Appendices

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Agricultural Sciences

COURSE ADDS

43-03-001 SOILS 296
Independent Studies
INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Arts and Architecture

COURSE ADDS

43-03-002 ART H 105  (GA)
Pictures and Power
PICTURES AND POWER (3)
An introduction to strategies for analyzing the political effects, uses and interpretation of popular imagery.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-003 ARCH  431A (IL)
Architectural Design V–Foreign Study
ARCH DGN V-FGNSTY (6)
A studio offered in Rome, Italy, which emphasizes urban planning and architectural design in an urban context.
PREREQUISITE: Students must earn a C or better in: ARCH 332 and A E 424
CONCURRENT: ARCH 499B and ARCH 499C
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-004 ARCH  432A (IL)
Architectural Design VI–Foreign Study
ARCH DGN VI-FGNSTY (6)
A continuation of ARCH 431, this course explores urban planning and architectural design in an urban context in Rome, Italy.
PREREQUISITE:Students must earn a C or better in: ARCH 431
CONCURRENT:ARCH 499B and ARCH 499C
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-005 ART   481
Ceramic Materials and Glaze Calculation
CER MAT/GLAZE CAL (3:2:2)
The study of raw materials and their use in formulating clays and glazes.
PREREQUISITE: ART 280, ART H 111, ART H 112, and enrollment in the ART BA, ART BFA, Art Education, or Integrative Arts degree program.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-006 ART H 414  (IL)
Italian Baroque Painting
IT BAROQUE PTG (3)
Survey of Italian Baroque painting from sixteenth-century proto-Baroque masters to painters of the late Baroque and Rococo periods.
PREREQUISITE: ART H 100, ART H 112, or ART H 304
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-007 DANCE 380
Dance Programming
DANCE PROG (2)
Theoretical and practical experiences in dance production and implementation of dance programs in various environments.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-008 PHOTO 403
Photo Assemblage
PHOTO ASSEMBLAGE (4)
Collage making through collecting and assembling found materials, including photography; origins of photographic manipulation and contemporary uses.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-009 THEA  110
Playscript Analysis
SCRIPT ANALYSIS (3:3:0)
Theory and method of playscript analysis for the general theatre student.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-010 THEA  321
Scene Study II
SCENE STUDY II (3)
A continuation of THEA 320.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 420 and approval by department
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-011 THEA  471
Stagelighting Design II
LIGHT DESIGN II (3:3:2)
Advanced training through lectures and laboratory experience with color, shape, and form as it relates to the specifics of illumination.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 470
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-012 VOICE 212J
Music Theatre Voice I
MUS THEA VOICE I (1)
Individual instruction in voice.  Intended for Theatre Arts BFA-Music Theatre Option students.
PREREQUISITE: acceptance into program by faculty jury and successful completion of MUSIC 113-114
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-013 VOICE 262J
Music Theatre Voice II
MUS THEA VOICE II (1)
Individual instruction in voice.  Intended for Theatre Arts BFA-Music Theatre Option students.
PREREQUISITE: acceptance into program by faculty jury and successful completion of MUSIC 113-114
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-014 VOICE 312J
Music Theatre Voice III
MUS THEA VOICE III (1)
Individual instruction in voice.  Intended for Theatre Arts BFA-Music Theatre Option students.
PREREQUISITE: acceptance into program by faculty jury and successful completion of MUSIC 113-114
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-015 VOICE 362J
Music Theatre Voice IV
MUS THEA VOICE IV (1)
Individual instruction in voice.  Intended for Theatre Arts BFA-Music Theatre Option students.
PREREQUISITE: acceptance into program by faculty jury and successful completion of MUSIC 113-114
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Behrend College

COURSE ADDS

43-03-016 GAME  251  (GQ)
2D Game Programming
2D HTML5 GAME DEV (3)
Introduction to programming 2D Games with HTML5 and Javascript.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 021
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-017 GAME  460
Video Game Studies
VGSTUDIES (3)
A comparative look at the nature and history of video games as cultural artifacts, from Pond to online role-playing.
PREREQUISITE: GAME 160, GAME 140, or 3 credits in literature
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-018 CMPSC 479
Language Translation
LANGUAGE TRANSLATI (3:3:0)
Design and implementation of compilers, lexical analysis, syntax/semantic analysis, optimization, and code generation.
PREREQUISITE:CMPSC 465
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-019 E E   450
Signal and Image Processing
SIGNAL&IMAGE PROC (3:2:2)
Linear system analysis in one-dimension and two-dimensions, emphasis on filtering; multi-dimensional signal analysis; image enhancement and reconstruction; computer simulation applications.
PREREQUISITE: E E 352
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-020 EET   450
Manufacturing Related Topics in Electrical Systems
MFG IN ELEC SYS (3:2:2)
Manufacturing methods, including reliability and quality control considerations as applied to electrical and electronic systems.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 211; or MATH 231, MATH 250
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-021 PL ET 460
Advanced Computer Applications in Plastics Design
ADV CAE DESIGN (3:2:3)
Advanced applications of computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, computer-aided engineering, and finite element analysis to plastic product development.
PREREQUISITE: PL ET 350
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-022 STAT  402
Statistical Analysis II
STAT ANALYSIS II (3:3:0)
Two-sample problems, single and multifactor ANOVA, simple and multiple regression, categorical data.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 301. 400 level needed for honors program
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Berks College

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-023 PH SC 440
Applied Solid State and Optical Processes
ASSOP (3)
This course covers the solid state physics and material science prerequisite to understand today microelectronic and optoelectronic devices.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 237, PHYS 410
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Smeal College of Business

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-024 ACCTG 160
Cost Accounting
COST ACCTG (3:3:0)
Use of standard cost accounting procedures to present cost and budget statements as a means of providing managerial control.  Students may not receive credit for both ACCTG 160 and ACCTG 404.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 151, ACCTG 152
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-025 MIS   190
Microcomputer Accounting and Transaction Processing
MICRO ACCT & TPS (3:2:1)
Use of accounting software to manage small to medium sized businesses, transaction processing, general ledger, payables, receivables, inventory management, payroll.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 203 or MIS 103.  Prerequisite or concurrent:  2 credits in Financial Accounting
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-026 MIS   436
Business Data Communications
BUSINESS DATA COM (3)
Introduction to the principles and techniques of business data communication encompassing transmission concepts, network analysis, design, implementation, and administration.
PREREQUISITE: MIS 431
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-027 MIS   479
Management of Operations Information/ERP
MGT OPINF/ERP (3)
Management and implementation of enterprise information systems for business integration and supply chain management.
PREREQUISITE: MIS 390 or MIS 431
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-028 SCM   435
International Logistics
INT LOGISTICS (3)
Design and operation of global supply chain networks. Not available to baccalaureate business students in Smeal.
PREREQUISITE: SCM 301 and SCM 320
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-029 SCM   456
Supply Chain Risk Analysis
SUP CHN RSK ANLYSI (3:3:0)
Business processes are modeled as a network of queues using discrete-event simulation and analyzed model outcomes using statistical methods.
PREREQUISITE: SCM 200 and B A 302
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Capital College

43-03-030 Add. New B.A. in Humanities.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Humanities

Capital College (HUM)

PROFESSOR PATRICIA E. JOHNSON, Program Coordinator, School of Humanities

This major helps students appreciate, understand, and interpret relationships among the arts, ideas, media, and values that have shaped Western and world cultures. Students are expected to be active learners who can synthesize, interpret, and communicate knowledge and experience through writing, speaking, and creative expression in a variety of media. The School helps students meet these goals by offering a range of interdisciplinary and discipline-based courses in the arts, art history, communication studies, English, history, literature, music, philosophy, theatre, and writing.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Humanities major requires the completion of 27.1 or more credits and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

For a B.A. degree in Humanities, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

ELECTIVES: 0-15 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 51 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits) [1]
HUM 100 (3), HUM 200 (3), HUM 300W(3), HUM 400(3) (Sem: 1-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES  (6 credits) [1]
Select 6 credits from Humanities (HUM) courses: HUM 150 (3), HUM 311(3), HUM 410 (3), HUM 430 (3), HUM 453(3), HUM 460 (3), HUM 461 (3), HUM 491 (3), HUM 494 (3), HUM 495 (3), HUM 496 (3), HUM 497 (3), HUM 499 (3).   (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (33 credits)
(At least 15 credits of supporting courses must be at the 400 level.) [1]
Select 12 credits in one of the four following areas; select 9 credits in a second area: (Sem: 1-8)
a. history and global cultures:  select from HIST, CMLIT,  SPAN (all courses with those prefixes), CAS 271, COMM 350, ENGL 486, ENGL 488, INTST 100
b. performing and visual arts and art history: select from ART, ART H, INART, MUSIC, THEA (all courses with those prefixes), COMM 215, COMM 241, COMM 242, COMM 250
c. philosophy and religious studies:  select from PHIL, RL ST (all courses with those prefixes)
d. literature and writing:  select from ENGL, CMLIT (all courses with those prefixes), COMM 230W, COMM 260W, COMM 332, COMM 346, COMM474

Select 12 credits from AM ST, ART, ART H, CAS, CHNS, CMLIT, COMM, ENGL, FR, HIST, HUM, INART, MUSIC, PHIL, RL ST, SPAN,  or THEA and/or 12 credits that can be used toward a minor in an area of the student’s interests. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy


43-03-031 Number not assigned.


COURSE ADDS

43-03-032 HUM   100  (GH)
Foundations in the Humanities: Understanding the Human Experience
FOUNDATIONS HUM (3)
Introductory, interdisciplinary study of significant works in the humanities, stressing basic interpretive skills.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-033 HUM   200  (GH)
Explorations in the Humanities: The Quest
EXPLORATIONS HUM (3)
Interdisciplinary study of significant works in the humanities within the broad theme of the quest, stressing students’ interpretive skills.
PREREQUISITE: HUM 100
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-03-034 I HUM 150  (GH;IL)
World Mythologies in the Arts
WORLD MYTH IN ARTS (3)
Interdisciplinary, cross cultural, historical, and contemporary study of world mythologies as represented in the visual arts, literature, and film.
APPROVED START:  SP2009

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-035 I HUM 300W
Interpretations in the Humanities
INTR IN HUMANITIES (3)
A study of selected themes, topics, or periods that introduces students to interdisciplinary approaches to knowledge, interpretation, and creative expression.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015, ENGL 202, and at least 30 credits
APPROVED START:  FA2001

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-036 I HUM 311  (GH;IL)
The Western Tradition I
WESTRN TRADITION 1 (3)
From prehistory through the Roman world.
PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-037 I HUM 400
Expressions in the Humanities
EXPRESS IN HUMANIT (3)
Capstone course for School of Humanities majors: students synthesize and apply approaches to a topic in creative expression and knowledge.
PREREQUISITE: I HUM 300W, seventh-semester standing
APPROVED START:  FA2001

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-038 I HUM 410  (IL)
Religion and Culture
REL AND CULTURE (3)
A comparative examination of several world religions in their social and cultural contexts.
PREREQUISITE: sixth-semester standing
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-039 I HUM 430
Philosophy and Literature
PHIL AND LIT (3)
The study of philosophical viewpoints in literature.
PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
APPROVED START:  SP2002

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-040 I HUM 453
Texts and Culture
TEXTS & CULTURE (3)
Study of art, literature, film, and other creative genres to illustrate the interrelationships  between creative expression and cultural practices.
PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
APPROVED START:  SP2002

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-041 I HUM 460
Thematic Studies
THEMATIC STUDIES (3)
Analysis of a group of related ideas in art, music, literature, and/or philosophy. (May be repeated for credit.)
PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
APPROVED START:  SP2002

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-042 I HUM 491
Seminar in Interdisciplinary Humanities
SMNR INTER HUM (3)
Interdisciplinary studies dealing with selected periods of world culture. (May be repeated for credit.)
PREREQUISITE: I HUM 300W, seventh-semester standing
APPROVED START:  FA2001

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-043 I HUM 494
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
APPROVED START:  SP2002

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-044 I HUM 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-6)
Supervised internship for undergraduate or graduate Humanities majors in state offices, educational institutions, arts agencies, community organizations, or humanities councils.
PREREQUISITE: senior-level status for undergraduate students; 18 credits of course work for graduate students; approval of program required
APPROVED START:  SP2002

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-045 I HUM 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
APPROVED START:  SP2002

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-046 I HUM 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START:  SP2002

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-047 I HUM 499  (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HUM
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-048 ACCTG 463
Accounting Theory
ACCTG THEORY (3)
An analysis of the development of accounting theory and its current and future impact on accounting.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 471
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-049 AM ST 301  (GH)
American Civilization
AMER CIVILIZATION (3)
An interdisciplinary overview of major themes, works, and events, in American history and culture.
PREREQUISITE: HIST 020 or HIST 021 or 3 credits in American Studies
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-050 AM ST 321  (US)
American Indian Studies
AM INDIAN STUDIES (3 per semester, maximum of 99)
A study of American Indian history, societies and cultures (may be repeated for credit).
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits of American Studies or ANTH 146 or HIST 153
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-051 ART   405
Advanced Studio Art
ADV STUDIO ART (3 per semester/maximum of 9)
Advanced work in drawing and painting, with an emphasis on individual development.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ART or A ED, or graduate level status, or permission of program
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-052 B LAW 340
Business Law
BUS LAW (3)
Course examines topics such as commercial paper, secured transactions, bankruptcy, suretyship, professionals’ liability, malpractice, and related topics.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-053 CINSY 446
Database Management
DATABASE MGMNT (3)
Designed to provide students with explanation, comparison of techniques, methodology of systems, limitations, application of various database management systems.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in programming
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-054 CMPEH 449
VLSI Digital Circuits
VLSI DGITAL CRCUIT (3)
Modern approaches to using VLSI technology; logic circuits, cell layout and design on CAD systems.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-055 CMPSC 428
Programming in Ada
ADA PROGRAMMING (3)
Structured program design using Ada; strong typing, data abstraction, packages, subprograms, separate compilation, visibility, exceptions, generic units.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 121
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-056 COMM  482
Advanced Communication Workshop
ADV COMM WORKSHOP (4)
Conceptualization, planning, and execution of a visual product on a selected topic utilizing an intensive group project-oriented laboratory approach.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 371
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-057 COMMS 438
Magazine Editing
MAGAZINE EDITING (3)
Study and practice of the editing and design of magazines and newsletters.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-058 EDUC  412
Early Literacy Intervention I
EARLY LIT INTERV I (3)
Participants will better understand factors affecting early reading behavior through diagnostic techniques, observation techniques, and literacy intervention strategies.
PREREQUISITE: permission of the program
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-059 ET    302
Mechanics II: Dynamics
MECH II: DYNAMICS (3)
Kinematics of a particle; relative motion; kinematics of a mass-point; kinematics of a rigid body; work-energy; impulse-momentum.
PREREQUISITE: statics
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-060 MET   342
Instrumentation
INSTRUMENTATION (2)
Measuring system responses of first and second order instruments; fundamentals of mechanical measurements, including pressure, temperature, fluid flow, etc.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-061 MET   450
Manufacturing Engineering
MANUFACTURING ENGR (3:3:0)
Design, analysis and operational issues related to improved productivity and efficiency in modern manufacturing systems.
PREREQUISITE: MET 358
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-062 MGMT  402
Experiences in Organizational Relations
EXPR ORG REL (3)
An experiential approach to study of behavior in organizations, applying concepts and theories of management to interpersonal situations.
PREREQUISITE: MGMT 301
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-063 SOCIO 476
Sociology of Science and Technology
SOC OF SCI & TECH (3)
Examines the constitutive relationship between society, science and technology and ethical concerns arising from these relationships.
PREREQUISITE: 60 credits, at least 6 of which are in the social sciences or graduate status or permission of the program
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

COURSE ADDS

43-03-064 EARTH 107  (GN)
Coastal Processes, Hazards and Society
COASTAL PROCESSES (3)
Processes responsible for formation, diversity, and evolution of coastal landscapes; socioeconomic and policy responses to changes in coastal regions.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-03-065 E B F 200  (GS)
Introduction to Energy and Earth Sciences Economics
ENGY & ERH SCI ECO (3:3:0)
Resource use decisions and their effect on local, national, and global development.
APPROVED START:  FA2010

NEW
ADD PREREQUISITE: ECON 102 and MATH 022 or equivalent
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-066 P N G 450
Drilling Design and Production Engineering
DRILLING DESIGN (3)
Design and analysis of oil-field drilling operations and equipment.
PREREQUISITE: C E 360, E MCH 210
APPROVED START:  SP2001

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Drilling Engineering
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: EME 303, E MCH 210
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-067 GEOG  440
Topics in Regional Geography
REGION GEOG (3)
Analysis of historical, contemporary and future environmental and societal issues in a specified world region from a geographical perspective.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in physical geography, 3 credits in human geography
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-068 GEOSC 228
Dinosaurs
DINOSAURS (3)
Dinosaurs and other large Mesozoic reptiles; their morphology, stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental distribution, preservation, collecting, classification, lifestyles, origins, evolution, and extinction.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-069 GEOSC 461
Geology of North America
GEOL NORTH AMERICA (3:3:0)
Evolution of structural-stratigraphic framework of continent; interpretation of relevant data obtained from field, experimental, and geophysical observation.
PREREQUISITE: GEOSC 001, GEOSC 020, or GEOSC 071
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-070 MATSE 424
Materials Selection and Design
MATL SELECTION (1)
Introduction to the selection and design of materials for structural applications.
PREREQUISITE: MATSE 201 or MATSE 259
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-071 METEO 446
Laboratory in Atmospheric Physics II
LAB ATMOS PHYS II (1:0:3)
Experimental practices in cloud and aerosol physics, atmospheric electricity, atmospheric chemistry, radar meteorology.
PREREQUISITE: or concurrent: METEO 437
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-072 MN PR 424
Coal Preparation
COAL PREPARATION (3)
Unit operations, flowsheets, and testing methods used in preparation of coal.
PREREQUISITE: MN PR 301
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-073 MNG   470
Mining and Geologic Structures
MNG & GEO STRUCT (3)
Study of geologic structures and their impacts on mining operations.
PREREQUISITE: GEOSC 001, GEOSC 201
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Education

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-074 SPLED 434B
Evidenced-Based Practices for Inclusive Secondary Classrooms
INCLUSIVE SECOND (2)
Evidence-based methods to effectively serve special needs students in secondary general education settings.
PREREQUISITE: SPLED 430, SPLED 431, SPLED 432, SPLED 433
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Engineering

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-075 CH E  448
Advanced Mass Transfer Operations
ADV MASS TRANSFER (3:3:0)
Diffusion and mass transfer as applied to stagewise and continuous contact operations, including equipment design.
PREREQUISITE: CH E 410
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-076 I E 101S
Build Your Own Robot–First-Year Seminar
BUILD YOUR ROBOT (1)
The objective of this first-year seminar course is to provide students hands-on experience with robotics and automation devices.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-077 IET 105
Economics of Industry
ECON OF INDUSTRY (2:2:0)
Internal economics of industrial enterprise, cost factors, and methods of comparing alternate proposals.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-078 MCH T 212
Introduction to Dynamics
INTRO TO DYN (3)
Absolute and relative motion related to particles and simple linkages. Force-mass-acceleration, work-energy, and impulse-momentum solution techniques.
PREREQUISITE: MCH T 111. Prerequisite or concurrent: MATH 083
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-079 S T S 151S (GS;US)
Technology and Society in American History
TECH IN AM HIST (3)
Development of technology in America from colonial times; its reception and its influence on social, economic, and political life.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-080 S T S 457  (US;IL)
The History of Women in Science
HIST WOMEN SCI (3:3:0)
Critical analysis of the role women, gender, and minorities have played in the natural sciences.
PREREQUISITE: HIST 116, HIST 117, WMNST 100, WMNST 106, or WMNST 157
CROSS LIST: HIST  457  WMNST 457
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Health and Human Development

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-03-081 H P A 401  (IL)
Comparative Health Systems
COMPARTVE HLTH SYS (3:3:0)
Comparative analysis of health services in selected developed and developing countries.
APPROVED START:  S12011

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 401L
ADD PREREQUISITE: H P A 301W
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-082 BB H  045
Alcohol Awareness Education
ALCHL AWARENESS ED (1)
A course designed to raise awareness relative to the use and abuse of beverage alcohol.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-083 BB H  046
Introduction to Health Aspects of Human Sexuality
INTRO HUMAN SEX (1)
An examination of health concerns related to sexuality and sexual behavior.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-084 KINES 008  (GHA)
Competition Casting
CASTING (1.5:0:3)
A course designed to enhance student’s knowledge, skills, and performance in all forms of casting for sport fishing.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Information Sciences and Technology

43-03-085 Change. Reduce the number of credits required for the minor from 19 to 18 credits; Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology Minor

Abington College
Berks College
Capital College
University College: Penn State Beaver, Penn State Brandywine, Penn State Greater Allegheny, Penn State Hazleton, Penn State Lehigh Valley, Penn State New Kensington, Penn State Schuylkill, Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Penn State Worthington Scranton, Penn State York
University Park, College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST)
World Campus

This minor is structured to provide students with the theoretical frameworks and skill sets necessary to compete and be productive in the information technology-intensive global context that defines the new “Information Age.” Specifically, the minor will be focused on a program that will build an understanding of core information technologies and related areas of study; will prepare students for the practical application of various information sciences and related technologies; and engage students in sharpening their abilities to think critically and to work in teams. All this will be done with the intent to expose students to the cognitive, social, institutional, and global environments of Information Sciences and Technology and to then apply that knowledge as a supplement to their major.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in this minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
IST 110 GS(3), IST 210(3), IST 220(3) (Sem 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from IST 250(3), IST 301(3), or IST 302(3) (Sem 5-8)
Select 6 credits from IST 402(3), IST 431(3), or IST 432(3) (Sem 5-8)


43-03-086 Change. Reduce the number of credits required for the major from 41 to 40 credits; Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology

University Park, College of Information Sciences and Technology (ISTBA)

The Bachelor of Arts in Information Sciences and Technology will provide students who are inherently independent and creative with new avenues of study. This degree will be one which will provide them with a thorough grounding in information sciences and technology but also the flexibility to design a curriculum of study to fit their interests and aspirations. Whether these students wish to blend information science and technology with the arts, the humanities, or with the sciences, this degree will provide them with the breadth of experience that they need to accomplish their goals. The core of the B.A. program in IST will parallel that of the B.S. degree, thus the B.A. student will be equipped with the same core expertise and tools sets that they need to be able to navigate through the increasingly complex technology landscape. However, the flexibility of the curriculum will give them the opportunity to learn how to apply IT creatively. The B.A. in IST will be highly interdisciplinary, as is fitting for an expressly interdisciplinary college. The degree will be suitable for students who wish to be entrepreneurs, who seek to go on to law or medical school, or who want to acquire an advanced degree in graduate studies.

Entrance Requirements: To be eligible for entrance to the Information Sciences and Technology (ISTBA) major, students must:

  1. have achieved at least third semester classification while pursuing a program of study that includes at least two of the following four courses with a grade of C or better in each: IST 110, IST 130, IST 210, IST 220.
  2. have met with a member of the IST Advising staff, with the outcome being a workable academic plan selected either from a set of example templates (e.g., pre-law) or developed in consultation with the adviser. This meeting must take place prior to the completion of 60 credits. At campuses other than University Park, students will meet with a local IST adviser to develop their academic plans.

For the B.A. degree in Information Sciences and Technology, a minimum of 125 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of the Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 16 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 40 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (16 credits)
IST 110 GS(3)[1], IST 130 GA(3)[1], IST 210(3)[1], IST 220(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
IST 495(1)[1] (Sem: 3-8)
IST 440W(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)[1]
Select 24 credits of IST and IST-related courses in consultation with academic adviser. (At least 12 credits must be at the 400 level.)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-03-087 Change. Reduce the number of common credits required for the major from 30 to 29 credits; Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology

Berks College (2ISBL)
Continuing Education,
University Park (2 IST)
University College: Penn State DuBois, Penn State Fayette, Penn State Hazleton, Penn State Lehigh Valley, Penn State Mont Alto, Penn State New Kensington, Penn State Shenango, Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Penn State Worthington Scranton, Penn State York (2ISCC)
World Campus

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR MARY BETH ROSSON, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies

This associate degree major is structured to prepare graduates for immediate and continuing employment opportunities in the broad disciplines of information science and technology. This includes positions such as application programmers, associate systems designers, network managers, Web designers and administrators, or information systems support specialists. Specifically, the major is designed to ensure a thorough knowledge of information systems and includes extensive practice using contemporary technologies in the creation, organization, storage, analysis, evaluation, communication, and transmission of information. The major fosters communications, interpersonal, and group interaction skills through appropriate collaborative and active learning projects and experiences. Technical material covers the structure of database systems, Web and multi-media systems, and considerations in the design of information systems. Team projects in most courses, a required internship, and a second-year capstone experience provide additional, focused venues for involving students in the cutting-edge issues and technologies in the field.

The Associate of Science in IST degree will be offered at multiple campuses within the Penn State system of colleges and campuses. Note that not all options will be available at all locations.

Baccalaureate Option: This option provides maximum articulation with the baccalaureate degree. Students who complete this option will meet all lower division requirements for the baccalaureate degree. This is not the case with the remaining options, although the degree of articulation is quite high for all associate degree options.

Generalized Business Option: This option enables students to specialize in the general business areas of accounting, marketing, and management.

Individualized Option: This option enables students to work closely with an adviser to develop a plan of study that meets the dual objectives of allowing a flexible academic program and providing breadth of technical specialization. An example would be a program where a student would take some of the courses listed in the Web Administration option and the remainder in the Software option.

Software Option: This option prepares graduates for entry-level programming support positions in industry. Students take courses in Web programming, database programming, and other contemporary programming environments.

Web Administration Option: This prepares graduates for positions as Web administrators and Web programmers.

Networking Option: This option prepares graduates for positions as entry-level computer network administrators. Students take courses in personal computer hardware, networking essentials, and network administration.

Data/Information Option: This option prepares graduates for entry-level database support positions. Students take courses in relational database systems and database management.

Industrial/Manufacturing Option: This option prepares graduates for entry-level manufacturing information systems positions. Students take courses in electrical and mechanical systems, and business and industrial processes.

Telecommunications Option: This option prepares graduates for entry-level positions in the telecommunications industry. Students take courses in voice and data communications, protocols, networks, and wireless systems.

For the Associate in Science degree in IST, a minimum of 60 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(9-12 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See the description of General Education in this bulletin.)

ELECTIVES: 3-6 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 45-47 credits
(This includes 9-12 credits of General Education courses, i.e., ALL options: 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses. The Baccalaureate Option also includes 3 credits of GS courses to equal a total of 12 credits that double count; the General Business Option also includes 0-3 credits of GS courses to equal 9-12 credits that double count.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 29 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (25 credits)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
CAS 100B GWS(3), IST 110 GS(3)[1], IST 111S(1)[1], IST 210(3)[1], IST 220(3)[1], IST 250(3)[1], ENGL 015 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
IST 260W(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
IST 295A(1)[1] or IST 295B(1)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 15-18 credits

BACCALAUREATE OPTION: (17-18 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
IST 230(3)[1] and IST 240(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
ECON 102 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)

GENERALIZED BUSINESS OPTION: (15-16 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15-16 credits)
Select 15 credits in consultation with the adviser from the following list: (Sem:1-4)
ACCTG 151(3), ACCTG 152(3), ACCTG 153(3), ACCTG 160(3), ACCTG 170(3), ACCTG 211(4), B A 250(3), MKTG 220(3), MKTG 221(3), MKTG 310(3), MKTG 327(3), MGMT 100(3), MGMT 150(3), MGMT 321(3), MGMT 341(3)
ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), or ECON 014 GS(3)
MATH 017 GQ(3), MATH 021 GQ(3), MATH 022 GQ(3), or MATH 026 GQ(3)

INDIVIDUALIZED OPTION: (15 credits)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 15 credits in consultation with an adviser that follow a coherent theme in information sciences and technology with a grade of C or better required for all IST[1] courses. (Sem: 1-4)

SOFTWARE OPTION: (15 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
CMPSC 302(3) (Sem: 2-4)
IST 211(3)[1], IST 247(3)[1], and IST 256(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
MATH 017 GQ(3), MATH 021 GQ(3), MATH 022 GQ(3), or MATH 026 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)

NETWORKING OPTION: (15 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
IST 225(3)[1], IST 226(3)[1], IST 227(3)[1], and IST 228(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
MATH 017 GQ(3), MATH 021 GQ(3), MATH 022 GQ(3), or MATH 026 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)

WEB ADMINISTRATION OPTION: (15 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
IST 255(3)[1], IST 256(3)[1], IST 257(3)[1], and IST 258(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
MATH 017 GQ(3), MATH 021 GQ(3), MATH 022 GQ(3), or MATH 026 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)

MANUFACTURING OPTION: (16 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
IST 271(3)[1], IST 272(3)[1], IST 273(3)[1], and IST 274(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
MATH 110(4) or MATH 140(4) (Sem: 1-2)

TELECOMMUNICATIONS OPTION: (15 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
IST 221(3)[1], IST 222(3)[1], IST 223(3)[1], and IST 224(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
MATH 017 GQ(3), MATH 021 GQ(3), MATH 022 GQ(3), or MATH 026 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)

DATA/INFORMATION OPTION: (15 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
IST 211(3)[1], IST 212(3)[1], IST 213(3)[1], and IST 214(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
MATH 017 GQ(3), MATH 021 GQ(3), MATH 022 GQ(3), or MATH 026 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-03-088 Change. Decrease the number of credits required for the major from 85 to 84 credits; Increase the number of credits required for the option from 21 to 24 credits; Move IST 240, 242 from Additional Courses for Major to Prescribed/Additional Courses in the options; Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology

Abington College (ISSAB)
Berks College (ISSBL)
Capital College (ISSCA)
University College: Penn State Beaver, Penn State Brandywine, Penn State Greater Allegheny, Penn State Hazleton, Penn State New Kensington, Penn State Lehigh Valley, Penn State Mont Alto, Penn State Schuylkill, Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Penn State Worthington Scranton, Penn State York (ISSCC)
World Campus

University Park, College of Information Sciences and Technology (ISTBS)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

This major is structured to provide students with the theoretical frameworks and skill sets necessary to compete and be productive in the information technology-intensive global context that defines the new “Information Age.” Specifically, the degree will be focused on a program that will build an understanding of core information technologies and related areas of study; will prepare students for the practical application of various information sciences and related technologies; and engage students in sharpening their abilities to think critically and to work in teams. All this will be done with considerable interdisciplinary integration in order to expose students to the cognitive, social, institutional, and global environments of IST. Team projects in most courses, a required internship, and a senior capstone experience provide additional, focused venues for involving students in the cutting-edge issues and technologies of the field.

INFORMATION CONTEXT: PEOPLE, ORGANIZATIONS, AND SOCIETY OPTION: This option focuses on how information technology affects social change and the delivery of information to the consumer. This includes the human-machine interface; organization and retrieval of information; digital libraries; information and telecommunications services; information and media industry structures; software services and intermediaries; telecommunications and information law and policy; sociological aspects of technology change; multimedia; and art, design, and aesthetics.

INFORMATION SYSTEMS: DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT OPTION: This option is focused on expanding the skills needed to develop advanced information technology systems using state-of-the-art tools and techniques. The emphasis is on providing the student with both knowledge in the design, implementation, testing and evolution of complex software systems as well as a set of project-oriented, team-programming experiences.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: INTEGRATION & APPLICATION OPTION: This option is designed to prepare students to use information technology to realize a variety of system-based goals (e.g., reliability, accessibility, efficiency, etc.). It is focused on developing a theoretical foundation and the skill set needed for integrating information technology into different systems for the purpose of enhancing system performance. The emphasis is on providing the student with both the theoretical frameworks needed to use information technology as a system attribute as well as a set of application-oriented experiences and skills.

Entrance Requirements: To be eligible for entrance to the Information Sciences and Technology (ISTBS) major, students must:

  1. be taking, or have taken, a program appropriate for entry to the major as shown in the Bulletin, including approximately 60 credits of course work.
  2. have completed the following entrance-to-major requirements with a grade of C or better in each: IST 110(3); IST 210(3)and IST 220(3). These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance-to-major procedure is carried out.
  3. have achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 prior to and through the end of the semester during which the entrance-to-major procedure is carried out.

For the B.S. degree in Information Sciences and Technology, a minimum of 125 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of the Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 8 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 84 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; and 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 60 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (26 credits)
IST 110 GS(3)[1], IST 210(3)[1], IST 220(3)[1], IST 230(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-6)
IST 495(1)[1] (Sem: 3-8)
IST 301(3)[1], IST 331(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
IST 440W(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (13 credits)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3)[1], CMPSC 121 GQ(3)[1], or IST 140(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
ECON 014 GS(3), ECON 102 GS(3), or ECON 104 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
Attainment of third-level proficiency in a single foreign language (12 credits). Proficiency must be demonstrated by either examination or course work. See the admission section of the general information in this Bulletin for the placement policy for Penn State foreign language courses. (Sem: 1-4)
Select 6 credits of international courses in foreign culture from College-approved list (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits[1] at the 400 level in emerging issues and technologies from College-approved list (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 24 credits

INFORMATION CONTEXT: PEOPLE, ORGANIZATIONS, AND SOCIETY OPTION: 24 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)[1]
IST 431(3) and IST 432(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)[1]
IST 240(3) or IST 242(3) (Sem: 1-4)
IST 302(3) or IST 413(3) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from College-approved list (Sem: 5-8)

INFORMATION SYSTEMS: DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT OPTION: 24 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)[1]
IST 242(3) (Sem: 1-4)
IST 311(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)[1]
Select 3 credits from IST 261(3) or IST 361(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from IST 411(3), IST 412(3), or IST 413(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from College-approved list (Sem: 5-8)

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: INTEGRATION & APPLICATION OPTION: 24 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)[1]
IST 302(3), IST 420(3), IST 421(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)[1]
IST 240(3) or IST 242(3) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from College-approved list (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[2] Students in the Information Systems: Design and Development Option are expected to take IST 242 prior to taking the prescribed and additional courses for that option.


43-03-089 Change. Reduce the number of credits required for the minor from 19 to 18 credits; Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology for Communication Arts and Sciences Minor

University Park: College of the Liberal Arts (ISCAS)

The Internet and other technologies are emerging as important communication channels. People establish personal relationships, develop language skills, conduct business, and make arguments online. Web sites have become important sites of public discourse and are playing an encompassing role in political campaigns. Students who pursue careers as communication consultants, in management or human resources, as political speech writers, and as independent business operators need information management skills. As a result, it is essential for Communication Arts and Sciences students to be fully versed in information sciences and technology for both personal and professional advancement.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in this minor.

Scheduling Recommendations by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
IST 110 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
IST 210(3) (Sem: 3-4)
IST 220(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 9 credits of CAS courses from a department-approved list with at least 6 credits at the 400 level. (Sem: 5-8)


43-03-090 Change. Reduce the number of credits required for the minor from 19 to 18 credits; Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology for Labor Studies and Employment Relations Minor

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (ISLER)

The joint minor in Information Sciences and Technology for Labor and Employment Relations (ISLER) is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop working knowledge of information technology, labor and employment relations, and their interdisciplinary synergies. The joint minor is designed to prepare students for professional careers in human resource management, labor relations, information systems, software development, consulting, and government.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits[1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (12 credits)
LER 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
IST 110 GS(3), IST 210(3), IST 220(3) (Sem: 1-7)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from: LER 400 IL(3), LER 401(3), LER 404(3), LER 411(3), LER 424(3), LER 434(3), LER 435(3), LER 437(3), LER 444(3), LER 460(3), LER 464(3), LER 465(3), LER 470(3), LER 497(3) (Sem: 5-8)


43-03-091 Change. Reduce the number of credits required for the minor from 19 to 18 credits; Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Information Sciences and Technology for Mathematics Minor

University Park, Eberly College of Science (ISMTH)

The interaction between Information Sciences and Mathematics will continue developing in remarkable new directions. Mathematical scientists enormously benefit from information technology in the performance of research, in communicating and disseminating scientific information and results, as well as in career environments involving data analysis and management. Mathematicians also contribute to making inroads toward the development of new information technologies. Information sciences and technology are already playing a very important role in mathematical education, at all levels, and will experience an overwhelming increase in the near future. Giving undergraduate mathematics students the opportunity to minor in IST will not only enrich their educational achievements but it will also help them succeed in the employment searches.

Students must apply for entrance to the minor no later than the beginning of their senior year.

A grade of C or better is required in all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
IST 110 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
IST 210(3) Sem: 3-4)
IST 220(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following 400-level mathematics courses: MATH 451(3), MATH 457(3), MATH 459(3), MATH 465(3), MATH 467(3), MATH 468(3), MATH 469(3) (Sem: 5-8)


43-03-092 Change. Reduce the number of common credits required for the major from 73 to 72 credits; Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Security and Risk Analysis

Penn State Altoona (SRAAL)
Penn State Berks (SRABL)
Penn State Harrisburg (SRACA)
University Park, College of Information Sciences and Technology (SRA)
World Campus

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR FRED FONSECA, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies

The Bachelor of Science in Security and Risk Analysis (SRA) in the College of Information Sciences and Technology is intended to familiarize students with the general frameworks and multidisciplinary theories that define the area of security and related risk analyses. Courses in the major will engage students in the challenges and problems associated with assuring information confidentiality and integrity (e.g., social, economic, technology-related, and policy issues), as well as the strengths and weaknesses of various methods for assessing and mitigating associated risk.

The major provides a grounding in the analysis and modeling efforts used in information search, visualization, and creative problem solving. This knowledge is supplemented through an examination of the legal, ethical, and regulatory issues related to security that includes analyzing privacy laws, internal control and regulatory policies, as well as basic investigative processes and principles. Such understanding is applied to venues that include transnational terrorism, cyber crimes, financial fraud, risk mitigation, and security and crisis management. It also includes overviews of the information technology that plays a critical role in identifying, preventing and responding to security-related events.

Advisory groups from within and outside the University involved in the design of the major have agreed that graduates who can understand the cognitive, social, economic, and policy issues involved in security and risk management as well as the basics of the information technology and analytics that are included in the security/risk arena will be very successful. These observations drove the design and objectives of the SRA major.

SRA majors will choose one of the following options:

INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS AND MODELING OPTION. This option focuses on developing a more thorough knowledge of the strategic and tactical levels of intelligence collection, analysis, and decision-making. This includes examining the foundations of decision analysis, economic theory, statistics, data mining, and knowledge management, as well as the security-specific contexts in which such knowledge is applied.

INFORMATION AND CYBER SECURITY OPTION. This option includes a set of courses that provides an understanding of the theories, skills, and technologies associated with network security, cyber threat defense, information warfare, and critical infrastructure protection across multiple venues.

SOCIAL FACTORS AND RISK. This option includes the legal, regulatory, ethical, and other theories associated with security and risk. Such an examination is focused on understanding the social factors and causes that are linked to transnational terrorism, investigations and litigation involved in business, and other security-related environments.

Entrance Requirements: To be eligible for entrance to the Security and Risk Analysis (SRA) major, students must:

  1. be taking, or have taken, a program appropriate for entry to the major as shown in the Bulletin, including approximately 60 credits of course work.
  2. have completed the following entrance-to-major requirements with grades of C or better in each: IST 110(3); SRA 111(3); and SRA 211(3). These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance-to-major procedure is carried out.
  3. have achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 prior to and through the end of the semester during which the entrance-to-major procedure is carried out.

For the B.S. degree in Security and Risk Analysis, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(22 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of the Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 4 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 94 credits
(This includes 22 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses, 3 credits of GH, and 4 credits of GN courses)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 72 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (38 credits)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3)[1], SRA 111 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
IST 110 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 1-3)
IST 210(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
SRA 211(3)[1], SRA 221(3)[1], SRA 231(3)[1] (Sem: 2-4)
STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-6)
IST 495(1)[1] (Sem: 3-8)
IST 432(3)[1], SRA 311(3)[1], STAT 460(3) (Sem: 5-6)
IST 440W(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
AG BM 101 GS(3) or ECON 102 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
PL SC 001 GS(3), PL SC 014 GS;IL(3), or GEOG 040 GS;IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)
PSYCH 100 GS(3) or SOC 005 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (22 credits)
Attainment of third-level proficiency in a single foreign language (12 credits). Proficiency must be demonstrated by either examination or course work. See the admission section of the general information in this Bulletin for the placement policy for Penn State foreign language courses. (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits of lab lecture series (GN) in consultation with adviser (Sem: 1-6)
Select 6 credits of international courses from College-approved list or other courses approved by adviser. (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 21 credits

INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS AND MODELING OPTION: (21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)[1]
ECON 302 GS(3), SRA 321(3) (Sem: 3-6)
SRA 433(3), SRA 468(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from College-approved list (Sem: 5-8)

INFORMATION AND CYBER SECURITY OPTION: (21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)[1]
IST 220(3) (Sem: 1-6)
IST 451(3), IST 454(3), IST 456(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from College-approved list (Sem: 5-8)

SOCIAL FACTORS AND RISK OPTION: (21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)[1]
IST 452(3), SRA 471(3), SRA 472(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from College-approved list (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-03-093 Change. Reduce the number of credits required for the minor from 19 to 18 credits; Change credits for IST 210 from 4 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Supply Chain and Information Sciences and Technology Minor

University Park: Smeal College of Business and College of Information Sciences and Technology (SCIST)

The minor in SCIST is structured to provide students not majoring in Supply Chain & Information Systems (SC&IS) or Management Information Systems (M I S) with the opportunity to develop working knowledge of information technology, supply chain management, and their interdisciplinary synergies. The joint minor is designed for professional careers in business, information systems, software development, consulting, and government. The successful minor must, at a minimum, possess basic knowledge of quantitative techniques, computer applications, and microeconomics.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
IST 110 GS(3), IST 210(3), IST 220(3) (Sem 1-7)
SCM 301(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from SCM 404(3), SCM 405(3), SCM 406(3) (Sem: 6-8)


COURSE ADDS

43-03-094 SRA 365
Statistics for Security and Risk Analysis
STAT SEC & RSK ANL (3)
Theoretical foundations and practice of intermediate statistics.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 200
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-03-095 IST   240
Introduction to Computer Languages
INTRO COMP LANG (3:3:0)
Introduction to the specification and application of languages and language paradigms that interact with computers.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 101
CONCURRENT: IST 230
APPROVED START:  SP2002

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 101 or IST 140
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-096 IST   261
Application Development Design Studio I
APP DEV STUDIO I (3)
Introductory design and development studio course for IST and SRA students.
PREREQUISITE: IST 242
APPROVED START:  S12014

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: IST 242 or approval of the program
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-097 IST   311
Object-Oriented Design and Software Applications
OOD & SOFTWARE (3)
Introduction to object-oriented applications including applications in an Object Oriented Design (OOD) language or OOD languages.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 102 or CMPSC 101; IST 240
APPROVED START:  SP2008

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: IST 242
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-098 SRA   311
Risk Management: Assessment and Mitigation
RISK MGMT (3)
Assessment and mitigation of security vulnerabilities for people, organizations, industry sectors, and the nation.
PREREQUISITE: SRA 231
APPROVED START:  S12006

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Risk Analysis in a Security Context (RISK ANALYSIS)
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-099 SRA   321
The Role of Information and Intelligence
ROL OF INF & INT (3)
The Role of information and intelligence introduces students to the architecture and policies of the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) and examines how U.S. intelligence policies and practices relate to overall U.S. foreign policy objectives and are influenced by today’s global environment and emerging technologies.  The course examines the users and processes of IC, participants of Competitive Intelligence, and comparative intelligence communities.
PREREQUISITE: SRA 111, SRA 211, SRA 231
APPROVED START:  S12011

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 421
CHANGE TITLES: The Intelligence Environment (INTELL ENVIRONMENT)
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Intercollege

43-03-100 Change. Increase the number of credits required for the minor from 19-26 to 24-27; Add NAVSC 402 to Marines service branch; Remove NAVSC 205 from Marines service branch; Change credits for NAVSC 101, 204, 311,313, 402, 411 from 2 to 3 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Military Studies Minor (MLTRY)

CHAIR, MILITARY STUDIES INTERDISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE, in charge

This interdisciplinary minor is designed for all students with special interests in military and national security affairs. Military emphasis is provided in one of three areas–Aerospace Studies, Military Science, or Naval Science. American military forces have played an important role in our domestic and international history and will continue to have significant involvement in policy arenas relating to national security and international relations. Students elect one military service branch for their prescribed courses and select two additional courses from appropriate history and political science courses emphasizing national security policy. At least 6 credits must be taken at the 400 level.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 24-27 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (Choose one service branch–18-20 credits)

AIR FORCE (20 credits)
AIR 151(2), AIR 152(2), AIR 251(2), AIR 252(2), AIR 351(3), AIR 352(3), AIR 451(3), AIR 452(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ARMY (20 credits)
ARMY 101(2), ARMY 102(2), ARMY 203(2), ARMY 204(2), ARMY 301(3), ARMY 302(3), ARMY 401(3), ARMY 402(3) (Sem: 1-7)

MARINES (18 credits)
NAVSC 101(3), NAVSC 204(3), NAVSC 311(3), NAVSC 313(3), NAVSC 402(3), NAVSC 411(3) (Sem: 1-7)

NAVY (21 credits)
NAVSC 101(3), NAVSC 204(3), NAVSC 205(3), NAVSC 322(3), NAVSC 323(3), NAVSC 401(3), NAVSC 402(3) (Sem: 1-7)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
HIST 108 GH;IL(3), HIST 120 GS;IL(3), HIST 130 GH;US(3), HIST 142 GS;IL(3), HIST 143 GH;IL(3), HIST 144 US;IL(3), HIST 151 GS;US(3), HIST 160 US(3), HIST 161 US(3), HIST 165 IL(3), HIST 173 GH;IL(3), HIST 175 GH;IL(3), HIST 178 GH;IL(3), HIST 181 GH;IL(3), HIST 192 GH;IL(3), HIST 420 IL(3), HIST 430 IL(3), HIST 434 IL(3), HIST 441 US(3), HIST 444 US(3), HIST 452 US;IL(3), HIST 454 US(3), HIST 473 IL(3) (Sem: 1-2, 7-8)
PL SC 003 GS;IL(3), PL SC 014 GS;IL(3), PL SC 020 GS;IL(3), PL SC 022 GH;IL(3), PL SC 137(3), PL SC 150(3), PL SC 413(3), PL SC 415(3), PL SC 416(3), PL SC 437(3), PL SC 438(3), PL SC 439(3), PL SC 442(3), PL SC 452(3), PL SC 453 IL(3), PL SC 454 IL(3), PL SC 455(3), PL SC 456(3), PL SC 457(3-6), PL SC 458(3-6), PL SC 467(3) (Sem: 1-2, 7-8)


 COURSE ADDS

43-03-101 HONOR 235H
Honors Leadership Lessons
HONOR 235H (3)
Intensive survey of contemporary leadership theory joined with practice, team-building skills,  effective communication skills, policy formation and influence, and service ledership.
PREREQUISITE: First-Year at Penn State in Schreyer Honors College
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-102 – Number not Assigned

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of the Liberal Arts

43-03-103 Change. Add 300/400 level selection to Additional Courses; Move ENGL 200, 201 from Prescribed to Additional; Remove ENGL 221, 221W, 222, 222W, 231, 231W, 232, 232W, 235 from Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

English


Abington College (ENGAB)
Altoona College (ENGAL)
University College (ENGCC): Penn State Brandywine, Penn State Greater Allegheny, Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Penn State Worthington Scranton, Penn State York
University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (ENGL)

PROFESSOR ROBERT BURKHOLDER, Acting Head

Majors explore the imaginative and practical uses of English through courses in literature, writing, rhetoric, and language. They develop perspectives on human nature and cultural values through American, British, and other English literatures; they learn how to gather, analyze, synthesize, and communicate information; they gain mastery over their language. These skills help English majors find careers in such fields as publishing, business, industry, government, and teaching. English majors often go on to postgraduate study not only in English but in such areas as law, business, education, or other liberal disciplines.

Majors can emphasize writing, literature, or rhetoric, or a mix of literature, writing, and rhetoric. All provide a liberal education and all develop analytic and writing skills. Qualified students may participate in the career internship and in the English honors program.

Students interested in earning certification in secondary education should contact the College of Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction. (See also Teacher Education Programs.)

For the B.A. degree in English, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 18 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 36 credits[1]

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 3 credits from ENGL 200(3) or ENGL 201 GH(3) (Sem: 1-6)
Select 3 credits of a 300/400-level course in each of the following areas:
Medieval through Sixteenth Century (Sem: 1-8)
Sixteenth Century through Eighteenth Century (Sem: 1-8)
The Nineteenth Century (Sem: 1-8)
Twentieth Century to the Present (Sem: 1-8)

Select 3 credits from ENGL 310H(3) or ENGL 487W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
In consultation with adviser, select 18 credits in literature, writing, or rhetoric (Sem: 1-8)
(At least 9 credits must be at the 300/400 level)

(At least 3 of those 300/400 level credits must fulfill a departmental diversity requirement for a course related to race, gender, sexuality, disability, ethnicity, and/or postcolonial issues).

Integrated B.A./M.A. Program in English

The BA in English requires a minimum of 123 credits, with 36 of those credits required for the English major – 3 credits of English 200, 3 credits of English 201, 3 credits of English 221, 18 credits of English 300 level or above, 3 credits of pre-1800 300 level or above, 3 credits of post-1800 race, ethnic, or minority literatures 300 level or above, 3 credits of English 487W, senior seminar.

The B.A./M.A. consists of these 36 English credits of the B.A., plus an additional 24 English credits of M.A. work distributed as follows: 12 credits of English 512, 513, or 515. English 512, 513, and 515 can be repeated for credit. In addition, students will take 6 credits of a graduate-level literature and 6 credits of M.A. Master’s paper, 596, to support work on a major project that will be the centerpiece of each student’s culminating Master’s paper. In the Master’s paper, students receiving an M.A. in English with a creative writing concentration will append their Master’s paper with a bibliographic essay referencing primary and/or secondary sources generated by their research for the paper. The essay can discuss the range of research modalities, including contextual background in the work itself as well as contemporary and historic literature that has influenced the style and form of the Master’s paper. Sources consulted for contextual background can include library and database materials, historical research, oral history, interviews, and other bibliographic tools.  12 credits, 6 at the 400 level (412/413/415) and 6 at the 500 level (512/513/515), will be double counted between the B.A. and the M.A. The IUG B.A./M.A. consists of a total of 60 English credits.

A minimum of 141 credits are required to complete the IUG B.A/M.A. in English.

Time of Admission to the Program

Students shall be admitted to the English IUG program no earlier than the beginning of the third semester of undergraduate study at Penn State (regardless of transfer or AP credits accumulated prior to enrollment) and no later than the end of the second week of the semester preceding the semester of expected conferral of the undergraduate degree, as specified in the proposed IUG plan of study.

Application to the English IUG would typically occur in the junior year after a student has completed 60 credits, enrolled in the English major, and completed two English courses in creative writing.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the integrated B.A./M.A. program will be based on the submission of a portfolio of creative work and a plan of study to the department’s Director of Graduate Studies and the Director of the B.A./M.A. program. Applications typically will be filed during the 5th or 6th semesters of study, and applicants must have achieved a minimum of 60 credits and a 3.3 overall GPA and 3.6 GPA in English to begin the program. The English Director of Graduate Studies will ensure that the applicant meets the minimum credit and GPA requirements for the program. The Director of the B.A./M.A. program will evaluate the quality of the student’s creative work and the applicant’s plan for fulfilling the requirements of the M.A. in English. The Director of the B.A./M.A. program, in consultation with the Creative Writing faculty, will have final approval for what constitutes an acceptable level of creative work and an acceptable plan for the completion of the M.A.

The application procedure requires submission of the following:

  1. Support Letters from Faculty and Administrators (addressed to the department’s Director of Graduate Studies and the Director of the B.A./M.A. program)
  2. A Personal Statement
  3. Portfolio of Creative Work
  4. A Plan of Study
  5. A transcript and degree audit printed from e-Lion
  6. A current resume or curriculum vita
  7. A copy of the completed on-line Graduate School Application (GRE scores are not required).

Plan of Study and Advising

Prior to the application process, students should communicate their intent to enroll in the IUG to the English B.A. adviser and the Director of the B.A./M.A. program. The Director of the B.A./M.A. will help each student identify an appropriate series of English courses to properly prepare each student for the 500-level M.A. workshops and 500-level literature courses.

Students will be expected to maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.3 for all undergraduate coursework and a GPA of 3.6 in English (ENGL) courses throughout the IUG program of study. Failure to do so will result in the student being advised that he/she must regain a GPA of 3.3 within one semester. If the GPA is not 3.3 or higher in general undergraduate coursework and 3.6 or higher in English coursework after that term, the student will be dropped from the IUG.

Each student enrolled in the B.A./M.A. will meet at the beginning of each term with the Director of the B.A./M.A. to discuss his or her progress through the M.A. degree and to make sure that he or she is following the plan established upon his or her admission to the B.A./M.A. program.

If the student decides not to continue on in the IUG, the student may, contingent on fulfilling all other requirements for the BA in English, graduate with a B.A. in English.

Sequence of Courses

The IUG B.A./M.A. consists of a total of 60 English credits. A minimum of 141 credits are required to complete the IUG B.A/M.A. in English.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-03-104 AF AM 303  (GS;IL)
Race and Gender in the Americas: Latin American and Caribbean Cultures
LTN AM RACE & GEND (3)
Utilizing a theoretical framework of intersectionality, this course examines historical and cultural constructions of race and gender in Latin America and the Caribbean.
CROSS LIST: ANTH  303  WMNST 303
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-105 ANTH  303  (GS;IL)
Race and Gender in the Americas: Latin American and Caribbean Cultures
LTN AM RACE & GEND (3)
Utilizing a theoretical framework of intersectionability, this course examines historical and cultural constructions of race and gender in Latin America and the Caribbean.
CROSS LIST: AF AM 303  WMNST 303
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-106 ASIA  171  (GH;IL)
Introduction to South Asian History 2: Early Modern to Contemporary
INTRO:SOUTH ASIA 2 (3)
An introduction to South Asian history from early modern to contemporary times.
CROSS LIST: HIST  171
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-107 ASIA  200  (GH;IL)
What Are Asian Languages?
ASIAN LANGUAGES (3)
Introduction to the interrelated notions of language, interaction, and culture centering on regions and languages covered in Asian Studies.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-108 CMLIT 128  (GH;US;IL)
The Holocaust in Film and Literature
HOLOCAUST FILM/LIT (3)
Thematic, formal, and historical analysis of filmic and literary representation of the Holocaust.
CROSS LIST: ENGL  128  J ST  128
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-109 COMM  434
Movies, Media, and the Jewish American Experience
JEWISH AMER FILM (3)
Study of Jewish American Film and Popular Culture.
PREREQUISITE: A previous course in Jewish Studies, Film Studies, Media Studies, Art, Music, English, or Comparative Literature
CROSS LIST: J ST  434
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

43-03-110 ENGL  128  (GH;US;IL)
The Holocaust in Film and Literature
HOLOCAUST FILM/LIT (3)
Thematic, formal, and historical analysis of filmic and literary representation of the Holocaust.
CROSS LIST: CMLIT 128  J ST  128
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-111 ENGL  179  (GH;US)
Exploring the Literature of Food: Current Trends in American Food Writing and Environmentalism
FOOD LITERATURE (3)
Examines historical and contemporary American food literature.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-112 ENGL  234  (GH)
Sports, Ethics, and Literature
SPORTS/ETHICS/LIT (3)
Exploration of social and ethical issues in sports through a variety of literary texts.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-113 HIST  171  (GH;IL)
Introduction to South Asian History 2: Early Modern to Contemporary
INTRO:SOUTH ASIA 2 (3)
An introduction to South Asian history from early modern to contemporary times.
CROSS LIST: ASIA  171
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-114 HIST  261Y (GH;US;IL)
Ghetto: From Venice to Detroit
GHETTO (3)
This course explores why certain groups have been segregated in cities around the world in the last 500 years.
CROSS LIST: J ST  261Y
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-115 HIST  266Y (GH;US)
Sex and Violence in Nineteenth-Century America
SEXVIOLENCEUS19THC (3)
Historical Overview of Sex and Violence in the Nineteenth-Century United States.
CROSS LIST: WMNST 266Y
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-115A HIST 422 (GH;US)
Religion and American Culture
AMERICAN RELIGION (3 per semester/maximum of 6)
Selected topics, problems, or historical movements in American religion. Relation between religion and American culture.
CROSS LIST: RL ST 422
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-03-116 HIST  423  (GH;IL)
Orthodox Christianity: History and Interpretations
ORTHODOXHISTORY (3)
Examines Orthodox Christianity from origins to present using critical historical analysis of primary and secondary sources.
PREREQUISITE: HIST 105
CROSS LIST: RL ST 423
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-117 HIST  439
Women and the Holocaust
WOMEN HOLOCAUST (3)
Analysis of women’s experience in the Holocaust and exploration of the role of gender in Holocaust Studies.
PREREQUISITE: J ST 010 or J ST 121 or HIST 121 or consent of program
CROSS LIST: J ST  439  WMNST 439
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

43-03-118 J ST  104  (GH)
The Bible as Literature
THE BIBLE AS LIT (3)
Study of the English Bible as a literary and cultural document.
CROSS LIST: ENGL  104
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

43-03-119 J ST  128  (GH;US;IL)
The Holocaust in Film and Literature
HOLOCAUST FILM/LIT (3)
Thematic, formal, and historical analysis of filmic and literary representation of the Holocaust.
CROSS LIST: CMLIT 128  ENGL  128
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-120 J ST  143  (GH;IL)
History of Fascism and Nazism
FASCISM & NAZISM (3)
The study of right-wing totalitarianism in the twentieth century, with special emphasis on Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.
CROSS LIST: HIST  143
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

43-03-121 J ST  181  (GH;IL)
Introduction to the Middle East
INTRO MIDDLE EAST (3)
Origins of Islamic civilization; expansion of Islam; the Ottoman Empire; the Middle East since 1918.
CROSS LIST: HIST  181
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

43-03-122 J ST  261Y (GH;US;IL)
Ghetto: From Venice to Detroit
GHETTO (3)
This course explores why certain groups have been segregated in cities around the world in the last 500 years.
CROSS LIST: HIST  261Y
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-123 J ST  439
Women and the Holocaust
WOMEN HOLOCAUST (3)
Analysis of women’s experience in the Holocaust and exploration of the role of gender in Holocaust Studies.
PREREQUISITE: J ST 010 or J ST 121 or HIST 121 or consent of program
CROSS LIST: HIST  439  WMNST 439
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-124 J ST  472
The Ottoman Empire and Other Muslim States
OTTOMAN EMPIRE (3)
Turkish and Mongol invasions; Mamluks; Ottoman expansion and institutions; Safavid Persia; disintegration and reform; emergence of modern Turkey and Iran.
PREREQUISITE: HIST 181
CROSS LIST: HIST  472
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

43-03-125 J ST  473  (IL)
The Contemporary Middle East
CONTEMP MIDEAST (3)
Political, economic, and social changes in Turkey, Iran, Israel, and the Arab countries in the twentieth century; Arab-Israeli conflict.
CROSS LIST: HIST  473
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

43-03-126 LER   403  (IL)
International Human Resource Studies
IHRS (3)
Course exploring human resource management from an international perspective.
PREREQUISITE: LER 100
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-127 OLEAD 410  (IL)
Leadership in a Global Context
LDRS IN A GLOB CON (3)
This course explores the science and practice of leadership around the globe through pertinent scholarly literature and related instructional resources.
PREREQUISITE: OLEAD 100
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-128 PL SC 465Y (IL)
Democratization in Asia
DEMOCRATIZ IN ASIA (3)
A course which identifies components of democracy, such as definitions, measures, datasets, and the democratization process.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 003 or ASIA 100
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-128A RL ST 422 (GH;US)
Religion and American Culture
AMERICAN RELIGION (3 per semester/maximum of 6)
Selected topics, problems, or historical movements in American religion. Relation between religion and American culture.
CROSS LIST: HIST 422
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-03-129  RL ST 423  (GH;IL)
Orthodox Christianity: History and Interpretations
ORTHODOXHISTORY (3)
Examines Orthodox Christianity from origins to present using critical historical analysis of primary and secondary sources.
PREREQUISITE: HIST 105
CROSS LIST: HIST  423
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-130 WMNST 105  (GS;US)
Living in a Diverse World
DIVERSE WORLD (3)
Critical perspectives on the relationship between social difference and power, emphasizing gender, race, sexuality, class, and disability.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-131 WMNST 266Y (GH;US)
Sex and Violence in Nineteenth-Century America
SEXVIOLENCEUS19THC (3)
Historical Overview of Sex and Violence in the Nineteenth-Century United States.
CROSS LIST: HIST  266Y
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-132 WMNST 303  (GS;IL)
Race and Gender in the Americas: Latin American and Caribbean Cultures
LTN AM RACE & GEND (3)
Utilizing a theoretical framework of intersectionality, this course examines historical and cultural constructions of race and gender in Latin America and the Caribbean.
CROSS LIST: AF AM 303  ANTH  303
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-133 WMNST 439
Women and the Holocaust
WOMEN HOLOCAUST (3)
Analysis of women’s experience in the Holocaust and exploration of the role of gender in Holocaust Studies.
PREREQUISITE: J ST 010 or J ST 121 or HIST 121 or consent of program
CROSS LIST: HIST  439  J ST  439
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-03-134 AF AM 416  (US;IL)
Race, Gender and Science
RACE GENDER & SCI (3)
The class will focus on race and gender as products of science, and how societal values shape scientific activity.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in S T S, WMNST, or AAA S
CROSS LIST: S T S 416  WMNST 416
APPROVED START:  SP2013

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: S T S 416
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-135 ARAB  164  (GH;IL)
Muhammad and the Qur’an
MUHANNAD AND QURAN (3)
History of the Qur’an and its interpretation by the early Muslim community; life of Muhammad and his role within Islam.
CROSS LIST: RL ST 108
APPROVED START:  SP2015

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: RL ST 164
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-136 ASIA  083S
Asian Studies First Year Seminar
ASIA FIRST-YR SEM (3:3:0)
The meaning and advantages of a Liberal Arts education in context of a specific discipline.
APPROVED START:  SP2010

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION DESIGNATION: GH
ADD UNITED STATES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES DESIGNATION: IL
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-137 CAMS  090  (GH;IL)
Archaeology of Jerusalem: Past and Present
ARCH OF JERUSALEM (3:3:0)
Archaeology and history of Jerusalem from earliest times (c. 3000 BCE) to the present.
CROSS LIST: J ST  090  RL ST 090
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Jerusalem: Past, Present, and Future (JERUSALEM)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Social, cultural, religious, political, and archaeological history of Jerusalem from earliest times (c. 3000 BCE) to present.
CROSS LIST: J ST  090  RL ST 090
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-138 ENGL  104  (GH)
The Bible as Literature
THE BIBLE AS LIT (3:3:0)
Study of the English Bible as a literary and cultural document.
APPROVED START:  SP2002

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: J ST  104
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-139 ENGL  132  (GH;US)
Introduction to Jewish American Literature
INTRO AM JEW LIT (3)
A historical and thematic survey of Jewish Literature of the United States.
CROSS LIST: J ST  132
APPROVED START:  SP2009

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Jewish American Literature (JEWISH AMER LIT)
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-140 FR    436Y (IL)
Readings in Seventeenth-Century French Literature
FR 17TH CEN LIT (3:3:0)
Baroque and classicism:  reappraisal of major and lesser-known 17th-century texts and theories.
PREREQUISITE: FR 351 or FR 352
APPROVED START:  FA2006

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 436
CHANGE TITLES: French and Francophone Theater (FRENCH THEATER)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: French Theater: From “classical unities” to Contemporary Performances.
PREREQUISITE: FR 351 or FR 352
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-141 HIST  143  (GH;IL)
History of Fascism and Nazism
FASCISM & NAZISM (3:3:0)
The study of right-wing totalitarianism in the twentieth century, with special emphasis on Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.
APPROVED START:  SP2006

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: J ST  143
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-142 HIST  172  (IL)
Survey of Japanese Civilization
SRVEY JAPANESE CIV (3:3:0)
Survey of social, institutional, cultural, and religious developments from ancient times to the present.
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION DESIGNATION: GH
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-143 HIST  181  (GH;IL)
Introduction to the Middle East
INTRO MIDDLE EAST (3:2:2)
Origins of Islamic civilization; expansion of Islam; the Ottoman Empire; the Middle East since 1918.
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: J ST  181
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-144 HIST  472  (IL)
The Ottoman Empire and Other Muslim States
OTTOMAN EMPIRE (3:3:0)
Turkish and Mongol invasions; Mamluks; Ottoman expansion and institutions; Safavid Persia; disintegration and reform; emergence of modern Turkey and Iran.
PREREQUISITE: HIST 181
APPROVED START:  SP2006

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: J ST  472
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-145 HIST  473  (IL)
The Contemporary Middle East
CONTEMP MIDEAST (3:3:0)
Political, economic, and social changes in Turkey, Iran, Israel, and the Arab countries in the twentieth century; Arab-Israeli conflict.
APPROVED START:  SP2006

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: J ST  473
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-146 J ST  090  (GH;IL)
Archaeology of Jerusalem: Past and Present
ARCH OF JERUSALEM (3:3:0)
Archaeology and history of Jerusalem from earliest times (c. 3000 BCE) to the present.
CROSS LIST: CAMS  090  RL ST 090
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Jerusalem: Past, Present, and Future (JERUSALEM)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Social, cultural, religious, political, and archaeological history of Jerusalem from earliest times (c. 3000 BCE) to present.
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-147 J ST  132  (GH;US)
Introduction to Jewish American Literature
INTRO AM JEW LIT (3)
A historical and thematic survey of Jewish Literature of the United States.
CROSS LIST: ENGL  132
APPROVED START:  SP2009

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Jewish American Literature (JEWISH AMER LIT)
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-148 J ST  434
Media and the American Jewish Experience
FILM AM JWISH HIST (3)
Study of United States Jewish history through film and accompanying written text.
PREREQUISITE: 5th semester standing  and one of the following: a previous course in art, music, or literature or else J ST 115
APPROVED START:  S12011

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Movies, Media, and the Jewish American Experience (JEWISH AMER FILM)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Study of Jewish American Film and Popular Culture.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: A previous course in Jewish Studies, Film Studies, Media Studies, Art, Music, English, or Comparative Literature.
ADD CROSS LIST: COMM  434
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-149 RL ST 090  (GH;IL)
Archaeology of Jerusalem: Past and Present
ARCH OF JERUSALEM (3:3:0)
Archaeology and history of Jerusalem from earliest times (c. 3000 BCE) to the present.
CROSS LIST: CAMS  090  J ST  090
APPROVED START:  S12005

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Jerusalem: Past, Present, and Future (JERUSALEM)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Social, cultural, religious, political, and archaeological history of Jerusalem from earliest times (c. 3000 BCE) to the present.
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

OLD
43-03-150 RL ST 108  (GH;IL)
Muhammad and the Qur’an
MUHAMMAD AND QURAN (3)
History of the Qur’an and its interpretation by the early Muslim community; life of Muhammad and his role within Islam.
CROSS LIST: ARAB  164
APPROVED START:  SP2015

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 164
PROPOSED START:  FA2015

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-151 ANTH  445W
Ethnographic Film
ETHNO FILM (3:3:0)
Comparisons of written and visual ethnography; critical assessment of ethnographic film; cross-cultural variation.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 001 or ANTH 045
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-152 ANTH  450
Comparative Social Organization
COMP SOC ORGN (3:3:0)
Social structure and cultural change among nonliterate societies.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 045
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-153 ANTH  450W
Comparative Social Organization
COMP SOC ORGN (3)
Social structure and cultural change among nonliterate societies.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 045
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-154 CAMS  133  (GH)
Archaeology of the Levant and Ancient Israel
ARCH LEV ISRAEL (3)
Archaeology of the Levant and Ancient Israel to c. 1000 B.C.E.; relationship between archaeological and textual evidence.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-155 CAMS  470  (IL)
Languages and Cultures of the Ancient Near East
ANE LANG & CULTURE (3)
This course is an overview of the languages and cultures that populated the Ancient Near East.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in any undergraduate CAMS courses.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-156 CRIM  083S
First-Year Seminar in Criminal Justice
1ST-YEAR SMNR (3)
Critical approaches to issues in criminal justice and criminology.
CROSS LIST: CRIMJ 083S
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-157 CRIMJ 201
Legal and Ethical Issues in Private Security
ISSUES IN SECURITY (3:3:0)
Detailed examination of legal issues and ethical considerations in private sector security.
PREREQUISITE: CRIMJ 200
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-158 ECON  418
A Comparative and Cost-Benefit Analysis of State Government Activities
ECON STATE GOVT (3)
This course examines federalism with a particular focus on the activities undertaken by the state of Pennsylvania.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 306
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-159 ECON  418W
A Comparative and Cost-Benefit Analysis of State Government Activities
STATE GOVERNMENT (3)
This course examines federalism with a particular focus on the activities undertaken by the state of Pennsylvania.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 490
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-160 ECON  439
Economics of Technology Diffusion
TECH DIFFUSION (3)
Technology Diffusion: Globalization, productivity measurement, intellectual property.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 433
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-161 ECON  476W
The Economics of Fertility in the Developing World
ECON OF FERTILITY (3)
Demand for children, supply of children, and costs of fertility regulation; fertility transition; public policies to affect fertility.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 471 and ECON 490
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-162 FR 141  (IL)
Cultural Tradition in French Cuisine
FRENCH CUISINE (3:3:0)
A study of French culture in English, emphasizing the French gastronomical traditions in literature and civilization.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-163 FR 407  (IL)
Business Writing in French
BUS WRIT IN FR (3:3:0)
Common forms of business communication; writing of reports and abstracts.
PREREQUISITE: FR 331 or FR 332
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-164 FR 408  (IL)
French-American Business Translation
FR-AMER BUS TRANS (3:3:0)
Translation from French to English of actual documents from the business world; theoretical consideration and systematic vocabulary building.
PREREQUISITE: FR 407
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-165 HIST  457  (US;IL)
The History of Women in Science
HIST WOMEN SCI (3:3:0)
Critical analysis of the roles women, gender, and minorities have played in natural sciences.
PREREQUISITE: HIST 116, HIST 117, WMNST 100, WMNST 106, or WMNST 157
CROSS LIST: S T S 457  WMNST 457
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-166 J ST  134  (GH;IL)
Archaeology of Biblical Israel
ARCH BIBL ISRAEL (3)
Archaeology of Biblical Israel from 1200 B.C.E. to c. 640 C.E.; relationship between archaeological and textual evidence.
CROSS LIST: CAMS  134  RL ST 134
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-167 LATIN 420
Medieval Latin Literature
MEDIEVAL LATIN LIT (3-6)
Survey of Medieval Latin literature.
PREREQUISITE: LATIN 003
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-168 PL SC 441
Transnational Corporations and Other Organizations in International Relations
CORPS & ORGS IN IR (3:3:0)
Analysis of the effects of transnational actor behavior on international relations.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 333, I B 303, PL SC 014, or BUS 364
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-169 RL ST 007
Inner Lives in Religious Biography
RELIG BIOG (3:3:0)
Reading and discussion of selected autobiographical and biographical statements to discover and compare different forms of spirituality.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-170 UKR   204
Readings in Ukrainian
READINGS IN UKR (3:3:0)
Readings in Ukrainian literature and journalism.
PREREQUISITE: UKR 003
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-171 WMNST 416  (US;IL)
Race, Gender and Science
RACE GENDER & SCI (3)
The class will focus on race and gender as products of science, and how societal values shape scientific activity.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in S T S, WMNST or AAA S
CROSS LIST: AF AM 416  S T S 416
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-172 WMNST 457  (US;IL)
The History of Women in Science
HIST WOMEN SCI (3:3:0)
Critical analysis of the roles women, gender, and minorities have played in the natural sciences.
PREREQUISITE: WMNST 100, WMNST 106, WMNST 157, WMNST 116, or WMNST 117
CROSS LIST: HIST  457  S T S 457
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Nursing

COURSE ADDS

43-03-172A NURS  441
Nursing Care of America’s Veterans: An Introduction Into the Care of Military Veterans
CARING FOR VETERAN (3)
This course offers information on caring for the unique population of United States military veterans.
PREREQUISITE: PSYCH 100 or SOC 001 or HD FS 129 or NURS 111 and NURS 112 or NURS 230 and NURS 251
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Science

43-03-173 Change. Revise program description; Add CHEM 425W to Additional Courses; Add C or better requirement to Additional Courses – advanced laboratory and chemistry selections.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Chemistry

University Park, Eberly College of Science (CHEM)

PROFESSOR Mark Maroncelli, Assistant Head for Undergraduate Education

This major provides a strong foundation in the theory and practice of chemistry. Mathematics and physics are emphasized, since these subjects are essential to the understanding of chemistry. Courses in English and electives ensure study in non-technical subjects which broaden the student’s general education and enables him or her to relate the major to other fields of knowledge.

In order to be eligible for entrance to the Chemistry major, a student must have: 1) Attained at least a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average. 2) Completed CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), CHEM 210(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), and MATH 141 GQ(4); earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses; and earned a combined grade point average of at least 2.50 in these courses. (Note: If courses are repeated, only the higher grade will be used in this calculation.)

For the B.S. degree in Chemistry, a minimum of 125 credits is required with a cumulative grade point average of at least a 2.00 in these courses. A grade of C or better is required in all courses within the major field.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR: 1-3 credits

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 94 credits
(This requirement includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (54 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1)[1], CHEM 112 GN(3)[1], CHEM 113 GN(1)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), PHYS 213 GN(2), PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 231(2) (Sem: 3-4)
CHEM 210(3)[1], CHEM 212(3)[1], CHEM 213(2)[1], CHEM 227(4)[1], CHEM 310(3)[1], CHEM 316(1), CHEM 450(3)[1], CHEM 452(3)[1], CHEM 457(2)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (23 credits)
Select 3 credits from MATH 250(3) or STAT 401(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 4 credits from advanced laboratory courses[1]: CHEM 423W(4), CHEM 425W (4), CHEM 431W(4), CHEM 459W(4) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 16 credits of chemistry at the 400 level[1]. Up to 6 co-op credits (2 each of SC 295, SC 395, SC 495) may be used in this category. Chemical Research, CHEM 494(1-10) may be used, but the total of CHEM 494 credits plus co-op credits may not exceed 8. (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (17 credits)
These 17 credits may include any courses not on the Chemistry Department list of excluded courses except that CHEM 494 may not be used, and only one credit of each SC 295, SC 395, and SC 495 is allowed in this category. (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

University College

43-03-174 Change. Reduce the number of credits required for the minor from 22-23 to 19 credits; Revise program description; Remove B A 241, 242, 243, FIN 301, I B 303, MIS 2014, SCM 200, 301, STAT 200 from Additional Courses; Revise Supporting Courses and Related Areas; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Business Minor

Contacts: Abington College, Manohar Singh, m.singh@psu.edu; Berks College, John Guiseppe, jag52@psu.edu

The Business minor is a strong complement to virtually any major. Courses prescribed for the minor are taught by Penn State faculty providing courses to the B.S. in Business and the A.S. in Business Administration. It provides students with the opportunity to develop and apply skills appropriate to the business contexts of their chosen majors. Students pursuing the Business minor must complete thirteen credits of prescribed course work and six credits of additional course work. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor. The prescribed thirteen credits of coursework presents students with a critical foundation of core business disciplines: accounting, management, marketing, and either macro- or micro-economics. The six credits of additional coursework must be taken at the 400-level.

The additional coursework enables students to expand on the core foundation in one of two ways. They may choose to solidify their business knowledge base by exploring six credits of 400-level business courses in the following disciplines: Accounting; Business Administration; Business Law; Energy Business and Finance; Economics; Engineering; Entrepreneurship; Finance; Health Policy and Administration; International Business; Labor Studies and Employment Relations; Management Information Systems; Management; Marketing; Risk Management; Supply Chain Management; or Statistics. Alternately, students can augment three credits of 400-level coursework in one of the above listed business disciplines with three credits of 400-level work from an approved list of specific business-related course in disciplines such as Communication Arts and Sciences; Corporate Communication; Communications; Criminal Justice; English; Human Development and Family Studies; History; Hospitality Management; Information Sciences and Technology; Kinesiology; Philosophy; Political Science; Psychology; or Sociology.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 19 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (10 credits)
ACCTG 211(4) (Sem: 1-5)
MGMT 301(3), MKTG 301(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from ECON 102 GS(3) or ECON 104 GS(3) (Sem: 1-5)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (6 credits)
Select 3-6 credits at the 400 level from:
ACCTG, B A, B LAW, E B F, ECON, ENTR, FIN, FINSV, H P A, I B, LER, MIS, MGMT, MKTG, R M, SCM, or STAT (Sem: 5-8)
Select 0-3 credits at the 400-level from:
CAS 404(3), CAS 452(3), CAS 483(3), CC 401(3), CC 403W(3), COMM 421W(3), COMM 427(3), COMM 471(3), CRIMJ 408(3), CRIMJ/SOC 467(3), ENGL 419(3), ENGL 420(3), ENGR 425(3), HD FS 401(3), HD FS 424(3), HD FS 425(3), HD FS 455(3), HIST 458Y(3), HM 435(3), HM 471(3), HM 484(3), IST 402(3), IST 420(3), IST 425(3), IST 431(3), IST 432(3), IST 461(3), KINES 438W(3), KINES 492W(3), PHIL 406(3), PL SC 440 US;IL(3), PSYCH 404(3), PSYCH 408(3), PSYCH 423(3), PSYCH 482(3), PSYCH 484(3), PSYCH 485(3), RPTM 410(3), RPTM 415(3), RPTM 470(3), SOC 455(3), SOC 456(3) (Sem: 5-8)


43-03-175 Change. Add CAS 203 to Additional Courses.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Physical Therapist Assistant

University College (2 PTA): Penn State DuBois, Penn State Fayette, Penn State Hazleton, Penn State Mont Alto, Penn State Shenango

PROFESSOR THOMAS E. GLUMAC, Director, Penn State Mont Alto
PROFESSOR BARBARA E. REINARD, Coordinator, Penn State DuBois
PROFESSOR STACY A. SEKELY, Coordinator, Penn State Fayette
PROFESSOR ROSE PETRILLA, Coordinator, Penn State Hazleton
PROFESSOR GIZELLE DEAN, Coordinator, Penn State Shenango

This major helps prepare individuals to become skilled technical health workers who assist the physical therapist in patient treatment. Students develop knowledge and skills in the appropriate use of equipment and exercise associated with various physical therapy treatment interventions. In order to accomplish these tasks, the curriculum combines general education, science, and technical courses specifically designed for the physical therapist assistant. The program culminates with full-time clinical experiences.

The size of each entering class is limited so that optimal clinical experiences and practical application situations can be maintained. Students must progress through the PTA program as prescribed in the Recommended Academic Plan for their campus of admission. Clinical affiliations are maintained over a wide geographical area. Students may be required to make special housing and transportation arrangements during the clinical phase. In order to accommodate the clinical practicum, this major requires five semesters to satisfy graduation requirements.

In addition to a PTA certification/licensure, many state licensing boards and clinical facilities require a criminal background check, child abuse clearance, and a drug screening. PTA students are required to complete clinical requirements that may include FBI fingerprint check, child abuse clearance, state background check and drug screening prior to the beginning of the clinical practicum. Students will be responsible for completion and purchase of the necessary checks/clearances through a University approved vendor and providing results to the clinical sites. Students with criminal records should contact the physical therapy licensing board in the state they plan to practice prior to applying for admission to the PTA Program to inquire about potential restrictions for licensure.

The Associate of Science degree in Physical Therapist Assistant at Penn State  is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314; telephone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org; website: http://www.capteonline.org. Graduation from a physical therapist assistant education program accredited by CAPTE is necessary for eligibility to sit for the licensure examination, which is required in all states.

Effective April 30, 2014 The physical therapist assistant program at The Pennsylvania State University, DuBois Campus has been granted Candidate for Accreditation status by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314; phone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org).  Candidate for Accreditation is a pre-accreditation status of affiliation with the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education that indicates that the program may matriculate students in technical/professional courses and that the program is progressing towards accreditation.  Candidate for Accreditation is not an accreditation status nor does it assure eventual accreditation.

For the Associate in Science degree in Physical Therapist Assistant, a minimum of 68 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(9-12 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 59-61 credits
(This includes 9-12 credits of General Education courses: 3-6 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GN courses; 3-6 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (45 credits)
BIOL 129 GN(4)[1], BIOL 141 GN(3)[1], BIOL 142(1)[1], ENGL 015 GWS(3), P T 100(3)[1], PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
P T 290 (1)[1], P T 384(4)[1], P T 395E(3)[1]* (Sem: 3-4)
P T 150(2)[1], P T 160(3)[1], P T 250(4)[1], P T 260(3)[1] (Sem: 3-5)
P T 395F(4)*[1], P T 395G(4)*[1] (Sem: 5)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (14-16 credits)
Select 1 credit from KINES 013(1) or KINES 303 GHA(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from CAS 203 GS(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3) or PSYCH 212 GS(3) (Sem: 1-5)
Select 2-3 credits from any P T course not listed above in prescribed or additional courses.[1] (Sem: 1-5)
Select 4 credits from P T 270(3-4)[1], P T 270A(3-4)[1], or P T 270W(4)[1] (Sem: 2-4)
Select 4-5 credits from P T 280(4-5)[1] or P T 280W(4-5)[1]; or P T 281(2)[1] and P T 282(3)[1] or P T 280W(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

[1]A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

*Courses that include clinical education experiences may require the student to travel long distances or obtain housing near the assigned clinic. Housing and transportation arrangements are the responsibility of the student.


43-03-176 Change. Revise program description; Add IST 110, RADSC 295B, 295D to Prescribed Courses; Add RADSC 295A, 295C, 295E, 295F, 295G, 295I to Additonal Courses; Remove CMPSC 101, RADSC 295 from Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Radiological Sciences

University College: Penn State New Kensington (2RSCC), Penn State Schuylkill  (2RSCC)

For students interested in pursuing an education in the paramedical field of radiography (radiologic technology), the radiological sciences major meets the educational and clinical requirements for the graduate to function as an entry-level radiographer. Required course work is divided into three interrelated areas including general education, radiography specific, and clinical education components. During the clinical education component, students perform radiographic exams under the directed supervision of certified radiographers at multiple area clinical education settings. The clinical component emphasizes the concepts of team practice and patient-centered care. Both the radiography-specific course work and the clinical component are structured sequentially over six or seven consecutive semesters, commencing each fall semester. Upon successful completion of the 72-credit associate degree, the graduate will be eligible to attempt the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) examination for certification.

For the Associate in Science degree in Radiological Sciences, a minimum of 72 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(15 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 66 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GH courses; 3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (59 credits)
BIOL 129 GN(4)[1], RADSC 101(4)[1], RADSC 110(3)[1] (Sem: 1)
BIOL 141 GN(3), ENGL 015 GWS(3), IST 110 GS(3), MATH 021 GQ(3), PHIL 103 GH(3), RADSC 102(4)[1], RADSC 103(3)[1], RADSC 204(3)[1], RADSC 205(3)[1], RADSC 210W(3)[1], RADSC 220(3)[1], RADSC 295B(1)[1] RADSC 295D(1)[1], RADSC 230(3)[1] (Sem: 1-5)
RADSC 206(3)[1], RADSC 240(2)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
RADSC 207(4)[1] (Sem: 6-7)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)[1]
At Penn State New Kensington:
Take 7 credits from RADSC 295A(1.5), RADSC 295C(2), RADCSC 295E(1.5), RADSC 495F(2) (Sem: 1-6)

OR

At Penn State Schulykill:
Take 7 credits from RADSC 295A(1), RADSC 295C(1), RADCSC 295E(2), RADSC 495G(1), RADSC 295I(2) (Sem: 1-7)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-03-177 RADSC 295A
Radiologic Science Clinical Internship I
RADSC295A (1-1.5)
Supervised clinical education activities under the direction of registered radiologic technologies.
PREREQUISITE: admission to 2RSCC program
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-178 RADSC 295B
Radiologic Science Clinical Internship II
RADSC295BP (1)
Supervised clinical education activities under the direction of registered radiologic technologists.
PREREQUISITE: RADSC 295A
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-179 RADSC 295C
Radiologic Science Clinical Internship III
INTERNSHIP III (1-2)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: RADSC 295B
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-180 RADSC 295D
Radiologic Science Clinical Internship IV
INTERNSHIP IV (1)
Supervised off-campus group instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: RADSC 295C
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-181 RADSC 295E
Radiologic Science Clinical Internship V
INTERNSHIP V (1-2)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: RADSC 295D
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-182 RADSC 295F
Radiologic Science Clinical Internship VI
INTERNSHIP VI (1-2)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: RADSC 295E
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-183 RADSC 295G
Radiologic Science Clinical Internship VI-A
RADSC295G (1)
Supervised clinical education activities under the direction of registered radiologic technologists.
PREREQUISITE: RADSC 295E
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-184 RADSC 295I
Radiologic Science Clinical Internship VII
RADSC295I (2)
Supervised clinical education activities under the direction of registered radiologic technologists.
PREREQUISITE: RADSC 295G
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

COURSE DROPS

43-03-185 RADSC 295
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

FIVE-YEAR DROPS

43-03-186 ACCTG 201
Introductory Financial Accounting
INTRO FINANC ACCTG (3)
Fundamentals of the collection, recording summarization, and interpretation of accounting data.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-187 GEOG  010S (GN)
Physical Geography:  An Introduction
INTRO PHYS GEOG (3:2:2)
Survey and synthesis of processes creating geographical patterns of natural resources, with application of basic environmental processes in resource management.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX B

Graduate

COURSE ADDS

43-03-188 A ED  524
Arts Education Policy and Advocacy
ARTS ED POLICY (3)
Critical examination of current and emerging arts education policies in the United States in relation to federal, state, and local education and cultural policies.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-189 AN SC 543
Animal Genomics
ANIMAL GENOMICS (3)
Foundations in genomics, proteomics, epigenomics, and basic bioinformatics, and their applications in animal breeding, health, production, reproduction, nutrition, and medicine.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-190 CHEM  511
Chemical Nanoscience
NANOSCIENCE (3)
Chemical aspects of matter at the nanoscale.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 452 and either CHEM 450 or CHEM 466
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-191 H P A 506
Design and Evaluation of Prevention and Health Promotion Programs Across the Life Span
PROG DESIGN & EVAL (3)
Addresses theory and application of program evaluation, emphasizing process and outcome evaluation strategies for programs involving individuals, organizations and populations.
PREREQUISITE: HD FS 503 and HD FS 516; or H P A 564
CROSS LIST: HD FS 506
APPROVED START:  SP2002

43-03-192 HRER  523
Seminar in Work-Life Dilemmas, Practices, and Policies
WORK LIFE DILEMMAS (3)
The course will provide students with an analytic framework for understanding how social inequalities in race, class, and gender shape experiences in families and the workplace.
CROSS LIST: WMNST 523
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-193 PL SC 504
Topics in Political Methodology
TOPICS IN POL METH (3)
This course examines a range of statistical models widely used in political science that generalize from linear normal regression.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 503 or STAT 462 or STAT 501 or STAT 504 or STAT 511
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-194 WF ED 807
Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs)
CAR & TECH STU ORG (3)
This course examines principles and practices of Career and Technical Student Organizations to promote enhanced learning and skills development.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-195 WMNST 523
Seminar in Work-Life Dilemmas, Practices, and Policies
WORK LIFE DILEMMAS (3)
The course will provide students with an analytic framework for understanding how social inequalities in race, class, and gender shape experiences in families and the workplace.
CROSS LIST: HRER  523
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-03-196 HD FS 506
Design and Evaluation of Prevention Programs Across the Life Span
PROGRAM EVALUATION (3)
An introduction to the theory and application of program evaluation; both process and outcome evaluation strategies are addressed.
PREREQUISITE: HD FS 503, HD FS 516
APPROVED START:  SP2002

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Design and Evaluation of Prevention and Health Promotion Programs Across the Life Span (PROG DESIGN & EVAL)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Addresses theory and application of program evaluation, emphasizing process and outcome evaluation strategies for programs involving individuals, organizations and populations.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: HD FS 503 and HD FS 516; or H P A 564
ADD CROSS LIST: H P A 506
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

APPENDIX D

Dickinson School of Law

COURSE ADDS

43-03-197 CCLAW 981
Law Firm as a Business
LAW FIRM BUSINESS (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course will cover a broad range of business topics related to the operation of a law firm.
PREREQUISITE: CORE 934
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-198 COCUR 903
Dispute Resolution Magazine
DISPUTE RES MAG (1) CRDT ONLY: Y ANON GR: N
This will be an academic writing experience for 1-2 students per year, who will be designated as “associate editors” or “law student editors” of the Dispute Resolution Magazine.
PREREQUISITE: faculty approval required
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-199 CRIML 951
Scientific Evidence
SCIENTIFIC EVIDNCE (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course examines the legal principles governing the use of scientific evidence in criminal and civil litigation.
PREREQUISITE: SKILS 955
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-200 LLMLW 908
Legal Counseling in Arbitration
LEG COUNS IN ARB (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
Students will address a hypothetical investment scenario from beginning to end. Various stages of client counseling will attach to the proposed facts. Lawyers will consult with clients and among themselves. The transborder character of the deal will yield a strong need for arbitration. Students will be asked to draft an arbitration agreement and organize an arbitral proceeding. Students will be assigned to competing groups.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-201 LLMLW 909
Statutory Rules for Arbitration
STAT RULES ARB (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
A class in which students will eventually write a statutory framework for the legal regulation of arbitral proceedings, contracts, and awards. The major phases of the arbitral process will be addressed in all of the statutory frameworks: contract freedom, the arbitrator’s adjudicatory
powers, the right of arbitrators to rule on the validity of their own jurisdiction, and the function of courts in terms of arbitration. The groups will assess existing laws on arbitration: the UNCITRAL Model Law, the 1996 UK Arbitration Act, the French statutory provisions on arbitration, and the Federal Arbitration Act. Discussions among groups will focus upon the drawbacks of existing regimes and the means of perfecting the regulation of arbitration.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-202 RP&EL 966
Law and Policy of Shale Gas Development
LW POLICY GAS DEV (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course will address current legal and policy aspects of shale oil and gas development.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-203 RP&EL 967
Water Law & Policy
WATER LW & POLICY (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course provides an overview of U.S.-focused law and policy related to water.
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-204 SEM   950
Evidence-Seminar: Testimonial Privileges
EVIDENCE SEMINAR (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This Seminar will examine the testmonial privileges that permit or require professionals, family members, individuals, companies, and governmental actors to withhold testimony in furtherance of a competing public interest.
PREREQUISITE: SKILS 955, CORE 934 recommended
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

43-03-205 SKILS 973
Spanish and Bilingual Communication in Law Practice
SPAN BILINGAL COMM (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course is designed for students who want to improve their ability to understand and communicate with Spanish-speaking clients and colleagues in legal settings.
PREREQUISITE: faculty approval required
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-03-206 CCLAW 986
Federal Securities Regulation
FED SECURITIES REG (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course is intended to provide an overview of the federal securities laws. Securities regulation plays a crucial role in many different fields of business law, and every lawyer should have at least a basic knowledge of its general principles.  The course focuses on issues such as the offering of securities, civil liabilities connected with the sale and purchase of financial instruments, insider trading, proxy voting and M&As, takeovers, stock exchanges and brokers/dealers regulation.  Specific attention is devoted to securities litigation aspects, including class actions.
PREREQUISITE: CCLAW 963
APPROVED START:  FA2011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CCLAW 986 recommended
PROPOSED START:  SP2015

OLD
43-03-207 SEM   936
Law and Sexuality Seminar
LAW & SEXUALITY (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar explores the different ways in which the law regulates and accounts for sexuality in general and sexual orientation in particular. Topics to be covered will include rights to privacy and their impact on the ability of the state to regulate sexual conduct; rights to equal protection by lesbians and gay men; the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy; rights to free speech and associations of lesbians and gay men (and of those who do not want to associate with them): same-sex marriage and adoption by lesians and gay men; employment discrimination; and legal issues involving transgendered individuals.
APPROVED START:  S12011

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: PERSP
CHANGE NUMBER: 948
CHANGE TITLES: Law and Sexuality (LAW AND SEXUALITY)
CHANGE ANON GR: Y
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course will explore the different ways in which the law regulates and accounts for sexuality in general and sexual orientation in particular. Topics to be covered will include rights to privacy and their impact on the ability of the state to regulate sexual conduct; rights to equal protection by lesbians and gay men; the movement for relationship recognition, marriage equality, and other family rights; rights to free speech and associations of lesbians and gay men (and of those who do not want to associate with them); employment discrimination; and legal issues involving transgendered individuals.
PROPOSED START:  FA2015