 Critical Infrastructure Protection (3) Critical Infrastructure Protection provides a definition of critical infrastructure and examines the importance of protecting it in the post-9/11 era. The course focuses on policies and programs designed to prevent catastrophic events and to protect and maintain the nation’s critical infrastructure. It examines such activity through an understanding of the network of
organizations at all levels of government and in the private sector responsible for protecting infrastructure. Case examples are provided of catastrophic events to provide an understanding of risks involved in infrastructure protection. Understanding key principles will be measured through preparation of a written analysis of a key homeland security/defense issue with alternative strategies consistent with current policy and legal constraints.
REMOVE PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2019

OLD
46-03-012 PUBPL 476 (3-3:3)
Title: Homeland Security Intelligence
Abbreviated Title: Homeland Sec Intel
Description: The Homeland Security Intelligence course provides a depth of knowledge of key intelligence issues for homeland security professionals.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: REMOVE REPEATABLE 3
CHANGE Description: The Homeland Security Intelligence course provides a depth of knowledge of key intelligence issues for homeland security professionals. The course achieves this goal by focusing on intelligence sharing strategies, the political and cultural context of policy development, the policies established by governments to develop relevant and timely intelligence for customers, identification of the key players in the Intelligence Community, and the relevant legal issues in intelligence. Shortfalls in intelligence sharing were identified as
key problems in the 9/11 Commission Report (2004) which allowed the 9/11 attacks to be executed. Improvements in intelligence sharing and a vast increase in intelligence volume have resulted from this finding. There are also areas in which intelligence sharing continues to be a challenge. This is all important information for future homeland security and criminal justice practitioners alike. Homeland security and law enforcement professionals are producers as well as consumers of intelligence products. This includes state and local officials who are part of the homeland security enterprise and the law enforcement network, and who must ultimately respond to potential threats and attacks, if they should occur. Students who can participate in coursework which exposes them to the intelligence cycle, the intelligence production process, and the intelligence community, writ large, have an advantage in applying for intelligence research specialist, criminal research specialist, and other intelligence analyst positions with federal, state, and local agencies. Intelligence analysts are a key component of the homeland security and law enforcement picture, and represent an excellent career path for Penn State graduates.
ADD Cross-Listed Courses: HLS 476(CA)
Proposed Start: SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Earth and Mineral Sciences

PROGRAM CHANGES

46-03-013 Change. Revise program description. Remove GEOG 10, 20, 30, 160, 364, and STAT 200 from Prescribed Courses. Add GEOG 210, 220, 230, 260, and 390 to Prescribed Courses. Remove ENGL 15 and 30 from Additional Courses. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Geography

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (GEOBA)

PROFESSOR CYNTHIA A. BREWER, Head

The Department of Geography in Penn State’s College of Earth and Mineral Sciences offers a strong mix of human, physical, and methodological components that comprise the core of the geography major. Combining geography with other areas of study allows students to choose from a broad range of topics in order to suit their individual interests. Undergraduate degrees in geography are offered in the Bachelor of Science (BS) and in the Bachelor of Arts (BA). Both programs offer an integrated course of study in which students learn fundamental concepts in physical and human geography while developing methodological proficiency in qualitative analysis, spatial analysis, and/or geospatial technologies.

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) major is a broader liberal-arts based program that incorporates foreign langauge study and courses outside the major in combination with core and elective geography courses. The BA Geography major is especially appropriate for students seeking a deeper understanding of the human experience and human-environment interactions, planning to combine their degree with concurrent majors and minors, or intending to pursue post-graduate work in geography or related disciplines.

In both the B.A. and B.S., students can customize and specialize their programs through the completion of undergraduate certificates. The Geography major can provide preparation for a career in business, industry, or government. Geographers with bachelor’s degrees are currently being placed in federal, state, and local administrative and planning agencies and in private firms that specialize in planning and development or in environmental, socioeconomic, or location analysis.

Program Learning Objectives:

1. Majors in Geography will deomonstrate knowledge of fundamental geographic skills and concepts and apply them to complex spatial relationships (interactions, patterns, processes) within the human socio-cultural and natural environments at global, regional, and local scales.
2. Majors in Geography will engage in spatial and environmental critical thinking by analyzing, discussion and synthesizing geographical information that may include professional/technical docments, primary data, maps, graphics, and/or archival data.
3. Majors in Geography will communicate geographic information utilizing oral, written, and visual formats to effectively process and integrate facts, ideas, and research results.
4. Majors in Geography will develop research skills by locating, understanding, and explaining geographic challenges and opportunities related to human socio-cultural and/or environmental phenomena at global, regional, and local scales.

For the B.A. degree in Geography, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 8-23 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 46 credits[1]
(This includes 3 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (19 credits)
EMSC 100 GWS(3)[71] (Sem: 1-2) (
GEOG 210(3), GEOG 220(3), GEOG 230(3), GEOG 260(3) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOG 390(1) (Sem: 4-8)
GEOG 301(3) (Sem: 4-8)

(The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: CAS 100 GWS or ENGL 202 GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (27 credits)
Engaged Scholarship: Select 3 credits: GEOG 493(1-3); GEOG 494(1-3); GEOG 494H(1-3); GEOG 495B(1-3); GEOG 495G(1-3); GEOG 499 IL(1-3) (Sem: 5-8)

Qualitative or quantitative methods in geography: Select 3 credits: GEOG 308(3); GEOG 364(3) (Sem: 3-6) (Note: GEOG 364 has a prerequisite of STAT 200.)

300-level geography – Select 9 credits, not including courses taken above: GEOG 308(3); GEOG 310(3); GEOG 310 WAC(3); GEOG 314(3); GEOG 315(3); GEOG 320 US;IL(3); GEOG 324(3); GEOG 326(3); GEOG 328(3); GEOG 330(3); GEOG 333(3); GEOG 361(3); GEOG 362(3); GEOG 363(3); GEOG 364(3); GEOG 365(3) (Sem: 3-8)

400-level geography – Select 12 credits, not including courses taken above: GEOG 410(3); GEOG 411(3); GEOG 411W WAC(3); GEOG 412 WAC(3); GEOG 414(3); GEOG 420 US;IL;WAC(3); GEOG 421(3); GEOG 422W WAC(3); GEOG 424(3); GEOG 424W WAC(3); GEOG 425 US(3); GEOG 426 US;IL;WAC(3); GEOG 428Y US;IL;WAC(3); GEOG 430(3); GEOG 431(3); GEOG 432(3); GEOG 433(3); GEOG 434(3); GEOG 436(3); GEOG 438 WAC(3); GEOG 439(3); GEOG 444(3); GEOG 461 WAC(3); GEOG 462(3); GEOG 463(3); GEOG 464(3); GEOG 465(3); GEOG 467(3); GEOG 481(3); GEOG 485(3); GEOG 493(1-3); GEOG 494(1-3); GEOG 495(1-3); GEOG 495B(1-3); GEOG 495G(1-3); GEOG 496(1-3), GEOG 497(1-9); GEOG 498(1-9); GEOG 499 IL(1-6) (Sem: 4-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[71] The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: CAS 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EMSC 100 GWS.


46-03-014 Change. Revise program description. Remove GEOG 10, 20, 30, 130, and 160 from Prescribed Courses. Add GEOG 210, 220, 230, 260, 390, and 464 Prescribed Courses. Remove ENGL 15, 30, GEOG 110, 111, 115, 120, 122, 123, 124, 126, and 128 from Additional Courses. Add GEOG 308, 310, 310W, 314, 315, 320, 324, 326, 328, 330, 333, 361, 362, 363, 365, 410, 411, 411W, 412W, 414, 420, 421, 422W, 424, 424W, 425, 426, 428Y, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 436, 438, 439, 444, 461, 462, 463, 465, 467, 481, and 485 to Additional Courses. Add Supporting Courses and Related Areas section. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Geography

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (GEOBS)

PROFESSOR CYNTHIA A. BREWER, Head

The Department of Geography in Penn State’s College of Earth and Mineral Sciences offers a strong mix of human, physical, and methodological components that comprise the core of the geography major. Combining geography with other areas of study allows students to choose from a broad range of topics in order to suit their individual interests. Undergraduate degrees in geography are offered in the Bachelor of Science (BS) and in the Bachelor of Arts (BA). Both programs offer an integrated course of study in which students learn fundamental concepts in physical and human geography while developing methodological proficiency in qualitative analysis, spatial analysis, and/or geospatial technologies.

In contrast to the broader liberal arts-oriented B.A., the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) major is a more disciplinary-focused program, emphasizing technical skills and preparation across the human/physical spectrum of geography. It includes rigorous training in the use of geographic tools and technologies as well as core and advanced courses on the ways people use environmental resources and how they arrange themselves and their economic, social, and political activities on the Earth’s surface. 

In both the B.S. and B.A., students can customize and specialize their programs through the completion of undergraduate certificates. The Geography major can provide preparation for a career in business, industry, or government. Geographers with bachelor’s degrees are currently being placed in federal, state, and local administrative and planning agencies and in private firms that specialize in planning and development or in environmental, socioeconomic, or location analysis.

Program Learning Objectives:
1. Majors in Geography will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental geographic skills and concepts and apply them to complex spatial relationships (interactions, patterns, processes) within the human socio-cultural and natural environments at global, regional, and local scales.
2. Majors in Geography will engage in spatial and environmental critical thinking by analyzing, discussing and synthesizing geographical information that may include professional/technical documents, primary data, maps, graphics, and/or archival data.
3. Majors in Geography will communicate geographic information utilizing oral, written, and visual formats to effectively process and integrate facts, ideas, and research results.
4. Majors in Geography will develop research skills by locating, understanding, and explaining geographic challenges and opportunities related to human socio-cultural and/or environmental phenomena at global, regional, and local scales.

For the B.S. degree in Geography, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(9 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 9 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 75 credits
(This includes 9 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (29 credits)
EMSC 100 GWS(3)[71] (Sem: 1-2)
GEOG 210(3), GEOG 220(3), GEOG 230(3), GEOG 260(3) (Sem: 1-4)
STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOG 364(3) (Sem: 3-6)
GEOG 390(1) (Sem: 3-8)
GEOG 301(3) (Sem: 4-8)
GEOG 464(3) (Sem: 4-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (34 credits)

Calculus: Select 4 credits: MATH 83 GQ(4); MATH 110 GQ(4); MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)

Engaged scholarship: Select 3 credits: GEOG 493(1-3); GEOG 494(1-3); GEOG 494H(1-3); GEOG 495(1-3); GEOG 495B(1-3); GEOG 495G(1-3); GEOG 499 IL(1-3) (Sem: 5-8)

Geographic Information Science skills: Select 6 credits: GEOG 361(3); GEOG 362(3); GEOG 363(3); GEOG 365(3) (Sem: 3-6)

300-level geography: Select 9 credits not taken above: GEOG 308(3); GEOG 310(3); GEOG 310W WAC(3)[1]; GEOG 314(3); GEOG 315(3); GEOG 320 US; IL(3); GEOG 324(3); GEOG 326(3); GEOG 328(3); GEOG 330(3); GEOG 333(3)

400-level geography: Select 12 credits not taken above: GEOG 410(3); GEOG 411(3); GEOG 411W WAC(3); GEOG 412W WAC(3); GEOG 414(3); GEOG 420 US; IL;WAC(3); GEOG 421(3); GEOG 422W WAC(3); GEOG 424 US; IL(3); GEOG 424W WAC(3); GEOG 425 US(3); GEOG 426 US; IL; WAC(3); GEOG 428Y US; IL;WAC(3); GEOG 430(3); GEOG 431(3); GEOG 432(3); GEOG 433(3); GEOG 434(3); GEOG 436(3); GEOG 438 WAC(3); GEOG 439(3); GEOG 444(3); GEOG 461 WAC(3); GEOG 462(3); GEOG 463(3); GEOG 465(3); GEOG 467(3); GEOG 481(3); GEOG 485(3); GEOG 493(1-3); GEOG 494(1-3); GEOG 494H(1-3); GEOG 495(1-3); GEOG 495B(1-3); GEOG 495G(1-3); GEOG 496(1-3); GEOG 497(1-9); GEOG 498(1-9); GEOG 499 IL(1-6) (Sem: 4-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits in geography or related areas (not used above) in consultation with advisor.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[71] The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: CAS 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EMSC 100 GWS.

COURSE ADDS

46-03-015 GEOG 210 (3)(GN)(BA)
Title: Geographic Perspectives on Environmental Systems Science
Abbreviated Title: Geog Envtl Sys Sci
Description: This lecture, lab and field-based course explores Earth’s physical environment and its interactions with human activities. While it is intended primarily for Geography majors and minors, the subject matter and approach are sufficiently broad to be relevant to any
student with interests in the environmental and natural sciences. We survey the geographic patterns and physical processes attending Earth’s environmental and landscape systems; its climate, hydrology, landforms, soils and vegetation, and their mutual interactions of
energy and mass (water, sediment). We adopt both spatial—map-able—and temporal perspectives; for example, the evidence for, causes of, and impacts from, past and contemporary environmental changes such as glaciations, pluvials (wet periods), and warming.
An important emphasis involves human interactions with the natural environment; how human activities are constrained by, yet also constrain processes and alter features of, the physical landscape across spatial and temporal scales. Representative topics include the burning of fossil fuels and emissions of greenhouse gases and particulates into the atmosphere, natural gas fracking and earthquakes, river diversion and dam construction, ground-water withdrawal and land subsidence, urbanization and the “heat island” effect, land clearance and deforestation, irrigated agriculture, wildland fire, the introduction of invasive species, and coastal overdevelopment. Our examples will come from across the globe, from areas as diverse as tropical oceans to the polar deserts. An important outcome of the course is that students become better scientific observers of Earth’s environmental system and its spatiotemporal
variations. Course Objectives: 1. To understand the processes giving rise to the patterns of Earth’s physical landscape components. 2. To evaluate the causes of environmental changes and their impacts on the physical landscape, particularly in the context of human activities. 3. To develop and analyze physical geographic datasets in the field and laboratory, in order to better comprehend the science undertaken by physical geographers. Learning Outcomes: By taking this course, students will 1. Gain understanding of the geographic patterns and processes associated with Earth’s environmental system, as expressed in the physical landscape features. 2. Develop their ability to scientifically evaluate the causes and impacts of past and contemporary environmental changes, including the role of human activities. 3. Acquire experience in applying the scientific method to the study of physical geography, through practical in-lab and field assignments.
Proposed Start: SP2018

46-03-016 GEOG 330N (3)(GN)(GS)(BA)
Title: Political Ecology
Abbreviated Title: Political Ecology
Description: This course introduces students to political ecology as one approach to advanced human-environment studies in geography. Political ecology is an interdisciplinary approach that combines environmental justice, cultural ecology, and other related approaches to undertake an integrated, holistic assessment of the relationships between social and ecological change. In particular, it analyzes the power dynamics at play in social and ecological marginalization and change; the social issues surrounding conservation of protected natural areas and species and conflicts over natural resources; the underlying causes of environmental conflicts; and issues of justice and distribution as they relate to the production and consumption of environmental goods and services. Students will gain familiarity with a wide range of theories and methods central to contemporary human-environment geography, such as Marxist political economy, Foucauldian governmentality, feminist intersectionality, ethnography, and land change science. Students will increase their knowledge of the world in general, and of approaches to the challenges of environmental policy in particular, by learning how these theories and methods have been put to use in the analysis of case studies from many different countries and continents. They will develop their ability to conduct independent research, work collaboratively, and present their thinking verbally and in writing through a variety of exercises and assignments. Upon completing this course, students will be able to: 1. understand key theories in political ecology 2. evaluate contemporary debates in human-environment studies using political ecology thinking 3. apply political ecology theories and concepts to relevant topics 4. use integrated thinking across the natural and social sciences to analyze and produce possible solutions to complex human-environment challenges
Prerequisites: GEOG 230 OR GEOG 30
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-017 METEO 426 (3-3:3)
Title: Inside Numerical Weather Prediction Models
Abbreviated Title: Inside NWP Models
Description: This course will teach the student a practical understanding of the structure of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models in the context of their application to real world precipitation forecasting. The course combines lecture material on the inner workings of NWP
models with a forecasting module that applies the lecture material to daily precipitation forecasts. Topics covered during the semester include the mathematical structure of weather models, including their historical development, techniques for initializing models (data
assimilation), basic numerical methods used to advance the model in time, techniques to account for phenomena not directly resolved by the model (parameterizations), as well as the theory behind, and creation of, ensemble model forecasts. Current, and next generation, operational NWP models will be used as examples for each topic. Students will use the lecture material and other forecasting techniques to issue precipitation forecasts three days per week in the form of a class-wide forecast contest.
Prerequisites: METEO 411; METEO 421
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-018  GEOG 1 (3)(IL)
Title: Global Parks and Sustainability
Abbreviated Title: Parks and Sustain
Description: Introduction to U.S. and global protected areas, with a focus on historical and emerging trends in conservation, sustainability, and socio-ecological systems.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER:  1N
ADD GENED DESIGNATION GN
ADD GENED DESIGNATION GS
ADD US DESIGNATION US
ADD BA DESIGNATION BA
CHANGE Abbreviated Title: Parks&Sustainablty
CHANGE Description: This course uses parks and protected areas – both in the U.S. and globally – as a framework for exploring broad themes of sustainability, conservation, and socio-ecological systems. Case studies that exemplify U.S. and international parkscapes (i.e., parks
and protected areas embedded within complex landscapes) are used to convey stories of evolving attitudes and approaches toward conservation and sustainability. These stories help explain the historical, transitioning, and future role of conservation in societies shaped by local ecologies, conflict, and change. The unique geographies of conservation parkscapes– past and future –reinforce and challenge a globally dynamic conservation discourse. Examining the sustainability of conservation activities themselves, as well as the socio-ecological systems in which they are embedded, can provide a lens through which we can begin to understand other cultures, aesthetic values and value systems, and the diverse ecologies of Earth. In this course, we will: – Explore the history of parks and protected areas globally, including the development of the U.S. National Park system, and the globalization of conservation and sustainability policies and approaches – Examine globally representative case-studies to assess how parks and protected areas are part of both social and ecological landscapes (“parkscapes”) – Assess new challenges and opportunities for conservation in an era of rapid change and conflict – Evaluate the history, current socio-ecological condition, and future approaches in sustainability for a
particular global parkscape By the end of the course students should be able to: – Describe why the idea of ‘wilderness’ is both influential and contested – Explain temporal and spatial trends in national and international conservation management – Compare and contrast contemporary conservation approaches – Illustrate a parkscape as a coupled socio-ecological system – Identify key drivers of future ecological change affecting conservation management
Proposed Start: SP2019

OLD
46-03-019 GEOG 30 (3)(IL)(BA)
Title: Geographic Perspectives on Sustainability and Human-Environment Systems
Abbreviated Title: Geo Sustainability
Description: Introduction to theory, methods, history and contemporary issues in global and regional relationships between human activity and the physical environment. GEOG 030 Geographic Perspectives on Sustainability and Human-Environment Systems (3) (GS;IL)(BA) This
course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. One of the major themes in the discipline of geography is the study of the relationships between humans and the natural environment. GEOG 030 introduces students to the multiple ways in which people and
the environment are interconnected. From a dynamic systems perspective, we refer to this interconnectedness as “coupled socialecological systems.” The course uses a geographic perspective to understand how differently these linkages are shaped in various ecological and cultural settings around the globe. The course follows an interdisciplinary approach, exploring from multiple angles major environmental and societal challenges such as climate change, genetically-modified food, over-consumption, disease, and environmental service provision in the industrialized North and the Global South. It promotes critical thinking regarding key concepts such as carrying capacity, ecological footprints, feedback, stability domains, and resilience. Students are encouraged to examine their role and responsibilities for the sustainability of the social-ecological systems we inhabit and to take action in their own lives to
contribute to a more equitable and sustainable environment. The course will provide students with the opportunity to read, learn, and debate about the ways in which humans value, use, affect, and are affected by small-scale and large-scale human-environment interactions. It will provide them with skills for critically analyzing and evaluating the ways in which humans have transformed the environment in different parts of the world. They will also learn how to assess what future pathways are sustainable and ethically sound. One key goal of the course will be to help students increase their sensitivity to the global and international context of human
interactions with nature. A recitation section is crucial because it allows students to explore controversial issues such as biotechnology, nature as a commodity, and global warming, and to develop critical positions on such issues.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 30N
ADD GENED DESIGNATION GN
ADD GENED DESIGNATION GS
ADD US DESIGNATION US
CHANGE Title: Environment and Society in a Changing World
CHANGE Abbreviated Title: Envt Soc Chg World
CHANGE Description: One of the major themes in the discipline of geography is the examination of the relationships between humans and the natural environment. GEOG 30 introduces students to these relationships, in addition to the theories and methods that geographers employ in addressing them. The course begins with an overview of theories and key concepts to understand and predict the interactions between social and ecological systems, across settings in the United States and globally. The course will provide students with the opportunity to read and learn about the ways in which humans think about, use, and are affected by the natural environment. It will also provide skills for analyzing and evaluating the ways in which humans have transformed the environment in different parts of the world through the integration of knowledge from the natural and social sciences. This class is designed to address big questions in human environment interactions at the present time, while drawing upon their histories and key conceptual ideas. The specific questions that
we will address this semester are: 1. What is a human-environment system? How does the geographic discipline contribute towards understanding human-environment systems and sustainability? 2. Why do we conserve what we conserve? Is it possible to conserve natural resources and also meet human needs? 3. What are ways to mitigate the effects of economic development upon the natural environment? Is sustainable development possible? 4. How is climate change impacting social and ecological systems? Can we adapt to the impacts of climate change? One of the hallmarks of the discipline of geography is attention to how social and ecological processes interact and spread across spatial scales. This means that specific events, such as the consumption of particular product or the emission of greenhouse gases, connect sites within countries and across the globe. GEOG 30 meets the definition for both a US
and international cultures course by emphasizing how current human-environment systems developed over time in the U.S. and internationally. GEOG 30 examines how various political, economic, and cultural factors influenced the creation of the different forms of human-environment systems that exist today. Further, it teaches students to see nations, cultures, and social identities in relation to one another, exploring how decisions made in relation to a human-environment system in one place or by one people group are can impact other people or places. Course Learning Objectives This course has four specific objectives. Students will: 1. Analyze major concepts used to study human-environment systems in the U.S. and globally, and how the geographic discipline contributes in addressing them across diverse places 2. Examine the historical underpinnings that shape current understandings and debates on
human-environment interactions within the U.S. and internationally, including discussion of how understandings and debates differ across the globe 3. Evaluate the role of divergent global and national processes, such as states, markets, and institutions, in shaping human-environment systems across time and space 4. Consider how to make informed decisions about the ways in which we, as individuals, communities, and nations, relate to the natural environment
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Engineering

PROGRAM CHANGES

46-03-020 Change. Revise program description. Remove all options. Remove CHEM 466 from Prescribed Courses. Add Supporting Course and Related Areas section. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Chemical Engineering

University Park, College of Engineering (CH E)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR PHILLIP E. SAVAGE, Head, Department of Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering is one of the most versatile professions–you’ll find Chemical Engineers employed in a broad array of industries ranging from pharmaceutical and biotechnical companies to semiconductor manufacturing to start-up companies converting the latest laboratory discoveries to large-scale commercial production. Chemical Engineers work with catalysts to develop new ways to manufacture medicines and plastics; they develop control systems that enable the safe production of products from semiconductors to household soap; they design chemical and petroleum plants; they research the effects of artificial organs on blood flow; and they develop the equipment and processes necessary for advances in biotechnology. While chemistry emphasizes the facts and principles of science, chemical engineering emphasizes its practical application for the development of new products and processes.

The undergraduate program in Chemical Engineering provides students with fundamental skills in problem solving, analysis, and design, along with hands-on experience in practical applications. The curriculum builds upon the traditional foundation in the chemical and energy-related industries and introduces new material in the life sciences, polymers, and environmental fields.

Program Educational Objectives:

The educational objectives of the undergraduate program in Chemical Engineering are specifically designed to produce graduates who will be able to:

  1. identify and pursue their personal and professional goals using the foundation provided by the breadth of educational opportunities in chemical and biomolecular engineering offered at Penn State
  2. pursue careers as practicing chemical engineers in traditional chemical and energy-related universities as well as in expaning areas of materials, environmental, biomedical, and biotechnology
  3. apply their broad chemical engineering education–including their problem solving, analytical, design, research, and communication skills–in industry, government agencies, financial instutitions, consulting firms, educational instutitions, business, law, and medicine
  4. provide the technical, educational, business, and poltical leadership needed in today’s rapidly changing, increasingly technological, global society.

Program Outcomes (Student Outcomes):

(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic contraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
(d) an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
(g) an ability to communicate effectively
(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

ENTRANCE TO MAJOR — In addition to the minimum grade point average (GPA) requirements* described in the University Policies, all College of Engineering entrance to major course requirements must also be completed with a minimum grade of C: CHEM 110 (GN), MATH 140 (GQ), MATH 141 (GQ), MATH 250 or MATH 251, PHYS 211 (GN) and PHSY 212 (GN). All of these courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the admission to major process is carried out.

For the B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering, a minimum of 133 credits is required. This baccalaureate program in Chemical Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 115 credits
(This includes 27 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (84 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), EDSGN 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
BMB 251(3), CHE 210(3)[1], CHE 220(3)[1], CHE 230(1), CHE 300(1), CHE 320(3)[1], CHE 330(3), CHE 340(3), CHE 350(3)[1], CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2), CHEM 457(2), MATH 231(2), MATH 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
CHE 410(3)[1], CHE 430(3)[1], CHE 452(3), CHE 470(3), CHE 480W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 15 GWS(3) or ENGL 30 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), or ECON 14 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
CAS 100A GWS(3) or CAS 100B GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSE AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
Select 3 credits of physical chemistry from departmental list (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits of materials elective from departmental list (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits in 400-level chemical engineering electives from departmental list (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits of approved engineering electives from departmental list (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits of professional electives from department list [31] (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[31] Students may substitute 6 credits of ROTC for part of this requirement in consultation with department.
[91] “…senior, undergraduate students with an average of at least 3.5, and certain other students with averages of at least 3.00 who have been granted special permission to enroll through the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services.” Penn State University 2003-2004 Graduate Degree Programs Bulletin. Instructor approval is also required.

COURSE ADDS

46-03-021 AERSP 397 (1-18:18)
Title: Special Topics
Abbreviated Title: Special Topics
Description: Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-022 CHE 455 (3)
Title: Drug Delivery, Pharmacokinetics, and Artificial Organs
Abbreviated Title: Drug Delivery
Description: CHE 455 is an elective course that examines the application of chemical engineering principles (thermodynamics, transport, and kinetics) to the analysis of a number of medically related phenomena and devices. Specific topics include drug delivery systems,
pharmacokinetics, artificial organs, biological transport phenomena, and temperature regulation. One of the important goals of the course is to understand how chemical engineers go about developing appropriate physical models for complex biological systems. Emphasis will be placed on identifying the key physical / biological phenomena governing the system behavior. Where appropriate, the course will also examine some of the social, political, and economic implications of medical technology in our society, e.g., the artificial kidney program. Students do not need a background in biology or physiology — the key biological phenomena will be covered at appropriate places throughout the semester.
Prerequisites: CHE 350, BME 409, BME 413, OR BE 302
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-023 ESC 430 (3)
Title: Advanced Biofabrication Processes
Abbreviated Title: Adv Biofab Process
Description: This course covers advanced biofabrication processes used in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and drug testing, and provides fundamental statistical concepts and tools that are required to analyze biofabrication process data. Topics include: Introduction, Review of Basic Statistics, Statistics for Analysis of Experimental Data, Hypothesis Testing with Two Sample, Introduction to Biofabrication, Traditional Manufacturing Processes for Tissue Engineering, Micro-patterning and Molding, Microfluidics in Tissue Engineering, Scaffold-free Tissue Fabrication, Modular Assembly and 3D Printing in Tissue Engineering. The course also includes utilization of software packages, hands-on laboratory homework assignments.
Cross-Listed Courses: BME 430
Prerequisites: At least 7th semester classification so that students have a robust technical background before taking the course.
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-024 BE 301 (3)
Title: Mathematical Modeling of Biological and Physical Systems
Abbreviated Title: Math Mod Biophys S
Description: Modeling tools, quantification of processes, linear and non-linear systems of equations, numerical methods, matrix operations, applied to biological and physical systems. B E 301 Modeling Methods for Biological Systems (3)The ability to quantify relationships into
mathematical models, and implement the models into the computer to finds solutions, is essential for engineering analysis and design. This course provides the student with tools for modeling biological and physical systems. Upon completion of this course, the student
will be able to: identify a process/system and represent that process/system mathematically; solve the mathematically-represented system using two computer-based modeling tools, Excel and MATLAB; describe the emphasis areas offered in the Agricultural and Biological Engineering major; and be able to develop a systems model related to each area. The course includes engineering economics, matrix operations, curve fitting, numerical integration and differentiation, and applications of these methods to biological and agricultural systems.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The ability to quantify relationships into mathematical models, and implement the models into the computer to find solutions, is essential for engineering analysis and design. This course provides the student with tools for modeling biological and physical
systems. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify a process/system and represent that process/system mathematically; solve the mathematically-represented system using computer-based modeling tools, such as Excel and MATLAB; describe the emphasis areas offered in the Biological Engineering major; and be able to develop a systems model related to each area. The course includes engineering economics, matrix operations, curve fitting, numerical integration and differentiation, linear and non-linear systems of equations, and applications of these methods to biological and agricultural systems.
CHANGE Prerequisites: MATH 251
PROPOSED START: SP2019

OLD
46-03-025 BE 304 (3)
Title: Engineering Properties of Food and Biological Materials
Abbreviated Title: Food Bio Matl Prop
Description: Composition, structure, and properties relationships. Measurement of mechanical thermal, chemical and biological properties, their variability, and use in engineering calculations. B E 304 Engineering Properties of Food and Biological Materials (3) Engineering
properties play a crucial role during the analysis, design, and synthesis phases of problem solving. The accurate knowledge of properties is essential to the precise determination of the overall system and component responses. Due to the time-dependent and environmentally-sensitive nature of properties of the agricultural, food, and biological materials, the theory and measurement systems are different from those used for conventional engineering materials and their systems. Therefore, the focus of this course is to provide the students with sound bases of the theory and measurement methods that are used to quantify physical, mechanical, thermal, biological, and chemical properties of products and their systems. In addition, the significance and importance of the inherent variation in the property values of agricultural, food, and biological materials is emphasized.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Engineering properties play a crucial role during the analysis, design, and synthesis phases of problem solving. The accurate knowledge of properties is essential to the precise determination of the overall system and component responses. Due to the timedependent and environmentally-sensitive nature of properties of the agricultural, food, and biological materials, the theory and measurement systems are different from those used for conventional engineering materials and their systems. Therefore, the focus of this course is to provide the students with sound bases of the theory and measurement methods that are used to quantify physical, mechanical, thermal, biological, and chemical properties of products and their systems. In addition, the significance and importance of the inherent variation in the property values of agricultural, food, and biological materials is emphasized.
CHANGE Prerequisites: ( EMCH 210; EMCH 213 ) , MATH 251
CHANGE Concurrent Courses: BE 301, ( CE 360; ME 320 )
Proposed Start: SP2019

OLD
46-03-026 CHE 210 (3)
Title: Introduction to Material Balances
Abbreviated Title: Mater Bal
Description: An integrated approach to the study of material balances and industrial chemical processes important in chemical engineering. CH E 210 Introduction to Material Balances (3) The objective of this course is to present an introduction to chemical engineering calculations,
establish mathematical methodologies for the computation of material balances and to present an overview of industrial chemical processes. It is the introductory course in the chemical engineering curriculum and is normally taken in the sophomore year. It is prerequisite for several junior-level courses in the curriculum, including courses in process fluid dynamics, heat transfer and phase equilibrium.The course reviews the fundamentals of chemistry and physics as they pertain to chemical problems and applies mathematics to the development of time-dependent equations to describe materials flow through a process. Examples of the processes studied include stoichiometry in combustion and other reactions, materials flow with recycle streams, humidification and drying process, and the analysis of non-steady systems. In addition, the course presents an introduction to Industrial Chemistry with an overview of steam reforming, ammonia synthesis and similar examples.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE Description: An integrated approach to the study of material balances and industrial chemical processes important in chemical engineering. CHE 210 Introduction to Material Balances (3) The objective of this course is to present an introduction to chemical engineering calculations, establish mathematical methodologies for the computation of material balances and to present an overview of industrial chemical processes. It is the introductory course in the chemical engineering curriculum and is normally taken in the sophomore year. It is prerequisite for several junior-level courses in the curriculum, including courses in process fluid dynamics, heat transfer and phase equilibrium.The course reviews the fundamentals of chemistry and physics as they pertain to chemical problems and applies mathematics to the development of time-dependent equations to describe materials flow through a process. Examples of the processes studied include stoichiometry in combustion and other reactions, materials flow with recycle streams, humidification and drying process, and the analysis of non-steady systems. In addition, the course presents an introduction to Industrial Chemistry with an overview of steam reforming, ammonia synthesis and similar examples.
CHANGE Prerequisites: MATH 251
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-027 CHE 210H (3)(H)
Title: Introduction to Material Balances (Honors)
Abbreviated Title: Mater Bal Honors
Description: An integrated approach to honor-level study of material balances and industrial chemical processes important in chemical engineering. CH E 210H CH E 210H Introduction to Materials Balances (Honors) (3) The objective of this course is to present an introduction to
chemical engineering calculations, establish mathematical methodologies for the computation of material balances and to present an overview of industrial chemical processes. The course reviews the fundamentals of chemistry and physics as they pertain to chemical problems and applies mathematics to the development of time-dependent equations to describe materials flow through a process. Examples of the processes studied include stoichiometry in combustion and other reactions, material flow with recycle streams, humidification and drying process, and the analysis of non-steady systems. The Honors version of the course places emphasis on the
use of computational methods in the solution of chemical engineering problems through the use of advanced mathematical packages.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE Description: An integrated approach to honor-level study of material balances and industrial chemical processes important in chemical engineering.  CHE 210H Introduction to Materials Balances (Honors) (3) The objective of this course is to present an introduction to chemical engineering calculations, establish mathematical methodologies for the computation of material balances and to present an overview of industrial chemical processes. The course reviews the fundamentals of chemistry and physics as they pertain to chemical problems and applies mathematics to the development of time-dependent equations to describe materials flow through a process. Examples of the processes studied include stoichiometry in combustion and other reactions, material flow with recycle streams, humidification and drying process, and the analysis of non-steady systems. The Honors version of the course places emphasis on the use of computational methods in the solution of chemical engineering problems through the use of advanced mathematical packages.
CHANGE Prerequisites: MATH 251
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-028 CHE 220 (3)
Title: Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
Abbreviated Title: Chem Eng Thermo
Description: Chemical process applications of energy balances, equations of state, thermodynamic properties of real fluids, second law of thermodynamics, cycles. CH E 220 Introduction to Chemical Engineering (3) This course is the introductory course in chemical
engineering thermodynamics. It is normally scheduled in the sophomore year and is continued by a second course which covers the thermodynamics of phase transformations and chemical reactions. The emphasis of this course is in the development of the theory of thermodynamics and its application to pure substances. The theory is applied on the thermodynamic analysis of small- and large-scale processes with multiple streams and energy exchanges, how to compute heat and work loads, and how to assess the efficiency of the process with respect to energy utilization. Starting from small units, such as pumps, compressors, turbines, and heat exchangers, examples grow to include large systems such as power plants and refrigeration cycles, that may involve many interconnecting units and recycle streams. A parallel focus of the course is in the computation of thermodynamic properties through the use of charts, tables, and equations of state with emphasis on non-ideal systems.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE Description: Chemical process applications of energy balances, equations of state, thermodynamic properties of real fluids, second law of thermodynamics, cycles. CHE 220 Introduction to Chemical Engineering (3) This course is the introductory course in chemical
engineering thermodynamics. It is normally scheduled in the sophomore year and is continued by a second course which covers the thermodynamics of phase transformations and chemical reactions. The emphasis of this course is in the development of the theory of thermodynamics and its application to pure substances. The theory is applied on the thermodynamic analysis of small- and large-scale processes with multiple streams and energy exchanges, how to compute heat and work loads, and how to assess the efficiency of the process with respect to energy utilization. Starting from small units, such as pumps, compressors, turbines, and heat exchangers, examples grow to include large systems such as power plants and refrigeration cycles, that may involve many interconnecting units and recycle streams. A parallel focus of the course is in the computation of thermodynamic properties through the use of charts, tables, and equations of state with emphasis on non-ideal systems.
CHANGE Prerequisites: MATH 231
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-029 CHE 220H (3)(H)
Title: Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (Honors)
Abbreviated Title: Ch E Thermo Honors
Description: Chemical process applications of energy balances, equations of state, thermodynamic properties of real fluids, second law of thermodynamics, cycles. CH E 220H CH E 220H Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (Honors) (3) CH E 220H is
the introductory course in chemical engineering thermodynamics. The emphasis of this course is in the development of the theory of thermodynamics and its application to pure substances. The theory is applied on the thermodynamics analysis of small- and largescale processes in closed and open systems. Students learn how to formulate the energy balance for a process with multiple streams and energy exchanges, how to compute heat and work loads, from small units, such as pumps, compressors, turbines, and heat exchangers, examples grow to larger systems such as power plants and refrigeration cycles, that may involve many interconnecting
units and recycle streams. The Honors version of the course places special emphasis on (a) the connection between thermodynamics and molecular properties and (b) on the use of computational methods for the calculation of thermodynamic properties under non-ideal
conditions.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE Abbreviated Title: ChE Thermo Honors
CHANGE Description: Chemical process applications of energy balances, equations of state, thermodynamic properties of real fluids, second law of thermodynamics, cycles. CHE 220H CHE 220H Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (Honors) (3) CHE 220H is
the introductory course in chemical engineering thermodynamics. The emphasis of this course is in the development of the theory of thermodynamics and its application to pure substances. The theory is applied on the thermodynamics analysis of small- and largescale processes in closed and open systems. Students learn how to formulate the energy balance for a process with multiple streams and energy exchanges, how to compute heat and work loads, from small units, such as pumps, compressors, turbines, and heat exchangers, examples grow to larger systems such as power plants and refrigeration cycles, that may involve many interconnecting
units and recycle streams. The Honors version of the course places special emphasis on (a) the connection between thermodynamics and molecular properties and (b) on the use of computational methods for the calculation of thermodynamic properties under non-ideal
conditions.
CHANGE Prerequisites: MATH 231
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-030 CHE 450 (3)
Title: Process Dynamics and Control
Abbreviated Title: Process Dynamics
Description: Analysis of time-dependent variables in chemical process plants; reactor design and control; computer applications. CH E 450 Process Dynamics and Control (3) The course is an introduction to chemical process dynamics and control and is offered as a technical elective. The first part of the course is devoted on the dynamical behavior of systems and the mathematical tools (differential equations, Laplace transforms) used in their analysis. The second part of the course covers the design and operation of various types of controllers, including proportional, integral and differential and their combinations. The theoretical principles are demonstrated with applications to chemical engineering processes such as storage tanks, chemical reactors and separation processes.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE Description: Analysis of time-dependent variables in chemical process plants; reactor design and control; computer applications. CHE 450 Process Dynamics and Control (3) The course is an introduction to chemical process dynamics and control and is offered as a technical elective. The first part of the course is devoted on the dynamical behavior of systems and the mathematical tools (differential equations, Laplace transforms) used in their analysis. The second part of the course covers the design and operation of various types of controllers, including proportional, integral and differential and their combinations. The theoretical principles are demonstrated with applications to chemical engineering processes such as storage tanks, chemical reactors and separation processes.
CHANGE Prerequisites: CHE 210 with minimum grade of “C” AND MATH 251
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-031 CHE 452 (3)
Title: Chemical Process Safety
Abbreviated Title: Chem Proc Safety
Description: This course provides an overview of Process Safety in the Chemical Industry, focusing on the nature of chemical plant addidents. CH E 452 Chemical Process Safety (3) The course will provide an overview of Process Safety in the Chemical Industry, focusing on the
nature of chemical plant accidents, their causes, and steps to eliminate them, with emphasis on inherently safe designs. Chemical Plant accidents deal most often with Flammability and Toxicity issues and these are dealt with in great detail. The role of Human Error in accidents is also examined Actual case studies (including Bhopal, BP Texas City, Piper Alpha) will be examined to show the relevance in today’s workplace. The course requires active student participation via discussions of system designs, their weakness and improvements. Guest lecturers will also be invited to supplement the material. This is offered as a senior elective in Chemical Engineering.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE Description: This course provides an overview of Process Safety in the Chemical Industry, focusing on the nature of chemical plant addidents. CHE 452 Chemical Process Safety (3) The course will provide an overview of Process Safety in the Chemical Industry, focusing on the nature of chemical plant accidents, their causes, and steps to eliminate them, with emphasis on inherently safe designs. Chemical Plant accidents deal most often with Flammability and Toxicity issues and these are dealt with in great detail. The role of Human Error in accidents is also examined Actual case studies (including Bhopal, BP Texas City, Piper Alpha) will be examined to show the relevance in today’s workplace. The course requires active student participation via discussions of system designs, their weakness and improvements. Guest lecturers will also be invited to supplement the material. This is offered as a senior elective in Chemical Engineering.
CHANGE Prerequisites: CHE 320
CHANGE Concurrent Courses: CHE 330, CHE 350

OLD
46-03-032 CMPSC 221 (3)
Title: Object Oriented Programming with Web-Based Applications
Abbreviated Title: Oop With Web
Description: This course will continue with object-oriented programming and will introduce graphics, virtual machines, programming language concepts and web-based programming using Java. CMPSC 221 CMPSC 221 Object Oriented Programming with Web-Based Applications (3) CMPSC 221 introduces graphics, virtual machines, programming language concepts and web-based programming using Java. Topics include object oriented design, event-handling methods, Web technologies, virtual machines, graphical user interfaces, API programming. This course uses Java as the object oriented computer language to complement the C++ computer
language from the previous programming course in preparing computer science and computer engineering majors to meet immediate demands in solving computational problems.CMPSC 221 is the third course in a 3-course uninterrupted programming sequence. This course extends the understanding of basic paradigms and concepts in computer science and computer engineering with a second course of object oriented design, classes and subclasses. Web technologies, client-server computing, common gateway interface (CGI) programs, client-side scripts, and Java applets are just a few of the concepts presented in the third course that stresses the principles of graphical user interfaces (GUI). The 3-course programming sequence reinforces fundamental, intermediate and advanced levels of sophistication in both C++ classes and Java classes with GUI in the third course of the uninterrupted programming sequence.CMPSC 221 develops web-based object oriented programming and design including the concepts of net-centric computing. CMPSC 221 includes the concepts of a virtual machine and intermediate code generation (Java-specific). The course covers the creation of a program employing (GUI) user interface features: text box, list box, radio buttons, and check boxes to name a few. Another program to be written is a server-side program which will translate a client request into a database query, execute it, and resultant data. Other topics cover issues of security, permissions and file management with regard to a client/server system.CMPSC
221 programming assignments in Java requires an understanding of the entire process of client/server development. A small-group semester project must be successfully completed within time-lines by following these steps: interface prototyping, program design, implementation of both client and server programs, unit testing, and documentation.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE Description: The course covers advanced object-oriented principles and their application to web-based, net-centric computing. Major topics include virtual machines, intermediate code generation (Java-specific), graphical user interfaces (GUI) design, event handling, server-side programming with database queries, and security, permissions and file management concepts for client/server systems. Extensive programming assignments provide an understanding of the entire process of client/server development including interface prototyping, program design, implementation of both client and server programs, unit testing, and documentation. This course prepares students to meet immediate demands in solving complex computational problems.
CHANGE Prerequisites: CMPSC 122 OR CMPSC 132
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Health and Human Development

PROGRAM CHANGES

46-03-033 Change. Revise program description. Remove Commercial and Community Recreation Management Option. Add Commercial Recreation and Tourism Management Option and Community Recreation Management Option. Increase the Requirements for the Major from 65-70 to 67-74 credits. Remove RPTM 101, 356 and 460 from Prescribed Courses for the Major. Add RPTM 220, 390 and 456 to Prescribed Courses for the Major. Remove Additional Courses for the Major. Add RPTM 100S, 295A, 360, 395B, 495B, 495C, and 495D to Prescribed Courses for the Professional Golf Management Option. Move HM 336, 466, TURF 100 and BLAW 243 from Prescribed Courses to Additional Courses in the Professional Golf Management Option. Remove HM 318, MGMT 100, RPTM 210, 360, and 415 from Prescribed Courses for the Professional Golf Management Option. Add ACCTG 211, HM 335, STAT 100 and STAT 200 to Additional Courses for the Professional Golf Management Option. Remove RPTM 470 and 480 from Prescribed Courses for the Outdoor Recreation Management Option. Add RPTM 101, 325, and 330 to Prescribed Courses for the Outdoor Recreation Management Option. Add CAS 283 and CMPSC 203 to Additional Courses for the Outdoor Recreation Management Option. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management

University Park, College of Health and Human Development (RPTM)

PROFESSOR PETER NEWMAN, Head of the Department

The program prepares students for supervisory and administrative positions with park systems, environmental centers, commercial recreation and tourism agencies, golf courses, hospitals and assisted living facilities, private voluntary agencies, schools and colleges, and other commercial, nonprofit, and public organizations that provide recreation and leisure services. The program combines a broad educational foundation with specific courses designed to accommodate career interests in recreation, park, and tourism management. The program helps students gain the theoretical, managerial, technical, and experiential skills they need to become the next generation of leaders in the field. Additionally, students obtain 300 hours of real-world experience through our internship program. Students work full-time for twelve weeks with professionals in a setting of your choice.

Four (4) options are offered: (1) Commercial Recreation and Tourism Management, (2) Community Recreation Management, (3) Professional Golf Management, (4) Outdoor Recreation Management.

Students who have completed 29.1 credits with a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average are eligible for entrance into the major. First-year students are admitted directly into the Golf Management option at the University Park campus only. In addition to the University’s academic requirements, each student admitted to the Golf Management option must have a playing proficiency represented by a minimum golf handicap of 12 or lower. This must be certified in writing by a PGA member or golf coach.

COMMERCIAL RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option focuses on management in the private/commercial, non-profit, and public sectors of recreation/leisure services. The private/commercial focus will be of interest to students seeking careers in a variety of commercial settings such as resorts; theme parks, convention centers; sports and fitness facilities, including arenas and stadiums; tourism promotion/planning agencies; and employee recreation departments within corporations. This focus will also appeal to students wishing to become entrepreneurs.

COMMUNITY RECREATION MANAGEMENT: For those interested in the community, public, or non-profit sectors, the Community Recreation Management Option prepares students for positions within municipal, state, and federal government agencies; recreation divisions of the armed services; YMCA agencies; United Way agencies; scouting organizations; university-affiliated units such as student unions, intramural and alumni services; and other non-profit organizations.

PROFESSIONAL GOLF MANAGEMENT OPTION: Accredited by the Professional Golfers’ Association of America, the Professional Golf Management Option prepares students for careers in the golf industry. Students will be prepared to assess leadership and management principles including customer service, interpersonal skills, business communication, conflict resolution, time management, negotiating, project management, marketing, and community relations. In addition to the core curriculum, the program has a strong business focus and is drawn from several nationally recognized academic disciplines on campus.

OUTDOOR RECREATION MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option prepare students for careers in Outdoor Experiential Leadership (OEL) and/or Park Management and Environmental Interpretation (PMEI). The OEL track emphasizes outdoor experiential leadership, including wilderness experiences and personal development. The PMEI track focuses on natural and cultural history environmental interpretation and education and the social science of conservation. The third track provides a flexible route for students to combine parts of the OEL and PMEI to create a meaningful personalized set of courses that could include study abroad experiences and prepare students for international contexts of recreation management. The outdoor recreation option is of interest to students seeking employment in a variety of recreation and park venues (local, state, and national from urban to wilderness) offering outdoor activities and personal development to the public.

For the B.S. degree in Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83.80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. RPTM requires students to complete 24 credits for the major through courses taken at University Park. Courses taken at other Penn State campuses may not be counted toward this 24 credit minimum. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for this major.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3-7 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 4-15 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 67-74 credits
(This includes 3-7 credits of General Education courses: 3-4 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 24 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (24 credits)[1]
RPTM 120 GS;US;IL(3), RPTM 220(3), RPTM 236(3) (Sem: 1-4)
RPTM 277 US(3), RPTM 390(3) (Sem: 5-8)
RPTM 410(3), RPTM 433 WAC(3) (Sem: 7-8)
RPTM 456(3) (Sem: 7-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 43-50 credits

COMMERCIAL RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT OPTION: (46-50 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (25 credits)[1]
RPTM 101(3), RPTM 210(3), RPTM 394(1), RPTM 300 IL;WAC(3), RPTM 415(3), RPTM 495A(12)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
Select 6-7 credits from CAS 283(3) or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) and RPTM 370(3)[1] or RPTM 435 (3)[1]

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15-18 credits)
Consult with an advisor to review course recommendations, Minors, and Certificate Programs. A minimum of 6 credits must be completed at the 400 level.

COMMUNITY RECREATION MANAGEMENT OPTION: (43-47 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (22 credits)[1]
RPTM 101(3), RPTM 201(3), RPTM 334(3), RPTM 394(1), RPTM 495A(12)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
Select 6-7 credits from CAS 283(3) or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) and RPTM 370(3)[1] or RPTM 435 (3)[1]

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15-18 credits)
Consult with an advisor to review course recommendations, Minors, and Certificate Programs. A minimum of 6 credits must be completed at the 400 level.

PROFESSIONAL GOLF MANAGEMENT OPTION: (44-45 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (19 credits)
RPTM 100S(2), RPTM 295A(3), RPTM 360(3), RPTM 395B(3), RPTM 495B(3), RPTM 495C(3), RPTM 495D(2) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (25-26 credits)
Select 6-7 credits from TURF 100(3) and ACCTG 211(4) or HM 335(3)
Select 18-19 credits from BLAW 243(3) and BA 303(3) and BA 304(3) and HM 336(3) and HM 466 US(3) and STAT 100 GQ(3) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-6)

OUTDOOR RECREATION MANAGEMENT OPTION: (49-50 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (28 credits)[1]
RPTM 101(3), RPTM 320(3), RPTM 325(3), RPTM 330(3), RPTM 394(1) (Sem: 3-4)
RPTM 435(3), RPTM 495A(12) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3-4 credits)
CAS 283(3) or CMPSC 203 GQ(4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 18 credits in an Outdoor Recreation pathway. Consult with an advisor to review course recommendations and pathways. At least 6 credits in RPTM must be completed at the 400 level (not including core or prescribed courses).

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


46-03-034 Change. Add KINES 100 and 101 to Additional Courses. Revise Supporting Courses and Related Area. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Kinesiology Minor

Penn State Berks, Benjamin Infantolino, bwi100@psu.edu
University Park, College of Health and Human Development (KINES)

Contact: Mark Dyreson, mxd52@psu.edu

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Students in the Athletic Training Major are not permitted to obtain a Kinesiology Minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18-19 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
Select 6-7 credits from KINES 100(3) or KINES 141 US;IL(3) and KINES 101(3) or KINES 180(3) and KINES 202(4) (Sem: 5-7)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from approved list, 6 credits must be at the 400-level: (Sem: 5-8) (see below)
KINES 100(3) or KINES 141 US;IL(3), KINES 101(3) OR KINES 180(3), KINES 202(4), KINES 321(3), KINES 341(3), KINES 345(3), KINES 350(3), KINES 360(3), KINES 384(3), KINES 410(3), KINES 411(3), KINES 420(3), KINES 421(3), KINES 422(3), KINES 423(3), KINES 424 US(3), KINES 425W(3), KINES 426(3), KINES 427(3), KINES 428(3), KINES 429(3), KINES 439W(3), KINES 440(3), KINES 441 US(3), KINES 442 IL(3), KINES 443 IL(3), KINES 444 US(3), KINES 446 IL(3), KINES 447W(3), KINES 450(3), KINES 452(3), KINES 453(3), KINES 454(3), KINES 455(3), KINES 456(4), KINES 457(3), KINES 460(3), KINES 463(3), KINES 465(3), KINES 467(3), KINES 481W(3), KINES 483(3), KINES 484(3), KINES 485(3), KINES 488(3), KINES 492W(3), KINES 493(3) (Exclude: EMT Courses – Kines 303, 304, 403, 404, 498A, 498B, 498C, 498D, 498E, 498F, Internship Courses – Kines 495A, 495B, 495C, and 495D and Kines 203, 296 and 496)

COURSE ADDS

46-03-035  HHD 100H (1)(H)
Title: Honors Seminar on Longevity, Health, and Human Development
Abbreviated Title: Hon Sem Longevity
Description: This course aims to provide students with an overview of the impact the growth in human longevity is having on society, viewed through the lens of current research in the fields of health and human development. Students will explore the recent research on growth in the
human lifespan and how this is having impacts on individuals, families, employers, governments, and communities. Through readings and discussions with faculty working on research related to aging and longevity, students can see how these issues connect with
physical activity, nutrition, communication, health behaviors, health policy, cognition and the effects longer life is having on restaurants, hotels, parks, tourism, health care facilities, schools, and other service industry employers.
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-036 NUTR 453 (3)
Title: Diet in Disease
Abbreviated Title: Diet in Disease
Description: Nutrient and energy controlled diet programs. Implications for nutrition counseling and education.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE Title: Medical Nutrition Therapy
CHANGE Abbreviated Title: Med Nutr Ther
CHANGE Description: This Medical Nutrition Therapy course provides students with a strong understanding of how to best prescribe diets for patients, depending on the specific disease profile of the individual. This understanding comes from integrating knowledge of disease
pathophysiology with nutrient roles and requirements. This knowledge of disease process informs dietary recommendations. In each case, students use the Nutrition Care Process to assess individual patient needs to determine best practice. Strong assessment skills
will allow students to prioritize treatment for best outcomes at an individual level. This course covers prescribed medical nutrition therapy for major disease states encountered in clinical practice. Background pathophysiology lays the foundation for interpreting research and prescribing best practice diets for diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, renal failure, and liver disease among others. Additionally, planning and usage of enteral and parenteral nutrition is covered. In each unit, students use their understanding of disease states to provide nutrition recommendations in case study examples. Prescriptive diets must reflect physiological states as well as individual patient preferences.
CHANGE Concurrent Courses: NUTR 452
Proposed Start SP2019

COURSE DROPS

46-03-037 Designation: KINES 141 (3)(US)(IL)
Title: The Socio-Cultural Dynamics of Kinesiology
Abbreviated Title: Soc Cultur Kines
Description: Evolution of cultural values in physical activity from antiquity to the present. KINES 141 The Socio-Cultural Dynamics of Kinesiology (3) (US;IL) Physical activity involves the bodily processes that scientists explore, from chemical reactions to electrical impulses to muscular accelerations. Human bodies, however, do not just move in vacuums, they move in cultural and social environments as well as in laboratories and on force plates. The Introduction to the Socio-Cultural Dynamics of Kinesiology provides students with opportunities to explore the connections between sport, exercise, physical education, and fitness practices and the broader cultural, political, intellectual and economic patterns that have shaped human cultures from their origins to their contemporary manifestations. The class situates these themes within the context of kinesiology, the study of human movement and activity. The course begins with
an introduction to the contemporary realities and historical development of kinesiology. The class offers a wide variety of perspectives, historical, philosophical, sociological, anthropological, and political, on the development and significance of physical activity in human cultures.This course concentrates on three basic areas of physical activity. The course explores the history of sports, exercise, and fitness, the history of physical education systems, and the history of ideas and beliefs about physical activity and human nature. The class offers a special emphasis through the readings and lectures on the social construction of cultural, national, racial, gender, and class identities as well as other manifestations of human diversity in both the United States and around the globe.This course introduces students to the fundamental ideas about how and why the human environments we inhabit shape our understandings of our movements, a subject that has long fascinated curious minds. Physical activities such as sport, play, and exercise–seem to be universal phenomena, occurring across the time-span of human history and in every known culture. In every human time and place, people have invented contests of physical of prowess, engaged in physical education, and developed ideas and beliefs about the
relation of the body to human nature. While curiosity about the processes, qualities, and meanings of physical activity may be universal, human movements and our ideas about those movements do not occur in timeless, placeless, ahistorical environments. Human movements and our ideas about them always occur in particular places, at particular times, and in particular
cultures. They might share a few universal characteristics but physical activities cannot be divorced from their social and cultural locations. This course surveys the connecting points between physical activities and socio-cultural dynamics.
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Information Sciences and Tech

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-038 Designation: CYBER 100 (3) (FYS)
Title: Computer Systems Literacy
Abbreviated Title: COMPSYS LIT
Description: This is an introductory university-level course in computer systems literacy. The history, architecture and operation of computing systems and underlying computing theory are covered. The intent of this course is to ensure that students with diverse backgrounds
can gain the information technology fundamental skills and understanding to succeed with subsequent in-depth courses in the Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations curriculum. At the same time the general nature of the introduction may make it useful for other programs that involve education in concepts and skills relating to information and computing systems.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 100S
Proposed Start FA2018

OLD
46-03-039 Designation: CYBER 342 (3)(WF)
Title: Cyber Incident Handling and Response
Abbreviated Title: CYBER INCID RESPON
Description: Cyber Incident Handling and Response is an intermediate course appropriate for students who are majoring in Cybersecurity. This course provides the student with the background, experience and perspective that is required to document organizational preparation for cyber incidents, document cyber incident impact and resolution, document response strategies, as well as integrate business continuity planning into the organization. This is a writing intensive course, which requires each student to individually document cyber
security incidents and communicate the impact of those incidents to the organization. Peer writing evaluation will help students to consider how effective their written communication skills are. Team writing assignments will provide students will the real-world experience of writing portions of organizational documents such as preparedness documentation, documenting the organization of computer incident response teams, documenting organizational disaster recovery plans, and documenting post-incident recovery plans.
Students will receive peer feedback on their writing assignments, as well as direct feedback from the instructor with a goal of improving writing skills and conforming their writing styles to the expectations of organizations and industry.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 342W
Proposed Start FA2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Liberal Arts

46-03-040 Add. New B.S. in Anthropological Science.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer 2018

Anthropological Science

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts

PROFESSOR TIMOTHY RYAN, Head

The Bachelor of Science degree in Anthropological Science provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in anthropological theory, research methods, quantification, and laboratory science. It prepares students with the skills and competencies needed to pursue graduate study or careers in professions associated with archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, ecological anthropology and related fields. Students contemplating futures in anthropological research, biomedical, forensic, or archaeological sciences should consider this degree.

Archaeological Science Option: The Archaeological Science option provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in the theory, methods and application of archaeological science. The focus is on advanced research methods, quantification, field methods, and laboratory science. It prepares students with the skills and competencies needed to pursue graduate study in archaeology as well as careers in cultural resource management. Supporting coursework in related disciplines is intended to provide depth and breadth of knowledge from the perspective of related fields.

Biological Anthropology Option: The Biological Anthropology option provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in the theory and methods of biological anthropology. The focus is on the theoretical underpinnings of biological anthropology together with advanced research methods, quantification, and laboratory methods current within the field. This option prepares students with the skills and competencies needed to pursue graduate study, training in the medical professions, as well as careers in professions associated with biological anthropology and related fields. Supporting coursework in related disciplines is intended to provide broader understanding of biological, ecological, and evolutionary theory.

Human Ecology Option: The Human Ecology option focuses on the theory and methods of human behavioral ecology and cultural anthropology. Students are introduced to the theories and methods current in the field of human ecology, focusing on understanding the human condition from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives. Students will gain competency in human cultural and behavioral variation. This option prepares students for graduate study or a diversity of careers in fields related to anthropology. Supporting coursework in related disciplines is intended to supplement and broaden perspectives on the study of the human condition.

Integrated Anthropological Science Option: The Integrated Anthropological Science option provides students with an opportunity to bridge the three main subdiscplinary areas within Anthropology. This option allows students to focus on the ways in which an integrated theoretical and methodological approach to anthropology can provide powerful insights into the human condition. Coursework cuts across all three areas and allows students to make links between the subdiscplines. This option prepares students for graduate study or careers in any field related to Anthropology.

For the B.S. in Anthropological Science, a minimum of 120 credits are required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing Given Like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(13 of these 45 credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 27 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 61 credits[1]

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 28 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
ANTH 2 GS(3), ANTH 21 GN(3), ANTH 45 GS;USL;IL(3), STAT 200 GQ(4)

ADDTIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Area/Survey courses: Select 6 credits of ANTH courses at the 200 level or below (excluding ANTH 1 GS;US;IL(3), ANTH 83S, and courses in the following ranges: 190-199, 290-299, other than 297) (Sem: 1-5)

Methods courses: Select 9 credits of Methods courses from: ANTH 321W, ANTH 380, ANTH 410, ANTH 411, ANTH 421, ANTH 425, ANTH 426W, ANTH 427W, ANTH 428, ANTH 429, ANTH 431, ANTH 432, ANTH 458, ANTH 492, ANTH 493. Students in Archaeological Science option are required to take ANTH 492/493 Field School. (Sem: 3-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 33 credits

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE OPTION: (33 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 12 archaeology credits from the range ANTH 420-439
Select 3 biological anthropology credits from ANTH 400-419, ANTH 460-473
Select 3 human ecology/cultural anthropology credits from ANTH 440-459, ANTH 474-479

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 15 credits of supporting courses from the list of approved courses in consultation with an adviser. See department for current list for the Archaeological Science Option.

BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY OPTION: (33 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 12 biological anthropology credits from ANTH 400-419, ANTH 460-473
Select 3 archaeology credits from the range ANTH 420-439
Select 3 human ecology/cultural anthropology credits from ANTH 440-459, ANTH 474-479

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 15 credits of supporting courses from the list of approved courses in consultation with an adviser. See department for current list for the Biological Anthropology Option.

HUMAN ECOLOGY OPTION: (33 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 12 human ecology/cultural anthropology credits from ANTH 440-459, ANTH 474-479
Select 3 archaeology credits from the range ANTH 420-439
Select 3 biological anthropology credits from ANTH 400-419, ANTH 460-473

SUPPORTING COURSES AND REALTED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 15 credits of supporting courses from the list of approved courses in consultation with an adviser. See department for current list for the Human Ecology Option.

INTEGRATED ANTHROPOLOGICAL SCIENCE OPTION (33 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 6 archaeology credits from the range ANTH 420-439
Select 6 biological anthropology credits from ANTH 400-419, ANTH 460-473
Select 6 human ecology/cultural anthropology credits from ANTH 440-459, ANTH 474-479

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 15 credits of supporting courses from the list of approved courses in consultation with an adviser. See department for current list of courses. Students in the Integrated Anthropological Science option must take at least 3 unique credits from each of the three subject area lists (Archaeological Science, Biological Anthropology, Human Ecology).

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


46-03-041 Change. Decrease the Major Requirements from 123 to 120. Decrease the Requirements for the Major from 36 to 33 credits. Move FR 331, 332, 351, 352 from Prescribed Courses for the Major to Additional Courses for the Major. Move FR 316, 417, 418, and 419 from Prescribed Courses for the Langauge and Culture Option to the Additional Courses for the Language and Culture Option. Add FR 442, 426Y, 436Y, 445Y, 452Y, 453Y, 458, 460, 470, 471, 487, 489, and 497 to Additional Courses for the Language and Literature Option. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

French and Francophone Studies

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (FR BA)

PROFESSOR BENEDICTE MONICAT, Head

The B.A. major in French and Francophone Studies encourages students to develop fluency in the language as well as an appreciation of francophone literature and culture. The major can also help to prepare students for interdisciplinary professional careers in which a knowledge of a foreign language is useful. At present, the B.A. major in French and Francophone Studies is available as a Language and Culture option, a Language and Linguistics option, or as a Language and Literature option.

For the B.A. degree in French, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 18 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 33 credits[1]

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 15 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
FR 201 IL(3), FR 202 IL(3)

ADDTIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from: FR 331 IL(3), FR 332(3), FR 351 IL(3), FR 352 IL(3) (Sem: 1-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 18 credits

LANGUAGE AND CULTURE OPTION: (18 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
FR 402 IL(3), FR 430 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 3 credits from: FR 316(3) or FR 417 IL(3) or FR 418 IL(3) or FR 419 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits in French literature or culture at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE OPTION: (18 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 3 credits in French linguistics from: FR 316(3) or FR 417 IL(3) or FR 418 IL(3) or FR 419 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits in French literature at the 400 level from: FR 442(3) or FR 426Y(3) or FR 436Y(3) or FR 445Y(3) or FR 452Y(3) or FR 453Y(3) or FR 458 IL(3) or FR 460 IL(3) or FR 470 IL(3) or FR 471(3) or FR 487 IL(3) or FR 489(3) or FR 497(3) (Sem: 5-8)

LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS OPTION: (18 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
FR 316(3), FR 402 IL(3), FR 417(3), FR 418(3), FR 419(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from: LING 402(3) or LING 404(3) or LING 449(3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


46-03-042 Change. Decrease Requirements for the Major from 57-74 to 51-68 credits. Move FR 331, 332, 351, and 352 from Prescribed Courses to Additional Courses for the Major. Add FR 419 to Additional Courses for the Major. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

French and Francophone Studies

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (FR BS)

PROFESSOR BENEDICTE MONICAT, Head

The B.S. degree is designed to allow students to combine fluency in French with other academic disciplines. The Business option develops basic skills in French (speaking, understanding, reading, writing) and acquaints students with a number of fields essential to business, especially in the international area. The Engineering option has a required overseas study or work component. The Applied French option develops basic skills in French (speaking, understanding, reading, writing) as well as a basic knowledge of French literature and culture. At the same time, it provides a concentration in a professional area in which a command of French can be particularly relevant or useful. Courses in French culture and civilization are essential to all B.S. options, and students are encouraged to participate in the University’s International Studies programs in France.

For the B.S. degree in French and Francophone Studies (all options) a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-13 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 7-24 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 51-68 credits[1]
(This includes 0-13 credits of General Education courses. For the French-Business Option, 0-4 credits of GQ courses; 6-9 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 24 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
FR 201 IL(3), FR 202 IL(3), FR 401 IL(3), FR 402 IL(3) (Sem: 3-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 3 credits from: FR 316(3) or FR 417 IL(3) or FR 418 IL(3) or FR 419(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits from: FR 331 IL(3) or FR 332 IL(3) or FR 351 IL(3) or FR 352 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 27-44 credits

FRENCH-BUSINESS OPTION: (44 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (31 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), BA 301(3), BA 303(3), BA 304(3), ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), FR 409 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
FR 430 IL(3), IB 303 IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
Select 4 credits from: SCM 200 GQ(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from: ECON 333 GS(3) or MKTG 445 IL(3), or MGMT 461 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from: MKTG 220(3) or IB 403(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits in French at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

FRENCH-ENGINEERING OPTION: (30 credits)
(Open only to students enrolled in an engineering major.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
FR 409 IL(3), FR 430 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)
Select 21 credits of engineering courses, including ENGR 295(1-3) and ENGR 395(1-3), in consultation with the engineering adviser (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits in French at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

Note:All French-Engineering majors are required to participate in a one-semester engineering internship in France, arranged by the College of Engineering, during which up to 9 credits in French and up to 12 credits in engineering may be earned. The work experience may take the form of a professional internship (ENGR 195I) or be part of a cooperative education sequence (ENGR 295I, ENGR 395I, or ENGR 495I).

APPLIED FRENCH OPTION: (27 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
FR 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)
Select 18 credits in related areas such as Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management; Linguistics; Sociology; Economics; Science, Technology and Society, or in another professional areas where competency in French is desirable. The courses are to be selected in consultation with an adviser. At least six credits of such courses must be at the 400 level. (Sem: 1-8)
Select 6 credits in French at the 400 level. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


46-03-043 Change. Remove INTST 400 from Prescribed Courses. Add GLIS 400 to Prescribed Courses. Changes indicated by underlining.

Global and International Studies

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (GSBA)

PROFESSOR Josepth G. Wright, in charge
PROFESSOR Jonathan Abel, in charge

The interdisciplinary B.A. degree in Global and International Studies is intended to prepare students for lives and careers in a world that is increasingly interdependent. It reflects a “One World” concept that emphasizes the importance of global perspectives, international communication, and study or working experience abroad. The major combines the expertise of multiple disciplines, including the Social Sciences and the Humanities, to suggest a variety of methods for understanding the dynamic issues facing human beings across the globe. The structure of the major also recognizes the fact that the vast majority of the world’s people live in regions other than the European and North American spheres, and that a knowledge of non-Anglophone cultures is an important form of preparation for global citizenship.

The major develops transnational and trans-regional literacy, drawing on coursework both in the Humanities and the Social Sciences to focus on questions of globalization, ethical imagination, and ways to engage peoples and cultures in local terms. Students learn to situate global trends, both macro and micro in nature, in relation to other historical processes. Most courses for the GLIS major will demonstrate a global or regional (rather than national) perspective and address a central topic in one of five designated Pathways.

Human Rights
This Pathway examines the history, development, enforcement, and violations of concepts of the basic rights of mankind. Whether through questions of torture, freedom of conscience, trafficking of women and children, agreements about prisoners of war, human rights constantly need redefining and rethinking if they are to be broad enough to cover everyone on our planet and specific enough to have a real effect on human behavior.

Culture and Identity
Global economic, political, and cultural processes are bound up with complex questions of culture and identity at the individual, familial, and community levels. Examining how differences in language, ideology, religion, race, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation among others impact our sense of self and other, this Pathway considers: foundational expressions of social and cultural values; the formation and contestation of identity over time; the impacts of modernization on individual, family, and community identity; genetic manipulation and modification; and questions of colonization and colonialism on political and cultural structures.

Global Conflict
This Pathway examines war, peace, and security on a global and historical scale to reveal the contingent decisions, random accidents, and devious schemes which continue to be at the root of violence around the world. This Pathway studies conflicts great and small, from tribal warfare to national and international wars, revolutions, acts of terrorism, and so on. It also considers successful and unsuccessful efforts to halt conflict, and how and why approaches to and experiences with peace can affect conflict situations.

Wealth and Inequality
This Pathway considers global distribution of people, goods, and money, both in the contemporary world and in deep historical time, examining feudalism, trade, imperialism, nationalism, and the socioeconomic impacts of globalization. Some of the themes on which it focuses include: motivations for and experiences of such human movement as migration, exploration, travel, slavery, diaspora, asylum, and exile; demographic change; poverty, wealth, and economic inequality; and political, social, and cultural incentives for and restrictions on circulation (censorship, translation, free trade, prize culture, protectionism, access, privilege, bias).

Health and Environment
This Pathway considers the direct impact of global issues on the life on our planet. As intercontinental travel makes nearly every epidemic already global today, the more and more the health of individuals is directly connected to the health of the globe. Growing populations, aging demographics, increasing pollution, and decreasing food resources present new challenges for global human health. Similarly the global cycles of climate change and crisis force us to reconsider both natural processes and anthropogenic influences, examining the philosophy and history of human’s place in nature. Some of the themes on which this Pathway focuses include: the relationship between local resources and global geopolitics; cultural, economic, and social effects of global climate change; pollution and conservation; environmental movements; and evolution and extinction.

Alternatively, students with a GPA above 3.5 may work with advisors and faculty to create a personalized Pathway that reflects their interests.

The B.A. degree requires six credits of foreign-language study beyond the 12-credit proficiency level, or in a second foreign language.The B.A. degree may include a significant engaged scholarship experience (such as undertaking an internship, job, volunteer position, or period of study) located either abroad or in a majority non-English-speaking part of the United States.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

For the B.A. degree in Global and International Studies, a minimum of 120 credits is required

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 15 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 36 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
GLIS 101 GS; IL(3), GLIS 102 GH; IL;WAC(3) (Sem: 1-4)
GLIS 400 IL;WAC(3) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select EITHER 6 cr. in a language beyond 12th-credit level proficiency, OR 6 cr. in a second foreign language, or equivalent proficiencies. Courses must be taught in the language, i.e., not in English (Sem: 1-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
Select 21 credits in the Pathway courses. Lists of the Pathway courses are kept by departmental advisors, and appear online on the program’s website, glis.la.psu.edu

-15 credits of these 21 will be in a single Pathway concentration (no more than 6 credits towards the Pathway completion are to be from courses in a single department).
-6 credits of these 21 are from other Pathway concentrations.

At least 12 credits must be taken at the 400 level or higher.

With approval of the academic advisor and/or the directors of undergraduate studies for the GLIS major, students are encouraged to substitute up to 15 credits of their Pathway work with equivalent coursework in significant engaged scholarship experience (such as undertaking an internship, job, volunteer position, or period of study) located either abroad or in a majority non-English-speaking part of the United States.


46-03-044 Change. Remove INTST 400 from Prescribed Courses. Add GLIS 400 to Prescribed Courses. Changes indicated by underlining.

Global and International Studies

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (GSBS)

PROFESSOR Joseph G. Wright, in charge
PROFESSOR Jonathan Abel, in charge

The interdisciplinary B.S. degree in Global and International Studies is intended to prepare students for lives and careers in a world that is increasingly interdependent. It reflects a “One World” concept that emphasizes the importance of global perspectives, international communication, and study or working experience abroad. The major combines the expertise of multiple disciplines, including the Social Sciences and the Humanities, to suggest a variety of methods for understanding the dynamic issues facing human beings across the globe. The structure of the major also recognizes the fact that the vast majority of the world’s people live in regions other than the European and North American spheres, and that a knowledge of non-Anglophone cultures is an important form of preparation for global citizenship.

The major develops transnational and trans-regional literacy, drawing on coursework both in the Humanities and the Social Sciences to focus on questions of globalization, ethical imagination, and ways to engage peoples and cultures in local terms. Students learn to situate global trends, both macro and micro in nature, in relation to other historical processes. Most courses for the GLIS major will demonstrate a global or regional (rather than national) perspective and address a central topic in one of five designated Pathways.

Human Rights
This Pathway examines the history, development, enforcement, and violations of concepts of the basic rights of mankind. Whether through questions of torture, freedom of conscience, trafficking of women and children, agreements about prisoners of war, human rights constantly need redefining and rethinking if they are to be broad enough to cover everyone on our planet and specific enough to have a real effect on human behavior.

Culture and Identity
Global economic, political, and cultural processes are bound up with complex questions of culture and identity at the individual, familial, and community levels. Examining how differences in language, ideology, religion, race, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation among others impact our sense of self and other, this Pathway considers: foundational expressions of social and cultural values; the formation and contestation of identity over time; the impacts of modernization on individual, family, and community identity; genetic manipulation and modification; and questions of colonization and colonialism on political and cultural structures.

Global Conflict
This Pathway examines war, peace, and security on a global and historical scale to reveal the contingent decisions, random accidents, and devious schemes which continue to be at the root of violence around the world. This Pathway studies conflicts great and small, from tribal warfare to national and international wars, revolutions, acts of terrorism, and so on. It also considers successful and unsuccessful efforts to halt conflict, and how and why approaches to and experiences with peace can affect conflict situations.

Wealth and Inequality
This Pathway considers global distribution of people, goods, and money, both in the contemporary world and in deep historical time, examining feudalism, trade, imperialism, nationalism, and the socioeconomic impacts of globalization. Some of the themes on which it focuses include: motivations for and experiences of such human movement as migration, exploration, travel, slavery, diaspora, asylum, and exile; demographic change; poverty, wealth, and economic inequality; and political, social, and cultural incentives for and restrictions on circulation (censorship, translation, free trade, prize culture, protectionism, access, privilege, bias).

Health and Environment
This Pathway considers the direct impact of global issues on the life on our planet. As intercontinental travel makes nearly every epidemic already global today, the more and more the health of individuals is directly connected to the health of the globe. Growing populations, aging demographics, increasing pollution, and decreasing food resources present new challenges for global human health. Similarly the global cycles of climate change and crisis force us to reconsider both natural processes and anthropogenic influences, examining the philosophy and history of human’s place in nature. Some of the themes on which this Pathway focuses include: the relationship between local resources and global geopolitics; cultural, economic, and social effects of global climate change; pollution and conservation; environmental movements; and evolution and extinction.

Alternatively, students with a GPA above 3.5 may work with advisors and faculty to create a personalized Pathway that reflects their interests.

The B.S. degree requires six credits in quantitative competencies appropriate to the social sciences. The B.S. degree may include a significant engaged scholarship experience (such as undertaking an internship, job, volunteer position, or period of study) located either abroad or in a majority non-English-speaking part of the United States.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

For the B.S. degree in Global and International Studies, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3-6 GQ credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 21-24 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 57-58 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
GLIS 101 GS;IL(3), GLIS 102 GH;IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 21 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-8)
GLIS 400 IL(3) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3-4 credits)
Choose 3-4 credits from one of the following: STAT 100 GQ(3) , STAT 200 GQ(4), STAT 220(3), SOC 207(3), or PSYCH 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (42 credits)
Select 21 credits in the Pathway courses. Lists of the Pathway courses are kept by departmental advisors, and appear online on the program’s website, glis.la.psu.edu.

-15 credits of these 21 will be in a single Pathway concentration (no more than 6 credits towards the Pathway completion are to be from courses in a single department).
-6 credits of these 21 are from other Pathway concentrations.

At least 12 credits must be taken at the 400 level or higher. These credits do not have to be within a single Pathway.

Select 21 credits in related areas such as engineering, business, science, the humanities, or the social sciences, or in another area where competency in Global and International Studies is desirable. The courses are to be selected in consultation with an advisor. At least six credits of such courses must be at the 400-level.

With approval of the academic advisor and/or the directors of undergraduate studies for the GLIS major, students with equivalent coursework in significant engaged scholarship experience (such as undertaking an internship, job, volunteer position, or period of study) located either abroad or in a majority non-English-speaking part of the United States, may use up to 15 of those credits to substitute for credits in the Pathways.

COURSE ADDS

46-03-045 AFAM 105N (3)(GH)(GS)(IL)(BA)
Title: Afro-Latin America: Race and Revolution
Abbreviated Title: Afro-Latin America
Description: Too often the history of race in the Americas is overly defined by concepts of racial identity and race relations in the United States. When examined quantitatively, fewer than five percent of the approximately 10 million slaves who survived the Middle Passage arrived in
what we know as the United States of America. This course will examine the impact of slavery throughout the Americas, from the establishment of the plantation in Brazil through the impact of Black migration throughout the Americas today. Through lecture and discussion, we will identify patterns of racial identity and participation in the formation of the Latin American nation state that will give us a more nuanced understanding of both race and nation in the Americas. We will examine the development of the modern plantation from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century as well as the role of urban slavery in this era throughout Latin America. We will study the various paths to abolition with a particular focus on the Haitian Revolution and the common practice of military service among slave populations during the early nineteenth century struggles for Latin American independence. Additionally, we will look at the comparative abolition of slavery in the United States and Latin America, the role of slaves and free blacks in Central America, as well the role of race in the tensions between Haitians and Dominicans on the island of Hispaniola. The second half of the course will move to an
examination of contemporary black politics, patterns of anti-black racism and state violence, and the emergence of new social movements for racial, gender, and economic justice in the Americas. This course meets the criteria for General Education designation in the B.A. fields of Humanities (GH), Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS), and International Cultures (IL).
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-046 AFAM 114N (3)(GH)(GS)(US)(BA)
Title: Race, Gender and Sport
Abbreviated Title: Race Gender Sport
Description: In 1969, sociologist Harry Edwards declared that a surge of protest among African American athletes marked “the newest phase of the black liberation movement in America.” Today, athletes such as Richard Sherman, Serena Williams, and Michael Sam remind us that
the relationship between race, gender, and sport remains complicated, and that athletes continue to offer meaningful contributions to a variety of struggles for liberation. This course addresses the race, gender and sport relationship from two complementary angles. First,
we will examine the ways that sport gives meaning to racial and gender identity. As concepts that shift over time, race and gender derive their influence from prevailing forms of scientific reason, social attitudes, and cultural mythologies. From Jack Johnson to Serena Williams, sport has found and intervened itself in each of these contexts, particularly as society and culture produce marginal or subordinate identities. We will consider, for example, how and why sport posits the differences between men and women according to assumptions about physical strength, and how and why sport reinforces dubious assumptions regarding the physical superiority and cognitive inferiority of black athletes. Second, we will examine the ways that sport works as a setting in which political struggles around race and gender are imagined and expressed. From the 1968 stand by black track and field Olympians, to Billie Jean King’s 1973
famous “Battle of the Sexes,” to tennis player Venus Williams’ achievement of gender pay equity in 2007, to sports figures protesting on behalf of the Movement for Black Lives in 2016, athletes have long placed their social identities at the center of political speech. Finally, we will consider the historical trajectory of a narrative about the “activist athlete,” which once held that athletes had abdicated political obligations in pursuit of wealth, but which now seems to herald athletes’ return to the nation’s political scene in examples like LeBron James and Colin Kaepernick. This course will address sport’s potential to rethink, resist, or challenge race and gender relations
and other social hierarchies.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-047 ANTH 240N (3)(GN)(GS)
Title: Livelihoods and Ecosystems: Anthropological Approaches to Human-Environment Interaction
Abbreviated Title: Livelihoods & Eco
Description: This course provides an anthropological understanding of the relationship between human subsistence and environment. The impacts of environmental change on human societies, and the roles those societies play in ecological modification, have deep roots in human evolution. This class focuses on providing students with tools to understand the foundations and cross-cultural expressions of resource use, environmental transformation, and their ecological interactions. The class has three goals: 1) introduce students to ways of
thinking about ecological and social factors that shape variability in how humans define, use, and consume resources, 2) provide students the opportunity to explore archaeological, ethnographic, and ecological evidence of the interaction between human livelihoods
and habitats across the entirety of the human experience, 3) utilize those concepts and evidence to investigate variability in contemporary livelihoods, socio-ecological systems, and the dilemmas we all face in natural resource use and sustainability. Regarding the first goal, students are introduced to the natural science of conservation biology and community ecology, along with influential concepts in the social science of decision-making and cultural institutions of resource management. We review key models of ecosystem dynamics and social interaction from evolutionary ecology, disturbance ecology, niche construction, common property
theory, and political ecology to approach questions about consumption, complex socio-ecological systems, and the role of humans in food webs and trophic interactions. The course then investigates archaeological and paleo-ecological evidence concerning the evolution
of human subsistence systems, global settlement, intensification, and their implications for understanding environmental change over the last two million years. We take the broadest possible anthropological approach: we explore the diversity of ways that humans have
made a living in the past, and investigate a wide variety of contemporary systems of resource use. We begin with the emergence of subsistence regimes among the earliest members of our genus and variability in environmental conditions through the Pleistocene. We
then discuss the spread of modern humans and arguments concerning the ecological impact of people in the “New Worlds” as humans first colonized Australia, the Americas, and islands of Pacific and Indian Oceans. Finally, students investigate contemporary Indigenous
systems of resource use and food production, exploring interactions between people and culturally constructed environments, commensal relationships between humans and non-human plants and animals, processes of intensification, and ecosystem function.
The course incorporates these concepts with studies of inequality into new ways of understanding global issues of conservation, economics, and policy impinging on environmental change.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-048 ANTH 375N (3)(GN)(GS)(H)
Title: Anthropology of Food Honors
Abbreviated Title: Anthro Food Honors
Description: This course is an anthropological approach to understanding temporal and spatial variation in human food consumption and nutrition: why do we eat what we eat? To answer this question, we approach it from multiple perspectives: biological, evolutionary, ecological and
social. In this course, students will investigate how food tastes, preferences, and diets of different individuals and societies both in the past and present are affected by genetic variation, by processes of individual and cultural learning, by evolutionary and ecological forces
and histories of ecological and social interaction, by existing social contexts and structures, and by global political and economic forces. Topics include a broad survey of human and nonhuman primate diets and their physiological and behavioral correlates; theories of optimal diet breadth and prey choice; fossil and archaeological evidence for early human diets; genetic adaptations to diet; metabolic syndrome; food security; food taboos; the origins and cross cultural uses of spices; ecological impacts of hunting, gathering, and agropastoralism especially relative to food webs, biodiversity and sustainability; cultural diversity in the social uses and meanings of
food and the sharing of food and how sociopolitical contexts have shaped the overexploitation of certain resources throughout history. Students will come away from this course with an understanding of the diversity of human foodways through time and space: how biology, culture, and ecology interact to shape the food we eat, and how the food we eat shapes us.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-049 ASIA 101N (3)(GH)(GS)(IL)(BA)
Title: Sports in Asia
Abbreviated Title: Sports in Asia
Description: The history and contemporary practice of athletics in Asia shows that sports are much more than just games. Taking a multidisciplinary approach to the study of sports in Asia, this course will examine what meanings have been attached to the participation in and planning of athletic events and institutions by Asian peoples and nations. The course will begin with a historical perspective, examining the place of traditional athletic practices, then tracing the introduction of Western-style athletics to various Asian countries in the 19th and 20th centuries and their incorporation into programs of national development. The second part of the course will focus on the international relations of sports mega-events like the Olympic Games and the FIFA World Cup. The third part will focus on the sociology of sports: what meanings do athletic activities and competitions hold in Asian societies, how does that shape people’s behavior, and how does it compare to Western societies? Finally, the course will include an anthropological component that seeks to understand Asian societies in new ways by focusing on specific athletic activities, such as Japanese baseball and the Beijing Olympics, and by tracing the changing meanings of Asian sports like judo and karate as they spread to other parts of the world. The aim of this course is not only to build understanding of distant places and disparate peoples, but also to gain new perspectives on our own society through the shared activity of sports.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-050 ASIA 105 (3)(GH)(IL)(BA)
Title: War and Memory in Asia: Twentieth Century and beyond
Abbreviated Title: War&Memory in Asia
Description: The history and memory of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Nanking massacre, the Cambodian genocide and other forms of mass violence are often taught separately in different disciplines within Asian Studies and beyond. This course will examine them together through the various ways different Asian societies dealt with, experienced and understood them. Using the extensive literature on the history of genocide, this course further suggests the mutual impact of these entangled tragic events. Specific content will vary according to individual instructor, but topics may include victim cultures, ethnic cleansing, trauma, human rights, dark tourism, memorials, and architecture, as well as the general impact of these tragedies on Asian and global politics.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-051 CAS 210 (3)(GH)
Title: Landmark Speeches on Democracy and Dissent
Abbreviated Title: Landmark Speeches
Description: Landmark Speeches on Democracy and Dissent offers a survey of key speeches, debates, and controversies making up the rich tradition of U.S. civic life. The course is designed to introduce students to the basic historical contexts within which these key events arise; engage them in close readings of speeches, tracts, and polemical writing; and develop skills in critical thinking and writing. Students will attend to a broad spectrum of voices, including those of historically under-represented peoples as well as canonical figures. Landmark Speeches on Democracy and Dissent thereby encourages students to develop a broad rhetorical literary in the diverse democratic voices that have long contributed to essential U.S. arguments about nationhood, protest, war, race, gender, religion, and more. The course presupposes that students will be able to apply this rhetorical literary to both participation within and critical
thinking about contemporary forms of democracy and dissent.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-051A CAS 304 (3)(GS)
Title: Quantitative Methods for Communication Research
Abbreviated Title: Quan Meth Comm Res
Description: The purpose of this course is to instruct students on concepts and issues of quantitative research methods in Communication. Students will learn how Communication researchers conduct and evaluate research from using a variety of quantitative methodologies.
By the end of the course, students will possess the knowledge necessary to understand and evaluate arguments utilizing research to persuade, as well as, to conduct sound research on their own. A primary goal of the course is to enable students to become a critical consumers and producers of information that defines the world around them. The course will educate on the proper terminology/concepts used in research methods. The end result of the course should be a fundamental understanding of how to critique and conduct research in the field of Communication.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-052 CAS 493 (1-3:6)
Title: Undergraduate Teaching Assistantship
Abbreviated Title: Teaching Assistant
Description: As a Teaching Assistant, you’ll activate your learning in a way that will reinforce and enrich your understanding of course material. In addition to this intellectual benefit, working as a Teaching Assistant is great professional experience that enhances other skill sets
including: organization, time management, planning and executing effective meetings, and, of course, effective communication. Finally, teaching assistantships are great ways to cultivate strong relationships with faculty and graduate students who may become mentors and personal and professional resources. Specific duties of undergraduate teaching assistants might include leading discussions, holding office hours, doing research or creating materials for the instructor, and performing tasks related to the course (e.g., taking attendance or keeping records). Grading of exams and assignments is not an appropriate task for undergraduate TAs.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-053 ENGL 478 (3)
Title: Grant-Writing
Abbreviated Title: Grant-Writing
Description: Grants can do many things. Let’s say you are a student who has always dreamed of combining help for food-insecure people with support for the mentally ill homeless. You’ve written papers about it for classes, you’ve read lots of research that points to past pitfalls
and future innovative possibilities–but now you want to make it real by finding funding for the program you’ve envisioned. Or maybe you have your sights set on finding an existing non-profit foundation that might serve as a fiscal conduit for grants that will feed the cause you feel passionately about. These scenarios and many others call for finding and winning a grant. Here’s what grants can’t do: Write themselves. Given that writers of grants do not have one how-to professional manual to rely on, professional grant-seekers must learn to have flexible responses to a variety of writing situations. Every grant proposal is different, as is every population with a problem to solve, and every organization hoping to help with the solution. A successful grant-writer achieves confidence with hands-on practice— confidence earned from mastering the underlying principles of effective research and outreach; feasible and complete contentgeneration; and the writing of precise, clear, audience-centered prose. English 478 will provide you with the basic knowledge and practice needed to get you on your way to confidence. Six Main Learning Goals: • Comprehensive understanding of the grant-writing field • Strategic use of research skills to match program to foundation, need to grant-maker • Beginning mastery of all elements of the basic proposal, including: mission match, objectives that fill a proven need, evaluation strategies that reliably measure outcome, a feasible budget, and proof of capacity and sustainability • Practice of skills most needed in the current economic and political climate, including collaboration, diversified funding, and innovation within an established organization • Practical use of social media and cultivation skills for sustainability of project • Mastery of applied rhetorical style emphasizing clarity and precision
Prerequisites: ENGL 15; OR ENGL 30; OR ( ENGL 137, ENGL 138, ) AND ( ENGL 202A; OR ENGL 202B; OR ENGL 202C; OR ENGL 202D )
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-054 IT 470 (3)
Title: Ghosts and Otherworldly Visions in Italy c. 1300-1600
Abbreviated Title: Ghost Storytelling
Description: This course explores ghost storytelling and visions of the afterlife in early Italian literature and culture. Motivations for telling ghost stories go far beyond entertaining or inducing fear in an audience. Ghost stories can engage some of the most profound human
inquiries – mortality, grief, commemoration, spirituality, ethics, human imagination, and the violations of proper societal behavior. This course will explore such issues in a range of readings (poetry, short stories, diaries, and dialogues), including works by Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Ficino, Machiavelli, and Ariosto. In addition to a foundational survey knowledge and contextualization of some of the greatest works of medieval/Renaissance Italian literature, successful students of this course will receive a deep understanding of the potentials of authorial power and the rhetorical strategies that storytellers use to convince or manipulate the beliefs and emotions of their readers through close study of the primary texts, active in-class discussions, practice in critical interpretation, and individual experiments in the creative composition of spirit narratives. This 3-credit course is taught in English, and no knowledge of Italian is expected.
Prerequisites: 5th Semester standing
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-055 OLEAD 210 (3)(GS)
Title: Evidence Based Leadership
Abbreviated Title: Evidnce Based Lead
Description: In evidenced based leadership students will learn how to use strong information and facts to increase the likelihood of success of leadership in organizations. In particular, this course starts by examining different kinds of evidence and analyzing their quality and usefulness. From there students will learn how to use that evidence to improve their leadership. Also covered will be convincing others to use strong evidence as well as implementing strategies based on that evidence to improve organizational effectiveness and
success.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-056 RLST 133N (3)(GN)(GH)
Title: Ethics of Climate Change
Abbreviated Title: Ethics Climate Chg
Description: Climate change is not only a political, economic, and social crisis, it presents one of the great moral problems of our time. This course will cover the science, policy, and ethics of climate change. It fulfills general science requirements by giving an overview of the role
played by such diverse scientific disciplines as chemistry, earth systems, ecology, and geology in understanding our changing climate while also exploring mitigation and adaptation strategies being developed in the fields of engineering, forestry, agriculture, and others. It
fulfills humanities requirements by delving into the ethical dimensions of climate change, including religious and humanistic theories of human flourishing, deontological and teleological theories of ethics, and analysis of specific choices addressed by international negotiators. A hallmark of this course is using Penn State as a “living laboratory” by taking advantage of both faculty expertise and the realworld activities of the Office of Physical Plant. Every week, students will interact with experts from various quarters of the University in order to see how climate change is being approached in a multi-disciplinary fashion. The first third of the course will feature guest lectures by EMS faculty working on paleoclimate, modeling, carbon sinks, ocean acidification and other aspects of climate science. The second portion will engage humanists, economists, historians, and artists at Penn State. The third will include tours of Penn State
facilities, such as the East Campus Power Plant, and interviews with researchers developing new energy and sequestration technologies. In addition to exams and papers, students will prepare for a mock negotiation by learning about the energy profile and history of assigned countries. They will then have to set specific CO2 and temperature goals and come up with solutions to achieve these. The goal is to understand the role placed by ethical ideals in the pragmatic process of producing an equitable solution. In short, this course will give students the tools to understand the basic science of climate change and its ethical implications. Students will
come away with a better sense of the moral dimensions of this phenomenon and the implications for human civilization and for the biosphere.
Cross-Listed Courses: PHIL 133(LA) METEO 133(EM)
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-057 CAS 137 (3)(H)
Title: Rhetoric and Civic Life I
Abbreviated Title: Rcl I
Description: Within a liberal arts framework and with attention to public discourse– speaking, writing, online communication, and visual presentation–this course instructs students in the arts, practices, and principles of rhetoric.
Approved Start: 201617FA
Cross-Listed Courses: ENGL 137

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER:  137H
ADD GEN ED DESIGNATION: GWS
CHANGE Description: Rhetoric and Civic Life (RCL) is a year-long honors course offering comprehensive training in oral, written, visual, and digital communication. It unites these various modes under the flexible art of rhetoric and uses rhetoric both to strengthen communication skills and to sharpen awareness of the challenges and advantages presented by oral, written, visual, and digital modes. This portion of the course, RCL 1/CAS 137 focuses particularly on two critical academic capacities: analyzing and contextualizing. In this semester,
students learn to rigorously examine the rhetoric surrounding them, compellingly present their findings in various modes, and thoughtfully contextualize their research. In this course, students will: -Develop a rich understanding of rhetorical concepts -Practice application of concepts and terms in expressing understanding of effectiveness of rhetoric through analysis and contextualization of existing texts -Enhance communication skills by practicing and applying in a variety of communication modes (written, oral, digital)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-058 CAS 138 (3-3:3)(H)
Title: Rhetoric and Civic Life II
Abbreviated Title: Rcl II
Description: This course builds rhetorical skills in oral, written, visual, and digital contexts and introduces deliberation and advocacy in civic and disciplinary spheres. CAS (ENGL) 138T Rhetoric and Civic Life II (3) (GWS)ENGL/CAS 138T, Rhetoric and Civic Life II, expands
knowledge and aptitudes built in ENGL/CAS 137H by asking students to use rhetorical skills and principles to develop strategies for persuasion and advocacy in the context of civic issues. The course continues the multimodal emphasis–the focus on oral, written, visual, and digital communication–used in 137H and adds new components as well. Students will develop a repertoire of communication skills through hands-on practice at composing and delivering speeches and essays, and they will work with digital media to create multimedia texts, podcasts, and websites. Students will reflect on these different modes as themselves rhetorical
choices. The course’s civic and ethical components take center stage as students learn how to deliberate important public issues thoughtfully and with civility and respect. They will learn the difference between persuasion and advocacy and develop strategies for both in the context of pertinent local, national, and global issues. They will participate in a public deliberation forum on topics they generate and vote on. The forum will be organized to allow small deliberative action groups as well as large forum-style meetings. The course focuses on ethics in many contexts, e.g., community action and public deliberation; ethics of persuasion; ethical controversies in the disciplines. Students will be encouraged to explore percolating disciplinary interests and to share knowledge in online disciplinary communities. Students will work throughout the semester to design and build a final electronic portfolio that represents
their academic work with an eye to their imagined professional futures. The portfolio assignment is designed to permit assessment of learning outcomes and encourage students to move toward qualifying for the College of the Liberal Arts Excellence in Communication
Certificate (http://laus.la.psu.edu/current-students/paterno-fellows-program/excellence-in-communication-certificate), a mechanism which helps students hone their communication abilities throughout their Penn State careers by creating and perfecting an online portfolio.
Approved Start: 201617FA
Cross-Listed Courses: ENGL 138

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 138T
ADD GENED DESIGNATION: GWS
CHANGE CREDITS: REMOVE REPEATABLE
CHANGE Cross-Listed Courses: ENGL 138T
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-059 CAS 202 (3)(BA)
Title: Introduction to Communication Theory
Abbreviated Title: Comm Thry
Description: Survey of human communication studies in relational, interpersonal, group, organization, intercultural, health, technology and communication systems.
Approved Start: 201718FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 303
ADD GENED DESIGNATION GS
CHANGE Title: Communication Theory
CHANGE Description: This course is intended as a foundational course in communication theory for Communication Arts and Sciences majors and others interested in social science theory in general. It is designed to show you how communication theory can be applied to understand and improve communication in your professional (and personal) life. The theories examined will span the range of communication contexts, including interpersonal, group, organizational, mediated, and cross-cultural interactions.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-060 LER 100 (3)(BA)
Title: Employment Relations
Abbreviated Title: Employment Relatns
Description: Introductory analysis of the employment relationship and of the interrelated interests of managements, workers, unions, and the public. LER 100 Employment Relations (3) (GS)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the employment relations process in the U.S. and to the institutions that participate in this process. This will be done by examining the areas: the evolution of labor-management relations in this country, including the history of workers’ attempts to organize unions, management’s response, and government’s role; the institutions that participate in the employment relations process–unions, management, and government; the process of employment relations, including organizing a union, negotiating a contract, and administering that contract; outcomes of collective bargaining, public sector/international employment relations, and current issues/trends in employment relations.Employment relations is a process studied from a multi-disciplinary perspective. This course will, therefore, draw on a number of social and behavioral science disciplines including economics, history, psychology, political science, and sociology.This course will also incorporate active and collaborative approaches to learning. Through recitation sections, students will have an opportunity to gain experience in taking responsibility for learning and in working with others in a team situation. Students will be evaluated on the basis of exams, group activities, written assignments, and class participation.This course is the introductory course in Labor Studies and Employment Relations (LER) curriculum. It will help prepare students for all subsequent courses in the LER B.A. and B.S. majors and serve as a prerequisite for some advanced LER courses. This course is required for the LER B.A. and B.S. majors and the LER minor. It also counts toward the fulfillment of the general education or Bachelor of Arts social/behavioral science requirement.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
ADD GENED DESIGNATION GS
CHANGE Title: Introduction to Labor and Human Resources
CHANGE DESCRIPTION : This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop an understanding of the role of work and the employment relationship in their lives from an individual, institutional and global perspective. The course begins with a series of lessons focusing on the meaning of work to each of us. Students will study motivation theories to help them understand the various needs that work can satisfy, from earning a paycheck to serving others. The course then moves to a description of the types of organizations that represent the
“employer”, from the “mom and pop” operation to the for-profit corporate environment. In this context students will be exposed to basic management concepts (e.g., authority; span-of-control) as well as the manner in which “bureaucracy” affects the nature of the workplace. Students will conclude this section with a study of the “employment contract”, particularly the manner in which the nature of at-will employment philosophies dominate U.S. labor markets. Part II of the course is a systematic study of several important issues associated with the human resource function and how it affects the individual workers. Students will study such topics of “recruitment and selection” not only from the perspective of the employer seeking to attract staff who will contribute to organizational efficiency and effectiveness, but also from the point of view of the applicants who seek to pursue positions consistent with their own personal needs and career aspirations. The HR function exists in every organization; however, in some situations students will work under a different set of rules. Part III will focus on the environment associated with labor unions and the various elements defining the relationships among employers, unions and employees. In addition to studying the history of the labor movement, students will develop an understanding of the collective bargaining process and its effect on their employment circumstances. Part IV addresses what has reemerged as a critical element in the relationship between workers and work: the globalization of the economy. Students will learn about the opportunities and threats globalization presents. They will also study the development of global labor standards.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-061 PLSC 1 (3)(BA)
Title: Introduction to American National Government
Abbreviated Title: Intr to Am Nat Gov
Description: Introduction to development and nature of American political culture, constitutional/structural arrangements, electoral/policy processes; sources of conflict and consensus. PL SC 001 Introduction to American National Government (3) (GS)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. This course takes a broad look at American national government and American politics. It begins with a discussion of founding principles and documents and concludes by looking at how government uses its power. Readings and
discussions cover the governing institutions-Congress, Executive, and Courts-and the institutions that link the American people to these-political parties, interest groups, and the media. Throughout, contemporary political events are placed in the context of theories,
concepts, and arguments presented in class. By the end of the course students should have an understanding of how American national government is organized; a sense of what political scientists do, the types of questions they ask and the methods they employ; and the ability to make more informed choices in the political arena.Class meets for two lectures and one discussion section each week. The recitation is led by a graduate teaching assistant and is used to review lecture material, do exercises based on the lectures and reading, and discuss current events and course materials. Grading is based upon multiple choice (or identifications) and
essay exams, short papers (some based on applying course concepts to New York Times articles), and participation in section. The course is a prerequisite for most upper level American Politics courses. It fulfills a lower level requirement for Political Science majors, and may be used by non-majors to fulfill General Education and Social/Behavioral requirements. It is generally taught every semester.
Approved Start: 201617SP

NEW
ADD GENED DESIGNATION GS
ADD US DESIGNATION US
CHANGE Title: American Politics: Principles, Processes and Powers
CHANGE Abbreviated Title: Amer. Politics
CHANGE Description: This course examines the American democracy by looking at the dynamic interaction between the founding ideals of the United States government, the institutions established by the Constitution, and the ongoing contest for power within and through those institutions. Students will learn how Congress, the Presidency and the Supreme Court shape law and public policy; how the electoral process influences the decisions of voters and political parties; and how the media, interest groups, political action committees, and public
opinion impact political outcomes. Through these topics the course takes up questions such as, Who has a voice in American politics and why are some political actors more influential than others? Do the electoral and policy making processes uphold democratic values? How responsive is the United States government to public wants? How does the media influence citizens’ political preferences and behavior? The course both provides a foundation for further study of politics and equips students with the capacity to act politically on their own behalf and in concert with their communities. Students are empowered to interpret and pursue their interests, rights, and opportunities within the US political system in relation to the values of democratic equality and liberty the system was organized to secure, and to influence the process through which policies that shape their lives in critical ways are made.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-062 WMNST 106 (3)(US)(IL)(BA)
Title: Representing Women and Gender in Literature, Art and Popular Cultures
Abbreviated Title: Wmn Gender and Arts
Description: Interdisciplinary consideration of primary works and scholarship pertaining to women in the humanities and the arts. WMNST 106 Representing Women and Gender in Literature, Art and Popular Cultures (3) (GH;US;IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts
degree requirements. This is an introductory survey course that fulfills general education requirements in humanities and international and intercultural competence. The course is also a prerequisite for upper level women’s studies courses. Women’s Studies 003 examines the experiences, achievements and status of women in the humanities and the arts. The course provides a broad interdisciplinary overview of scholarly researchand theory pertaining to women and gender. Students acquire an expandedframework forresponding to the humanities and integrating knowledge from other courses in the humanities and the arts.Topics studied may include the creation of patriarchy, international women’s movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, cross-cultural examinations of women’s religious roles, women’s spirituality and religious expression, and an overview of women in literature and in elite, popular and folk arts.
Other topics may include religious witch-hunts of the 16th and 17th centuries (as the expression of misogyny and ethnic bias), and developing an appreciation for aesthetic objects from various media and ethnic origins (such as Pueblo pottery, Amish quilts, Black sculpture, Hispanic painting, Appalachian music, Jewish poetry, Chinese American fiction).The course will focus primarily upon the United States with concerted diligence to include examples of work made by a wide diversity of aesthetically creative women differing by race, class, ethnicity, national origin and sexual orientation. Women’s Studies 003 is thereforeboth interdisciplinary (drawing information and readings from literature and languages; art history, popular and folk arts; religion and philosophy; history, psychology, sociology) and broadly inclusive (addressing at all times the relationships among gender and class, ethnicity, national origin and sexual
orientation).Depending on the location teaching the course, class meetings may be a mixture of lectures, group discussions, individual and group exercises, films, and guest speakers. Assigned readings and class meetings may be designed to help students reassess predominant modes of thought and to give students tools to appreciate the creative work of highly diverse women. Depending again upon location, evaluation methods will include a balanced selection from among short papers, longer research papers, journals, book reviews, quizzes, exams, group assignments and other creative activities.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER:  106N
ADD GENED DESIGNATION GA
ADD GENED DESIGNATION GH
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Interdisciplinary consideration of primary works and scholarship pertaining to women in the humanities and the arts. WMNST 106 Representing Women and Gender in Literature, Art and Popular Cultures (3) (GH;US;IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. This is an introductory survey course that fulfills General Education Integrative Studies requirements in humanities and arts, and also fulfills United States and International Cultures requirements. The course is a prerequisite for upper level
women’s studies courses. WMNST 106 is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, with an emphasis on the experiences, achievements, and status of women in the arts and humanities in the U.S. and global context. While
providing a broad overview of scholarly research and theory pertaining to women and gender, students will also see many examples of contemporary women’s creative practice through the visual arts, media, and popular culture. Students will learn about the challenges
women artists have faced in making their way in a male-dominated arts and media industry; they will learn how these artists sought and continue to seek new languages and forms, whether in paint, words, film, music, crafts, to reassess and re-imagine notions of sex
and sexuality, gender, race and ethnicity that underlie many forms of social injustice. Depending on the location where the course is taught, class meetings may be a mixture of lectures, group discussions, individual and group exercises, films, and guest speakers.
Assigned readings and class meetings may be designed to help students reassess predominant modes of thought and to give students tools to appreciate the creative work of highly diverse women. Depending again upon location, evaluation methods will include a balanced selection from among short papers, longer research papers, journals, book reviews, quizzes, exams, group assignments and other creative activities.
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Science

PROGRAM CHANGES

46-03-063 Change. Add STAT 184 and 380 to Prescribed Courses for the Major. Add Additional Courses section for the Major. Move STAT 480 from Prescribed Courses to Additional Courses for the Major. Add STAT 481, 482, and 483 to Additional Courses for the Major. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Statistics

University Park, Eberly College of Science (STAT)

PROFESSOR DAVID HUNTER, Head, Department of Statistics

This major helps prepare students with interests in mathematics, computation, and the quantitative aspects of science for careers in industry and government as statistical analysts, or for further graduate training in statistics. The major includes five options: An Actuarial Statistics Option for students interested in working as actuaries in the insurance or business fields; an Applied Statistics Option for students interested in a cross-disciplinary program, such as econometrics, or psychometrics; a Biostatistics Option for students interested in pursuing careers with pharmaceutical companies, research hospitals or other fields in which biological data is analyzed; a Graduate Study Option for students planning to go to graduate school in a statistics-related field; and a Statistics and Computing Option for students wishing to combine statistical expertise with programming skills.

In order to be eligible for entrance into the Statistics major, a student must have: 1) Attained at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average. 2) Completed MATH 140 GQ(4) and MATH 141 GQ(4); and earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses.

For the B.S. degree in Statistics a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(6-15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 80-95 credits
(This includes 6-15 credits of General Education: 0-9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses, 0-6 credits of GS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 38-41 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (37-38 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 220 GQ(2-3)[1], MATH 230(4)[1], STAT 184 (1)[1], STAT 200 GQ(4)[1] STAT 380 (3)[1], STAT 414(3)[1], STAT 415(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
STAT 461(3)[1], STAT 462(3)[1], STAT 470(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (1-3 credits)
STAT 480 (1)[1]; STAT 481 (1)[1]; STAT 482 (1)[1]; STAT 483 (3)[1]

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 47-57 credits

ACTUARIAL STATISTICS OPTION: 53 credits

Students who major in statistics with the actuarial statistics option and who wish to complete a concurrent major in mathematics may not choose the actuarial mathematics option in mathematics. Any other option in mathematics is acceptable.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (28 credits)
ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ACCTG 211(4)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
FIN 301(3)[1], RM 302(3)[1], RM 410(3)[1], RM 411(3)[1], RM 412(3)[1], STAT 463(3)[1] (Sem: 4-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 3 credits from: CMPSC 101 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 102(3)[1], CMPSC 121 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 200 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 201 GQ(3)[1], or CMPSC 202 GQ(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
Select 9 credits from IE 434(3)[1]; IE 436(3)[1]; MATH 436(3)[1] or MATH 441(3)[1]; MATH 451(3)[1] or MATH 455(3)[1]; STAT 416(3)[1], STAT 440(3)[1], STAT 464(3)[1], STAT 466(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (13 credits)
Select 13 credits from department list (Sem: 1-8)

APPLIED STATISTICS OPTION: (47 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 3 credits from: CMPSC 101 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 121 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 201 GQ(3)[1], or CMPSC 202 GQ(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
Select 12 credits from IE 434(3)[1]; IE 436(3)[1], MATH 436(3)[1] or MATH 441(3)[1], MATH 451(3)[1] or MATH 455(3)[1], STAT 416(3)[1], STAT 440(3)[1], STAT 463(3)[1], STAT 464(3)[1], STAT 466(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (32 credits)
Select 32 credits from department list, including a minor in a supporting field other than Mathematics. (Sem: 1-8)
(Neither the mathematics major nor the six sigma minor, nor the risk management major with the actuarial science option may be used to satisfy the minor/concurrent major requirement. If a student wants to work in a supporting field that does not have a minor, he or she can propose a list of six appropriate courses and petition the Statistics Department for approval. It is the student’s responsibility to justify the appropriateness of the proposed list. Students must receive a grade of C or better in each of these six courses.)

BIOSTATISTICS OPTION: (56-57 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (8 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4)[1], CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1)[1] (Sem: 1-3)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (28-29 credits)
Select 3 credits from: CMPSC 101 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 121 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 201 GQ(3)[1], or CMPSC 202 GQ(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
Select 7-8 credits from BIOL 220W GN(4)[1], BIOL 222(3)[1], BIOL 230W GN(4)[1], BIOL 240W GN(4)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from 400-level BIOL courses[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 12 credits from IE 434(3)[1]; IE 436(3)[1], MATH 436(3)[1] or MATH 441(3)[1], MATH 451(3)[1] or MATH 455(3)[1], STAT 416(3)[1], STAT 440(3)[1], STAT 463(3)[1], STAT 464(3)[1], STAT 466(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (19-20 credits)
Select 19-20 credits from department list (Sem: 1-8)

GRADUATE STUDY OPTION: (47 credits)

A student completing the Graduate Study option will have earned a minor in mathematics in addition to a B.S. in Statistics. However, a student must fill out and submit the appropriate paperwork to the Mathematics Department in order for this minor to be officially recognized.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
MATH 312(3)[1], MATH 403(3)[1], MATH 404(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24 credits)
Select 3 credits from: CMPSC 101 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 121 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 201 GQ(3)[1], or CMPSC 202 GQ(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
Select 9 credits from MATH 310(3)[1], MATH 311W(3-4)[1], MATH 421(3), MATH 422(3)[1], MATH 426(3), MATH 429(3), MATH 456(3)[1], MATH 468(3)[1], MATH 469(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 12 credits from IE 434(3)[1]; IE 436(3)[1], MATH 436(3)[1] or MATH 441(3)[1], MATH 451(3)[1] or MATH 455(3)[1], STAT 416(3)[1], STAT 440(3)[1], STAT 463(3)[1], STAT 464(3)[1], STAT 466(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (14 credits)
Select 14 credits from department list (Sem: 1-8)

STATISTICS AND COMPUTING OPTION: (47 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
CMPSC 121 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 122(3)[1], CMPSC 465(3)[1] (Sem: 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24 credits)
Select 3 credits from: CMPSC 360(3)[1] or MATH 311W(3-4)[1](Sem: 3-6)
Select 9 credits from CMPSC 221(3)[1], 400-level CMPSC [1] other than CMPSC/MATH 451 or CMPSC/MATH 455 (Sem: 5-8)
Select 12 credits from IE 434(3)[1]; IE 436(3)[1], MATH 436(3)[1] or MATH 441(3)[1], MATH 451(3)[1] or MATH 455(3)[1], STAT 416(3)[1], STAT 440(3)[1], STAT 463(3)[1], STAT 464(3)[1], STAT 466(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (14 credits)
Select 14 credits from department list (Sem: 1-8)

Integrated B.S. in Statistics and Master of Applied Statistics (M.A.S.)

The Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) degree with B.S. in Statistics and Master of Applied Statistics (M.A.S.) is designed to be completed in five years. This integrated degree will enable a select number of highly qualified and career-oriented students to obtain training in statistics focused on developing data analysis skills and exploration of core areas of applied statistics at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The M.A.S. degree is a professional master’s degree that emphasizes applications and does not provide as much training in the mathematical and statistical theory. The degree prepares students with interests in mathematics, computation, and the quantitative aspects of science for careers in industry and government as statistical analyst. Research divisions in the pharmaceutical industry, quality control and quality engineering divisions in manufacturing companies, clinical research units, corporate planning and research units, and other data-intensive positions require persons with training in mathematics, computation, database management, and statistical analysis, which this program will provide.

Application Process

The number of openings in the integrated B.S./M.A.S. program is limited. Admission will be based on specific criteria and the recommendation of faculty. Applicants to the integrated program:

Must be enrolled in the Statistics B.S. program.

  1. Must have completed at least 60 credits of the undergraduate degree program including the two courses: STAT 414 and STAT 415, and the students must apply to the program prior to completing 110 credits.
  2. Must submit a transcript and a statement of purpose.
  3. Must present a departmental-approved plan of study in the application process in consultation with the M.A.S. program director.
  4. Must be recommended by the chair of the department’s undergraduate program committee.
  5. Must be accepted into the M.A.S. program in Statistics.

For the IUG B.S./M.A.S. degree, 120 credits are required for the B.S. and 30 credits for the M.A.S. The following twelve graduate-level credits (number of credits in parentheses) can apply to both B.S. and M.A.S. degrees; six of these are at the 500 level:

STAT 414 (3) Introduction to Probability Theory
STAT 415 (3) Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
STAT 501 (3) Regression Methods
STAT 502 (3) Analysis of Variance and Design of Experiments

Assuming all requirements for the B.S. are completed, students in the program can complete the B.S. degree and not advance to the M.A.S. Degree if they desire.

Degree Requirements

IUG Statistics B.S. prescribed Statistics courses: See above, but note that students in IUG Statistics B.S. take STAT 501 and 502 instead of STAT 460 and 462.

IUG Statistics M.A.S. requirement (30 credits)

STAT 414 (3) Introduction to Probability Theory
STAT 415 (3) Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
STAT 501 (3) Regression Methods
STAT 502 (3) Analysis of Variance and Design of Experiments
STAT 580 (2) Statistical Consulting Practicum I
STAT 581** (1) Statistical Consulting Practicum II
Electives (15) Choose from STAT 503-510 and the departmental list of additional courses for the M.A.S. program with the approval of the adviser.

**For all students in the M.A.S. program, the STAT 581 course will have a comprehensive written project report required as part of the course, which serves as the culminating experience.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

46-03-064 ASTRO 19N (3)(GN)(GH)(BA)
Title: Being in the Universe
Abbreviated Title: Being in the Univ
Description: “Being in the Universe” considers three fundamental questions of human existence from both humanistic and scientific perspectives: (1) What is the nature of our universe, and to what extent are creatures like ourselves a predictable consequence of it? (2) What is the nature of time, and what does it mean to be a conscious being living our lives through time? (3) What would it mean for humans to be alone in the Galaxy or the universe, or alternatively, not alone? Instruction will include class lectures, in-class exercises and online discussions, supplemented by films and other media as appropriate. “Being in the Universe” is an integrative GH+GN GenEd course. The course’s three major units cover the following topics: (1) We discuss cosmology and religion as human enterprises, as well as the history of science; (2) We study the basic scientific theory of the Big Bang universe, and consider its implications for human life; (3)
We address contemporary theories of the multiverse from scientific, philosophical, and literary perspectives; (4) We consider the thermodynamic and relativistic theories of time, and the basic philosophical approaches to time, and discuss the implications of these for our ordinary human experience of the past, present, and future; (5) We discuss the history of life in the universe, the possibility of life on other planets, and the social, religious, and imaginative reactions to those possibilities in literature and film. As a large lecture course, “Being in the Universe” assigns three major exams, and asks students to complete one group project. In smaller seminar versions of this course, assignments will depend on the instructor.
Cross-Listed Courses: CMLIT 19N(LA)
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-065 ASTRO 21 (2)
Title: Introduction to Research in Astronomy
Abbreviated Title: Intro to Research
Description: The course is designed to provide first year undergraduate students in both the ASTRO and PASTR majors with necessary tools and techniques to perform research. Students will practice a variety of techniques on authentic astronomical data, which might include
light curves from the Kepler mission, galaxy and stellar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, or pulsar data from the Green Bank or Arecibo telescopes. An emphasis will be placed on using common tools for observational astronomy, such as viewing astronomical FITS images in SAOimage. Students will be introduced to the common programming languages and environments used by astronomers at the time the course is offered, which currently includes Python and IDL. Students will be given experience in calculating statistical information about a set of astronomical data using the R programming language and its built-in tools. Students will make plots to illustrate a pattern in their data using the tools in Python, IDL, or R, for example.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-066 BIOL 478 (3)
Title: COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
Abbreviated Title: COMPAR NEUROANATOM
Description: This course provides instruction on the functional and structural organization of the vertebrate nervous system. In addition to lectures, students attend laboratory sessions devoted to human brain dissections, histologic sections of various vertebrate brains, neuroanatomical methods for analyzing brain and spinal cord organization, and non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. The structural organization of the brain is described at both the gross and microscopic levels. A major aim of the course is to instill students with an understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the brain. To achieve this goal, students are taught how to recognize specific structures in different planes of sections along the major axes of the brain. Structural-functional relationships in the nervous system are explained, and particular emphasis is placed on understanding the functional impact of brain trauma and a variety of neurological diseases. While the course emphasizes the mammalian nervous system, many aspects of brain organization in nonmammalian vertebrates are also presented. As part of this, a major section of the course is devoted to understanding neurocladistics and the biological principles that have guided brain evolution across different phylogenetic lineages.
Prerequisites: BIOL 469
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-067 ASTRO 320 (2) (GN)
Title: Observational Astronomy Laboratory
Abbreviated Title: Obs Astro Lab
Description: Basic observational astronomy techniques introduced through observational exercises, lab experiments, and lectures on relevant statistical techniques. ASTRO 320 Observational Astronomy Laboratory (2) (GN)ASTRO 320 will provide students with practical
experience in basic observational and laboratory aspects of astronomical data collection and analysis, including an introduction to associated statistical concepts. Observational techniques will be introduced through an observing project using a telescope with a CCS imaging camera. Lectures will introduce fundamental principles including Poisson and Gaussian statistics, measurement precision, propagation of errors, and systematic uncertainties. These principles will be put into practice in the observing project and with laboratory experiments investigating the properties of light and cosmic rays. Experiments include: a cosmic ray telescope; a Michelson interferometer; a photodiode and monochromator; laser interference, diffraction and refraction; fluorescent gases; and a diffraction grating spectrometer.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
RECERTIFY GENED GN
CHANGE CREDITS 3
CHANGE Description: Basic observational astronomy techniques introduced through observational exercises, lab experiments, and lectures on relevant statistical techniques. ASTRO 320 Observational Astronomy Laboratory (3) (GN) ASTRO 320 will provide students with practical experience in basic observational and laboratory aspects of astronomical data collection and analysis, including an introduction to associated statistical concepts. Observational techniques will be introduced through an observing project using a telescope with a CCS imaging camera. Lectures will introduce fundamental principles including Poisson and Gaussian statistics, measurement precision, propagation of errors, and systematic uncertainties. These principles will be put into practice in the observing project and with
laboratory experiments investigating the properties of light and cosmic rays. Experiments include: a cosmic ray telescope; a Michelson interferometer; a photodiode and monochromator; laser interference, diffraction and refraction; fluorescent gases; and a
diffraction grating spectrometer.
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
University College

COURSE ADDS

46-03-068 CRIMJ 150N (3)(GHW)(GS)
Title: Safe and Sound: The Intersection of Criminal Justice and Public Health
Abbreviated Title: Justice and Health
Description: This course will consider the overlapping responsibilities and epistemologies of criminal justice and public health. Both fields concerned with the promotion of population welfare, the public health and criminal justice systems nevertheless confront the same social problems from different ethical perspectives, research methodologies, and knowledge bases. Each may further mobilize different institutional actors driven by divergent political agendas. While we will discuss the productive collaboration between public health and public safety agencies, we will also consider ongoing ownership struggles over certain issues, behaviors, and even populations. Given its practical relevance to many ongoing social issues and controversies of general importance, this course is motivated by a commitment to “community-engaged scholarship,” and thus will include topics, readings, assignments, speakers, and field trips of
local and state importance. At the same time, specific topics will be framed in terms of their national and international importance, and students will be encouraged to link “micro-level” problems to “macro-level” processes.
Cross-Listed Courses: BBH 150N
Proposed Start SP2018

APPENDIX C
MEDICINE

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-069 PHS 895A (3-6:6)
Title: Master of Public Health Internship
Abbreviated Title: Mph Internship
Description: Provides Master of Public Health (MPH) degree students with hands-on, real- world experience in the practice of public health.

NEW
CHANGE Abbreviated Title: MPH Internship
CHANGE Recommended Preparations: Students are required to complete 20 hours of practice-based activities prior to enrollment in this course. These activities can include community-based volunteer opportunities, PSU COM career development training events, PHASE events, or other activities as approved by the Public Health Program.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-070 PHS 895B (1-6:6)
Title: Advanced Field Experience
Abbreviated Title: Adv Field Exp
Description: This course provides DrPH degree students with advanced hands-on, practical experience in the practice of public health.

NEW
CHANGE Recommended Preparations: Students are required to complete 20 hours of practice-based activities prior to enrollment in this course. These activities can include community-based volunteer opportunities, PSU COM career development training events, PHASE events, or other activities as approved by the Public Health Program.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-071 PHS 895C (1-6:6)
Title: Master of Public Health International Internship
Abbreviated Title: MPH Intl Intern
Description: Provides Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) students with real-world experience in the practice of public health in international or local settings. The Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) global health internship aims to provide M.P.H. students with hands-on experience in the practice of public health. The internship builds and reinforces public health practice skills by enabling students to apply what they have learned in the classroom to real-world public health problems and settings. As the M.P.H. is a professional degree, an internship in a real-world public health setting is critical to students’ academic and professional development, and their ability to become competent in the practice of public health. Students complete their internships at public health agencies, organizations, and/or institutions, and work on substantive projects that contribute to the mission, goals, and objectives of the sites in which they are placed. Students are matched with public health internships based on their respective academic and professional interests and goals. Students may be matched with pre-approved internships, which have been identified by the M.P.H. program leadership. Students also may seek out internship opportunities on their own. Internships that are not pre-approved must be reviewed and approved by the M.P.H. program leadership before students can begin. At each internship site, students report to an on-site Preceptor. Preceptors are identified by the M.P.H. program leadership and generally are key decision-makers at their respective agencies, organizations, or institutions. Prior to beginning the internship, students will work with the course Director to develop individualized learning objectives. These learning objectives will shape a student’s experience at the internship site and the types of projects the student will complete. The learning objectives also will provide students with a measure against which they can evaluate their efforts and the internship sites.

NEW
CHANGE Title: MPH Global Health Internship
CHANGE Abbreviated Title: MPH Global Intern
CHANGE Recommended Preparations: Students are required to complete 20 hours of practice-based activities prior to enrollment in this course. These activities can include community-based volunteer opportunities, PSU COM career development training events, PHASE events, or other activities as approved by the Public Health Program.
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX C
Dickinson Law

COURSE ADDS

46-03-072 CERT 934 (3)
Title: Corporate Compliance
Abbreviated Title: Corp Compliance
Description: This course will introduce students to the growing field of compliance. Students will learn why compliance programs are necessary in the corporate environment, as well as how they can be structured and enforced. Students will learn about assessing risk and the different roles that boards and management play in compliance programs, and will learn about conducting investigations, taking corrective actions and communication with internal and external stakeholders.
Corequisites: REQ 911 BAR 906
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-073 CERT 935 (3)
Title: Health Law: Business Organizations & Finance
Abbreviated Title: Health Law: Bus Or
Description: This course will provide an overview of laws relevant to health care institutions, particularly insurers, hospitals, and provider groups. Topics covered in-depth will include insurance regulation (including ERISA requirements governing the division of state and federal
authorities, ACA requirements, and Public Health Services’ Act requirements); professional and facility regulation; antitrust laws as applicable to health care entities; fraud, waste, and abuse rules (including the False Claims Act); institutional and managed care liability; financing and reimbursement systems (including advanced payment models currently redefining physician payment under MACRA, Accountable Care Organizations, and risk adjustment); referral fee laws; and corporate compliance. Students should leave the course with three substantive competences. First, students should have an understanding of the most significant areas of
health law for business entities. Second, students should have an up-to-date understanding of current trends in and the likely direction of efforts to reform the laws applicable to business entities in healthcare, including an ability to track and understand future such efforts. Third, students should have an understanding of the normative tools applied to the evaluation of reforms in this area, from adverse selection to health justice, and ability to utilize those tools in support of legal arguments.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-074 EXPIN 905 (3-3:6)
Title: Legislative & Regulatory Advocacy Internship
Abbreviated Title: Leg & Reg Adv Int
Description: The Legislative and Regulatory Advocacy Internship will focus on legal analysis and problem solving in the area of legislative and regulatory practice. The primary goal is to provide students experience with the legislative and regulatory processes by which policy is made and
implemented at the state level, and to prepare them to advocate a particular policy position. Using the Pennsylvania legislature and Commonwealth agencies as the prime focuses, clinical students gain experience in how to draft legislation; comment on proposed regulations; work with the state’s legislative leadership, legislative committees, and executive branch agencies; represent interest groups in advancing public policy agendas; influence public opinion on contemporaneous policy issues; effectively deal with opponents; and earn the support of officials and staff from across the political spectrum.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-075 SEMNR 916 (2)
Title: Cybersecurity Law & Policy Seminar
Abbreviated Title: Cybersecurity Law
Description: This course is designed to give students an accessible and foundational understanding of the legal and policy issues associated with cybersecurity. Cybersecurity is the protection of electronic data and systems from attack, loss or other compromise. Electronic data and systems include governmental records, and investor and private firm information, and the hardware and software systems used to generate and maintain that data.
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-076 CERT 901 (2)
Title: Accounting for Lawyers
Abbreviated Title: Accounting for Law
Description: In this course students learn why financial accounting is a system for measuring and communicating the outcomes of business activities to parties outside the firm. The purposes of this course are to: (1) provide students with a basic understanding of the concepts and principles (i.e., the jargon) underlying financial accounting practices; (2) make students comfortable with financial data (in particular, opening a 10K or annual report); (3) enable students to have a conversation with accountants; and (4) provide students with the technical tools and references to analyze how a particular transaction affects a firm’s financial statements.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS (3)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-077 CERT 908 (3)
Title: Employee Benefits Law
Abbreviated Title: Employee Benefits
Employer-provided pension and health care programs play a critical role in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. They also affect corporations, financial markets, and the economy as a whole. Employee benefit programs are, in short, an important staple of modern law practice. This course surveys the Employee Retirement Income Security Act and relevant portions of the Internal Revenue Code. Classes examine what benefit plans must do regarding reporting and disclosure, accrual, vesting, funding, and fiduciary standards. The course covers health care reform, the shift from defined benefit to defined contribution programs, and the effect of stock market volatility on benefit programs. Students examine the policy goals underpinning federal benefits law. The course surveys major issues in ERISA litigation, including that statute’s claims and remedies provisions, as well as its preemption of state law.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS (2-3)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-078 CERT 916 (3)
Title: Immigration Law
Abbreviated Title: Immigration Law
Description: This class surveys the immigration laws of the United States, including the administrative and regulatory framework of the United States agencies charged with enforcing U.S. immigration laws. The topics covered by this course include the power of the Congress to regulate immigration; substantive provisions and procedures governing admission and exclusion; nonimmigrant and immigrant visa classifications and visa processing; asylum and refugee status; the effect of criminal acts on immigration status; grounds for removal from the United States; relief from deportation; judicial review; and the law of naturalization and derived citizenship.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS (2-3)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-079 CERT 927 (3)
Title: Patent Law
Abbreviated Title: Patent Law
Description: This course examines the theory behind patent protection and the societal ramifications of providing limited legal monopolies to inventors. The course explores patentable subject matter, the requirements for obtaining a patent, patent rights, infringement, remedies, and different patent types—e.g., utility patents, design patents, and plant patents.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS (2-3)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-080 ELECT 906 (3)
Title: Comparative International Tax Law
Abbreviated Title: Comp Intl Tax Law
Description: This course treats the unique problems of Home country taxation of foreign income and operations of resident persons and enterprises and Host country taxation of foreign persons and enterprises from the perspective of many nations perspectives.
PREREQUISITE: BAR 904
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS (2)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-081 ELECT 911 (3)
Title: Environmental Law
Abbreviated Title: Environmental Law
Description: This course introduces some of the most important concepts, issues, and statutes in environmental law. After discussing the economic and ethical bases for environmental law and briefly reviewing the relevant principles of constitutional and common law, students examine a representative selection of federal statutes, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, “Superfund,” and the Clean Air Act.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS (2)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-082 ELECT 923 (3)
Title: Law Practice Management
Abbreviated Title: Law Practice Manag
Description: This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the management of a legal services organization. Attention is paid to the operation of a law practice as a business, including entity formation, internal organization, quality control, business development and finance. The course also is designed to provide a complement to other parts of the curriculum in which students can continue to develop their professional identities.
PREREQUISITE: REQ 911
COREQUISITES: BAR 906
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: Legal Competencies & Law Practice Management Skills
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: remove prerequisites
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-083 ELECT 929 (3)
Title: Workers’ Compensation Law
Abbreviated Title: Workers’ Comp Law
Description: This course will explore the history and development of, public policy considerations for, and state and federal systems for delivery of medical and wage benefits to injured workers.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS (2-3)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-084 EXPSK 906 (3)
Title: Negotiation/Mediation
Abbreviated Title: Negotiation/Mediation
Description: Negotiation/Mediation combines the law and ethics of negotiation, mediation and settlement with economic and psychological bargaining theory and regular hands-on practice in representing clients in negotiation and mediation. Bargaining theory (including distributive and integrative bargaining), relevant socio-psychological research, negotiation and mediation ethics, the law of settlement, and the basics of contract drafting are all introduced. Instruction consists of assigned reading, a series of simulations and exercises (including drafting a resulting contract), written negotiation planning and self-evaluation, feedback, and group discussion. The course also may involve participation in a full-day Saturday program, and students should be prepared to experiment with various means to maximize their facility in using videoconferencing and other technologies to negotiate and represent clients in mediation.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS (2-3)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-085 CERT 929 (3)
Title: Real Estate Negotiation & Drafting
Abbreviated Title: Real Estate Negot
Description: This course covers transactional drafting techniques for any commercial matter, and negotiation exercises useful in all legal settings. It then addresses the structure and law of real estate transactions, including agreements of sale, title and survey matters, leasing, financing, easements, and development rights.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION AND NUMBER: EXPSK 911
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-086 CCURR 905 (1-1:2)
Title: Medical Legal Colloquium
Abbreviated Title: Med Legal Colloqm
Description: The Medical Legal Colloquium is a simulation-based course focused on the law of medical negligence. During the semester, students prepare for and participate in two abridged mock trials involving medical residents from Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Law students work in teams to develop their theory of the case, meet with medical residents to refine their understanding of medical terminology and concepts, and prepare the medical residents to testify as defendants and expert witnesses before a live jury. Class sessions and readings cover the law of medical negligence, trial advocacy in the medical malpractice context, and ideas for reforming the medical malpractice system.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION AND NUMBER: EXPSK 912
CHANGE TITLE: Medical Malpractice Workshop
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: Med Mal Workshop
CHANGE CREDITS (2)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-087 REQ 907 (3)
Title: Practicing Law in a Global World: Contexts
Abbreviated Title: Contexts
Description: Most law students come to law school in order to become a lawyer. But what does it mean to be a lawyer? Are there qualities, characteristics, and competencies that lawyers have in common? Is all of the work performed by lawyers the same? If not, how can a student determine those practice settings for which the student’s skills, interests, and attributes would be a good fit? This course focuses on professional identity, which has been called the underdeveloped “third apprenticeship” of legal education. Students will hear from a number of speakers who work in different practice settings. Students will be required to conduct informational interviews with lawyers and prepare a portfolio. They will have numerous opportunities for reflection about the competencies that make one a good lawyer. This course will help students make more informed choices while in law school and will help prepare them for life after law school.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: Practicing Law in a Global World: Contexts & Competencies
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: Contexts & Compet
CHANGE CREDITS: (2)

OLD
46-03-088 REQ 909 (2)
Title: Problem Solving II: The Lawyer as Writer
Abbreviated Title: Prob Solving II
Description: In Problem Solving II, students continue to hone and practice essential lawyering skills: analyzing a client’s case by researching the relevant law, including cases, statutes, constitutional provisions, and administrative regulations; explaining and applying the law to the client’s situation using two of the most common written forms (objective or predictive writing in an office memorandum, and persuasive writing in a trial brief); and presenting oral arguments. Because research, analysis, writing and oral argument skills improve only with practice, students will work through a variety of exercises and client problems, receiving individualized feedback from their professor during the course. Throughout the semester, we will remain mindful of the relationship between the concepts of law, order and justice – and will continually examine the role of the lawyer in that relationship.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS (3)
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-03-089 SEMNR 904 (2)
Title: Cross-Border Legal Practice Seminar
Abbreviated Title: Cross-Bord Leg Sem
Description: This seminar examines globalization’s impact on the legal profession. It begins by exploring the cross border legal practice phenomenon. It then introduces students to the similarities and differences among U.S. lawyers and lawyers elsewhere. Students will learn about developments outside the U.S. that already have or that may affect the U.S. policy and the U.S. legal profession. By the end of the course, students will be prepared to participate in policy discussions regarding the regulation of cross border legal practice. They will also have acquired tools that are useful when encountering their own cross border legal practice issues.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: Globalization & the Legal Profession Seminar
Proposed Start SP2019

PENN STATE LAW

COURSE ADDS

46-03-090 BUSLW 951 (3)
Title: Corporate Social Responsibility
Abbreviated Title: CORP SOC RESP
Description: This course provides an introduction to the law and policy issues that touch on the responsibility of enterprises for their activities. It provides an overview of corporate social responsibility (CSR), as a subject of legal regulation within states, as a matter of international law and compliance beyond the state, and as a tool and methodology of corporate governance and finance with governance effect through contract. The emphasis is on the study of the legal and regulatory frameworks, both existing and emerging within states, in international institutions, and within production chains and the apex corporations that manage them. The
course begins with definitional issues and variations in approaches between major jurisdictions. It then turns to the existing law of CSR, focusing specifically on charitable giving and disclosure regimes. It then considers the rise of CSR regulatory regimes as privatizing law making using the mechanisms of contract to regulate CSR related conduct throughout a production chain. It then
considers the emergence of international standards as they inform regulatory efforts in states and enterprises and as normative standards in their own right.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-091 IHIPC 900 (4-4:8)
Title: Intellectual Property Clinic
Abbreviated Title: IP CLINIC
Description: The Intellectual Property Clinic provides Penn State Law – University Park students an opportunity to gain practice-ready skills in intellectual property law. Under the clinic director, students will provide legal services to the clinic’s start-up clients in much the same manner as practicing IP lawyers. Students in the clinic will engage in client counseling regarding patents and trademarks and other intellectual property. Projects may include: preparing and prosecuting US patent applications before the US Patent and Trademark office, performing patentability searches, developing a patent portfolio strategies for early-stage companies, performing diligence (i.e. freedom to operate studies and/or patent landscape analysis), and registering US Trademarks. Students will adhere to standard patent law office practices
such as conflict checks, maintenance of strict confidentiality, docketing, and time-recordation. Students will learn and conform to the professional responsibilities of lawyers engaged in IP transactional practice as well as the Rules of Ethics of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The clinic will meet as a weekly class to discuss current client cases, intellectual property law in practice, ethics, and special projects. In addition, students will interface with clients in-person, via telephone, and via email to discuss client intake, IP evaluation, and counseling. Students will also meet individually, as necessary, with the clinic director regarding the representation of particular clients and special projects.
Prerequisites: Faculty Approval Required
Corequisites: IPLAW 952, IPLAW 980
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-092 LWPER 947 (3)
Title: National Security Law I (Foundations)
Abbreviated Title: NATIONAL SEC LW I
Description: This the first of a two-course sequence. Students may take this course and later choose to not continue with National Security Law II (Crisis Simulation); however, all students wishing to take the National Security Law II (Crisis Simulation) must take National Security Law I (Foundations) as a prerequisite. National Security Law I (Foundations) examines the laws, processes, and institutions relevant to protecting the nation’s security. The course first examines the critical relationships between the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in forming, overseeing, and executing national security policy and operations. The course then
examines the federal government’s authority to use force abroad, including covert and special operations; the government’s authority to collect intelligence and conduct surveillance, both within the U.S. and abroad; the interrogation and prosecution of terrorist subjects; and critical issues relevant to protecting the homeland. The course also examines the practical challenges
national security lawyers confront in practice. Persistent themes include the balance between security and liberty, the allocation of authority within and between governments, and the perceived tension between national security and international obligations. This course is appropriate for any student interested in better understanding some of the most important and even existential issues facing the nation today. The course is also essential for students with specific career interests in national security or public international law.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-03-093 ULWR 906 (3)
Title: Constitutional Interpretation Seminar
Abbreviated Title: CON LAW SEM
Description: This course introduces students to contemporary debates over the interpretation of the Constitution. The revival of originalist theory in recent decades has reanimated discussions over how the Constitution should be interpreted. The arguments for different
approaches are sophisticated, and the stakes are high, since the resolution of important constitutional questions often turns on what interpretive method is used. Each student’s semester culminates in a research paper on an original topic related to constitutional interpretation. For the final four sessions of the semester, the class becomes a workshop in which students comment on each other’s paper drafts.
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-03-094 AULWR 964 (2)
Title: Intensive Legal Writing & Drafting
Abbreviated Title: INT LEG WRITE/DRFT (2)
Description: This course develops students’ skills in common legal writing formats other than memos and briefs. Not intended as a remedial course, this course rather provides an opportunity for students to sharpen legal writing skills with an emphasis on clarity and precision of expression. Weekly writing assignments include a few fully drafted documents (e.g., a short will, a short contract, a statute), as well as letters, short pleadings, jury instructions, and other short pieces. Students will concentrate on re-writing and editing their work.
Prerequisite: Faculty approval required
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: REMOVE PREREQUISITE

OLD
46-03-095 BAREX 900 (2)
Title: Fundamental Skills for the Bar Examination
Abbreviated Title: FUND SKIL BAR EXAM
Description: This course provides students with a substantive review of selected material routinely tested on the bar exam, primarily through problems and exercises in a bar exam format designed to familiarize students with the exam and techniques for answering multiple choice questions. Individualized feedback is provided every week to assist each student identify areas of strength and weakness. The goal is to enhance student ability to prepare for the bar exam and is intended to supplement, not replace, commercial bar preparation courses. This course is not focused an any particular state, so all students will benefit regardless of where they are sitting for the bar exam. Students enrolled in BAREX 900 are not permitted to use laptops, phones or other devices during class. This course is not recommended for students ranked in the top third of their class. BAREX 900 is graded on a pass/fail basis but is not subject in any other respect to the Pass/Fail Option.
Approved Start: FA2017

NEW:
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course provides students with a substantive review of selected material routinely tested on the bar exam, primarily through problems and exercises in a bar exam format designed to familiarize students with the exam and techniques for answering multiple choice questions. Individualized feedback is provided every week to assist each student identify areas of strength and weakness. The goal is to enhance student ability to prepare for the bar exam and is intended to supplement, not replace, commercial bar preparation courses. This course is not focused an any particular state, so all students will benefit regardless of where they are sitting for the bar exam. Students enrolled in BAREX 900 are not permitted to use laptops, phones or other devices during class. BAREX 900 is graded on a pass/fail basis but is not subject in any other respect to the Pass/Fail Option.
Proposed Start SP2018

OLD
46-03-096 EXPR 968 (2)
Title: Judicial Opinion Writing
Abbreviated Title: JUDICIAL OP WRTING
Description: Students will learn about the role of a judicial clerk and how to draft judicial opinions. Students will recognize the impact of written advocacy on judicial opinion writing as they switch roles from advocating as a lawyer to deciding issues raised by the advocates and writing opinions that implement subtle persuasive writing techniques. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the process for creation of legal precedent through opinions, including the impact of standards of review and procedural posture. The course will cover the common forms of judicial writing. With individualized feedback, students will develop precision in self-editing and revision skills and will practice producing concise, clear, and accessible written work.
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: Prerequisites: Enrollment is limited to J.D. students only.
Proposed Start SP2018

OLD
46-03-097 EXPR 983 (3)
Title: Representing the Entrepreneur
Abbreviated Title: Rep Entrepreneur
Description: This course considers legal issues typically arising in the course of representing an entrepreneurial venture, including choice of appropriate entity, naming and trade names, agreements among initial and early owners, operational management, governance, succession, equity and debt finance, intellectual property issues, employment arrangements and applicable employment statutes, executive compensation, typical operational contracts, risk management and ethical issues. This course will also review customary financial statements, business strategies in terms of long-term development or early exit, and common exit alternatives. The objective is to give participants an introduction to the diverse legal problems that they are likely to encounter in an entrepreneurial setting, either as lawyers for the enterprise or as owners of an equity position in the enterprise.
PREREQUISITE: BUSLW 963
RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: TAXLW 949
APPROVED START: FA2017

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: REMOVE PREREQUISITE
CHANGE RECOMMENDED PREPARATIONS: BUSLW 963, TAXLW 949
Proposed Start SP2018