Appendix 46-02

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Agricultural Sciences

46-02-001 Change. Remove FDSC 430 from Prescribed Courses. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Food Science

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (FD SC)

PROFESSOR SARA R. MILILLO, Program Coordinator

Food science involves the application of science and technology to food product manufacture, storage, and distribution to consumers. Food scientists are especially concerned with food safety, nutritional values, managing food quality, food plant management, and development of new products and processes. They are employed by manufacturers and distributors of food products; by chemical, packaging, and other industries that supply goods and services; by colleges and universities in teaching and research; and by government agencies concerned with food regulations and the health and well-being of the general public.

For the B.S. degree in Food Science, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(19 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES5 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 87 – 91 credits
(This includes 19 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 7 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (62 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), BMB 211(3), BMB 212(1), CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3)[1], CHEM 113 GN(1), FDSC 200(3)[1], FDSC 201(1)[1], FDSC 400(4), FDSC 405(3)[1], FDSC 406(3), FDSC 408(3), FDSC 409(2 ), FDSC 410(3), FDSC 411(3 ), FDSC 413(3), FDSC 414(3), FDSC 415(3), MICRB 201(3), MICRB 202(2)[1], PHYS 250 GN(4), STAT 250 GQ(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (13-15 credits)
CHEM 202(3)[1], CHEM 203(3); or CHEM 210(3)[1], CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3)
MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12-14 credits)
To reflect the student’s career interests, select 12-14 credits (depending on the organic chem series taken, a total of 6 credits or 8 credits) from department list or in consultation with adviser (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


46-02-002 Change. Revise program description. Decrease Requirements for the Major from 90-102 to 88-100 credits. Remove FOR 400 from Prescribed Courses. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Forest Ecosystem Management

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (FOREM)

PROFESSOR ELLEN MANNO, Program Coordinator

The mission of the B.S. program in Forest Ecosystem Management is to help students develop the knowledge, skills, and professional ethics for understanding and managing forest ecosystems and living as responsible members of society.

The Forest Ecosystem Management major provides for the education necessary for students to pursue professional careers in one of the following options: (1) Forest Biology, (2) Forest Management, (3) Community and Urban Forest Management, and (4) Watershed Management. These options also will prepare students for graduate studies in continuing professional education.

FOREST BIOLOGY OPTION: This option provides a strong background in the biological and ecological aspects of contemporary forestry and establishes a sound foundation for professional employment and graduate-level study in forest and environmental sciences.

FOREST MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option provides professional training in the management of forest lands consistent with the needs of ownership objectives. Employment opportunities include forest management positions with public agencies, industry, and private consulting.

COMMUNITY AND URBAN FOREST MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option helps prepare students to manage community trees and green spaces. It emphasizes technical expertise, communication abilities, and skills for working with diverse people. Employment opportunities include municipalities, arboricultural companies, utilities, and government agencies.

WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option focuses on water resources and the integrated management of natural resources with emphasis on water. Graduates qualify for federal employment as hydrologists and for water-related careers in municipal watershed management, state and local government, and environmental/engineering consulting.

For the B.S. degree in Forest Ecosystem Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required for the Forest Biology, Forest Management, and Watershed Management options, and a minimum of 123 credits for the Community and Urban Forest Management option. Students should be aware that, in most cases, completion of the Forest Ecosystem Management degree in four years requires enrollment at the University Park Campus beginning the fall semester of the sophomore year.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21-27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 2-12 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 88-100 credits
(This includes 21-27 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3-6 credits of GS courses; 0-3 credits of GA courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 33-34 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (27 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), ECON 102 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
FOR 200(1)[1], FOR 203(3)[1], FOR 255(3)[1], FOR 266(4)[1], SOILS 101 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)
FOR 308(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
FOR 421(3)[1] (Sem:7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
STAT 200 GQ(4)[1], STAT 240 GQ(3)[1], or STAT 250 GQ(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 5-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 55-66 credits

FOREST BIOLOGY OPTION: (57-58 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (34 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), BIOL 220W GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 202(3) (Sem: 3-4)
FOR 204(2)[1], FOR 350(3)[1], FOR 409(2)[1], SOILS 102(1) (Sem: 3-6)
FOR 410(3)[1], FOR 430(3)[1], FOR 450(3)[1], HORT 445(3), WFS 209(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (8-9 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
Select 4-5 credits from ENT 313(2), FOR 403(3), PPEM 318(2) (Sem: 4-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from department list in consultation with adviser (Sem: 5-8)

FOREST MANAGEMENT OPTION: (56-60 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (32 credits)
FOR 204(2)[1], FOR 320(2)[1], FOR 350(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
ENT 313(2), PPEM 318(2), WFS 209 GN(3) (Sem: 5-6)
FOR/WFS 430(3)[1], FOR 440(3)[1], FOR 455(3)[1], FOR 466(3)[1], FOR 470(3)[1], FOR 480(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12-16 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4) or BIOL 127 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 22 GQ(3)[1] and MATH 26 GQ(3)[1]; or MATH 40 GQ(5)[1]; or MATH 41 GQ(3)[1]; or MATH 110 GQ(4)[1]; or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
FOR 409(2)[1] and SOILS 102(1) or FOR 475(3)[1]; (Sem: 3-8)
FOR 401(3)[1] or FOR 450(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
In consultation with adviser, select 12 credits from department list approved for the option. Six credits must be 300-to 400-level. (Sem: 5-8)

COMMUNITY AND URBAN FOREST MANAGEMENT OPTION: (61-66 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (32 credits)
ASM 217(3), ENT 313(2), ENT 314(1), FOR 204(2), PPEM 318(2) (Sem: 3-6)
FOR 401(3)[1], FOR 450(3)[1], FOR 480(3)[1], GEOG 430(3), HORT 138(3), HORT 301(3), HORT 408(4) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21-25 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4) or BIOL 127 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 22 GQ(3)[1] and MATH 26 GQ(3)[1]; or MATH 40 GQ(5)[1]; or MATH 41 GQ(3)[1]; or MATH 110 GQ(4)[1]; or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
ARCH 316 GA(3) or LARCH 60 GA(3) or LARCH 65 GA(3) (Sem: 3-4)
FOR 409(2)[1] and SOILS 102(1) or FOR 475(3)[1] (Sem: 3-8)
FOR 495(3)[1] or FOR 496(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
RPTM 320(3) or RPTM 325(3) or RPTM 435(3) or RPTM 470(3) (Sem: 5-6)
FOR 455(3) or GEOG 363(3) or SOILS 450(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (8-9 credits)
Select 8-9 credits from department list in consultation with adviser (Sem: 5-8)

WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTION: (55-59 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (7 credits)
FOR 450(3)[1], FOR 470(3)[1], FOR 471(1)[1] (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-11 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 111 GQ(2) or MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
FOR 409(2)[1] and SOILS 102(1); or FOR 475(3)[1] (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (39-41 credits)
Select 6 credits of GS social sciences from EBF 200 GS(3), ECON 302 GS(3), EGEE 211 GS(3), ENVST 100 GS(3), GEOG 20 GS(3), GEOG 30 GS(3), GEOG 130 GS(3), GEOG 160 GS(3), PLSC 1 GS(3), PLSC 135 GS(3) (Sem: 1-5)
Select 6 credits of physical sciences from EARTH 100 GN(3), EARTH 103 GN(3), EARTH 111 GN(3), GEOG 10 GN(3), GEOG 110 GN(3), GEOSC 1(3), GEOSC 10 GN(3), GEOSC 40 GN(3), METEO 3 GN(3), METEO 122 GN(3), MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 201(3) (Sem: 1-5)
Select 6-8 credits of GN from PHYS 1 GN(3), PHYS 150 GN(3), PHYS 151 GN(3), PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 213 GN(2), PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits in geospatial analysis from FOR 455(3), GEOG 362(3), GEOG 363(3), GEOG 364(3) or SOILS 450(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits of resources management from ASM 327(3), CED 201(3), CED 427(3), CED 429(3), CED 431(3), CED 450 IL(3), ERM 411(3), ERM 412(3), ERM 413(3), FOR 410(3), FOR 440(3), GEOG 411W(3), GEOG 430(3), GEOG 431(3), SOILS 422(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits from water sciences from ASM 309(3), CE 360(3), CE 370(3), CE 371(3), ERM 435(3), ERM 447(3), ERM 450(3), ENVE 411(3), ENVE 415(3), ENVSE 408(3), GEOG 310(3), GEOG 311(3), GEOG 412(3), GEOSC 412(3), GEOSC 413(3), GEOSC 440(3), GEOSC 452(3), METEO 451(3), METEO 454(3), SOILS 405(3), WFS 422(3) Three credits must be at the 400-level. (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 additional credits at the 300-to 400-level from the lists above (Sem:7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


46-02-003 Change. Revise description. Remove AEE 440, AGBM 102, AGECO 134, AGRO 28, ANSC 201, ASM 327, AYFCE 438, BBH 305, 402, 407, BIOL 436, CED 410, 417, 427, EDSGN 497C, FDSC 200, GEOG 20, 40, 110, 310, 428, INTAG 296, 297, 298, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497, 498, NUTR 421, 430, SOILS 101 from Additional Courses. Add AFR 105, AGBM 470A, 470B, AGECO 3, AGBM 470A, 470B, ANSC 499, ANTH 120, 472, BBH 305, 402, 407, CED 420, ENT 202, 222, 457, FDSC 460, 499, FOR 201, GEOG 3, 210, 220, GEOSC 105, HORT 499, INTAG 199, 200, 470A, 470B, NUTR 421, 425, 430, PPEM 405, SOILS 499, SPAN 105, 106, VBSC 499, WMNST 420. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

International Agriculture Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (INTAG)

This minor is an interdisciplinary program of study designed to enable students to (1) gain an awareness and appreciation for the interrelationship and interdependency of the nations of the world for their food and fiber systems worldwide; (2) gain awareness of problems in international agriculture and sustainability of alternative solutions; (3) understand global impacts of technology, and (4) understand systems of learning across cultures.

This minor requires 18 credits and may be combined with any undergraduate major in the University. Some courses require prerequisites not included in the minor. Foreign language competence is highly recommended.

Students may apply for admission to the minor by completing and submitting an application for admission to Dr. Tom Gill, Office of International Programs, College of Agricultural Sciences, 106 Administration Building, University Park campus. A signature from the student’s major program adviser is required. For more information, contact Dr. Tom Gill, Assistant Director of International Programs, at 814-865-8309 or tbg12@psu.edu; or Dr. Leif Jensen, Distinguished Professor of Rural Sociology and Sociology, at lij1@psu.edu.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor. Students must have six credits of 400-level course work for the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
INTAG 100 GS;IL(3), INTAG 490(3) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select three courses from the first two categories (9 credits) and one internationally-oriented experience from the third category (3 credits):
Category 1: Social Sciences (Select up to two courses from this category; 3-6 credits)
AEE 400(3), AGBM 338 IL(3), ANTH 120 GS;IL(3), ANTH 472(3), BBH 305(3); BBH 402 IL(3), BBH 407 IL(3), CED 230(3), CED 420 US;IL(3), CED 425(3), CED 450 IL(3), GEOG 3 GN;GS(3), GEOG 30 GS;IL(3), GEOG 123 GS;IL(3), GEOG 126 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 220(3), GEOG 430(3), GEOG 444(3), NUTR 421 US;IL(3), NUTR 425 IL(3), NUTR 430 IL(3), SPAN 105(4), SPAN 106(4), WMNST 420 US;IL(3), any university language skill development course (Sem: 1-8)
Category 2: Natural Sciences (Select up to two courses from this category, 3-6 credits)
AFR 105 GN;IL(3), AGECO 3(3), AGECO 457(3), EARTH 2 GN(3), ENT 202 GN(3), ENT 222 GN(3), ENT 457(3), ERM 210 GN(3), FDSC 105(3), FOR 201 GN(3), FOR 418 US;IL(3), FOR 488 IL;WAC(3), GEOG 210 GN(3), GEOSC 105 GN;IL(3), INTAG 300 IL(3), PPEM 405(3), SOILS 71 GN;IL(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select international experience (3 credits)
AGBM 470A(2.5), AGBM 470B(0.5), AGECO 499 IL(1-2); ANSC 499 IL(1-12), CED 499 (1-12); ERM 499(1-12); FDSC 460(1), FDSC 499 IL(1-12), HORT 499 IL(1-12), INTAG 199 IL(1-12), INTAG 200(3), INTAG 470A (2.5), INTAG 470B(0.5), INTAG 499 IL(1-12), SOILS 499 IL(1-12), VBSC 499 (0.5-4)

Students are given the option of participating in a semester study abroad program that would be discussed and approved by the INTAG coordinator and the student’s academic advisor. Twelve credits maximum can count toward the minor, and should normally only fulfill elective and internationally-oriented experience credits, and not replace prescribed credits for the minor. The semester study abroad program needs to focus on courses within the food, agriculture or natural resources areas.

COURSE ADDS

46-02-004 ANSC 202W (3) (WF)
Title: Contemporary Issues in Animal Agriculture
Abbreviated Title: Issues in ANSC
Description: ANSC 202W, Contemporary Issues in Animal Agriculture, is a 3 credit 200 level course, emphasizing the appropriate citation of sources and writing about contemporary issues facing the animal sciences field. Thus, writing assignments will center on new and emerging issues facing animal science students entering today’s job market. Students completing this course will have produced a writing portfolio that includes a range of works appropriate for different audiences, as well as having participated in extensive self and peer evaluation of writing. Students scheduling the course should first complete ANSC 100, or have completed or be concurrently enrolled in ANSC 201. Course objectives are to teach written communication skills that will be valuable to those pursuing an education and career in animal science related fields. Upon completion of this course, students should be capable of developing a focused writing objective based on some knowledge of the designated audience, finding reliable sources of evidence, critically evaluating evidence and sources, correctly citing sources for various types of material, developing an effective outline, writing and revising drafts for a final piece of written communication, performing self and peer evaluations of writing, and producing a final piece of written communication that achieves the original objective and is valuable to the designated audience.
Prerequisites: ANSC 100; ANSC 201
Concurrent Courses: ANSC 201
Proposed Start: SP2018

46-02-005 ANSC 447 (3) (GN)
Title: Equine Exercise Physiology
Abbreviated Title: Equine Exer Phys
Description: ANSC 447, Equine Exercise Physiology, is a 3 credit junior/senior-level course for students interested in the basic and applied aspects of exercise physiology of the horse. The course begins with discussion on the history of equine sport. Students then explore the biochemistry and energetics of exercise followed by the anatomy and physiology that make the horse a unique mammalian athlete. The course then moves to the more applied aspects of exercise and training responses and training regimes specific for different disciplines. Finally, students will explore important management practices associated with the care of the equine athlete. Upon completion of this course students should be able to: 1. Apply an understanding of form and function of the horse to the diverse and unique athletic capabilities of the horse. 2. Discuss physiologic responses of the muscular, skeletal, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems of the horse to various exercise and training regimes. 3. Prepare and/or evaluate appropriate training regimes for horses preparing for different disciplines. An important component of this will be the ability to use knowledge of the basic science to improve application. 4. Design and describe physical therapy strategies for horse recovering from exercise or training related
injuries. 5. Communicate to clients, customers and peers important information about exercise physiology, training, and exercise related issues, enabling them to improve the health and performance of their horse.
Prerequisites: ANSC 327
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-006 FDSC 444 (3)
Title: Arguing About Food
Abbreviated Title: Arguing about Food
Description: The food science major seeks to educate students in the sciences and technologies important in the industrial manufacture of food and food scientists tend to value foods in this context. Food is good if it can be manufactured at scale, distributed and sold at a profit.
The qualities of the food can be defined in largely physical terms (e.g., price and costs, free from pathogens, certain levels of defined nutrients, good sensory scores, stability, and uniform and predictable properties). However, deservedly or not, food attracts more ethical attention than other goods. For food scientists to fail to appreciate the different values, theirs and others, that impact arguments about food is harmful for (i) the food scientists themselves who may feel conflicted if they cannot resolve their personal preferences for food (perhaps local and organic) with the value set of their profession. (ii) the quality of the public conversation around food if scientists and technicians cannot usefully contribute their perspectives and (iii) the food companies that employ the scientists and who seek to make and sell products acceptable to a set of consumers. The first part of the course will focus on some foundational ideas useful to all controversies. A background in toxicology (or, if most of the projects are around the healthfulness as opposed to the risks of food, nutrition), epistemology in science, critiques of sciences, science as a social construct, ethics. The second part of the course will use current controversies to examine the ways different values combine with empirical scientific facts to create arguments about foods. Students are not taught to “win” arguments but rather examine how they are structured and why they are appealing to different people. Students will use concepts from social science and philosophy (ethics, epistemology) to critique the strong normative opinions of guest speakers and readings. Throughout the course they will work in groups around projects on specific current controversies related to the formulation or manufacture of foods. They will collect and critique the scientific facts available and then respond to the speakers/readings by generating multiple different arguments reflecting the different perspectives (“how might the speaker think about my case?”).
Prerequisites: FDSC 200
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-007 VBSC 439 (3)
Title: Mucosal Immunology and the Microbiome
Abbreviated Title: Muc Immuno
Description: Mucosal tissues are gateways into the body. Because of their direct interaction with the environment, a specialized immune response is needed. Unlike the systemic immune system, which functions in a sterile environment inside the body, mucosal immune responses must be able to discriminate between harmful pathogens and benign stimuli like commensal organisms and food. The emphasis of this course is to understand the unique properties of the mucosal immune system. This course will build on the general understanding of immunology presented in MICRB 410 and provide a detailed discussion of the symbiotic relationship between the microbiome and the development and function of the mucosal immune system. The effects of disruptions in the microbiome and the effects on disease will also be a major theme of the course. The course will include lecture and discussion of the topics presented in the textbook. In addition, articles from the primary literature will be presented and discussed. These articles will also provide an experimental framework for understanding the mucosal immune system. The topics presented here will provide a greater understanding of mucosal immunology and its interactions with the microbiome for students majoring in Immunology and Infectious Disease, Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Animal Science, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biology, Microbiology, Food Science and Nutrition. The course would also be appropriate for Graduate students seeking more information about mucosal immune responses.
Prerequisites: MICRB 410
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-02-008 FDSC 402
(2-3)
Title: Supervised Experience in Food Science Teaching
Abbreviated Title: Teaching Food Sci
Description: Theories and experiences of teaching and learning relevant to food science and to the work of a teaching assistant. This course provides an introduction to the ways topics in food science can be effectively taught to diverse populations. Students will serve as a teaching assistant in a food science course and in addition meet regularly as a group to reflect on their experience as learners and teachers in the context of readings from the educational literature. The focus on the class is on the teaching of food science topics, so special attention will be given on laboratory and project based learning as well as teaching to industry short courses and in the context of cooperative extension. This course is only available to students currently serving as undergraduate teaching assistants in food science and enrollment is by permission of the instructor.
PREREQUISITE: Junior or senior standing in food science. Permission of instructor required.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS 1-3 MAXIMUM 5
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-009 PPEM 417 (3)
Title: Phytobacteriology
Abbreviated Title: Phytobacteriology
Description: How bacterial pathogens infect plants and evade plant immune responses. PPEM 417 Phytobacteriology (3) This lecture and lab course covers the genetic, molecular, physical, and physiological mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis in plants. We will examine how the tools of microbiology are used to deduce the pathogenic mechanisms behind various plant diseases caused by bacteria. Topics include: motility; attachment; evasion of host defense; toxins; enzymes and proteins; biofilms; and bacterial communication. Readings include research and review articles. The course includes weekly hands-on laboratory activities that cover handling bacteria, isolating bacteria from plants, monitoring bacterial growth in plants, monitoring plant symptoms development, and the genetic control of bacterial and plant interactions.
PREREQUISITES: BIOL 110 ; BIOL 222 or BIOL 322 ; B M B211 or MICRB201 or MICRB251 or B M B251
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 417W
ADD WRITING ATTRIBUTE
CHANGE TITLE: Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis in Plants
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: BACT PATHOG PLANTS
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course covers the mechanisms that certain bacteria use to infect and cause disease in plants. We will consider the molecular, genetic, biochemical, and physiological systems that are used by plant-pathogenic bacteria to move about and infect plants, cause disease symptoms, evade plant immune responses, and derive nutrition from the plant. We will cover these topics through a combination of lectures and close readings of current and classic primary research articles. The course also has a major, hands-on laboratory component that includes experiments on bacterial genetics related to disease, bacterial physiology and behavior, and the stimulation of plant immune responses during bacterial infection. Students taking this class can expect to gain experience reading primary plant bacteriology research literature and designing and implementing experiments in plant-bacterial interaction.
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: BIOL 110
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Arts and Architecture

46-02-009A Drop Dance Minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Dance Minor

University Park, College of Arts and Architecture (DANCE)

This minor is a rigorous program designed to help students who wish to further their skills in this art form. This modern-based program focuses on technique, choreography, and performance. Students choose from a variety of options to create their own dance minor that will give them the tools and the knowledge to further their individual interest in the field. Students have the opportunity to perform in pieces created by faculty, be a member of the University Dance Company, create their own pieces for performance, and attend national conferences. Upon completion of this minor, the student will be able to pick from a variety of career opportunities such as performance, teaching, choreography, production, and studio or have it apply to their major. Twenty-one credits are required for completion of the dance minor with a minimum of 6 credits at the 400 level.

Entrance into the Dance minor will be based on an audition. The audition will consist of a Ballet Barre, Jazz combo, and Modern combo. Ability to pick up and execute technique and combinations is essential. A grade of C or better is required in all courses required in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 21 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (5 credits)
DANCE 301(2) (Sem: 2-8)
DANCE 410 US;IL(3) (Sem: 3-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (13 credits)
Select 3 credits from DANCE 261(1.5), DANCE 262(1.5), DANCE 361 GA(1.5), DANCE 362(1.5), DANCE 461(1.5), DANCE 462(1.5) (Sem: 1-8)
(These courses may not double count for other dance minor requirements.)
Select 6 credits from the following courses (3 credits at the 400-level):
DANCE 231(1.5), DANCE 232(1.5), DANCE 241(1.5), DANCE 242(1.5) (Sem: 1-4)
DANCE 251(1.5), DANCE 252(1.5), DANCE 261(1.5), DANCE 262(1.5), DANCE 361 GA(1.5), DANCE 362(1.5) (Sem: 1-4)
DANCE 431(1.5), DANCE 432(1.5), DANCE 441(1.5), DANCE 442(1.5), DANCE 451(1.5), DANCE 452(1.5), DANCE 461(1.5), DANCE 462(1.5) (Sem: 5-8)
(All dance minors are required to demonstrate proficiency at beginning level technique courses before selecting the advanced level courses.)
Select 4 credits from:
DANCE 381(2) (Sem: 3-8)
DANCE 480(2) (Sem: 5-8)
DANCE 485(1-2) (Sem: 1-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from:
DANCE 280(1), DANCE 281(1), DANCE 296(1-18), DANCE 297(1-9), DANCE 385(2) (Sem: 3-8)
THEA 100 GA;US;IL(3), THEA 102 GA(3), THEA 146(2), THEA 150(3), THEA 189 GA(1-6) (Sem: 1-6)
THEA 208 GA;US;IL(3) (Sem: 1-8)
DANCE 482(3), DANCE 496(1-18), DANCE 497(1-9), THEA 408 US(3) (Sem: 5-8)

COURSE ADDS

46-02-010 AA 295 (1-18:18)
Title: Internship
Abbreviated Title: Internship
Description: Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internship. Written and oral critique of activity required.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-011 AA 495 (1-18:18)
Title: Internship
Abbreviated Title: Internship
Description: Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-02-012 ARTH 458 (3)(IL)(BA)
Title: Baroque Capitals of Europe
Abbreviated Title: Baroque Capitals
Description: This course examines the architecture and urbanism of European capital cities from 1600-1800. ART H 458 Roman Rococo Architecture and the Dawn of Neoclassicism (3)Most scholars agree that the modern European capital was created in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This course will examine what transformed the cities into centers of power, culture, and learning. We will look at new building types, the creation of civic institutions, and changes in the urban plan. The course will therefore provide an overview of the architecture and urbanism of the period and also explore the political and social contexts that made them possible. Topics include capitals of great political importance such as Paris and London as well as smaller centers like Turin and Nancy that underwent major urban and architectural transformations. The social function of buildings that mark these capitals, from poor houses to opera houses, will also be explored. Units covered may include Rome of Alexander VII, London Before and After the Great Fire, Convents and Capitals, and the City Destroyed and Rebuilt. Primary and secondary reading, ranging from Pepy’s Diary to Habermas’ examination of the public sphere will offer period accounts as well as conceptual frameworks for understanding the capital. The objective is to challenge students to think deeply about our urban environment and its debts to this earlier era. This course fulfills elective and 400-level requirements in Art History and General Education (IL), but it is also designed to complement concentrations in History, Music, and Architecture. It would be offered every two to three years. Students will be evaluated based on class participation, four exams, group presentations, and critical essays.
PREREQUISITES: ART H100 , or ART H112 , or ART H202 , or ART H304 , or ART H314
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: The City 1600–1800
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: The City 1600-1800
CHANGE Description: This course examines the architecture and urbanism of cities from 1600-1800. This course will examine what transformed the cities into centers of power, culture, and learning. We will look at new building types, the creation of civic institutions, and changes in the urban plan. The course will therefore provide an overview of the architecture and urbanism of the period and also explore the political and social contexts that made them possible. Topics include capitals of great political importance such as Paris, Beijing, and London as well as smaller centers like Turin and Lisbon that underwent major urban and architectural transformations. The social function of buildings that mark these capitals, from poor houses to opera houses, will also be explored. Primary and secondary reading, ranging from Pepy’s Diary to Habermas’ examination of the public sphere will offer period accounts as well as conceptual frameworks for understanding the capital. The objective is to challenge students to think deeply about our urban environment and its debts to this earlier era. This course fulfills elective and 400-level requirements in Art History and General Education (IL), but it is also designed to complement concentrations in History, Music, and Architecture.
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: ARTH 202; ARTH 304; ARTH 100; ARTH 112; ARTH 314; ARTH 120; ARTH 140; ARTH 315;
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Behrend College

46-02-012A Drop Plastics Engineering Technology

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Plastics Engineering Technology

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (2PLET)

This major is designed to help graduates prepare for careers as engineering technicians in the plastics industry. Graduates are qualified for positions requiring setting up and operating plastics processing equipment, troubleshooting processing problems, production line management, solids modeling and design, and technical service and support.

To be eligible for entrance to the Plastics Engineering Technology (PLTBD) major, a student must have: 1) attained at least a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average; 2) completed MATH 081 or MATH 026, AND MATH 082 or MATH 022, AND MATH 083 or MATH 140, and PHYS 250, and earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses.

The curriculum provides training in applied mathematics, physics, chemistry, fundamentals of the chemical and physical properties of plastics materials and their processing characteristics, quality control, solids modeling and engineering design principles, and technical communications. The processing component of the curriculum emphasizes injection molding.

Students will receive extensive hands-on experience in the college’s state-of-the-art processing laboratory, learning the fundamental principles of operating equipment currently utilized in the plastics industry, including application of statistical methods and quality control. Students will also be trained in the use of solids modeling and fundamentals of plastic tooling and part design.

Graduates of this program may qualify for admission to the baccalaureate degree program in Plastics Engineering Technology offered at Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

For the Associate in Engineering Technology degree in Plastics Engineering Technology, a minimum of 70 credits is required.

This program is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(12 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 61 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (51credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), EGT 120(3), EGT 121(3), ENGL 015 GWS(3), PLET 050(2)[1], PHYS 250 GN(4)[1], PSU 007(1) (Sem: 1-2)
CAS 100 GWS(3), MCHT 111(3)[1], PLET 205(3)[1], PLET 222(4)[1] (Sem: 3)
MATH 210 GQ(3), MCHT 213(3)[1], PLET 206(3)[1], PLET 227(4)[1], PLET 232(3)[1],
PLET 235(2)[1] (Sem: 4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
MATH 081 GQ(3)[1] or MATH 026 GQ(3)[1] (Sem: 1)
MATH 082 GQ(3)[1] or MATH 022 GQ(3)[1] (Sem: 2)
MATH 083 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 3)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

46-02-013 ENVSC 200 (3)
Title: Introduction to Environmental Science
Abbreviated Title: Intro Environ Sci
Description: This team-taught course is designed to be the entrance/introduction to major course in Environmental Science. The course consists of seven modules. The first module is an introduction to research methods, and is designed to teach students the fundamentals of
searching the primary literature, reading scientific research papers, and accessing and using available environmental databases. Modules 2–6 address various large issues in environmental science. Each of these issues manifests across spatial and temporal scales from local/short-term to global/long-term. Information in each module will be conveyed via assigned readings from a textbook, student presentations of case studies, computer laboratory exercises in which students will access existing databases with the goal of downloading and analyzing some small data set, reviews of 1–2 papers from the primary literature, and discussions of the readings.
These modules cover the breadth of environmental science including population growth/control, climate science and climate change, water resources, energy issues, and pollution. The last module specifically addresses communication skills, science-based policy
and resource management, and the critical importance of communication between scientists and non-scientists. This module will include writing exercises and presentation skills. At the end of the course, local environmental professionals (lawyers, regulatory personnel, health department officials, urban planners will be invited to participate in a panel discussion of careers options.
Prerequisites: BIOL 110, CHEM 110
Proposed Start SP2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Communications

46-02-014 Change. Remove COMM 411 from Prescribed Courses. Add COMM 305 to Prescribed Courses. Remove COMM 404 from Additional Courses in the International Communications Option. Add COMM 381 to Additional Courses in the International Communications Option. Add COMM 325, COMM 326, and COMM 327 to Additional Courses in the Media Effectis Option. Add COMM 411 to Prescribed Courses in the Society and Culture Option. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Media Studies

University Park, College of Communications (MEDIA)

PROFESSOR ANTHONY OLORUNNISOLA, Head, Department of Film-Video and Media Studies

This major is designed for students who want to pursue an academic rather than professional program of media studies. Students are exposed first to the breadth of approaches to understanding the mass media (e.g., aesthetic, cultural, humanistic, social-behavioral) and then, by selecting one of four options, go into depth in a specialized area of media studies. All options within the major are closely intertwined with the liberal arts and sciences. Therefore, students who successfully complete this major must have a strong foundation in the liberal arts and well-developed language and analytical skills. That foundation should include courses such as ARTH 100 GA(3), ECON 102 GS(3), HIST 2 GH(3), PSYCH 100 GS(3), and SOC 1 GS(3).

The following four options are offered:

FILM AND TELEVISION STUDIES OPTION: This option is designed for students interested in studying the art, history, and criticism of film and television. Electives offer students the opportunity to pursue a related field, such as art, art history, creative writing, speech communication, or theatre arts. This option merges aesthetics and social sciences and is appropriate for those seeking a more theoretical/critical approach to the study of film and video.

INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS OPTION: This option is designed for students who want to study the mass media systems of the world and their role in international affairs. The option offers students an opportunity to enhance their occupational opportunities in international business, organizations, or government and to be better prepared to participate in the world community. Students must select either a University-approved minor in a foreign language, area studies, or international studies; a University-approved education abroad program; or other international-related courses or programs with prior departmental approval.

MEDIA EFFECTS OPTION: This option focuses on the social and psychological effects of media messages and technologies. Students progress through a general introduction to problems and issues, such as the effects of televised sex and violence, to courses that emphasize more theoretical approaches and advanced applications. A minor in a complementary area of study, such as Psychology or Sociology, is encouraged.

SOCIETY AND CULTURE OPTION: In this option, a student and faculty adviser work together to tailor a program of courses to meet the student’s individual interest in a coherent theme in media studies. These courses are usually selected in tandem with a minor or other supporting cluster of non-major courses in the area of specialization. Examples of themes include, but are not limited to, communication and the environment, communication and health campaigns, sports and the media, minorities and the media, and gender and the media. A minor in an area of specialization is encouraged.

Students must select at least 80 credits in courses outside the College of Communications, including at least 65 in the liberal arts and scienes.

For the B.A. degree in Media Studies, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3 of these 45 credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6-15 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 36-45 credits[1]
(3 of these 45 credits are inculded in:

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 15 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
COMM 100 GS(3), COMM 304(3), COMM 305(3), COMM 405(3), COMM 413W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 21-30 credits

FILM AND TELEVISION STUDIES OPTION: (21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
COMM 150 GA(3), COMM 242(3), COMM 250 GA(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 9 credits from COMM 451(3), COMM 452(3), COMM 453 IL(3), COMM 454(3), COMM 455(3), COMM 495(1-3), or COMM 496(1-3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from CAS 415(3), CHNS 121 GH;IL(3), CMLIT 153 GH;IL(3), ENGL 403(3), FR 138 GH(3), FR 487 IL(3), FR 488 IL(3), IT 475(3), JAPNS 453 IL(3), MUSIC 4 GA(3), PHIL 5 GH(3) (Sem: 5-8)

INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS OPTION: (21-30 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
COMM 110 GH(3), COMM 410 IL(3), COMM 419 US;IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from COMM 118 GS(3), COMM 150 GA(3), COMM 205 US(3), COMM 320(3), COMM 381(3) or COMM 452(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9-18 credits)
Select at least one of the following for a minimum of 9 credits and a maximum of 18 credits, no more than 9 credits in COMM. (Sem: 1-8)

University approved minor in foreign language, area studies or international studies

University approved education abroad program

Other international related courses or programs with prior departmental approval

More than one of the above is strongly recommended.

MEDIA EFFECTS OPTION:(21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
COMM 118 GS(3), COMM 418(3), PSYCH 100 GS(3)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from COMM 110 GH(3), COMM 150 GA(3), COMM 180(3), COMM 205 US(3), COMM 320(3), COMM 403(3) or COMM 412(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from: COMM 325(3); COMM 326(3); COMM 327(3) (Sem: 3-7)
Select 3 credits from PSYCH 221 GS(3) or PSYCH 256 GS(3)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits in research methods from an approved department list (Sem: 1-8)

A minor in a complementary area of study is encouraged (e.g. Psychology or Sociology) (Sem: 1-8)

SOCIETY AND CULTURE OPTION: (21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
COMM 411(3)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 6 credits from COMM 110 GH(3), COMM 118 GS(3), COMM 150 GA(3), or COMM 205 US(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 12 credits in communication theory from COMM 110 GH(3), COMM 118 GS(3), COMM 150 GA(3), COMM 170(3), COMM 180(3), COMM 408(3), COMM 409(3), COMM 410 IL(3), COMM 412(3), COMM 417(3), COMM 418(3), COMM 419 US;IL(3), COMM 451(3), COMM 452(3), COMM 453 IL(3), COMM 454(3), COMM 455(3) [At least 9 credits must be at the 400-level] (Sem: 5-8)

A minor in an area of specialization is encouraged.

Integrated B.A./M.A. in Media Studies

The College of Communications offers academically qualified students enrolled in a Bachelor of Arts program in the College of Communications the opportunity to earn both the B.A. and the M.A. upon completion of five years of study. The Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Program in Media Studies would facilitate the advanced study of communications research and thesis development through a carefully organized selection of undergraduate courses, graduate seminars and directed research projects. The program would accelerate and enhance undergraduate students’ appreciation for graduate level scholarship by involving them in the seminars, research activities and the scholarly discourse of the College’s community of Masters and Doctoral-level scholars.

For the IUG Media Studies B.A./M.A. degree, a minimum of 120 credits are required for the B.A. and 36 credits for the M.A. Twelve graduate level credits, in consultation with the adviser, can apply to both the B.A. and M.A. degrees. Six of these must be at the 500 level.

If for any reason a student admitted to the B.A./M.A. program is unable to complete the requirements for the Master of Arts degree program in Media Studies, the student will be permitted to receive the BA degree assuming all degree requirements have been satisfactorily completed.

Application Process and Admissions Requirements

Applicants must complete 6 credits from the following lists of courses with a minimum GPA of 3.5 in order to be admitted: 3 credits from COMM 100, COMM 150, COMM 180, COMM 320, or COMM 370 and 3 credits from COMM 205, COMM 250, COMM 381, COMM 401, COMM 403, COMM 404, COMM 405, COMM 407, COMM 408, COMM 409, COMM 410, COMM 411, COMM 413, COMM 417, COMM 418, COMM 419, COMM 451, COMM 452, COMM 453, COMM 454, COMM 455, COMM 484, or COMM 485. The minimum overall GPA required of applicants is 3.2. Admission to the program is based on the evaluation of the student’s transcript, examples of completed writing and research projects, a narrative statement of objectives, and two letters of support from faculty with whom they have worked. One faculty member must be from the College of Communications. Students are expected to apply after completing 60 credits but before the completion of 100 credits. Candidates are expected to present records of outstanding scholarly achievement to qualify. Applications will be reviewed by the appropriate subset of members of the Graduate Committee of the College.

Applicants to the integrated program:

Must be enrolled in a B.A. program in the College of Communications.

Must have completed 60 credits of the undergraduate degree program. (It is recommended that students apply prior to completing 100 credits.)

Must provide a narrative statement of objectives and two letters of endorsement from faculty with whom they have worked. One faculty member must be from the College of Communications.

Must present an approved plan of study in the application process.

Program of Study

The Integrated B.A./M.A. degree in Media Studies is an academic program that involves students in the systematic study of media. The objective of the course of study is to enable students to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the systems, networks, cultures, and information associated with media. The program prepares students for doctoral study in communications and for professional positions in business and government requiring a comprehensive understanding of the historical, social, and political implications of the media. This program helps prepare students to organize research projects, critically evaluate research reports, and directly influence media practices by the application of research findings. The program is specifically not intended for advanced professional education.

Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is in undergraduate status, unless the student receives financial support, such as an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition.

Degree Requirements

For the IUG Media Studies M.A. degree, a minimum of 120 credits are required for the B.A. and 36 credits for the M.A. At least 18 of the required 36 credits must be at the 500 level. Twelve graduate level credits, in consultation with the adviser, can apply to both the B.A. and M.A. degrees. Six of these double-counted credits must be at the 500 level. A minimum of 12 credits of coursework, as opposed to research credits, must be completed in Communications. COMM 515 and COMM 506 or COMM 511 are required. IUG students will prepare a thesis proposal in consultation with their advisers and are required to present the final thesis in a formal oral defense meeting to a committee of at least 3 members of graduate faculty, two of whom must be members of the College faculty. It is encouraged that one member of the committee be from outside the College.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Earth and Mineral Sciences

46-02-015 Change. Move MATH 22 from Prescribed Courses to Additional Courses. Add EBF 472, MATH 110, 140, STAT 200 and 401 to Additional Courses. Add EBF 402 and 483 to Supporting Courses and Related Areas. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Start: Spring 2018

Energy Business and Finance Minor

University Park: College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (EBF) Contact: Professor Seth Blumsack, Program Officer
World Campus

The minor in Energy, Business and Finance is an offering of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences. The minor introduces students to financial, investment, and management concepts applied to private sector organizations whose operation emphasizes the Earth and its environment, the energy and mineral industries, or the development of new and enhanced materials. The minor focuses on the leadership and information strategies characteristic of enterprises that are succeeding in a rapidly integrating global economy.

The minor provides science and engineering students an introduction to basic entrepreneurial and business concepts to help prepare them for success in a changing professional environment. It also provides other Penn State students an opportunity to focus on business strategies in the Earth resources, environmental, and materials industries. A minimum of 27 credits is required for the minor. A student enrolled in this minor must receive a grade C or better in all courses in the minor. Advising is available through the EMS Student Center (25 Deike Building) or the professor in charge.

Scheduling Recommendations by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 27-29 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
ECON 102 GS(3), EBF 200 GS(3), EBF 301(3), EME 460(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-11 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from: MATH 22 GQ(3); MATH 110 GQ(4); MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits from: STAT 200 GQ(4); STAT 401(3); EBF 472(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from: EGEE 101 GN(3) or EGEE 102 GN(3) or EGEE 120 GS;US;IL(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the approved list of EMS courses. Approved courses are: EBF 401 (3), EBF 402(3), EBF 473(3), EBF 483(3), EBF 484(3), EGEE 401(3), EME 444(3), GEOG 424 US;IL(3), GEOG 430(3), GEOG 431(3), GEOG/EME 432(3), GEOG 444(3), GEOG 469(3), GEOSC 402 IL(3), GEOSC 454(3), and METEO 473(3) (Sem: 7-8).

COURSE ADDS

46-02-016 GEOG 422W (3) (WF) (BA)
Title: Globalization, Migration, and Displacement
Abbreviated Title: Golbalizatn&Migrtn
Description: This course explores the economic, political, legal, and socio-cultural dimensions of displacement and migration in the context of globalization. The substantive focus will be transnational low-wage labor migration and refugee flows of the late 20th- early 21st centuries, even as the course situates contemporary processes within histories and geographies of economic modernization, urbanization and colonialism. At a conceptual level, students will engage key theories of migration from sociology, economics, geography, and demography, and they will closely explore how race and gender shape migrant experiences and policy debates.
Topics to be examined include: political and economic drivers of labor migration; immigration and border policies and politics; refugee politics and policies; human trafficking; shifting social identities, cultures, and notions of belonging in sending and receiving communities; and the role of race, gender, class and nationalism in these processes. Upon completion of this course students will be able to: – Identify and describe the historical antecedents to contemporary cross-border labor migration and refugee flows – Analyze the economic, political, legal, and social-cultural dimensions of transnational labor migration. – Explain the causes and consequences of labor migration from sending regions – Discuss the causes and consequences of labor migration to regions of reception – Compare the factors generating refugee flows across distinct regions over the 20th century – Integrate scholarly understandings of migrant
experiences and identities with broader structural forces generating cross-border flows. – Examine distinct politics and policies of refugee protection and resettlement. – Demonstrate how social hierarchies of race, gender, and class shape cross-border labor migration and refugee resettlement. – Apply theories of migration to specific case studies of cross-border mobility. – Develop a research paper that engages course themes and scholarly debates, linking class concepts and debates to a specific case study. – Demonstrate effective visual and oral presentation skills
Prerequisites: GEOG 220; OR GEOG 20
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-017 PNG 301 (3)
Title: Introduction to Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering
Abbreviated Title: Intro Pet Nat Gas
Description: Introduction to the design and implementation of the systems used in the extraction of oil and gas, including basic calculations in production, reservoir, facilities, and drilling engineering. Differences between unconventional and conventional extractions and systems are described. Section 1: Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering (material for co-class PNG 411) 1. History of oil industry 2. Origins of petroleum reservoirs 3. Conventional versus unconventional oil and gases 4. Different type of oil and gas reservoirs 5. Oil and gas engineering: – Petroleum exploration – Drilling – Reservoir engineering – Production – Onshore/Offshore engineering – Transportation, refining, processing – Petroleum products – Oil and gas markets 6. Environmental impacts Section 2: Drilling engineering 1. Components of drilling rigs 2. Bit types 3. Mud and hydraulic systems 4. Open hole logging 5. Casing design 6. Completion types – Open hole – Slotted liner – Cased and perforated/cementing – Horizontal vs. vertical – Multi-stage hydraulic fracturing for unconventionals Section 3: Reservoir engineering 1. Reservoir conditions: temperature, pressure 2. Darcy’s law – Absolute permeability – Relative permeability 3. Reservoir production mechanisms and stages of production (primary, secondary, tertiary) 4. What’s in a reservoir: – Reservoir fluids: Oil, gas, and water – Phase behavior – Reservoir solids 5. Reservoir properties: porosity, permeability, lithology, compressibility 6. Reservoir heterogeneity: fundamental concepts of geostatistics? 7. How much is the reserve? Volumetric calculation 8. Multiphase flow concepts: – Contact angle, wettability, capillary pressure, saturation 9. Reservoir fluid properties: formation volume factors, 10. Reservoir as a tank: Material balance calculation 1 11. Reservoir as a tank: Material
balance calculation 2 12. Decline curves and rate transient analysis Section IV: Production engineering 1. Stimulation 2. Artificial lift 3. Cased hole logging/PLT/PIT 4. Drill-stem tests Section V. Facilities engineering 1. Separators 2. Gathering facilities 3. Stock tanks 4. Recycle plants 5. Pipelines 6. Water treatment/disposal
Prerequisites: PHYS 211 OR PHYS 250
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-02-018 EBF 301 (3)
Title: Global Finance for the Earth, Energy, and Materials Industries
Abbreviated Title: Global Finance Eem
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce fundamental concepts of financial management and illustrate their global applications.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW:
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: EBF 301 covers the physical and financial aspects of the following energy commodities – crude, natural gas, natural gas liquids and, gasoline. The physical “path” of each commodity from the point of production to the point of use will be explained as well as, the “value chain” that exists for each. Commodity market pricing, both cash and financial, will be presented, encompassing industry “postings” for cash, commodity exchanges and, “over-the-counter” markets. The use of financial derivatives to reduce market & price risk (“hedging”) will be presented and “real world” examples will be utilized.
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: MATH 22, ECON 102
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-019 GEOG 220 (3)
Title: Perspectives on Human Geography
Abbreviated Title: Human Geog
Description: Why are some countries richer than others? How do consumption patterns in one part of the world affect `far flung¿ peoples and environments? How does global warming shape land use patterns and rates of hunger across different regions, and what are the political implications of these patterns? Why do rich economies around the world increasingly depend on the recruitment of low-wage immigrant workers, both ¿legal¿ and ¿illegal¿? How do race and gender shape access to services, housing and employment in many large cities? In what ways does drone warfare change the nature of state power in the 21st century? These kinds of questions are ones that animate the work of human geographers. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the breadth of contemporary human geography. We will explore both the range of topics that geographers study, and some of the key concepts and methods used to study geographic topics. Major themes will investigate how cultural, economic, political, and environmental interactions relate to geographic processes. These general topics will be explored through a detailed examination of case studies. Learning Objectives and Outcomes
After taking this class students will be able to: ¿ Define and explain key concepts, themes, and approaches in human geography ¿ Characterize the emergence and influence of globalization across distinct scales and places ¿ Make connections and comparisons, in written form, between related issues raised in films, class readings and discussions. ¿ Identify the differences between academic and non-academic sources and explain the process for narrowing topics and developing a research paper.
Approved Start: 201617SP

NEW
ADD GEN ED ATTRIBUTE: GS
ADD US ATTRIBUTE
ADD IL ATTRIBUTE
ADD BA ATTRIBUTE
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Why are some countries richer than others? How do consumption patterns in one part of the world affect ‘far flung’ peoples and environments? How does global warming shape land use patterns and rates of hunger across different regions, and what are the political implications of these patterns? Why do rich economies around the world increasingly depend on the recruitment of low-wage immigrant workers, both “legal” and “illegal”? How do race and gender shape access to services, housing and employment in many
large cities? In what ways does drone warfare change the nature of state power in the 21st century? These kinds of questions are ones that animate the work of human geographers. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the breadth of contemporary human geography. We will explore both the range of topics that geographers study, and some of the key concepts and methods used to study geographic topics. Major themes will investigate how cultural, economic, political, and environmental interactions relate to geographic processes. These general topics will be explored through a detailed examination of case studies in the United States and across the globe. Learning Objectives and Outcomes After taking this class students will be able to: • Define and explain key concepts, themes, and approaches in human geography • Characterize the emergence and influence of globalization across distinct scales and places, in
the U.S. and globally • Discuss the differences, similarities, and interrelationships of economic, political, and cultural systems and practices across the globe and within the U.S. • Recognize the role of social identity and power dynamics in shaping lived experience in various contexts, both in the U.S. and globally • Make connections and comparisons, in written form, across space, scale, and context and between related issues raised in films, class readings and discussions. • Identify the differences between academic and non-academic sources and explain the process through which you can narrow topics, find sources, and develop a research paper.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-020 GEOG 390 (1)
Title: Professional Development Seminar in Geography
Abbreviated Title: Prof Devt Seminar
Description: This course equips geography students with a toolkit for career development as they explore the discipline, develop professional networks, and move into life ¿beyond¿ Penn State. It will help students develop a deeper understand of the relationship between careers, research, experiential learning, civic responsibility, transferable skills, and the discipline of geography. Students will come away with a set of career-related competencies as well as a framework for achieving further professional development. Students will hone a resume, engage in professional networking via LinkedIn and informational interviews, and construct an e-portfolio to showcase their accomplishments.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS 1-3 MAXIMUM 4
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course equips geography students with a toolkit for career development as they explore the discipline, develop professional networks, and move into life “beyond” Penn State. It will help students develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between careers, research, experiential learning, civic responsibility, transferable skills, and the discipline of geography. Students will come away with a set of career-related competencies as well as a framework for achieving further professional development. Students will hone a resume, engage in professional networking via LinkedIn and informational interviews, and construct an e-portfolio to showcase their accomplishments.
Prerequisites: 3 credits in geography
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-021 GEOG 414 (1-3)
Title: Principles and Applications in Landscape Ecology
Abbreviated Title: Geog
Description: Introduction to the ways in which spatial patterns and processes operate in an ecological context. GEOG 414 Principles and Applications in Landscape Ecology (1-3) Landscape ecology is a rapidly evolving discipline that is poised to address contemporary challenges in sustainability science, land management, and conservation. The focus of landscape ecology is on the controls, interactions and outcomes of spatial patterns and processes on ecological dynamics at multiple spatial scales. Landscape ecology explores how energy and nutrients flow across spatially variable patches, how dispersal and migration of aquatic and terrestrial organisms are affected by spatial networks, and how disturbances propagate across complex terrain. Grounded in related fields of ecology, geography, and spatial analysis, landscape ecology provides additional theoretical tools and approaches to guide applied conservation decision-making in a dynamically changing world.The objective of this course is for students to apply the methods, theories, approaches and practical applications of landscape ecology to inform landscape decision-making. Particular emphasis is placed on how humans modify landscapes and how species, ecological communities, and ecosystems have responded to these
changes. These objectives will be met through lecture and discussion of prominent landscape ecology topics (scale, pattern quantification, agents of pattern formation, green infrastructure, and conservation biology), computer laboratory exercises, written papers, and group presentations.By the end of the course students will be able to (1) articulate in written and oral form the concepts of scale and pattern, (2) use landscape pattern metrics, spatial statistics, and models to characterize ecological pattern on landscapes, and explain how ecological patterns develop, and (3) apply knowledge of spatial pattern-process interactions to issues of sustainability, conservation, and landscape management.
PREREQUISITES: BIOL 110 or BIOL 220 or GEOG 314 or GEOG 314 or FOR  308 or W F S209 or LARCH241 , or by permission
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: Landscape Ecology
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Landscape ecology is a rapidly evolving discipline that is poised to address contemporary challenges in sustainability science, land management, and conservation. The focus of landscape ecology is on the controls, interactions and outcomes of spatial patterns and processes on ecological dynamics at multiple spatial scales. Landscape ecology explores how energy and nutrients flow across spatially variable patches, how dispersal and migration of aquatic and terrestrial organisms are affected by spatial networks, and how disturbances propagate across complex terrain. Grounded in related fields of ecology, geography, and spatial analysis, landscape ecology provides additional theoretical tools and approaches to guide applied conservation decision-making in a dynamically changing world.The objective of this course is for students to apply the methods, theories, approaches and practical applications of landscape ecology to inform landscape decision-making. Particular emphasis is placed on how humans modify landscapes and how species, ecological communities, and ecosystems have responded to these changes. These objectives will be met through lecture and discussion of prominent landscape ecology topics (scale, pattern quantification, agents of pattern formation, green infrastructure, and conservation biology), computer laboratory exercises, written papers, and group presentations.By the end of the course students will be able to (1) articulate in written and oral form the concepts of scale and pattern, (2) use landscape pattern metrics, spatial statistics, and models to characterize ecological pattern on landscapes, and explain how ecological patterns develop, and (3) apply knowledge of spatial pattern-process interactions to issues of sustainability, conservation, and landscape management.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-022 GEOG 485 (3) (BA)
Title: GIS Programming and Customization
Abbreviated Title: Gis Programming
Description: Customizing GIS software to extend its built-in functionality and to automate repetitive tasks. GEOG 485 GEOG 485 GIS Programming and Customization (3)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. GEOG 485 is an elective course in the Master
of Geographic Information Systems degree program. It is also one of the optional capstone courses that lead to Penn State’s Certificate of Achievement in Geographic Information Systems. The course consists of readings, quizzes, projects, and discussions about constructing tools that solve geographic problems not easily solved using out-of-the-box GIS software. Students learn to use the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) programming environment to add functionality toArcGIS 8.x . No previous programming experience is assumed. The course covers programming basics like object-orientation, COM, object model diagrams, loops, if-then constructs, and modular code design, as well as GIS-focused topics such as working with maps, layers, tables, and performing queries. Students who successfully complete the course are able to automate repetitive tasks, customize theArcGISinterface, and share their customizations with others. The course is ten weeks in length and requires a minimum of 8-12 hours of student activity each week. It is offered quarterly (starting in January, April, July, and October).
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: GIS Programming and Software Development
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: GIS Programming
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The course focuses on solving geographic problems by modifying and automating generic Geographic Information System (GIS) software through programming. In GEOG 485, students use the Python programming language to write and modify scripts that add
functionality to desktop GIS tools and to automate geospatial analysis processes. No previous programming experience is assumed. Core topics covered in this class include object-oriented programming, component object model technologies, object model diagrams, loops, if-then constructs, and modular code design, and situates these topics in the geospatial workflow through their integration with maps, layers, spatial data tables, and spatial analysis methods. Students who successfully complete the course can automate repetitive GIS tasks, customize GIS interfaces, and share their geospatial software development work with others.
RECOMMENDED PREPARATIONS: GEOG 363; GEOG 484
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Education

46-02-022A Add. New Early Development and Education Minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Early Development and Education Minor

Contact: James Johnson, jej4@psu.edu

The Intercollege Minor in Early Development and Education builds upon existing courses across the university and especially ones found in the College of Education and the College of Health and Human Development. The minor affords the opportunity for students to study practices and policies informed by research and theory covering the period in human development from prenatal to three years. The minor prepares graduates majoring in a variety of fields such as education, human development and family studies, psychology, speech communication, nutrition, and others to have a deeper understanding of this period of the life cycle with an emphasis on the transltion of this knowledge to applied settings.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Some courses may require prerequisites.

For a Minor in Early Development and Education, a minimum of 20 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 20-21 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (8-9 credits)
ECE 451(3), ECE 453(2-3), ECE 479(3)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
CI 295(3); HDFS 330(3)
EDPSY 10 GS(3); EDPSY 11(3); HDFS 229 GS(3) (Sem: 1-5)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
CI 495(3); CSD 146(3); CSD 300(3); ECE 453(3); ECE/HDFS 454(3); HDFS 428(3); HDFS 430(3)

Treatment of Language Disorders
SPLED 415(3); PSYCH 410(3); PSYCH 474(3)


46-02-022B Drop Teaching and Learning Online Minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Teaching and Learning Online Minor

University Park, College of Education (TLO)

This minor is designed for students who are interested in a thorough understanding of online teaching and learning—that is teaching and learning experiences with primary delivery of content through the Internet with use of a variety of advanced technological tools to include but not limited to course management systems, social networking, podcasts, discussion forums, blogs, tablets, mlearning, and other advanced instructional tools. This minor is intended for all education majors and is particularly focused on those interested in opportunities in the future to teach online courses, blended courses, or within an entirely online cybercharter or similar institution. The minor includes two introductory survey courses, one on the impact of online learning globally and one on educational communications. The four remaining courses are focused on distance education broadly construed, design skills, working with course management systems, and special attention to K-12 cybercharter and online delivery. In conjunction with the student’s major in Education, the minor prepares the student for entry to a professional position as a teacher in online and blended educational settings at all levels. Majors complemented by this minor would include but not be limited to Agricultural Education, Art Education, Childhood and Early Adolescent Education, Education and Public Policy, Kinesiology (Teacher Education Option), Music Education, Rehabilitation and Human Services, Secondary Education, Special Education, Workforce Education, and World Languages Education.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
ADTED 470(3), LDT 100 GS/IL(3), LDT 101(3), INSYS 415(3), INSYS 432(3), INSYS 433(3) (Sem: 3-6)

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Engineering

COURSE ADDS

46-02-023 CMPSC 131 (3)
Title: Programming and Computation I: Fundamentals
Abbreviated Title: PROG & COMP I
Description: This course introduces the fundamental concepts and processes of solving computational problems through the design, implementation, testing and evaluation of efficient and robust computer programs. The concepts include basic computational constructs found in imperative, object-oriented and functional programming languages such as iteration, conditionals, functions, recursion, and datatypes. These provide the basic building blocks found in virtually all programming languages. The processes include the stepwise refinement of a problem description into individual components that can be implemented, tested, and integrated into an effective solution. A central theme to the course is computational thinking which includes a wide range of approaches to solving problems and designing systems that draw upon concepts fundamental to computer science. Computational thinking includes thinking recursively, considering parallel processing, thinking about types and type checking, judging a program not just for correctness and efficiency but also for its esthetics, and judging a system design for its simplicity and elegance. Computational thinking is applying principles of abstraction at multiple levels to focus on important details; it is applying problem decomposition to identify small problems that can be individually solved then combined to form a solution to the original problem. Computational thinking uses program invariants
to describe a system’s behavior succinctly and declaratively. Computational thinking considers multiple models of computation when designing an effective solution to a problem. Specific outcomes of this course include the abilities to: • Conceptualize and implement computational solutions to problems • Utilize imperative model of computation to solve problems • Utilize functional model of computation to solve problems • Reason about problems at multiple levels of abstraction • Analyze code for its behavior, efficiency and correctness
Concurrent Courses: MATH 110; MATH 140
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-024 CMPSC 132 (3)
Title: Programming and Computation II: Data Structures
Abbreviated Title: PROG & COMP II
Description: This course builds upon the foundations of programming and computation by introducing and studying the data structures and programming language features that support the design and construction of large-scale software systems. It introduces the foundations of object-oriented programming, the design and analysis of efficient algorithms using important data structures, and programming techniques that support reusable and modular program components, including data abstraction, polymorphism, and higher-order functions. Topics from object-oriented programming include classes, objects, inheritance, methods, message passing, static and dynamic type checking. These topics form the core of most object-oriented languages and provide a foundation for learning more advanced language topics. Data structures capture the common organization of many kinds of data arising in the design of
efficient solutions to computational problems. Specific data structures covered include stacks, queues, trees, graphs and linked lists. The design and analysis of efficient algorithms using these data structures provide a foundation for the study of computing, where understanding the complexity of a problem and the availability of efficient solutions are essential skills. Finally, topics including higher-order functional programming, data abstraction and parametric polymorphism, as well as principles from object-oriented programming, come together to support the design and implementation of modular, reusable and robust code. Specific outcomes of this course include the abilities to: 1. Design and implement classes that support encapsulation of data 2. Design and implement computational solutions to problems using standard composite data structures including linked lists, trees and graphs 3. Analyze the efficiency of algorithms manipulating these data structures 4. Design and implement computational solutions to problems using higher-order functions and parametric polymorphism 5. Design and implement a software system composed of modular reusable software components.
Prerequisites: CMPSC 121; CMPSC 131
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-025 ESC 460M (3) (H) (WF)
Title: Multidisciplinary Design Project
Abbreviated Title: Multidisc Design
Description: This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn the design process in the context of an industry- or government sponsored or service-based design project that demands delivering a working solution. The design projects in this course will be structured for students from two or more different engineering majors, as defined by the project sponsors in collaboration with the instructor and departmental project coordinators. While the projects may be supplied/supported/initiated by industry, topics may be related to the cutting-edge multidisciplinary research areas represented by the strengths and diversity of the Engineering Science faculty, such as nanotechnology, biomaterials, and other areas requiring cross-discipline collaboration. The project sponsor will provide the technical expertise for the project, a clear definition of all project deliverables, and the financial support to cover needed
materials and supplies and travel costs. Project sponsors will be invited to attend two key events each semester: Project Kickoff in week 1 of the semester to define the project and answer questions from the students as well as the Design Showcase in week 15 of
the semester, when teams present their project results to sponsors, faculty, other students, and the public. The College of Engineering will provide the facilities where the design teams will work together to develop the design concept and prototype solutions. Faculty members in the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics will administer the course, including reading, evaluating, and grading the final project report, provide lectures on topics including on project management, design, product manufacturing, intellectual property, engineering ethics, societal/global/contemporary/professional issues, and related technical topics, and organize
invited technical lectures related to industry projects. In accordance with standard procedures, specific multidisciplinary projects will be selected for this course to provide challenging design experiences for all students. The selection of these projects will be done by the course instructor prior to the start of each semester of the course offering. Multidisciplinary teams are be formed based on specific technical elements of the project and project scope.
Prerequisites: Senior standing in the student’s major or junior standing in Engineering Science Honors Curriculum or Schreyer Honors College. CHEM 110, MATH 140, MATH 141, MATH 250; OR MATH 251, PHYS 211; OR PHYS 212
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

46-02-026 BE 460 (1)
Title: Biological Engineering Design I
Abbreviated Title: Biol Eng Dsgn I
Description: Part one of a two course sequence; culminating design experience with projects in agricultural, food and biological processing, and natural resource engineering. B E 460 Biological Engineering Design I (3) Students will develop skills and techniques for managing and
executing engineering design projects in the following fields: agricultural engineering, food and biological processing engineering, and/or natural resource engineering. Projects are sponsored by faculty, industry, or community initiatives and are structured to span two semesters. In the Fall semester, the emphasis is on classroom lectures and project proposal development. In the Spring semester, the emphasis is on hands-on laboratory activities, project execution, and report preparation. Project teams perform all facets of the design process. This includes problem identification, planning of the project, formulation of design specifications, development and evaluation of alternative conceptual designs, development of detailed designs, consideration of safety and design optimization, design implementation, design testing, and analysis and documentation of results. Students improve their writing skills through preparation and refinement of various documents including a design notebook, proposal, statement of work, design specification, status reports, and a final report. Students also present their results in other formats, including poster and oral presentations for both technical and non-technical audiences.
Prerequisites: BE 301, BE 391, 7th Semester standing
Approved Start: 201617FA

CHANGE CREDITS: 2
ADD WRITING ATTRIBUTE
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: BE 460 is part one of a two course sequence that provides a culminating design experience for students in the Biological Engineering major. Students will develop skills and techniques for managing and executing engineering design projects in the following fields: agricultural engineering, food and biological processing engineering, and/or natural resource engineering. Projects are sponsored by faculty, industry, or community initiatives and are structured to span two semesters. In the Fall semester, the emphasis is on classroom lectures, preliminary analyses, and project proposal development. In the Spring semester, the emphasis is on hands-on laboratory activities, project execution, and report preparation. Project teams perform all facets of the design process. This includes problem identification, planning of the project, formulation of design specifications, development and evaluation of alternative conceptual designs, development of detailed designs, consideration of safety and design optimization, design implementation, design testing, and analysis and documentation of results. Students improve their writing skills through preparation and refinement of various documents including a design notebook, proposal, statement of work, design specification report, status reports, and a final report. Students also present their results in other formats, including poster and oral presentations for both technical and non-technical audiences.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-027 BE 466 (3)(WF)
Title: Biological Engineering Design II
Abbreviated Title: Biol Eng Dsgn II
Description: Part two of a two course sequence; culminating design experience with projects in agricultural, food and biological processing, and natural resource engineering. B E 466W Biological Engineering Design II (3) Students will develop skills and techniques for managing
and executing engineering design projects in the following fields: agricultural engineering, food and biological processing engineering, and/or natural resource engineering. Projects are sponsored by faculty, industry, or community initiatives and are structured to span two semesters. In the Fall semester, the emphasis is on classroom lectures and project proposal development. In the Spring semester, the emphasis is on hands-on laboratory activities, project execution, and report preparation. Project teams perform all facets of the design process. This includes problem identification, planning of the project, formulation of design specifications, development and evaluation of alternative conceptual designs, development of detailed designs, consideration of safety and design optimization, design implementation, design testing, and analysis and documentation of results. Students improve their writing skills through preparation and refinement of various documents including a design notebook, proposal, statement of work, design specification, status reports, and a final report. Students also present their results in other formats, including poster and oral presentations for both technical and non-technical audiences.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 2
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: BE 466 is part two of a two course sequence that provides a culminating design experience for students in the Biological Engineering major. Students will develop skills and techniques for managing and executing engineering design projects in the following fields:
agricultural engineering, food and biological processing engineering, and/or natural resource engineering. Projects are sponsored by faculty, industry, or community initiatives and are structured to span two semesters. In the Fall semester, the emphasis is on classroom lectures, preliminary analyses, and project proposal development. In the Spring semester, the emphasis is on hands-on laboratory activities, project execution, and report preparation. Project teams perform all facets of the design process. This includes problem identification, planning of the project, formulation of design specifications, development and evaluation of alternative conceptual designs, development of detailed designs, consideration of safety and design optimization, design implementation, design testing, and analysis and documentation of results. Students improve their writing skills through preparation and refinement of various
documents including a design notebook, proposal, statement of work, design specification report, status reports, and a final report. Students also present their results in other formats, including poster and oral presentations for both technical and non-technical audiences.
Prerequisites: BE 460
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Harrisburg

COURSE ADDS

46-02-028 MATH 448 (3)
Title: Mathematics of Finance
Abbreviated Title: Math Finance
Description: The course provides a foundational knowledge of the mathematics and mathematical models of finance, primarily of option pricing, hedging, and portfolio optimization. The topics include the definition of various financial securities and instruments (e.g. bonds, stocks, forward contracts, and options), the theory of interest, the No-Arbitrage Principle, measures of return and volatility, the Markowitz model of portfolio theory, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, the pricing of forward contracts, option trading strategies, the pricing of options via binomial models and the Black-Scholes model, and principles of hedging.
Prerequisites: MATH 141, AND ( STAT 200; OR STAT 301; OR MATH 318; OR STAT 318; OR STAT 401; OR MATH 414; OR STAT 414 )
Proposed Start SP2018

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Health and Human Development

COURSE ADDS

46-02-029 BBH 325 (3)
Title: Health Promotion Services Training
Abbreviated Title: HP Service Train
Description: This course will provide students with the knowledge and professional skills to deliver peer-based individual health promotion services for the college population. The course will cover a variety of health issues that are relevant to college students, including nutrition,
physical activity, sexual health, sleep, and stress (including mindfulness and time management). Students will be taught about each of the health topics over the course of two class sessions. Students will be taught information about how each health topic specifically relates to the college population. Current data about each topic will be included. These issues will be discussed in the context of health promotion principles and applicable health promotion theories. The class will provide an overview of the ecological perspective, but the focus will be on intrapersonal and interpersonal level theories, such as the Stages of Change (Transtheoretical) and Health Belief Models, as well as Social Cognitive Theory. Students will be taught the constructs for each model/theory. Students will be taught about how the theories/models apply to delivering individual health promotion interventions. Students will receive extensive training in motivational interviewing, an evidence-based strategy for promoting health behavior change. The content is designed to help students develop an understanding of the core concepts of motivational interviewing. Students will practice motivational interviewing techniques during class time. The students will deliver individual interventions during class time. Additionally, students will be given course assignments that require them to practice delivering the interventions. Students will learn about professionalism and ethics within the context of delivering individual interventions to college students.
Prerequisites: Permission of program AND PSYCH 100; CAS 100
PROPOSED START SP2018

46-02-030 RPTM 201 (3)
Title: Introduction to Community Recreation
Abbreviated Title: Intro to Comm Rec
Description: This course introduces students to the role of community and non-profit recreation agencies in generating benefits for individuals and communities. Using experience industry design/management and social justice perspectives, this course focuses on designing
meaningful experiences that serve people from a variety of backgrounds and circumstances. Topics covered in this course include: the history of community and non profit recreation; environmental, economic, health, social and human development benefits of recreation;
access and equity issues in recreation and community sport; engaging communities in decision making; the experience industry; and designing community recreation programs and spaces for meaningful experiences. Students will develop their ability to describe the benefits of community and non-profit recreation to individuals and society; identify disparities in access to recreation and the role of community and non-profit recreation in addressing these; describe methods and techniques for engaging community members in decision making; explain how theory informs the design of meaningful experiences; describe ways in which programs and places can be designed to facilitate meaningful experiences; and explain how individual and group characteristics should influence design to result in greater benefits.
Proposed Start SP2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-02-031 KINES 425 (3)(WF)
Title: Physical Activity in Diverse Populations
Abbreviated Title: Phys Act Div Pop
Description: An examination of the social, cultural, political, and environmental influences on health and physical activity promotion among diverse populations.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 425W
ADD US ATTRIBUTE
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: An examination of the social, cultural, political, and environmental influences on health and physical activity promotion among diverse populations. Includes examination of issues related to race, ethnicity, geography, income status, and other social factors across the lifespan for promoting physical activity through public health strategies.
Prerequisites: KINES 321
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-032 KINES 61 (3) ( GHA)
Title: Fitness Theory and Practice
Abbreviated Title: Fit Thry&Practice
Description: Students will learn about the science of fitness/wellness; evaluate their present fitness levels and create a personal fitness plan. KINES 061 Fitness Theory and Practice (3)( GHA) Fitness Theory and Practice is a course designed to give the Penn State student a complete understanding of the fundamental principles of physical fitness and the skills necessary to implement a personalized fitness program. This course will provide all the information and skill needed for the student to organize, plan, and implement a complete physical fitness program.In this course the Penn State student will acquire all the knowledge and critical thinking skills that are essential to the development of a healthful and active lifestyle. Through readings, classroom discussions, personal assessment techniques, video presentation, and World Wide Web based assignments, students will build a foundation of knowledge to guide them in their pursuit of an active and healthy lifestyle.In addition to the above mentioned knowledge base, students will be guided through laboratory activities designed to: assess personal fitness levels pre-and-post intervention strategies, educate the student about
cardiovascular training techniques, flexibility training techniques, muscular strength and endurance training techniques, and implement their own personal fitness program.Various evaluation techniques will be used to assess student progress in Kinesiology 061. These
techniques shall include, but not be limited to, conventional objective testing; group and individual presentations; World Wide Web based assignments and leadership activities; personal assessment inventories; and journaling assignments. Students who have already received credit for Kinesiology 084 or Kinesiology 066 may not enroll in this class because of the duplication of material.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
GEN ED RECERTIFICATION
CHANGE GHA TO GHW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Fitness theory and Practice is a course designed to give the Penn State student a complete understanding of the fundamental principles of physical fitness and the skills necessary to implement a personalized fitness program. This course will provide the information and skill needed for the student to organize, plan and implement a complete physical fitness program which can evolve over the lifespan. In this course the Penn State student will acquire the knowledge and critical thinking skills that are essential to the development of a healthful and active lifestyle. Students explore the training principles, health-related components of physical fitness, benefits of these components, and learn to use and apply established fitness guidelines. Students also consider factors which affect their performance in executing a fitness plan such as nutritional concerns, the impact of stress, choice of proper equipment, matching personal goals to proper execution, and personal motivation. In their pursuit of an active and healthy lifestyle, students assess and evaluate their
personal health, fitness, and wellness using pre and post intervention strategies, and engage in physical exercise to practice concepts presented in course materials including cardiovascular, flexibility, muscular strength and endurance training techniques.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-033 KINES 61S (3) (GHA) (FYS)
Title: Fitness Theory and Practice
Abbreviated Title: Fit Thry&Practice
Description: Students will learn about the science of fitness/wellness; evaluate their present fitness levels and create a personal fitness plan.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
GEN ED RECERTIFICATION
CHANGE GHA TO GHW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Fitness Theory and Practice is a course designed to give the Penn State student a complete understanding of the fundamental principles of physical fitness and the skills necessary to implement a personalized fitness program. This course will provide the information and skills needed for the student to organize, plan and implement a complete physical fitness program which can evolve over the lifespan. In this course the Penn State student will acquire the knowledge and critical thinking skills that are essential to the development of a healthful and active lifestyle. Students explore the training principles, health-related components of physical fitness, benefits of these components, and learn to use and apply established fitness guidelines. Students also consider factors which affect their performance in executing a fitness plan such as nutritional concerns, the impact of stress, choice of proper equipment, matching personal goals to proper execution, and personal motivation. In their pursuit of an active and healthy lifestyle, students assess and evaluate their
personal health, fitness, and wellness using pre and post intervention strategies, and engage in physical exercise to practice concepts presented in course materials including cardiovascular, flexibility, muscular strength and endurance training techniques. As a first year seminar course, students receive instruction in and introduction to campus resources and receive peer mentoring.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-034 KINES 84 (1.5-2:2) (GHA)
Title: Fitness for Life
Abbreviated Title: Fitness for Life
Description: A course designed to give students an understanding of the fundamental principles of physical fitness. Students who receive credit for KINES 084 shall not receive credit for either KINES 061 or 081. KINES 084 Fitness for Life (1.5) (GHA) Kinesiology 084 is a course that has been designed to give the Penn State student a complete understanding of the fundamental principles of physical fitness. This course will provide all of the information the student needs to understand, organize, plan and implement a complete physical fitness program.In this course the Penn State student will acquire the knowledge and critical thinking skills that are essential to the development of a healthful and active lifestyle. Kinesiology 084 will challenge students to be active participants in their learning process. Students will as individuals or as part of a learning team be involved in classroom discussions of various fitness/wellness related topics. Learning teams will delineate key elements of various topics for classroom presentation. Student will participate in student surveys collecting data, interpreting results and formulating theories about those results. Kinesiology 084 will be an ideal forum in which students can explore their social behaviors as they related to the ethical consumption of resources with regard to health and fitness.Various evaluation techniques will be used to assess student’s progress in Kinesiology 084. These techniques shall include but not be limited to conventional objective testing, group and individual presentations; Web based information gathering, personal assessment inventories, and journaling assignments.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
GEN ED RECERTIFICATION
CHANGE GHA TO GHW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1.5-3 NOT REPEATABLE
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Kinesiology 84 is a course that has been designed to give the Penn State student a complete understanding of the fundamental principles of physical fitness. This course will provide the necessary skills and information the student needs to understand, organize,
plan and implement a complete physical fitness program. Students are expected to explore wellness, disease progression, assess personal fitness and wellness, and explore variables (such as stress and nutritional practices) which may affect performance in the personal plan. In this course the Penn State student will acquire the knowledge and critical thinking skills that are essential to the development of a healthful and active lifestyle, be able to articulate the interrelationship between fitness and wellness, apply the concepts of physical fitness, develop an appreciation having a physically active lifestyle, and be able to alter a personal plan over the
lifespan.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-035 KINES 89 (3-3:3) (GHA)
Title: Student Wilderness Experience
Abbreviated Title: Wilderness Exper
Description: Incoming student wilderness experience. Backpacking and one additional adventure: rock climbing, high ropes course/canoeing. Oneday of community service. KINES 089 Student Wilderness Experience (3) (GHA) KINES 089 is a 6-day wilderness experience that is
offered to incoming students during the summer before the onset of the fall semester. This course includes four days of backpacking and one day of an additional adventure: rock climbing, high ropes course or canoeing. Through these activities students learn the various skills associated with backpacking and wilderness living. Students are engaged in hours of physical activity as they hike between 6 and 8 miles per day on variable, rolling terrain with 30-401b backpacks upon their backs. Students are placed into small groups of 8-10 students with Penn State students and graduate students who mentor and lead the wilderness experience. Small group discussions focus on life at Penn State, question and answer sessions for students and issues regarding outdoor leadership. KINES 089 emphasizes teamwork, group living skills, and wilderness ethics. Through the first five days of the program these various topics are addressed. Equipment for all activities is provided. Incoming students with all levels of experience may take this course. A community service project is also required. A follow-up classroom session takes place one to two months from the ending point of the program at
which time students will turn in their class assignments. KINES 089 is offered in June, July and August prior to the onset of fall classes. Both sections of KINES 089 begin and end at the University Park campus. The course is offered at least twice every year, prior to the beginning of fall semester, with anticipated enrollment of 60 students each section.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE TO NOT REPEATABLE
GEN ED RECERTIFICATION
CHANGE GHA TO GHW
CHANGE TITLE: Wilderness Experience
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: KINES 89 is a wilderness orientation program that is offered for incoming students to assist in their transition to life at Penn State. This course includes multiple days of backpacking in various locations. Through these activities students learn the various skills associated with backpacking and wilderness living which they can continue to use across the lifespan. Students are placed into small groups of eight to ten students with Penn State students and graduate students who mentor and lead the backpacking experience. Small group
discussions are threaded throughout the course and focus on student life at Penn State. This class emphasizes teamwork, group living skills, nutritional strategies, living in the elements, wilderness ethics, and health and wellness by introducing students to the craft of backpacking, an activity that students can continue throughout their lifetime. Through this aspect of the course the aim is to help students develop skills to successfully manage their time and stress in order to better balance the physical, social and academic aspects of their lives. Throughout the class these various topics are addressed. Equipment for all activities is provided. Incoming
students with all levels of experience may take this course. Both course travel and engagement in and completion of all other course content are required.
Proposed Start SP 2019

OLD
46-02-036 NUTR 320 (3-3:3)
Title: Science and Methods of Food Preparation
Abbreviated Title: Science and Methods of Food Pr
Description: Scientific principles of basic food preparation, with an emphasis on the physical and chemical aspects.
Prerequisites: NUTR 251, CHEM 202
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 4 NON REPEATABLE
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: Sci Food Prep
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this course is to teach students the science of food preparation, to develop culinary skills, to learn how to preserve the nutritional content of plant and animal foods, and how to apply food safety principles during food preparation. Additionally, for each food preparation method, students will learn the underlying chemical and physical principles responsible for the recipe outcome. Students will gain an understanding of production methods used by food manufacturers and the source of food additives used to make processed foods. Students will apply scientific principles of food preparation by modifying recipes to improve the nutritional quality of prepared foods while maintaining product quality. The course will include a didactic and cooking lab to reinforce the didactic concepts. During the lab sessions, students will learn basic culinary techniques and apply these techniques by reading recipes, preparing foods, and using sensory evaluation to analyze the prepared foods. Furthermore, students will apply the concepts learned during lecture and the assigned readings to evaluate the outcomes of the prepared recipes.
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Information Sciences and Technology

PROGRAM CHANGES

46-02-037 Change. Increase the Degree Requirements from 125 to 126 credits. Increase the Major Requirements from 93 to 99 credits. Add IST 432 and SRA 472 to Prescribed Courses. Add Supporting Courses and Related Areas section. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations

University Park, College of Information Sciences and Technology (CYAOP_BS)
Mary Beth Rosson, Associate Dean for Graduate and Undergraduate Studies

PROFESSOR PENG LIU, Information Sciences and Technology
PROFESSOR CHAO-HSIEN CHU, Information Sciences and Technology

The Bachlor of Science in Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations in the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) is an interdisciplinary program that prepares students for careers as cybersecurity professionals. It educates students on the essential concepts of cyber-defense and the analytical fundamentals of cybersecurity, with a focus on the analytical and risk management underpinnings and associated cyber-defense techniques and strategies for ensuring the safety of online information stored in large and heterogeneous networks that are embedded within and across the complex socio-technical infrastructures that are pervasive in today’s business, government and military organizations. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills needed to critically assess and respond to modern information security threats, using approaches that are grounded in a holistic understanding of adversarial strategies and effective responses. More specifically, it will offer an in-depth and domain-independent approach to the development of skills in cyberdefense technologies, tools and processes; cybersecurity analytics and visualization; and cybersecurity risk analysis and management. The major draws from concepts and skills associated with a number of disciplines, including information science, management science, statistics and data science, human behavior, and law/policy. Graduates will be prepared to join the rapidly growing cybersecurity workforce deployed across organizations of diverse sizes and missions.

Entrance Requirements: To be eligible for the Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations major, students must:

Have completed the following entrance-to-major requirements with a grade of C or better in each: CYBER 100S(3), IST 140(3), IST 210(3), IST 220(3), IST 242(3), STAT 200(4)

Have achieved a minimum cululative grade point average of 2.00 prior to and through the end of the semester during which the entrance to major is requested.

For the B.S. degree in Cybersecurity Analytics and Operations, a minimum of 126 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in General Education Requirements)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 3 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 99 credits[1]
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GS courses, 9 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (81 credits)
CAS 100 GWS(3), CYBER 100S(3)[1], CYBER 262 (3)[1], IST 140 (3)[1], IST 210 (3)[1], IST 220 (3)[1], IST 230 (3)[1], IST 242 (3)[1], IST 261 (3)[1], MATH 110 GQ(4)[1], SRA 111 GS(3)[1], SRA 211 (3)[1], SRA 221 (3)[1], STAT 200 GQ(4)[1](Sem: 1-4)
CYBER 342W(3)[1], CYBER 362 (3)[1], CYBER 366 (3)[1], IST 451 (3)[1], IST 454 (3)[1], IST 495 (1)[1], SRA 231 (3)[1], SRA 311 (3)[1], SRA 365 (3)[1](Sem: 3-6)
CYBER 440 (3)[1], IST 432(3)[1], IST 456 (3)[1], SRA 472(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 3 credits from: ENGL 15 GWS(3); ENGL 30 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: ENGL 202C GWS(3); ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 1-8)

SUPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from one of the Application Focus course lists in Appendix B; at least 6 credits must be at the 400-level. Students may also complete a custom Application Focus sequence with approval from an academic advisor and a CYBER teaching faculty member. (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

 

COURSE ADDS

46-02-038 IST 222 (3)
Title: Community Informatics
Abbreviated Title: Community IT
Description: This course combines theory and practice to help students develop a contextualized understanding of community as a conceptual lens for understanding human history and human experience. This course examines the history of community, and of interactions between community and information technology, emphasizing how possibilities and practices of community have been transformed by information technology through the last half century, and currently. The course includes opportunities for students to engage with, and
thereby come to understand and appreciate local community institutions off campus (e.g., in State College). Thus, in the tradition of the Chicago School of sociology, the course directly utilizes the local community itself as a living laboratory for the study of community informatics. The objective of the course is to help students think critically about community and technology in society, and more specifically, about how information technology can be used to shape human participation in and experience of community
Proposed Start SP 2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-02-039 DS 310 (3)
Title: Machine Learning for Data Analytics
Abbreviated Title: Mach Learn&Data An
Description: The course teaches students the principles of machine learning (and data mining) and their applications in the data sciences. DS 310 Machine Learning for Data Analytics (3) The course introduces the principles of machine learning (and data mining), representative  machine learning algorithms and their applications to real-world problems. Topics to be covered include: principled approaches to clustering, classification, and function approximation from data, feature selection and dimensionality reduction, assessing the performance of alternative models, and relative strengths and weaknesses of alternative approaches. The course will include a laboratory component to provide students with hands-on experience with applications of the algorithms to problems from several domains. Prerequisites for the course include basic proficiency in programming, elementary probability theory and statistics, and
discrete mathematics.
PREREQUISITES: DS 220, STAT 318
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: CMPSC 121, STAT 318
PROPOSED START SP2019

OLD
46-02-040 DS 340 (3-3:3) (WF)
Title: Applied Data Sciences
Abbreviated Title: Applied Data Sci
Description: This project-based course has students apply principles of data sciences to solving real-world problems while developing and demonstrating writing abilities.
PREREQUISITE: DS 300, DS 310, DS 330
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course builds up the students’ understanding of data sciences by discussing the fundamental principles in the context of realworld examples, and then shows specifically how the principles can provide understanding of many of the most common methods and techniques covered in previous data science courses. The course features three individual projects as well as a team project spanning the entire course. After taking this course, the students should be able to cover the entire pipeline of a data science project, from problem formulation to data science solutions. That is, start from a data driven problem, identify pertinent datasets to the problem and collect data, reason about the best techniques that should be used to solve the problem, implement algorithms and models, assess performance, and communicate actionable insights through both written reports and oral presentations. As one example, a fundamental principle of data science is that solutions for extracting useful knowledge from data must carefully consider the problem in the real world scenarios. This may sound obvious at first, but the notion underlies many choices that must be made in the process
of data analytics, including problem formulation, method choice, solution evaluation, and general strategy formulation. Another fundamental principle is that predictive modeling can both inform and be informed by relevant knowledge (including theories, models, frameworks) of the relevant domains. This principle manifests itself throughout data science: in the specific design of many particular data sciences applications, and more generally as the basis for all “intelligent” solutions. In this course, this principle will be highlighted by case studies from multiple domains so that students can be inspired to apply this principle to their term projects.
Lastly, as most data science projects are delivered as solutions as opposed to software deliverables, the ability for data scientists to communicate their results through concise and actionable insights plays a critical role in a data science project. This course places a particular focus on developing student writing abilities, through formal project reports and presentations. The individual projects will offer an interactive experience for students through feedbacks on their reports provided by the instructor. The term-long project will also train students in writing in a collaborative environment.
CHANGE Prerequisites: DS 300 AND ( DS 310 OR CMPSC 448 )
ADD RECOMMENDED PREPARATIONS DS 330

OLD
46-02-041 DS 402 (3-3:9)
Title: Emerging Trends in the Data Sciences
Abbreviated Title: Trends in Data Sci
Description: This course exposes and trains students in the analysis of emerging trends in data sciences. DS 402 Emerging Trends in the Data Sciences (3) Data sciences is a rapidly evolving field affected by innovations in a variety of technical domains, including data generation, capture, storage, and processing. Staying abreast of new developments can be a daunting task but is critical for success. This course provides an in-depth analysis of a particular innovation, but starts with developing generally applicable skills for analyzing new technologies. In particular, the analytic framework considers the innovation’s technical aspects and potential for widespread adoption, but also its social, organizational and policy implications. As a course focused on a new data sciences technology or analytic innovation, it is repeatable. As such, the course enables students to be exposed to the cutting edge of data sciences, supporting a forward looking view of the field for students across the university.
PREREQUISITE DS200
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: MAXIMUM 3 NOT REPEATABLE
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: TREND IN DATA SCI
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: DS 220
PROPOSED START SP2019

OLD
46-02-042 DS 440 (3-3:3)
Title: Data Sciences Capstone Course
Abbreviated Title: DATA SCI CAP
Description: This course provides a data sciences problem-solving experience, addressing realistic data science dilemmas for which solutions require teamwork and collaboration.
PREREQUISITES: DS 320, DS 410 AND 7TH SEMESTER STANDING
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: DS 220
ADD RECOMMENDED PREPARATIONS: DS 310; OR CMPSC 448
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Liberal Arts

COURSE ADDS

46-02-043 APLNG 280N (3) (GH) (GS) (IL) (BA) INTER-DOMAIN
Title: Conducting International Comparative Research
Abbreviated Title: Intl Comp Research
Description: APLNG 280 – Conducting International Comparative Research. (3) (Gen Ed;IL; Integrative) (BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements and may also serve as a methods course in the Global and International Studies (GLIS) major. The goal of this
course is to equip students with effective methods for conducting international and cross-cultural research that addresses issues and problems occasioned by an increasingly globalized world. Students will acquire the background knowledge and skills necessary to analyze and evaluate existing international comparative literature and to design and propose new cross-national and cross-cultural research. The course focuses on projects in five key, contemporary domains of globalization: human rights, culture and identity, global conflict, wealth and inequality, and health and environment, and it draws on multidisciplinary methods from across the humanities and social sciences—including qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods. Particular attention is paid to working with international datasets and the issue of translation and interpretation. As a result of the course, students will be able to: (1) locate and understand
the structure and import of existing international databases, (2) design comparative, cross-national and cross-cultural research projects, (3) evaluate the validity, reliability, and significance of published international comparative research, (4) conduct basic comparative analyses of social, political, and cultural texts (documents) and oral interview data and other audio and visual data, (5) evaluate comparative quantitative data from cross-cultural surveys and other quantitative instruments, and (6) design reports and multimedia presentations of international comparative research.
Proposed Start FSP2018

46-02-044 ASIA 402 (3)(IL)(BA)
Title: Language, Culture and Cognition in East Asian Context
Abbreviated Title: Asian Linguistics
Description: This course is a linguistic introduction to the relationship between language, culture, and cognition with a focus on Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. In this course, we study the cognitive linguistic view that human cognition is fundamentally embodied and shaped by various figurative processes such as metaphor and metonymy grounded in our bodily and cultural experiences, and that human thought and language are fundamentally metaphorical in nature. We examine how we think and speak figuratively and conceptualize our experience metaphorically in everyday life, and compare the languages in terms of cognitive universals and cultural variations. The objectives of this course are threefold: (1) to lead language students to a linguistic approach to language analysis so that they learn about how individual linguistic expressions fit into a coherent linguistic system; (2) to enable them to see how linguistic structures reflect underlying cognitive, conceptual structures which are derived from the interplay between human embodiment and cultural environment; and (3) to provide them with a broad perspective on similarities and differences among Chinese, Japanese, and Korean as components that form a coherent category known as “East Asian”. Class work will include some lecture but will emphasize guided discussions, literature review writings, student presentations, and research papers. This interactive approach is intended to encourage students’ participation, involvement, and cooperation in learning, to help them understand the relationship between
language, culture, and cognition, and to assist them in developing both analytic and expressive abilities. Evaluation will emphasize student performance on a day-to-day basis and as expressed in a final research project. A possible break down would be as follows: class attendance and participation 20%; students’ in-class presentations 20%; on-line discussions 20%; literature reviews 20%; final paper 20%. This course adds a linguistic dimension to the upper-division ASIA 400-level series, which has so far focused on history, literature, politics, etc. It will expand the selection of 400-level courses for Chinese and Japanese majors and minors, Korean minors, as well as Asian Studies majors and minors, and support other language and linguistics majors and minors who may be interested in a cognitive linguistic approach to language analysis. It is designed to count as a BA “Other Cultures” and International Culture.
Students can take this course as long as they have an interest in the relationship between language, culture and cognition, especially in the context of East Asia.
Prerequisites: ASIA 100; ASIA 101; ASIA 102; ASIA 103; ASIA 104; 5th Semester standing
Cross-Listed Courses: APLNG 402
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-045 CAMS 10U (3) (GH) (H) (IL)
Title: MESOPOTAMIAN CIVILIZATION
Abbreviated Title: MESOPOTAMIAN CIV
Description: This course will introduce students to the history of the civilization and the culture of Ancient Mesopotamia (Modern Iraq), which contributed to shape both the Western world and the modern Middle East. Ancient Mesopotamia was a land of contrasts between city and countryside, between sedentary and nomadic populations, between official cult and popular religion, between royal ideology and political skepticism. This course will encompass the variegated nature of this civilization and all the cultures that determine the nature of the historical records (written texts and material culture), through which one can reconstruct the history of Mesopotamia, and, in general, the whole Syro-Mesopotamian region. Furthermore, the connections between this region and other areas of the Ancient near East (Iran, Anatolia, Syro-Palestine, and Egypt) will be explored.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-046 CAS 304 (3) (GS)
Title: Quantitative Methods for Communication Research
Abbreviated Title: Quan Meth Comm Res
Description: The purpose of this course is to instruct students on concepts and issues of quantitative research methods in Communication. Students will learn how Communication researchers conduct and evaluate research from using a variety of quantitative methodologies.
By the end of the course, students will possess the knowledge necessary to understand and evaluate arguments utilizing research to persuade, as well as, to conduct sound research on their own. A primary goal of the course is to enable students to become a critical consumers and producers of information that defines the world around them. The course will educate on the proper terminology/concepts used in research methods. The end result of the course should be a fundamental understanding of how to critique and conduct research in the field of Communication.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-047 ECON 102H (3) (GS) (H) (BA)
Title: Introductory Microeconomic Analysis and Policy (Honors)
Abbreviated Title: Microec Anly Honor
Description: ECON 102H Introductory Microeconomic Analysis and Policy, Honors (3)(GS)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. Economics is the study of how people satisfy their wants in the face of limited resources. One way to think about economics is that it is a consistent set of methods and tools that is valuable in analyzing certain types of problems related to decision- -making, resource allocation, and the production and distribution of goods and services. There are two main branches of economics, microeconomics, and macroeconomics. Macroeconomics is concerned with economy–wide factors such as inflation, unemployment, and overall economic growth. Microeconomics deals with the behavior of individual households and firms and how government influences that behavior; it is the subject of this course. More specifically, ECON 102 is an introduction to microeconomic analysis and
policy. The principal objective of the course is to enable students to analyze major microeconomic issues clearly and critically. Students will be introduced to the methods and tools of economic analysis, and these analytical tools will be applied to questions of current policy interest. Learning these methods and tools and applying them to interesting policy questions and issues is sometimes called “thinking like an economist.” An important goal of this course is to take each student as far down the road of “thinking like an economist” as possible. A variety of mechanisms are used to assess student performance. These evaluation methods typically include exams, quizzes, and homework assignments. This course serves as a prerequisite for several microeconomics–oriented 300–level courses. This honors version of the course is designed to provide the opportunity for stronger students to pursue this course at a more in-depth and mathematically rigorous level.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-048 ECON 104H (3) (GS) (H) (BA)
Title: Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis and Policy (Honors)
Abbreviated Title: Macroec Anly Honor
Description: ECON 104H Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis and Policy (3)(GS)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. Economics is the study of how people satisfy their wants in the face of limited resources. One way to think about economics is that it is a consistent set of methods and tools that is valuable in analyzing certain types of problems related to decisionmaking, resource allocation, and the production and distribution of goods and services. There are two main branches of economics, microeconomics, and macroeconomics. Microeconomics deals with the behavior of individual households and firms and how that behavior is influenced by government. Macroeconomics is concerned with economy-wide factors such as inflation, unemployment, and overall economic growth; it is the subject of this course. More specifically, ECON 104H is an introduction to macroeconomic analysis and policy. The principal objective of the course is to enable students to analyze major macroeconomic issues clearly and critically. Students will be introduced to the methods and tools of economic analysis, and these analytical tools will be applied to questions of current policy interest. Broadly, the course focuses on the determination of national income, on unemployment, inflation, and economic growth in the context of a global economy, and on how monetary and fiscal policy, in particular, influence the economy. Learning the methods and tools of economics and applying them to interesting policy questions and issues is sometimes called “thinking like an economist.” An important goal of this course is to take each student as far down the road of “thinking like an economist” as possible. A variety of mechanisms is used to assess student performance. These evaluation methods typically include exams, quizzes, and
homework assignments. This course serves as a prerequisite for 300-level courses in intermediate macroeconomic analysis, international economics, and money and banking. This honors version of the course is designed to provide the opportunity for stronger students to pursue this course at a more in-depth and mathematically rigorous level.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-049 ECON 106H (3) (BA) (H)
Title: Statistical Foundations for Econometrics (Honors)
Abbreviated Title: Stat Econ Honors
Description: Statistical Foundations for Econometrics Honors (ECON106H) teaches basic statistical concepts used in economics, specifically in the area of econometrics. Econometrics is a field of economics where quantitative methods are used to study economic data. Topics
studied in this course include probability distributions, expectations, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and simple regression. Since probability and statistics is a mathematical subject, it is nearly impossible to study it without using mathematical tools such as sets and functions. Therefore, students are expected to be comfortable with, or at the minimum open to, using algebra and mathematical arguments. Some concepts from calculus (e.g. derivatives and integrals) are important to understand continuous probability distributions such as the famous normal distribution. Therefore, the course will spend some time reviewing important concepts and results from calculus as needed. Students will also learn and other probability distributions and density functions, and be able to apply them in practice. Students will use computer programs to model randomized experiments and run regressions on datasets for analysis. Interpreting the findings of the regressions are key to understanding what the data shows, and depending on the data, the results may also have important policy implications. ECON106 is a required course for all majors in economics. This honors version of the course is designed to provide the opportunity for stronger students to pursue this course at a more in-depth and
mathematically rigorous level. It is a natural preparation for taking an honors section of Econometrics (ECON306), which is an introductory course on econometrics. Students who have completed ECON306 may not schedule this course.
Proposed Start SP2018

46-02-050 JAPNS 210 (1.5-1.5:12) (IL) (BA)
Title: Extensive Reading in Japanese
Abbreviated Title: Reading Japanese
Description: Students read Japanese books of their choice without translation or grammar instruction. They choose books at a lower level first and move gradually to a higher level under the instructor’s supervision. Books may include an audio component. The instructor selects
appropriate reading materials and organizes them by levels for students to choose from. He/she constantly monitors students’ reading behavior, occasionally gives them suggestions, and periodically consults with them to improve their learning. The books at the introductory level that students are instructed to read first introduce only a few new words and grammar patterns at a time, repeatedly. With high frequency of the new items, students learn the language deductively. The emphasis is on acquiring the skill that allows students to enjoy the content of authentic and minimally controlled reading materials. Students develop the sense that the language skills they have acquired function as a communication tool, which motivates them to take their use of Japanese beyond the classroom. Students also develop a habit of reading for a certain amount of time at a designated place. There are no tests in the course. Without testing, reading becomes a pleasurable activity rather than schoolwork. This helps develop positive attitude toward reading in general. Students read, keep a reading journal, consult with the instructor, and discuss reading materials and their experiences in spoken and written forms as course work. A possible break down of evaluation would be as follows: Class Attendance and Participation 40%; Reading Journal 30%; Individual Project 15%; Individual Goal Setting and Self-assessment 10%; Oral Book Report 5%. The course complements the regular language instruction that uses textbooks, workbooks, recitation sessions, and testing. It responds to student interest in the language outside textbooks at an earlier stage of language development. It helps consolidate students’ learning in regular language instructions at the intermediate level. It also accommodates student desire to expand language learning beyond the major and minor requirements. The prerequisite will be JAPNS 002. Students who have finished JAPNS 002, 003, 110, 401, 402, and the 450-series courses are encouraged to take the course. The course will accommodate the students who have finished JAPNS 403Y and 404, as well.
Prerequisites: JAPNS 2
Proposed Start sp2018

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-02-051 ASIA 185 (3) (IL) (BA) (GH)
Title: Asian Pop: The History of Popular Culture in Asia
Abbreviated Title: Asian Pop Culture
Description: A history of popular culture from the early modern period to the present. ASIA (HIST) 185 Asian Pop: The History of Popular Culture in Asia (3) (GH;IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. Asian popular culture encompasses a broad array of
cultural practices and forms that shed light on the politics and society of Asia from the early modern period to the present day. This course examines “low” or non-elite culture, investigating subjects like martial arts, Chinese opera, beggar guilds, popular and folk religion, weddings, teahouses and many others (particular themes will vary depending on instructor) that allow us insight into the daytoday lives of historical people across Asia. Along the way, we will consider how popular culture intersects with and influences politics, economy, and society. A significant emphasis will be placed on the scope of cultural influence: some of the topics under consideration were decidedly local affairs, while others moved across political and regional boundaries, sometimes with far-reaching consequences. This focus on dissemination and influence grounds the course. For instance, students will begin their investigation of Asian popular culture by tracing the pre-modern roots of Asian cultural exchange when empires ruled not by political or military might, but what one scholar termed the ‘theater state’ or, put more simply, cultural persuasion. In contrast, however, common people often subverted state
orthodoxy and state policies, in ways ranging from the stories told about local gods to access to martial arts training to marriage practices. Out of this contestation over the meanings and presentations of popular culture symbols and forms, students will be introduced to the various and diverse ‘vehicles’ for popular culture, from the early modern period up to the present day. Themes and topics will vary depending on the instructor, but may include cities and urban culture, villages and rural culture, theater, film, mass literature, youth culture, “ethnicity” as culture, music, dance, opera, wartime culture and propaganda, advertising, sexuality, gender and its representations, martial arts and militarism, popular religion, weddings and marriage practices, and so on.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 102
CHANGE TITLEle: Asian Popular Culture
GEN ED RECERTIFICATION
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: An exploration of popular culture in Asia. ASIA 102 Asian Popular Culture (3) (GH;IL)(BA) Asian popular culture encompasses a broad array of cultural practices and forms that shed light on the politics and societies of Asia. This course examines “low” or non-elite cultures that allow us insight into the day-to-day lives of the people who created or enjoyed them. Along the way, we will consider how popular culture intersects with issues such as politics, economy, and society, whether on a local, national, regional, or even global scale. Through examining the contested meanings and presentations of popular culture symbols and forms, students will be introduced to the diverse media through which popular culture has been disseminated and consumed. Themes and topics will vary depending on the instructor, but may include cities and urban culture, commercial cultures, television and theater dramas, film, anime, digital video, mass literature, comics, game shows, video games, youth cultures, gender and its representations, martial arts, popular religion, food, and net cultures and social media.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-052 ASIA 489 (3) (IL) (BA)
Title: International Culture in East Asia
Abbreviated Title: Intl Culture Asia
Description: Study of the role of culture in East Asian regional and East-West international relations. ASIA 489 (PL SC 486/HIST 489) International Culture in East Asia (3) (IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. This course will examine the place of culture in international history through a comparative look at the role of cultural circulation and exchange in relations among China, Korea, and Japan (and between East Asia and the West) from the propagation of Buddhism in the first century A.D. to present-day circulation of popular music, movies, and comics. We will explore the international politics of culture and the politics of international culture, considering questions of what constitutes culture, whether it is ever entirely separate from politics, and how that separation has evolved over time. These larger themes of the course will be tackled by following the historical movement of concrete objects and people throughout the region. This is a course in international history; historical events, problems, and issues will be at the center of our weekly discussions. But it also seeks to explore aspects of international relations.This course is intended to examine the role of cultural exchange in international relations. The goals of the class are not only to gain an understanding of the uses and impact of culture in international relations, but also to develop the skill of building such an understanding through primary and secondary sources, both written and visual. Students in this class will take on the role of historian themselves, thinking critically about assigned texts and making their own interpretations of their meanings. Through readings, discussions, presentations, and the final project, students will enhance their ability to think critically and to express their ideas clearly in both speech and writing.Class work includes some lecture but emphasizes guided discussions, group work, writing exercises, and some student presentations. This participatory approach is intended to deepen student’s appreciation of the assigned readings, to help them understand value systems that may differ from those predominant in western cultures, and to assist students in developing both analytic and expressive abilities. Evaluation will emphasize student performance on a day-to-day basis and as expressed in a final research project. A possible break down would be as follows:This course is designed to respond to strong student interest in East Asian international history. This course will complement and extend popular survey and upper-level courses such as HIST 172/174/175/480/481/483/484/485/486.
PREREQUISITES: HIST 172 , HIST 174 , HIST 175 , HIST 480 , HIST 481 , HIST 483 , HIST 484 , HIST 485 , HIST 486
Cross-Listed Courses: HIST 489 PLSC 486
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 400
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Study of the role of culture in East Asian regional and East-West international relations. ASIA 400 (PLSC 486/HIST 489) International Culture in East Asia (3) (IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. This course will examine the place of culture in international history through a comparative look at the role of cultural circulation and exchange in relations among China, Korea, and Japan (and between East Asia and the West) from the propagation of Buddhism in the first century A.D. to present-day circulation of popular music, movies, and comics. We will explore the international politics of culture and the politics of international culture, considering questions of what constitutes culture, whether it is ever entirely separate from politics, and how that separation
has evolved over time. These larger themes of the course will be tackled by following the historical movement of concrete objects and people throughout the region. This is a course in international history, but it also seeks to explore aspects of international relations.
The goals of the class are not only to gain an understanding of the uses and impact of culture in international relations, but also to develop the skill of building such an understanding through primary and secondary sources, both written and visual. Students in this class will think critically about assigned texts to develop their own interpretations of their meanings. Through readings, discussions, presentations, and the final project, students will enhance their ability to think critically and to express their ideas clearly in both speech and writing. Class work includes some lecture but emphasizes guided discussions, group work, writing exercises, and some student presentations. This participatory approach is intended to deepen students’ appreciation of the assigned readings, to help them understand value systems that may differ from those predominant in western cultures, and to assist students in developing both analytic and expressive abilities.
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: ASIA 100; ASIA 101; ASIA 102 ASIA 103; ASIA 104; ASIA 172 ASIA 174; ASIA 175; ASIA 197 JAPNS 120; JAPNS 121 CHNS 120; CHNS 121; KOR 120; KOR 121
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-053 ASIA 476 (3) (IL)
Title: Technology & Society in Modern Asia
Abbreviated Title: Tech and Soc in Asia
Description: Role of technology in modernization, national identity, and foreign relations of an Asian country from 19th century to present day. ASIA (HIST) 476 Technology & Society in Modern Asia (3) (IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. The
countries of Asia are often seen (or imagined) in the West today in terms of their technological capabilities. This course will examine the role of technology in the modernization, national identities, and foreign relations of one or more countries of East, South, or Southeast Asia from the mid-19th century to the present day. Specific content will vary according to individual instructor, but topics may include the relationship between technological development and international relations, national power, leisure, domestic political and aesthetic movements, war, empire, and trade, as well as the impact of technology on interconnected images of self and other on the part of the peoples of Western and Asian countries.The objectives of the course are not only to learn about the role of technology in modern East Asia, but also to encourage us to rethink the way we view other countries and the factors that go into those perceptions (as well as developing a new way of understanding of what contributes to the views other peoples hold of their own countries). Students will also consider the changing role that technology has played (and continues to play) in all modern societies.
PREREQUISITES: ASIA 100 , HIST 172 , HIST 173 , HIST 174 , HIST 175 , HIST 176 , HIST 183 , HIST 184 , HIST 188
Approved Start: 201819FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 401
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Role of technology in modernization, national identity, and foreign relations of one or more Asian countries from 19th century to present day. ASIA 401 Technology & Society in Modern Asia (3) (IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree
requirements. The countries of Asia are often seen (or imagined) in the West today in terms of their technological capabilities. This course will examine the role of technology in the modernization, national identities, and foreign relations of one or more countries of
East, South, or Southeast Asia from the mid-19th century to the present day. Specific content will vary according to individual instructor, but topics may include the relationship between technological development and international relations, national power, leisure, domestic political and aesthetic movements, war, empire, and trade, as well as the impact of technology on interconnected images of self and other on the part of the peoples of Western and Asian countries.The objectives of the course are not only to learn about the role of technology in modern East Asia, but also to encourage us to rethink the way we view other countries and the factors that go into those perceptions (as well as developing a new way of understanding of what contributes to the views other peoples hold of their own countries). Students will also consider the changing role that technology has played (and continues to play) in all modern
societies.
REMOVE PREVIOUSLY DROPPED CROSS-LISTING: HIST 476
Prerequisites: ASIA 100; ASIA 101; ASIA 102; ASIA 103; ASIA 104; ASIA 172; ASIA 174; ASIA 175; ASIA 183; ASIA 184; ASIA 186; ASIA 187
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-054 ASIA 493 (3) (IL)
Title: Japan in the World
Abbreviated Title: Japan in the World
Description: Study of Japan’s foreign relations and position in the international community from the early 19th century to the present. ASIA (HIST) 493 Japan in the World (3) (IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. This course will examine Japan’s foreign relations and changing position in the international community, from the rethinking of relations with the Western world in the early nineteenth century to its emergence as a pop culture superpower in the present day. The course will explore the structures of international relations, such as imperialism and international organizations, with the Japanese experience providing a viewpoint that differs from the standard Western-centric narrative in important ways. We will also consider the development of alternative methods of diplomacy, including cultural exchange and economic and technical assistance. Class work may include some lecture but emphasizes guided discussions, group work, writing exercises, and some student presentations.
Cross-Listed Courses: HIST 493
Approved Start: 201819FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 430
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Study of Japan’s foreign relations and position in the international community from the early 19th century to the present. ASIA (JAPNS) 430 Japan in the World (3) (IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. This course will examine
Japan’s foreign relations and changing position in the international community, from the rethinking of relations with the Western world in the early nineteenth century to its emergence as a pop culture superpower in the present day. The course will explore the structures of international relations, such as imperialism and international organizations, with the Japanese experience providing a viewpoint that differs from the standard Western-centric narrative in important ways. We will also consider the development of alternative methods of diplomacy, including cultural exchange and economic and technical assistance. Class includes some lecture
but emphasizes guided discussions, group work, writing exercises, and some student presentations.
CHANGE CROSS LISTING: REMOVE HIST 493
CHANGE Cross-LISTING: ADD JAPNS 430
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: JAPNS 120; JAPNS 121
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-055 CAS 101 (3) (BA) (GS)
Title: Introduction to Human Communication
Abbreviated Title: Intro Human Comm
Description: Introduction to major theoretical, critical, research and pedagogical issues in human communication.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: CAS 101N
GEN ED RECERTIFICATION
ADD GEN ED INTER-DOMAIN
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: CAS 101 introduces students to the field of communication studies and to the most important concepts, questions, and ideas that surround the study of communication today. It is an essential class for anyone considering a major or minor in Communication Arts &
Sciences, and it is an important elective for students who want to understand how interpersonal, small group, organizational, intercultural, public, and technology assisted acts of communication occur in society. Objectives of this course: 1) To expose students to the concepts and best practices that cut across every aspect of modern communication. 2) To prepare students to excel in advanced classes within the Communication Arts & Sciences Department. 3) To help non-CAS majors incorporate essential communication principles into their own fields of study and future professions.
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-056 CAS 175 (3) (BA) (GH)
Title: Persuasion and Propaganda
Abbreviated Title: Persuasn Prpgnda
Description: An introductory examination of how symbols have been used to create belief and action in revolutionary, totalitarian, and democratic settings.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
GEN ED RECERTIFICATION
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Propaganda, in common usage, is a deliberate, systematic attempt to manipulate beliefs and emotions, usually through methods considered deceitful and unethical. Persuasion, on the other hand, is an everyday activity in our personal, social, and civic lives.
Persuasion is considered acceptable, even necessary in a free society. This course will explore the distinction—historically and theoretically—between propaganda and persuasion, with an emphasis on developing the critical skills necessary to distinguish between the two. There are many different definitions of “propaganda,” and the term often is used to label and discredit political opponents. This course allows students to develop a more precise understanding of “propaganda” and the techniques of the propagandist. In more practical terms, students will learn to recognize, describe, and evaluate propaganda in all of its various forms and contexts. Toward this end, it includes important cases from the history of propaganda as well as contemporary cases of public advocacy that raise questions about the distinction between persuasion and propaganda.
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-057 CAS 215 (3)
Title: Argumentation
Abbreviated Title: Argumentation
Description: Theory of argument: gathering of evidence, analysis of proposition, case building, cross-examination, refutation, composition and delivery of argumentative speech.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
GEN ED RECERTIFICATION
ADD GH ATTRIBUTE
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an opportunity for an in-depth examination of argumentation in both public and private contexts through investigations of claims and evidence and the practice of preparing for and participating in debate. Fundamental to this endeavor is strong attention to research, ethics, and strategy. The goals of argumentation are effective inquiry and advocacy. Understanding the theoretical foundation of argumentation will enable the student to accomplish four objectives: 1) to understand the significant role argumentation plays in public and private discourse. 2) to research, gather and organize supporting material into argumentative discourse so as to become a skilled advocate. 3) to be familiar with the physical and virtual PSU libraries 4) to become an effective critic of argumentative discourse.
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-058 CAS 201 (3) (BA) (GH)
Title: Rhetorical Theory
Abbreviated Title: Rhetorical Theory
Description: History and theory of public advocacy and civic discourse.
Approved Start: 201718SP

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 301
GEN ED RECERTIFICATION
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: For nearly 2,500 years, the discipline of rhetoric represented Western culture’s most sophisticated system for understanding the many uses of language in human affairs. Studying the history and theory of rhetoric involves more than an examination of various techniques for public speaking; it also requires an examination of vital changes in culture and politics. To study the rhetorical tradition is to study longstanding theories about the moral and political significance of everyday language; historically influential ideas about knowledge, truth, or social class; and the very foundations of both our political and educational systems. This course explores the history of rhetorical theory to demonstrate how its basic concepts and perspectives may continue to help us understand the many ways in which
human communication shapes our personal, academic, and public lives.
Proposed Start SP 2019

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46-02-059 CHNS 421 (3) (IL)
Title: China Beyond China
Abbreviated Title: Global China
Description: Study of modern and contemporary Chinese culture in its diversity and its intercultural contexts. CHNS 421 China Beyond China (3) (IL) In order to begin to understand Chinese culture, we cannot treat it as a monolithic, unified whole. This course will give an
introduction to modern and contemporary Chinese culture (focusing on the 20th and 21st centuries) by paying special attention to China’s inner diversity, as well as the continuous shaping of Chinese culture in contact, dialogue, and tension with other cultures. Through the study of literary texts, films, and other cultural material—as well as a small number of theoretical essays—this course will focus on:1) Chinese culture in its variety by focusing on Chinese cultural spheres beyond the People’s Republic (Taiwan, Hong Kong), the Chinese diaspora, as well as other ethnicities and cultures within Mainland China2) The ways in which Chinese modernity was impacted by intercultural impulses, as well as the recent self-representation of China in the context of globalization.Course Objectives include:1. Understand modern and contemporary China in its cultural diversity, as well as shaped by intercultural and global processes.2. Critically analyze processes of cultural contact and the representations of cultural differences.3. Think critically about globalization with its impact on such categories as the local and the national.4. Question your assumptions about the world, reexamine your own points of view, and understand cultures and value systems that may different from (or be shared with) your own.
PREREQUISITES: 3 credits in literature or other fields relevant to this course
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 415
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Study of modern and contemporary Chinese culture in its diversity and its intercultural contexts. CHNS 415 China Beyond China (3) (IL) In order to begin to understand Chinese culture, we cannot treat it as a monolithic, unified whole. This course will give an
introduction to modern and contemporary Chinese culture (focusing on the 20th and 21st centuries) by paying special attention to China’s inner diversity, as well as the continuous shaping of Chinese culture in contact, dialogue, and tension with other cultures. Through the study of literary texts, films, and other cultural material—as well as a small number of theoretical essays—this course will focus on: 1) Chinese culture in its variety by focusing on Chinese cultural spheres beyond the People’s Republic (Taiwan, Hong Kong), the Chinese diaspora, as well as other ethnicities and cultures within Mainland China; and 2) the ways in which Chinese modernity was impacted by intercultural impulses, as well as the recent self-representation of China in the context of globalization. Course Objectives include: 1. Understand modern and contemporary China in its cultural diversity, as well as shaped by intercultural and global processes. 2. Critically analyze processes of cultural contact and the representations of cultural differences. 3. Think critically about globalization with its impact on such categories as the local and the national. 4. Question your assumptions about the world, reexamine your own points of view, and understand cultures and value systems that may different from (or be shared with) your own.
ADD CROSS-LISTED COURSES: ASIA 415
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-060 CHNS 422 (3) (IL)
Title: Gender and Sexuality in China
Abbreviated Title: Gender/Sex: China
Description: Study of gender roles and the imaginary of sexuality in the literary, filmic, and artistic production of modern China. CHNS 422 Gender and Sexuality in China (3) (IL) This course explores gender roles and the imaginary of sexuality in the literary, filmic, and artistic
production of modern China (from the end of the 19th century up to today), paying attention also to developments in Chinese cultural spheres beyond the People’s Republic, such as Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Chinese diaspora. This course will use the representation of gender, sex, and sexuality as a lens through which modern and contemporary Chinese culture can be understood in its historical, social, and aesthetic changes. The analysis of representations of gender and sexuality throughout the class will focus on literary and filmic texts, as well as art, rather than on theoretical work on gender and sexuality (in China or in general). Course Objectives include:1. Critically assess the complex construction of gender roles and sexuality in modern and contemporary Chinese literature and film2. Reflect critically on different ways of understanding and representing gender difference.3. Critically assess the connections
between gender and sexuality and changing political, historical, and cultural contexts.4. Question your assumptions about gender and sexualities in the context of cultural difference, understand cultures and value systems that may be different from (or be shared with)
your own.
PREREQUISITES: 3 credits in literature or other fields relevant to this course
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 416
ADD BA ATTRIBUTE
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Study of gender roles and the imaginary of sexuality in the literary, filmic, and artistic production of modern China. CHNS 416 Gender and Sexuality in China (3) (IL) This course explores gender roles and the imaginary of sexuality in the literary, filmic, and artistic production of modern China (from the end of the 19th century up to today), paying attention also to developments in Chinese cultural spheres beyond the People’s Republic, such as Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Chinese diaspora. This course will use the representation of gender, sex, and sexuality as a lens through which modern and contemporary Chinese culture can be understood in its historical, social, and aesthetic changes. The analysis of representations of gender and sexuality throughout the class will focus on literary and filmic texts, as well as art, rather than on theoretical work on gender and sexuality (in China or in general). Course Objectives include:1. Critically assess the complex construction of gender roles and sexuality in modern and contemporary Chinese literature and film2. Reflect critically on different ways of understanding and representing gender difference.3. Critically assess the connections between gender and sexuality and changing political, historical, and cultural contexts.4. Question your assumptions about gender and sexualities in the context of cultural difference, understand cultures and value systems that may be different from (or be shared with) your own.
ADD CROSS-LISTED COURSES: ASIA 416
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-061 CHNS 423 (3) (IL)
Title: The Warrior, the Courtesan and the Ghost in Classical Chinese Novels
Abbreviated Title: Classical Novels
Description: This course provides an introduction to major classical Chinese novels by focusing on three character types: the warrior, the courtesan, and the ghost. CHNS 423 The Warrior, the Courtesan and the Ghost in Classical Chinese Novels (3) (IL) A narrowly defined notion of
modern literature is a relatively recent phenomenon that dates back only to the early twentieth century in the Chinese context. There is, however, a long tradition of the vernacular novel that remains influential till today, in spite of its marginalization by the Western-influenced Chinese Enlightenment project. This course provides an introduction to major classical Chinese novels by focusing on three character types: the warrior, the courtesan, and the ghost. The warrior is commonly found in historical romances, tales about errant knights and assassins, and martial arts fiction. Although the typical setting for the courtesan is in novels about prostitution (Xia Xie
Xiaoshuo), this course will relate this figure to other female types in various domestic space, thereby tracing the genealogical connections between the domestic fiction and the courtesan fiction. The ghost can be found in Accounts of the Strange (Zhi Guai) and Tales of the Miraculous (Chuan Qi). This course will relate this figure in these narrative genres with other types of the supernatural being, such as Gods and Demons. Most readings will be drawn from the Mind-Qing period (14th -20th c) but modern and contemporary literature as well as visual or media culture that consciously continue or rewrite these narrative traditions will be considered as well. All readings and class discussions will be in English. Knowledge of Chinese or Chinese literature is not assumed or required. From year to year the content we cover might change, but this course will always explore:1) Major classical Chinese narrative traditions that are
radically different from the Western-influenced narrative modes of the twentieth century.2) Pre-modern practices of literary reading and criticism and pre-modern notions of literacy, literature, and modes of circulation. Course Objectives include:1. Critically analyze major texts and genres of the classical Chinese novel.2. Understand pre-modern practices of story-telling, literary circulation, reading, and criticism. 3. Think critically about pre-modern societies and their connections with the contemporary world.
PREREQUISITES: 3 credits in literature or other fields relevant to this course
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 417
ADD BA ATTRIBUTE
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an introduction to major classical Chinese novels by focusing on three character types: the warrior, the courtesan, and the ghost. CHNS 417 The Warrior, the Courtesan and the Ghost in Classical Chinese Novels (3) (IL) A narrowly defined notion of modern literature is a relatively recent phenomenon that dates back only to the early twentieth century in the Chinese context. There is, however, a long tradition of the vernacular novel that remains influential till today, in spite of its marginalization by the Western-influenced
Chinese Enlightenment project. This course provides an introduction to major classical Chinese novels by focusing on three character types: the warrior, the courtesan, and the ghost. The warrior is commonly found in historical romances, tales about errant knights and assassins, and martial arts fiction. Although the typical setting for the courtesan is in novels about prostitution (Xia Xie Xiaoshuo), this course will relate this figure to other female types in various domestic space, thereby tracing the genealogical connections between the domestic fiction and the courtesan fiction. The ghost can be found in Accounts of the Strange (Zhi Guai) and Tales of the Miraculous (Chuan Qi). This course will relate this figure in these narrative genres with other types of the supernatural being, such as Gods and Demons. Most readings will be drawn from the Mind-Qing period (14th -20th c) but modern and contemporary literature as well as visual or media culture that consciously continue or rewrite these narrative traditions will be considered as well. All readings and class discussions will be in English. Knowledge of Chinese or Chinese literature is not assumed or required. From year to year the content we cover might change, but this course will always explore:1) Major classical Chinese narrative traditions that are
radically different from the Western-influenced narrative modes of the twentieth century.2) Pre-modern practices of literary reading and criticism and pre-modern notions of literacy, literature, and modes of circulation. Course Objectives include:1. Critically analyze major texts and genres of the classical Chinese novel.2. Understand pre-modern practices of story-telling, literary circulation, reading, and criticism.3. Think critically about pre-modern societies and their connections with the contemporary world.
ADD CROSS-LISTED COURSES: ASIA 417
Proposed Start SP2019

46-02-062 NUMBER NOT USED

46-02-063 NUMBER NOT USED

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46-02-064 CRIM 250 (3) (WF)
Title: Research Methods in Criminal Justice
Abbreviated Title: Research Methods
Description: Fundamental concepts of social science research including design, measurement, sampling, and interpretation of the study of
crime, law, and justice.
PREREQUISITE: CRIM 12
Cross-Listed Courses: CRIMJ 250
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
NEW NUMBER: 250W
CHANGE TITLE: Research Methods in Criminology
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this writing-intensive course is to engage students in the social scientific research process used by criminologists to answer empirical research questions. It is the second course (after CRIM 249) that overviews theory and research in criminology.
Students learn to use social science research methods through instructor-led demonstrations and applications of research methods, data analysis exercises, and critical reading of published research. Students apply their research knowledge and skills to an empirical research project completed in a sequence of steps producing written drafts that receive instructor feedback. After completion of this course, students will have acquired the following knowledge and skills: (1) The ability to generate a research question and effectively and efficiently search and review the relevant research literature. (2) A working knowledge of how to apply social science research methods and research designs to answer research questions. (3) The ability to strategically read published research articles to extract different types of information. (4) An understanding of the inductive and deductive aspects of the research process. (5) The ability to collect, analyze, and interpret quantitative and qualitative data. (6) The ability to design a quantitative research project to test hypotheses of interest to criminologists. (7) The ability to summarize and explain in writing the methods used and results derived from studies seeking answers to a common research question. (8) An understanding of social science research
methods needed to be critical consumers of research and claims about crime, criminal behavior, and social response to them. (9) A certified knowledge about ethical issues in social science research.
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: CRIM 249, STAT 200
REMOVE CROSS-LISTED COURSE
PROPOSED START SP2019

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46-02-065 FR 331 (3) (IL) (BA)
Title: French Culture and Civilization I
Abbreviated Title: Fr Cult and Civ I
Description: French history and culture from the Middle Ages until the French Revolution. FR 331 French Culture and Civilization I (3) (IL) This course, which fulfills the Humanities requirement within the Bachelor of Arts degree, will present a survey of French culture and
civilization from the Middle Ages up to the French Revolution. The course aims to familiarize students with the major events and themes in French history of this period; prominent artistic and other cultural developments; and French social and daily life. Students will gain a rich appreciation of this time period through frequent exposure to web sites, films, music and other audio-visual materials. Taught in French, the course also aims to help students develop further facility in written and spoken French through a combination of readings, writing assignments, class lectures, conversation and in-class activities. The course is designed as a complement to the French literature survey sequence. In addition, it serves as an important basis for 400-level language, literature and culture courses. The course will be offered every semester or every other semester.
PREREQUISITES FR 201 AND FR 202
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: French and Francophone Culture I
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: Fr & Franc Cult I
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: French and francophone history and culture from the Middle Ages until the French Revolution. FR 331 French and Francophone Culture I (3) (IL) This course, which fulfills the Humanities requirement within the Bachelor of Arts degree, will present a survey of French and francophone culture and civilization from the Middle Ages up to the French Revolution. The course aims to familiarize students with the major events and themes in French and francophone history of this period; prominent artistic and other cultural developments; and social and daily life. Students will gain a rich appreciation of this time period through frequent exposure to web sites, films, music and other audio-visual materials. Taught in French, the course also aims to help students develop further facility in written and spoken French through a combination of readings, writing assignments, class lectures, conversation and in-class activities. The course is designed as a complement to the French and francophone literature survey sequence. In addition, it serves as an important basis for 400-level language, literature and culture courses. The course will be offered every semester or every other semester.
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-066 FR 332 (3) (IL) (BA)
Title: French Culture and Civilization II
Abbreviated Title: Fr Cult and Civ II
Description: French history and culture from the French Revolution through the Third Republic. FR 332 French Culture and Civilization II (3) (IL) This course, which fulfills the Humanities requirement within the Bachelor of Arts degree, will present a survey of French culture and
civilization from the French Revolution to the collapse of the Third Republic with the onset of World War II. The course aims to familiarize students with the major events and themes in French history of this period; prominent artistic and other cultural developments; and French social and daily life. Students will gain a rich appreciation of this period through frequent exposure to web sites, films, music and other audio-visual materials. Taught in French, the course also aims to help students develop further facility in written and spoken French through a combination of readings, writing assignments, class lectures, conversation and in-class activities. The course is designed as a complement to the French literature survey sequence. In addition, it serves as an important basis for 400- level language, literature and culture courses. The course will be offered every semester or every other semester.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: French and Francophone Culture II
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: Fr & Franc Cult II
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: French and francophone history and culture from the French Revolution through the Third Republic. FR 332 French and Francophone Culture II (3) (IL) This course, which fulfills the Humanities requirement within the Bachelor of Arts degree, will present a survey of French and francophone culture and civilization from the French Revolution to the collapse of the Third Republic with the onset of World War II. The course aims to familiarize students with the major events and themes in French and francophone history of this period; prominent artistic and other cultural developments; and French social and daily life. Students will gain a rich appreciation of this period through frequent exposure to web sites, films, music and other audio-visual materials. Taught in French, the course also aims to help students develop further facility in written and spoken French through a combination of readings, writing assignments, class lectures, conversation and in-class activities. The course is designed as a complement to the French literature survey sequence. In addition, it serves as an important basis for 400-level language, literature and culture courses. The course will be offered every semester or every
other semester.
Proposed Start SP2019

46-02-067 Number not used

46-02-068 Number not used

OLD
46-02-069 FR 352 (3) (IL) (BA)
Title: Introduction to French Literature II
Abbreviated Title: Intro Fr Lit II
Description: Introduction to close textual reading and analysis of selected works of French Literature from 1789 to the present.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: French and Francophone Literature II
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: Fr & Franc Lit II
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course presents a survey of selected works of French and francophone literature from 1789 to the present. It aims to familiarize students with major literary works of this time period through close textual reading and analysis. Taught in French, it also aims to help students develop an appreciation for a wide variety of styles, genres, themes, literary movements, and historical contexts. It also serves to develop students’ written and oral language skills. This course is designed as a complement to the French and francophone
culture sequence.
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-070 JAPNS 421 (3) (IL) (BA)
Title: Courtly Japan
Abbreviated Title: Courtly Japan
Description: Focused study of aristocratic society and culture of Heian period Japan. JAPNS 421 Courtly Japan (3) (IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. The Heian period of Japanese history saw the apex of a refined court culture. Through readings
of primary and secondary sources, this seminar-style course will explore the activities, norms, and structures of courtly society in Japan, from the centralization of imperial power in the 8th century through the court’s political marginalization in the late 12th century. We will pay particular attention to religion, the arts, politics and governances, gender, and the gradual rise of samurai power in the shadows of the court. This course is intended to provide an introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural life of the Heian court of ancient Japan. The goals of the class are not only to gain an understanding of a time and place far removed from our own, but also to develop the skill of building such an understanding through primary and secondary sources, both written and visual. Students in this class will take on the role of historian or literary critic themselves, thinking critically about assigned texts and making their own interpretations of their meanings. Through readings, discussions, presentations, and the final project, students will enhance their ability to think critically and to express their ideas clearly in both speech and writing. Class work includes some lecture but emphasizes guided discussions, group work, writing exercises, and some student presentations. This participatory approach is intended to deepen student’s appreciation of the assigned readings, to help them understand value systems that may differ from those predominant in western cultures, and to assist students in developing both analytic and expressive abilities. The details of evaluation will vary depending on the instructor. In general, the emphasis will be on student performance on a day-to-day basis and as expressed in a final research project. The course is designed to be suitable for all students generally interested in Japan, or interested in various fields of humanistic study. This course is recommended, but not required, of the Japanese major. It is designed to count as a B.A. “Other Cultures” course, and as an IL “International Cultures” course.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 431
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Focused study of aristocratic society and culture of Heian period Japan. JAPNS 431 (ASIA 431) Courtly Japan (3) (IL)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. The Heian period of Japanese history saw the apex of a refined court culture. Through readings of primary and secondary sources, this seminar-style course will explore the activities, norms, and structures of courtly society in Japan, from the centralization of imperial power in the 8th century through the court’s political marginalization in the late 12th
century. We will pay particular attention to religion, the arts, politics and governances, gender, and the gradual rise of samurai power in the shadows of the court. This course is intended to provide an introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural life of the Heian court of ancient Japan. The goals of the class are not only to gain an understanding of a time and place far removed from our own, but also to develop the skill of building such an understanding through primary and secondary sources, both written and visual. Students in this class will take on the role of historian or literary critic themselves, thinking critically about assigned texts and making their own interpretations of their meanings. Through readings, discussions, presentations, and the final project, students will enhance their ability to think critically and to express their ideas clearly in both speech and writing. Class work includes some lecture but
emphasizes guided discussions, group work, writing exercises, and some student presentations. This participatory approach is intended to deepen student’s appreciation of the assigned readings, to help them understand value systems that may differ from those predominant in western cultures, and to assist students in developing both analytic and expressive abilities. The details of evaluation will vary depending on the instructor. In general, the emphasis will be on student performance on a day-to-day basis and as expressed in a final research project. The course is designed to be suitable for all students generally interested in Japan, or interested in various fields of humanistic study. This course is recommended, but not required, of the Japanese major. It is designed to count as a B.A. Other Cultures course, and as an IL (International Cultures) course.
ADD CROSS-LISTED COURSES: ASIA 431
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-071 JAPNS 425 (3)
Title: Beyond Anime
Abbreviated Title: Beyond Anime
Description: Selected works from the history of illustrated narrative from scrolls to chapbook, through film and anime; topics may vary. This seminar-style study of Japanese visual culture will help students see Japanese visual arts in terms that are local to Japanese aesthetics and through those that transcend local cultures.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 434
ADD BA ATTRIBUTE
ADD IL ATTRIBUTE
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The visual, tactile, and literary arts play key roles in how modern nation-states make sense of themselves and how they make sense of other nations. Japan provides one key example through which to observe the use and function of art to create not only the image and identity of a nation and national culture, but also the image and identity of other national cultures. In recent years, Japanese popular culture has been reborn around the world. A global generation has grown up watching anime and reading manga in Spanish, Chinese,
Russian, and English. Beyond Anime is designed to contextualize the recent appropriation and dissemination of Japanese popular culture through the cyclical history of such appropriations through the modern period. In this way, the course will explore the precursors, antecedents, and contexts to our present cultural moment. Through film, photography, posters, matchbook-labels, textiles, industrial design, novels, and myriad other popular media, this seminar-style study of Japanese popular visual culture will help students see Japanese visual arts in terms that are local to Japanese aesthetics and through those that transcend local cultures. Drawing on
the long history of illustrated narrative from scrolls to chapbooks, through film and photo essay, this course confronts the exoticist notion that Japan’s arts have always placed a disproportionately heavy emphasis on the visual. Through comparative readings of
cultural and visual material from Japan, this course will raise questions of aesthetic, cultural, and national difference. Specific topics will vary with instructor, but may include: the rendering of three dimensional space through perspective, the use of pictures in the service of narrative versus the use of pictures as narrative, and how notions of negative space promise deep insight and risk crass stereotypes.
ADD CROSS-LISTED COURSES: ASIA 434
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-072 KOR 120 (3) (IL)
Title: Introduction to Korean Culture
Abbreviated Title: Intro Kor Culture
Description: Survey of Korean culture and society in historical contexts; exploration from antiquity to the contemporary period through diverse media. This course is designed as a multi-disciplinary introduction to Korean society. In surveying Korean culture from antiquity to the
present, we will examine a wide range of primary sources from the past, including archaeological relics, written records, and works of art; as well as contemporary materials by Korean authors, directors, and other cultural producers, together with scholarly commentaries about these materials. Instruction and all materials will be in English. No preliminary knowledge of Korean history or language is required for taking this course. In the first part of the course that covers the origins of Korean ¿tradition,¿ we will observe the formation and development of social relations, popular beliefs, and systems of thought that have shaped the Korean way of life. Our historical analysis of these texts will also locate their resonances and ramifications in modern Korea, particularly in cultural representations. In the second part of the course, we will discuss Korea¿s transformation through its encounter with the West, its modern experiences and national struggle under colonial rule, social upheavals after liberation, and the Korean War. Finally, by tracing the enduring impacts of the unresolved past on contemporary society, we will look at Korea today in terms of economic development and crisis, the democracy movement and its limitations, relations with North Korea and with the US, and sociocultural diversification in the age of globalization. By situating these topics within the broader contexts of East Asia and the world, we will seek to gain a richer and more nuanced view of Korea on the global map. The overall goal of this course is to develop students¿ abilities to engage in crosscultural understanding. Through a comprehensive study of Korean materials from a variety of genres and media, students will not only learn about and from Korean history and culture, but also enhance their skills in reading closely, thinking critically, and writing effectively. In exploring Korean culture as a space of complex formations and dynamic interactions, students will be trained to question, analyze, and appreciate different modes of cultural production in their specific political and social contexts.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
ADD BA ATTRIBUTE
ADD GH ATTRIBUTE
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-073 KOR 121 (3) (IL)
Title: Korean Popular Culture
Abbreviated Title: Korean Pop Culture
Description: Survey of contemporary Korean popular culture in various forms, including pop music, film, TV drama, advertising, comics, and literature. What do we mark as “Korean-style”? Are the images of Korea(ns) changing with the worldwide spread of Korean popular culture known as the Korean Wave (Hallyu)? This course provides critical approaches to cultural flows from South Korea. We will employ theoretical concepts and critical vocabularies from cultural studies to deepen and sharpen our analysis of the cultural representation of Korea in relation to questions such as class, gender, ethnicity, and body politics. Using diverse texts from literature, film, TV dramas, comics, and pop music, we will examine the social codes, cultural values, and economic realities that influence Korean society, including the Korean diasporic population around the world. In directing our attention to various ways in which Korean
culture is transmitted and presented in different media, we will also inquire into historical and social issues rooted in the division of Korea, as well as the international dispersion of Koreans since the colonial period. Through intellectual exercises in boundary crossing, we will ultimately develop our ability to explore the cross-cultural production of trans/national identities in the age of globalization. Instruction and all materials will be in English. No preliminary knowledge of Korean history or language is required for taking this course.
Approved Start: 201617FA

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ADD BA ATTRIBUTE
ADD GH ATTRIBUTE
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-074 KOR 424 (3) (IL)
Cross-Listed Courses: ASIA 424 CMLIT 424
Title: Transnational Korean Literature
Abbreviated Title: Transnatl Kor Lit
Description: Exploration of seminal Korean texts, including poetry, fiction, autobiography, and criticism, from the early twentieth century to the contemporary era. This course provides a comprehensive overview of modern Korean literature within a transnational context. As we
learn how to critically analyze seminal Korean texts, we will locate them in the social, political, economic, and cultural conditions under which they were produced and received. In grappling with some of the fundamental issues they raise¿including colonialism, migration, national division, war, gender relations, developmentalism, urbanization, democratization, and contemporary consumer culture¿we will also seek to situate these writings in the Korean vernacular within the larger context of global modernity. Rather than take Korean literature and global modernity as given or apart from each other, we will attend to their intersections by raising such questions as: How did modern experiences, constructed through the interface with unfamiliar Others, change preexisting ways of writing and reading? How did foreign occupations affect the formation of a national literature? In what ways do Korean writers¿
representations of the inter/national events and phenomena on and beyond the Korean peninsula at once enrich and complicate empirical investigations into modern histories of Korea, East Asia, and the world? In an increasingly borderless world, can we draw a boundary around what is called ¿Korean¿ literature? In parallel with these questions, we will further discuss why and how to engage in literary practices in the current age of digital reproduction. Instruction and all materials will be in English. No preliminary knowledge of Korean history or language is required for taking this course.
Approved Start: 201617FA

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ADD BA ATTRIBUTE
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-075 KOR 425 (3) (IL)
Title: Global Korean Cinema
Abbreviated Title: Global Kor Cinema
Description: Exploration of Korean cinema from the early twentieth century to the present, with an emphasis on its global/local dynamics. This course offers an introductory overview of Korean cinema. As we trace its history from the colonial period to the current ¿Korean wave,¿ we will also engage with film criticism, the trans/national contexts of film productions, the particular aesthetics of selected auteurs/genres, and local/global receptions of Korean cinema. Our discussion of formal elements and key issues featured in these films¿modernity, colonialism, division, nation, class, gender, identity, tradition, ideology, desire, violence, and migration, among others¿will be informed by readings of secondary sources and theoretical works, as well as literary materials produced during the same period. Throughout our analyses, we will seek to contextualize the cinematic texts within moments of major shifts not only in modern Korean history, but also in the transnational film industry and screen culture. In pursuing a broad and detailed perspective of Korean cinema, this course will ultimately enrich, and simultaneously complicate, our understanding of Korea, cinema, and the world. Instruction and all materials will be in English. No preliminary knowledge of Korean history or language is required for taking this course.
Cross-Listed Courses: ASIA 425 CMLIT 425
Approved Start: 201617FA

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ADD BA ATTRIBUTE
Proposed Start SP2019

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46-02-076 PLSC 3 (3) (GS) (IL) (BA)
Title: Introduction to Comparative Politics
Abbreviated Title: Intro to Comp Pol
Description: Introduction to study of comparative government and politics: normative/ empirical theories; government functions in modern societies; representative structures and processes. PL SC 003 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3) (GS)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. In this course, you will be introduced to the major types of governments in existence today. We will examine several democratic nations, and several dictatorships. We will learn how power is exercised in each major type of government and how different governments grant authority and seek the acceptance and legitimacy of their citizens.In doing so, we will learn about the variety of ways to organize legislatures and executive branches, the difference between presidential and parliamentary systems, and the varying roles played by the courts and other legal institutions. We will also compare the different ways of holding elections and the different functions of political parties.In addition, students will gain a better understanding of the history and politics of a small number of nations that will serve as examples throughout the semester. The countries used as examples will vary from semester to semester; however, these will usually include a mix of advanced industrial democracies, developing nations, and communist and former communist governments.Students will take examinations that include multiple choice, short answer essays, and longer essays. Short projects or a major paper supplement exams. Students are also graded on attendance, participation and oral presentations in weekly recitation sections. The course fulfills one of the lower-division requirements for majors in Political Science and International Politics. For non majors this course may be used to fulfill a general education or Bachelor of Arts social/behavioral science requirement. It will be offered once a year with an enrollment limit of 180.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
GEN ED RECERTIFICATION
CHANGE TITLE: Comparing Politics around the Globe
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: Comp. Politics
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course examines the variety of ways that people seek and wield power around the world. Through cross national comparison and individual country analysis, the course considers different forms of democratic and authoritarian regimes, sources of stability and change in different regime types, and the relationship between cultural, economic, and social factors and political processes. Students are introduced to the central questions in comparative politics, including What is the state and where did it come from? What is democracy? Why are some countries democracies whereas others are dictatorships? Does the kind of regime a country has affect the prosperity and well-being of its citizens? Why are ethnic groups politicized in some countries but not in others? Why do some countries have many parties whereas some have only a few? How do governments form, and what determines the type of government that takes office? What are the material and normative implications associated with different types of government? The course examines competing answers to questions such as these and evaluates the explanations for their logical consistency and empirical accuracy. Students learn to compare political phenomena across disparate contexts and how to use such comparisons to test claims about the political world. In doing so, they learn about the similarities and differences among countries and a range of approaches to analyzing the political world.
Proposed Start SP2019

OLD
46-02-077 SPAN 420 (3) (BA)
Title: Spanish for Business and International Trade
Abbreviated Title: Span for Business
Description: Introduction to the Spanish of international business and to the social and cultural norms of negotiation in Spanish-speaking countries.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Spanish 420, Spanish for Business and International Trade, is an introduction to business administration (organizational structure, human resources, marketing, accounting, cross-cultural etiquette, business ethics, etc.) within the context of the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures against the backdrop of the global economy. Participants will broaden and deepen their ability to apply their Spanish skills in a professional setting by reading and evaluating current business articles, discussing and analyzing business issues
in various Hispanic countries, examining the intersection of business and culture in the Spanish-speaking world, viewing short videos, preparing a resume in Spanish, and participating in other written and oral activities. To complement the core content, various assignments also allow students to focus on their individual majors.
CHANGE PREREQUISITES: SPAN 100A OR SPAN 200 AND SPAN 215 OR SPAN 253
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Nursing

46-02-078 Change. Move NURS 251 to Additional Courses. Add NURS 352 to Additonal Courses. Changes indicated by underlining.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring 2018

Nursing

Altoona College
Penn State Abington
Penn State Erie,The Behrend College
Penn State Harrisburg
University College: Penn State Fayette, Penn State Mont Alto, Penn State New Kensington, Penn State Schuylkill, Penn State Shenango, Penn State Worthington Scranton
University Park, School of Nursing (NURN)
World Campus

PROFESSOR PAULA MILONE-NUZZO, Dean, College of Nursing

This major prepares registered nurse students as professional practitioners in areas of health promotion and maintenance, illness care, and rehabilitation. The major in Nursing is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), One DuPont Circle, NW Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036 (202-463-6930). Part-time or full-time study is available at any of the campus sites. The University Park site is a blended program, which includes resident instruction and online nursing courses. The World Campus site is completely online.

Senate legislation 42-97 Credit by Portfolio Assessment enables students to receive credit for certain prescribed nursing courses based on their RN licensure.

Students must meet all requirements of the clinical institutions that provide preceptors and clinical experiences. These requirements may include CPR certification, professional liability insurance, health examination, drug testing, criminal background check (State and Federal) and child abuse history clearances. Students also are responsible for their own transportation to and from clinical settings and may need the use of a car.

Graduates of this major may qualify for admission to a graduate nursing program.

For the B.S.N. degree in Nursing, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 3-5 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 91-93 credits[1]
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GHA courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (76 credits)
BIOL 129 GN(4), BIOL 141 GN(3), BIOL 142(1), HDFS 129 GS(3), MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 107 GN(1), NUTR 251 GHA(3), PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
NURS 200W(3)[38], NURS 357(3)[38], NURS 390 US(3)[38] (Sem: 3-4)
NURS 225(3)[37], NURS 230(4)[37], NURS 250 US(2)[37], NURS 301(4)[37], NURS 305(3)[37], NURS 306(3)[37],
NURS 310(3)[37], NURS 320(3)[37], NURS 405B(4)[37], NURS 420(4)[37], (Sem: 5-6)
NURS 417 US;IL(4)[38], NURS 465(3)[38], NURS 475(3)[38] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-11 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from: CHEM 101 GN(3); or CHEM 110 GN(3) and CHEM 111 GN(1) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: SOC 1 GS(3) or SOC 5 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3-4 credits from: STAT 200 GQ(4) or STAT 250 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: NURS 251(3)[38] or NURS 352(3)[38] (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from courses on school-approved list in consultation with adviser (3 credits of which must be at the 400 level)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[37] Credit by Portfolio Assessment
[38]Due to restricted enrollment, the School of Nursing assigns the semester in which students enroll in these courses and all course prerequisites must be successfully completed.

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Science

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
46-02-079 CHEM 108 (1)
Title: Problem Solving in Chemistry
Abbreviated Title: Prob Solving Chem
Description: Techniques, strategies, and skills for solving problems in general chemistry for students potentially at risk in CHEM 110. CHEM 108 CHEM 108 Problem Solving in Chemistry (1) The purpose of CHEM 108 is to facilitate success in the first semester general chemistry
course (CHEM 110). Students who need extra help in CHEM 110 are strongly encouraged to take CHEM 108 with CHEM 110. The course covers the same topics in the same sequence as the concurrent CHEM 110 course. It provides an opportunity for students to develop stronger problem solving skills through active and collaborative learning activities and skill building. CHEM 108 does not satisfy the General Education requirement and will not count toward graduation in some majors.
Approved Start: 201617FA

NEW
ADD COREQUISITE: CHEM 110
Proposed Start SP2019

APPENDIX D
PENN STATE LAW

COURSE ADDS

 

46-02-080 INTR 968 (3)
Title: International and Comparative Antitrust Law
Abbreviated Title: INTL COM ANTI TRST
Description: This course focuses on the antitrust law of the European Union and selected other jurisdictions. It will cover international mergers, monopolies, price fixing cartels, distribution restraints, and related topics. The course examines principles of comity and cooperation among international enforcers investigating cases with a multi-national impact. We also review the antitrust laws of other selected jurisdictions, focusing on proposed and recently enacted competition laws including those of selected new entrants to the European Union and China, and on laws of other jurisdictions with an important impact on U.S. firms such as Japan. Finally,
the course will consider issues such as advising multi-national clients, obtaining discovery internationally, and litigating complex cases.
Proposed Start SP2018