Appendices

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Agricultural Sciences

43-02-001 Drop. Drop Agricultural Business program.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Agricultural Business

Berks College
University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (2 AGB)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR JANELLE B. LARSON, in charge, Berks College
PROFESSOR SPIRO STEFANOU, Program Coordinator, College of Agricultural Sciences, Penn State University Park

The Agricultural Business major helps prepare students for employment in commercial agriculture and businesses serving agriculture. Five options allow students to specialize in either Crop or Animal Production, Food Technology, Horticulture, or General Agribusiness Management, which provides training in management, business organization, and marketing.

The first two semesters are offered at selected locations, where students fulfill basic course requirements in accounting, business, English, and natural and social sciences. The second year at the University Park campus provides course work in livestock and crop production, food technology, horticulture, management, and agribusiness. Each option allows the student a choice of courses to satisfy special interests and needs. The Food Technology and Horticulture options can be completed at both University Park and at Penn State Berks, although some course substitutions may be necessary, as not all courses listed below are offered at both campuses.

For the Associate in Science degree in Agricultural Business, a minimum of 63 credits is required depending on the option chosen.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(9 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR. Requirements for certain options also will fulfill other general education requirements.)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

ELECTIVES: 3-5 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 45-48 credits
(This includes 9 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 16 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3), CAS 100 GWS(3), ACCTG 211(4), AG BM 101 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
AG BM 200(3)[1] or MGMT 301(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 29-32 credits

ANIMAL PRODUCTION OPTION: (31-32 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
AGRO 028(3), AN SC 201(4)[1], A S M 101(3), SOILS 101 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
B A 243(4) or B LAW 243(3) or AG 301W(3) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) (Sem: 3-4)
AG BM 102(3) or AG BM 220(3) or MKTG 220(3) or MKTG 221(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits in animal science from AN SC 100(3), AN SC 207(2), AN SC 208(1), AN SC 301(3), AN SC 305(3), AN SC 306(3), AN SC 308(4), AN SC 309(4), AN SC 310(3), AN SC 311(4), AN SC 322(3), AN SC 324(3), and AN SC 327(3) (Note: some courses may have biology and/or chemistry prerequisites.) (Sem: 3-4)

CROP PRODUCTION OPTION: (30-31 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
A S M 101(3), AGRO 028(3)[1], ENT 313(2) and ENT 316(1), SOILS 101 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
B A 243(4) or B LAW 243(3) or AG 301W(3) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from agronomy, agroecosystems science, horticulture or turfgrass science. (Note: some may have biology and/or chemistry or other prerequisites.) (Sem: 3-4)

FOOD OPTION: (29-30 credits)
(Note: some courses may have biology and/or chemistry prerequisites.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (23 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 107 GN(1), FD SC 200(3)[1], FD SC 201(1), FD SC 205(3), FD SC 206(3), MIS 204(2), NUTR 251 GHA(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
AG BM 102(3) or AG BM 220(3) or MKTG 220(3) or MKTG 221(3) (Sem: 3-4)
B A 243(4) or B LAW 243(3) or AG 301W(3) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) (Sem: 3-4)

GENERAL OPTION: (30-31 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
AG BM 102(3), AG BM 106(3), AGRO 028(3), SOILS 101 GN(3), A S M 101(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
B A 243(4) or B LAW 243(3) or AG 301W(3) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) (Sem: 3-4)
AG BM 220(3)[1] or MKTG 220(3)[1], or MKTG 221(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 6 credits in agribusiness management or business (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits in agronomy, animal science, agroecosystems science, horticulture, or other courses in agriculture. (Sem: 3-4)

HORTICULTURE OPTION: (30-31 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
HORT 101 GN(3)[1], HORT 202(3), SOILS 101 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
AG BM 102(3) or AG BM 220(3) or MKTG 220(3) or MKTG 221(3) (Sem: 3-4)
HORT 137(3) or HORT 138(3) (Sem: 3-4)
B A 243(4) or B LAW 243(3) or AG 301W(3) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from horticulture, turfgrass science, agribusiness or business. (Note: some may have prerequisites.)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-02-002 Drop. Drop Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology minor.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (AE RS)

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (18 credits)
Select 12 credits of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology courses (Sem: 1-6)
Select 6 credits of 400-level Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology courses (Sem: 7-8)


43-02-003 Drop. Drop Wood Products Marketing minor.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Wood Products Marketing Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (WPMKT)

The Wood Products Marketing minor offers students in other majors, especially those oriented toward business, science, or engineering, an opportunity to develop a basic competency in wood products marketing and processing. Students will obtain knowledge and skills particularly helpful for those who wish to seek employment in sales, as a specifier of wood-based materials for construction and design, or in other related fields in the wood products industries.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
BRS 411(4), BRS 437W(4), W P 417(4), W P 435(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits of W P courses (Sem: 3-8)


COURSE ADDS

43-02-004 AN SC 494
Undergraduate Research
UNDERGRAD RES (1-6 per semester/maximum of 6)
Independent undergraduate research directed by an Animal Science faculty supervisor.
PREREQUISITE: junior or senior status, approval of an Animal Science faculty supervisor, and approval of the Undergraduate Program Coordinator.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-005 AN SC 494H
Honors Thesis Research
HONORS THESIS RES (1-6 per semester/maximum of 6)
Independent study directed by faculty supervisor culminating in an Animal Science honors thesis.
PREREQUISITE: junior or senior status in the Schreyers Honors College and permission of an Animal Science honors advisor.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-006 TURF 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (2-6 per semester/maximum of 6)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-02-007 FORT 105
Forest Mensuration
FOREST MENSURATION (3:2:3)
Measurement of forests and forest products.
APPROVED START: S12013

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Forest Measurements (FOR MEASUREMENTS)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3 per semester/maximum of 3
PROPOSED START: FA2015

COURSE DROPS

43-02-008 HORT 457
Interior Plantscaping
INTERIORSCAPING (3)
Foliage identification, environmental factors affecting plants, concepts of interior plant design, installation and maintenance.
PREREQUISITE: HORT 101; HORT 202 or HORT 250 or HORT 269
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-009 PSU 002

First-Year Seminar Agricultural Science
AG SCI 1ST-YR SMNR (1)
Facilitate student’s adjustment to the high expectations, demanding workload, increased academic liberties, and other aspects of the transition to college life.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-010 W P 460

Wood Products Industrial Environmental Control
WP IND ENVIR CTRL (3)
Wood products industrial environmental control technologies and strategies for pollution abatement.
PREREQUISITE: fifth semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2015


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Altoona College

43-02-011 Change. Add COMM 110, 190, 251, 282, 338, 339, 438, 439 to Additional Courses.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Communications

Altoona College (COMAL)

The curriculum of this B.A. in Communications provides a general grounding in traditional media forms along with work in the area of media convergence. Students must do coursework at both the practical and theoretical level. On the theory side, coursework will be offered in the areas of media criticism and theory, visual communications, and media history at the introductory and advanced levels. On the applied side, coursework will be offered in video and audio production, news writing and photojournalism, radio and television studio production, and public relations and advertising at the introductory and advanced levels. In the Convergent Media News Service courses, which form the most distinctive component of the program, students will actually produce and deliver a college news service in print, broadcasting (TV and streaming radio), and a multimedia online format. This hands-on experience will provide students an opportunity to create materials suitable for inclusion in a portfolio. Although not required, students will be strongly encouraged to do an internship sometime during their junior or senior years. Finally, the capstone Convergent Media Seminar will bring seniors together to consider the larger, theoretical issues related to the fast-paced changes in communications today and into the future. With a degree in this program, students will be well-positioned to go right into industry, where they will be able to compete in a number of different job markets, or to graduate school for advanced training.

For the B.A. in Communications, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES OR GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 12 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 42 credits[1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
COMM 100 GS(3), COMM 150 GA(3) (Sem: 1-3)
COMM 260W(3) (Sem: 2-3)
COMM 490(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (30 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following, including 6 credits at 400-level: COMM 001(1-3)[2], COMM 002(1-3)[2], COMM 215(3), COMM 241(3), COMM 242(3), COMM 251(3), COMM 269(3), COMM 270(3), COMM 282(3), COMM 296(1-6), COMM 337W(3), COMM 338(3), COMM 339(3), COMM 346(3), COMM 374(3) (Sem: 3-6)
COMM 360(3), COMM 374(3), COMM 415(3), COMM 421W(3), COMM 438(3 max:6), COMM 439(3 max:6), COMM 448(3), COMM 460W(3), COMM 461(3), COMM 462(3), COMM 467(3), COMM 468(3), COMM 469(3), COMM 471(3) (Sem: 5-8)
COMM 436(3), COMM 472(3), COMM 481(3), COMM 495(1-9), COMM 496(1-18) (Sem: 7-8)

Select 12 credits from the following, including 6 credits at 400-level: COMM 110 GH(3), COMM 180 GS(3), COMM 190 GS(3), COMM 205 US(3), COMM 250 GA(3), COMM 251(3), COMM 261 GH(3), COMM 292 GH(3), COMM 294(1-3), COMM 296(1-6), COMM 320(3), COMM 331(3), COMM 370(3) (Sem: 3-6)
COMM 401(3), COMM 403(3), COMM 408(3), COMM 409(3), COMM 411(3), COMM 412(3), COMM 413W(3), COMM 454(3) (Sem: 5-8)
COMM 417(3), COMM 451(3), COMM 452(3), COMM 494(1-3), COMM 496(1-18) (Sem: 7-8)

Select 6 credits from COMM 470A(3), COMM 470B(3), COMM 470C(3)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

[2] A student may apply only 6 credits total of COMM 001 and COMM 002 towards the requirements of the Communications degree.


COURSE ADDS

43-02-012 COMM 431
Topics in Television Culture and Communication
TOPICS IN TV CULT (3)
Study television technologies, techniques, audiences, genres and trends in relation to a specific decades or cultural periods.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 100, COMM 180 or permission of program
PROPOSED START: SP2015


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Behrend College

43-02-013 Change. Add C or better required to Additional Courses and Supporting and Related Areas; Add CAS 101, 175, COMM 100, 110, 118, 150, 168, 180 to Additional Courses; Remove CAS 211, 213, 215, 280W from Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Communication

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (COMBA)

The B.A. major in Communication offers a liberal arts background with emphasis in mass media studies and corporate communication. It prepares students for careers in corporate communication, print and broadcast journalism, multi-media and video production, and advertising/public relations by providing an interdisciplinary study of spoken, written, visual, and technically mediated messages.

For the B.A. degree in Communication, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-3 of these credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 9-21 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 45 credits
(This includes 0-3 of these credits of General Education courses: 0-3 credits of GA courses in the Journalism/Media Productions (Multimedia Area).)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)[1]
CAS 202 GS(3), COMM 160(1), COMM 251(3) (Sem: 1-4)
CAS 204(3), COMM 315(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (17 credits) [1]
Select 3 credits from CAS 101 GS(3), CAS 175 GH(3), COMM 100 GS(3), COMM 110 GH(3), COMM 118 GS(3), COMM 150 GA(3), COMM 168 GH(3), or COMM 180 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
COMM 242(3); or COMM 270(3) (Sem: 1-4)
CAS 212(3); or CAS 252(3) (Sem: 5-6)
CAS 271 US;IL(3); or COMM 410 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
COMM 494(3); or COMM 495(3-6) (Sem: 7-8)
Select two credits from the following: COMM 001(1-3), COMM 002(1-3), COMM 003(1-3), or COMM 004(1-3) (Sem: 1-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits) [1]
COMBA students are required to complete 15 credits of supporting coursework, from department approved list. Nine of these credits must be at the 400-level. In consultation with an academic advisor, students will select 6-9 credits from 2 of 3 Concentrations; 1. Communication Studies, 2. Strategic Communication, and 3. Journalism/Media Production. (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-02-014 Change. Increase number of credits required for the degree from 120 to 120-122; Add ACCTG 471, 472 sequence to Additional Courses; Add C or better requirement to Supporting Courses and Related Areas – business courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Finance

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (FNC)

The Finance major is a unique program that provides the student with a firm foundation in the principles of finance and its major areas: financial management, investments, and financial markets. The coursework is designed to lead to professional certification in financial analysis. Students have job opportunities in a variety of positions with mutual funds, brokerage firms, banks, and insurance companies, as well as positions in corporate finance.

The program provides students with the depth and breadth of knowledge necessary to prepare them for Level I of the Chartered Financial Analysts (CFA) Exam. The rigorous curriculum, including courses in finance, accounting, and economics, is based on the CFA Body of Knowledge developed through surveys of professionals involved in the practice of investment management. Students will be encouraged to take Level I of the CFA exam after graduation.

Entrance to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Finance major requires the completion of 5 entry-to-major courses: ACCTG 211(4); ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3); MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4); STAT 200 GQ(4) or SCM 200(4), and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

For the B.S. degree in Finance, 120-122 credits are required. Each student must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course in the major field.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-3 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 89-92 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (43 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
FIN 301(3)[1], MGMT 301(3)[1], MIS 204(3)[1], MKTG 301(3)[1], SCM 301(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
ACCTG 426(3)[1], FIN 420(3)[1], FIN 451(3)[1], FIN 471(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
MGMT 471W(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19-22 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
SCM 200 GQ(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) or B A 243(4) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 4-7 credits from one of the following sequences: ACCTG 305(4)[1]; or ACCTG 371(4)[1] and ACCTG 472(3)[1]; or ACCTG 471(1)[1] and ACCTG 472(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from: ECON 304(3)[1], ECON 351(3)[1], ECON 442(3)[1], ECON 481(3)[1], or ECON 485(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (27 credits)
Select 15 credits from one of the non-business supporting course areas (see school list of approved courses). See the Admission section of the general information in the front of this Bulletin for the placement policy for Penn State foreign language courses. (Sem: 1-8)
Select 6 credits [1] from FIN or other business areas (see school list of approved courses). (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 additional credits [1] from 400-level FIN courses, excluding FIN 494 and FIN 495 (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-02-015 Change. Revise program description; Add B A 364Y, 462, MGMT 433, 453, 466, 483, MIS 390, SCM 320, 416 to Additional Courses; Add C or better grade requirement to MGMT 420, 431, 432, 440; Move MGMT 415, 471W, SCM 455 from Prescribed Courses to Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Project and Supply Chain Management

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (PSCM)
Penn State Harrisburg, Capital College (PSMCA)

The Project and Supply Chain Management major concentrates on developing knowledge, skills, and abilities in both project and supply chain management, dynamic and important disciplines in modern corporations. Project management skills include the development of new projects, and coordinating procurement and project delivery systems. Supply chain management emphasizes the integration of manufacturing and service operations, logistics, purchasing, and distribution that enable organizations to develop value-creating supply chain networks. The major provides students with an opportunity to develop the quantitative and people skills necessary to design and operate today’s complex management systems. Students learn how to manage critical components in organizational supply chains, and apply business analytic methods for organizing and fully integrating supply chain practices throughout the organization.

Graduates are uniquely well-prepared for careers in some of the highest in-demand professions in the modern business and government environments, managing the supply chain and project initiatives in world-class business firms, public sector organizations, construction, IT organizations, third-party logistics providers, and goods and services distribution operations.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Management major requires the completion of 5 entry-to-major courses: ACCTG 211(4); ECON 102 GS(3); ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3); MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4); STAT 200 GQ(4) or SCM 200(4), and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

For the B.S. degree in Project and Supply Chain Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required. Each student must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course in the major field.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 2 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 88 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (43 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 102 GS(3), ECON 104 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
FIN 301(3)[1], MGMT 301(3)[1], MIS 204(3), MKTG 301(3)[1], SCM 301(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
MGMT 341 US(3)[1], MGMT 410(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
MGMT 418(3)[1], SCM 445(3)[1], SCM 460(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (33 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
SCM 200 GQ(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
B A 241(2) and B A 242(2); or B A 243(4) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from B A 364Y(3)[1], ECON 470(3)[1], FIN 471(3)[1], MGMT 461 IL(3)[1], MKTG 445 IL(3)[1], or other 400-level international business courses[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits of 300- or 400-level courses in one business supporting area or PSCM electives from MGMT 420(3)[1], MGMT 431(3)[1], MGMT 432(3)[1], MGMT 433(3)[1], MGMT 440(3)[1], MGMT 453(3)[1], MGMT 466(3)[1], or MGMT 483(3)[1](Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from ECON 481(3)[1] or MIS 336(3)[1] or MIS 390(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)
MGMT 415(3)[1] or SCM 416(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)
SCM 320(3)[1] or SCM 455(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)
B A 462(3)[1] or MGMT 471W(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits of nonbusiness supporting courses from any area (see school list of suggested courses) (See the admission section in the general information section in this bulletin for the placement policy for Penn State foreign language courses.) (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-02-016 Change. Reduce number of credits required for the degree from 124 to 120 credits; Revise program description; Add C or better requirement to Prescribed Courses and Additional Courses areas; Add PSYCH 489 to Prescribed Courses; Remove CMPSC 100 from Prescribed Courses; Revise Additional Courses area; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Psychology

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (PSHBA)

The Psychology program at Penn State Behrend provides students a strong foundation in the application of psychological knowledge, skills and techniques for the solution and prevention of individual and social problems. A spectrum of courses (bio-behavioral, clinical, cognitive-experimental, developmental, educational, human factors, industrial/organizational, personality, and social) is united by a strong focus on the scientific method. All students are afforded the opportunity to participate in internships and research assistantships throughout their training. Bachelor-level graduates in psychology are equipped for various positions in human service agencies, businesses, industries, and laboratories. Those not joining the workforce following graduation most often continue their training, working towards a master’s or doctoral degree in psychology; others go on to other disciplines, e.g., medical or law school. Courses within this degree can also be used to develop a specialty in areas such as criminal justice, sociology or international studies.

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires nine additional credits and proficiency in a second language. The Bachelor of Arts degree helps to prepare students for careers in education-related settings, human services, clinical settings, and other related fields.

For the B.A. degree in Psychology, a minimum of 120 credits is required. Each student must earn a grade of C or better for prescribed and additional courses in the major and for each 300- and 400-level course in the major field.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-4 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 8-27 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 43 credits
(This includes 0-4 credits of General Education GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)[1]
PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
PSYCH 301W(4)(Sem: 1-4)
PSYCH 406W(4) (Sem: 5-8)
PSYCH 489(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19 credits)[1]
PSYCH 200 GQ(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits in each of the five content categories below:
1. Biological Bases of Behavior – PSYCH 253 GS(3), PSYCH 260(3), PSYCH 261 GS(3), PSYCH 269(3), PSYCH 425(3), PSYCH 439(3), PSYCH 441(3), PSYCH 450(3), PSYCH 460(3), PSYCH 461(3), PSYCH 462 (3), PSYCH 464(3), PSYCH 475(3), PSYCH 478(3) (Sem: 1-8)
2. Social/Developmental – PSYCH 212 GS(3), PSYCH 221 GS(3), PSYCH 412(3), PSYCH 413(3), PSYCH 414(3), PSYCH 415(3), PSYCH 416(3), PSYCH 420(3), PSYCH 421(3), PSYCH 423(3), PSYCH 424(3) (Sem: 1-8)
3. Cognitive/Learning – PSYCH 253 GS(3), PSYCH 256 GS(3), PSYCH 261 GS(3), PSYCH 268(3), PSYCH 413(3), PSYCH 426(3), PSYCH 427(3), PSYCH 439(3), PSYCH 452(3), PSYCH 456(3), PSYCH 461(3) (Sem: 1-8)
4. Clinical/AppliedEDPSY 014(3), HD FS 311(3), HD FS 315(3), PSYCH 238 GS(3), PSYCH 243 GS(3), PSYCH 244 GS(3), PSYCH 270(3), PSYCH 281 GS(3), PSYCH 370(3), PSYCH 404(3), PSYCH 405(3), PSYCH 408(3), PSYCH 414(3), PSYCH 419(3), PSYCH 438(3), PSYCH 443(3), PSYCH 444(3), PSYCH 445(3), PSYCH 452, PSYCH 456(3), PSYCH 459(3), PSYCH 470(3), PSYCH 471(3), PSYCH 473(3), PSYCH 474(3), PSYCH 476(3), PSYCH 477(3), PSYCH 481(3), PSYCH 482(3), PSYCH 484(3), PSYCH 485(3) (Sem: 1-8)
5. Diversity – PSYCH 230 GS(3), PSYCH 231 GS;US;IL(3), PSYCH 232 GS;US;IL(3), PSYCH 422(3), PSYCH 432(3), PSYCH 479/WMNST 471(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Note: PSYCH 414 may be counted in either Social/Developmental or Clinical/Personality, but not both.

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 3 credits of a structured practicum, internship or an approved research experience (PSYCH 294, PSYCH 296, PSYCH 494, PSYCH 495 or PSYCH 496 may be applied to this requirement) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 9 credits of 400-level psychology courses from any combination of categories in consultation with adviser (except 494, 495, 496) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


43-02-017 Change. Add Human Factors and Design Option; Change name of Business Option to Psychology in the Workplace Option; Change name of General Option to Science Option; Reduce number of credits required for the degree from 124 to 120 credits; Revise program description; Add C or better requirement to Prescribed Courses and Additional Courses areas; Add PSYCH 489 to Prescribed Courses for the Major; Remove CMPSC 100 from Prescribed Courses; Remove MATH 110, 140 from Additional Courses; Revise all option requirements; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Psychology

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (PSHBS)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

The Psychology program at Penn State Behrend provides students a strong foundation in the application of psychological knowledge, skills and techniques for the solution and prevention of individual and social problems. A spectrum of courses (bio-behavioral, clinical, cognitive-experimental, developmental, educational, human factors, industrial/organizational, personality, and social) is united by a strong focus on the scientific method. All students are afforded the opportunity to participate in internships and research assistantships throughout their training. Bachelor-level graduates in psychology are equipped for various positions in human service agencies, businesses, industries, and laboratories. Those not joining the workforce following graduation most often continue their training, working towards a master’s or doctoral degree in psychology; others go on to other disciplines, e.g., medical or law school. Courses within this degree can also be used to develop a specialty in areas such as criminal justice, sociology or international studies.

The Bachelor of Science degree offers three multidisciplinary options. The Science option is intended for students with a strong interest in science and requires more course work in the biological, physical, social, and mathematical sciences than does the Bachelor of Arts program. The Psychology in the Workplace option is designed for students who wish to combine their interests in business and psychology. The Human Factors and Design option combines perspectives within the fields of psychology and engineering in order to design products that maximize human functioning.

The Bachelor of Science degree helps to prepare students for future careers in clinical developmental, educational, human factors, industrial organization, and other related health fields.

For the B.S. degree in Psychology, a minimum of 120 credits is required. Each student must earn a grade of C or better for prescribed and additional courses in the major and for each 300- and 400-level course in the major field.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(4-8 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 11-19 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 68 credits
(This includes 4-8 credits of General Education GQ courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 43 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits) [1]
PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
PSYCH 301W(4) (Sem: 3-6)
PSYCH 406W(4) (Sem: 5-8)
PSYCH 489(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19 credits) [1]
PSYCH 200(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits in each of the following five content categories below:
1. Biological Bases of Behavior – PSYCH 253 GS(3), PSYCH 260(3), PSYCH 261 GS(3), PSYCH 269(3), PSYCH 425(3), PSYCH 439(3), PSYCH 441(3), PSYCH 450(3), PSYCH 460(3), PSYCH 461(3), PSYCH 462 (3), PSYCH 464(3), PSYCH 475(3), PSYCH 478(3) (Sem: 1-8)
2. Social/Developmental – PSYCH 212 GS(3), PSYCH 221 GS(3), PSYCH 412(3), PSYCH 413(3), PSYCH 414(3), PSYCH 415(3), PSYCH 416(3), PSYCH 420(3), PSYCH 421(3), PSYCH 423(3), PSYCH 424(3) (Sem: 1-8)
3. Cognitive/Learning – PSYCH 253 GS(3), PSYCH 256 GS(3), PSYCH 261 GS(3), PSYCH 268(3), PSYCH 413(3), PSYCH 426(3), PSYCH 427(3), PSYCH 439(3), PSYCH 452(3), PSYCH 456(3), PSYCH 461(3) (Sem: 1-8)
4. Clinical/AppliedEDPSY 014(3), HD FS 311(3), HD FS 315(3), PSYCH 238 GS(3), PSYCH 243 GS(3), PSYCH 244 GS(3), PSYCH 270(3), PSYCH 281 GS(3), PSYCH 370(3), PSYCH 404(3), PSYCH 405(3), PSYCH 408(3), PSYCH 414(3), PSYCH 419(3), PSYCH 438(3), PSYCH 443(3), PSYCH 444(3), PSYCH 445(3), PSYCH 452, PSYCH 456(3), PSYCH 459(3), PSYCH 470(3), PSYCH 471(3), PSYCH 473(3), PSYCH 474(3), PSYCH 476(3), PSYCH 477(3), PSYCH 481(3), PSYCH 482(3), PSYCH 484(3), PSYCH 485(3) (Sem: 1-8)
5. Diversity – PSYCH 230 GS(3), PSYCH 231 GS;US;IL(3), PSYCH 232 GS;US;IL(3), PSYCH 422(3), PSYCH 432(3), PSYCH 479/WMNST 471(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Note: PSYCH 414 may be counted in either Social/Developmental or Clinical/Personality, but not both.

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 3 credits of a structured practicum, internship or an approved research experience (PSYCH 294, PSYCH 296, PSYCH 494, PSYCH 495 or PSYCH 496 may be applied to this requirement) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 9 credits of 400-level psychology courses from any combination of categories in consultation with adviser (except 494, 495, 496) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 21 credits
(Option courses may not double count with major requirements)

HUMAN FACTORS AND DESIGN OPTION: (21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)[1]
PSYCH 244 GS(3) (Sem: 3-8)
PSYCH 444(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)[1]
PSYCH 253 GS(3) or PSYCH 256 GS(3) (Sem: 2-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 3 credits of quantification courses from the departmental list – Quantification (Sem: 3-8)
Select 9 credits in psychology, engineering and business-related courses from the departmental list – Human Factors and Design Option and in consultation with adviser (Sem: 3-8)

PSYCHOLOGY IN THE WORKPLACE OPTION: (21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)[1]
PSYCH 281 GS(3) (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: 18 credits
Select 3 credits of quantification courses from the departmental list – Quantification (Sem: 3-8)
Select 15 credits in business-related courses from the departmental list – Psychology in the Workplace Option and in consultation with adviser (6 selected from PSYCH 482, PSYCH 484, or PSYCH 485) (Sem: 3-8)

SCIENCE OPTION: (21 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)[1]
PSYCH 253(3) or PSYCH 260A(3) or PSYCH 261(3) (Sem: 3-8)*

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 3 credits of quantification courses from the departmental list – Quantification (Sem: 3-8)
Select 15 credits in science-related courses from the departmental list – Science Option and in consultation with adviser (6 selected from PSYCH 482, PSYCH 484, or PSYCH 485) (Sem: 3-8) *

* Six credits of PSYCH courses listed in the Additional Courses category for the Science Option that the student does not apply under Additional Courses for the Science Option may be taken as Supporting Courses counting toward the Science Option. However, these credits may not count in both the Science Option and towards the Additional Courses or Supporting Courses and Related Areas Common Requirements for the Major.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-02-018 ARTSA 496
Independent Study
INDEPENDENT STUDY (3-9)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PREREQUISITE: ARTSA 301
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-019 GAME 490

Professional Development and Game Conference Travel
PROF DEV-GAME CONF (1)
Senior class trip for students enrolled in the Game Development Minor.
PROPOSED START: SP2015
LLEGE OF EDUCATION


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Berks College

43-02-020 Change. Add Hospitality Entrepreneurship Option; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2015

Hospitality Management

University Park, College of Health and Human Development (HM)
Penn State Berks (HMBL) – Effective Fall Semester 2015

PROFESSOR JOHN O’NEILL, Director, School of Hospitality Management

This major helps provide preparation for management positions in hotels, restaurants, institutions, and other hospitality organizations. The program is designed to give the student a broad general education and a strong management and problem-solving orientation balanced with the requisite technical skills, all of them essential for career progression to upper-management positions in the hospitality professions. The program also helps prepare students for graduate study.

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option helps prepare students for management positions in any segment of the hospitality industry, including hotels, restaurants, institutional or non-commercial operations, clubs, resorts, and casinos. The management focus helps provide students with the analytical, interpersonal, and organizational skills necessary to effectively function as hospitality professionals.

MANAGEMENT DIETETICS OPTION: This option helps prepare graduates for general management positions within the food services operated by or for medical organizations, health and life care facilities, college feeding, governmental agencies, and community feeding programs. The management dietitian is qualified to solve both nutrition and food service problems. Graduates may also choose to work in the management of commercial food service operations. Together with the necessary clinical experience, the option satisfies the eligibility requirements for membership in the American Dietetic Association.

HOSPITALITY ENTREPRENEURSHIP OPTION: (offered only at the Berks College) This option helps prepare students for careers as owners or managers of small independently-owned hospitality operations or as intrapreneurs within large hospitality corporations or management companies in hospitality segments such as a restaurants, hotels, and non-commercial operations. The entrepreneurship focus helps provide students with creative problem solving, opportunity recognition, and leadership skills necessary to effectively manage a small or individual unit’s hospitality operations.

For the B.S. degree in Hospitality Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required. The B.S. degree program consists of three options: (1) Hospitality Management, (2) Management Dietetics, and (3) Hospitality Entrepreneurship.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(8.5-20 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-7 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 76.5-95 credits[1]
(For the HM option, this includes 8.5 credits of General Education courses: 4 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 1.5 credit of GHA courses. For the Management Dietetics option, this includes 20 credits of General Education courses: 4 credits of GQ courses; 7 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GHA courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 54 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (51 credits)
MKTG 221(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
HM 201(3), HM 202(1), HM 228(1), HM 271(3), HM 329(3), HM 330(2), HM 335(3), HM 336(3), HM 350(3), HM 365 IL(3), HM 380(3), HM 430(3), HM 435(3), HM 442(3), HM 466 US(3), HM 490W(3), HM 492(1) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
ECON 102 GS(3) or ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 22.5-41 credits

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT OPTION: (22.5 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10.5 credits)
HM 355(3), HM 480(3), NUTR 100 GHA(1.5), NUTR 119(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (12 credits)
Select 12 credits of HM courses from an approved department list, up to 4 credits of any foreign language, and other courses in consultation with an advisor.

MANAGEMENT DIETETICS OPTION: (41 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (38 credits)
B M B 211(3), BIOL 141 GN(3), CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 202(3), MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 107 GN(1) (Sem: 3-4)
NUTR 120(3), NUTR 251 GHA(3), NUTR 370(1), NUTR 400(1), NUTR 445(3), NUTR 446(3), NUTR 452(3), NUTR 453(3), NUTR 456(2) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSE (3 credits)
PSYCH 100 GS(3) or SOC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)

HOSPITALITY ENTREPRENEURSHIP OPTION: (24-25 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
HM 305(3), HM 319(3), HM 484(3), MGMT 215(3), NUTR 119(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
Select 9-10 credits from the following: B A 243(4), B A 250(3), ENGR 310(3), MGMT 425(3), MGMT 427(3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Capital College

43-02-021 Change. Add new General Sociology Option, and Community Organization and Social Services Option; Increase number of credits required for the Major from 62 to 67-73 credits; Revise program description; Add option requirements; Add SOC 207, 400W, 495 to Prescribed Courses; Add PSYCH 200, SOC 055, 103, 109, 110, 297, 403, 445, 448, 461 to Additional Courses; Move SOC 001 from Additional Courses to Prescribed Courses; Remove SO SC 480W, 481, 492 from Prescribed Courses; Remove R SOC 011, SOC 005, 444, 448, 449, 450, 455, SOCIO 476 from Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Sociology

Capital College (SOCIO)

PROFESSOR KENNETH B. CUNNINGHAM, Program Coordinator

Sociology is the scientific study of society in all of its complexity. It includes the study of social structure, social interaction and social change from the micro level of small groups and families; to the meso level of communities, organizations, and institutions; to the macro level of globalization, war, technology and culture. The world today is undergoing tremendous changes and facing great challenges, problems, and possibilities. Sociology attempts to understand our world and to improve it.

The sociology major at Penn State Harrisburg provides a unique orientation to social change at multiple levels, including families, communities, organizations, social movements, institutions, society, and the world system. The major addresses topics such as culture, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social class, inequality, urban life, globalization, environmental change, and political conflict.

The sociology program at Penn State Harrisburg prepares students to succeed in an increasingly complex, diverse, and globalized world. A major in sociology provides opportunities for a wide range of career options. Students with degrees in sociology work in social services, community, advocacy and non-profit organizations, education, business, law, criminal justice, policy-making, social science research, and public administration. An undergraduate degree in sociology also provides a strong foundation for graduate study in sociology and fields such as law, social work, human resources, criminal justice, community psychology, urban planning, political science, and related areas.

Two options are available within the major: (1) the Community Organization and Social Services Option and (2) the General Sociology Option.

GENERAL SOCIOLOGY OPTION: This option provides students with strong education in general sociology in a diverse range of sociological topics. The General Sociology Option is designed for students who seek a solid sociological education with preparation for the widest range of careers and employment opportunities, as well as for graduate education.

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION AND SOCIAL SERVICES OPTION: This option provides students with strong preparation for careers working in community settings or in social services. The Community Organization and Social Services Option is designed for students who wish to work directly with people in a broad range of possible settings, in both public and private sectors.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Sociology major requires 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

For a B.S. degree in Sociology, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION, or MAJOR REQUIREMENTS)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 9-15 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 67-73 credits[1]
(This includes 7 credits of General Education course requirements: 3 credits of GWS courses; 4 credits in GQ courses)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 46-52 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (18-24 credits)
ENGL 202A GWS(3), SOC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
SOC 207(3), SOC 400W(3), SOC 405(3), SOC 495(3-9) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (28 credits)
At least 9 of these credits must be at the 400-level

A. Statistics. Select 4 credits from PSYCH 200 GQ(4), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)

B. Social Institutions. Select 9 credits from SOC 030(3), SOC 055(3), SOC 403(3), SOC 411 US(3) or HD FS 416 US(3), SOC 416(3), SOC 429(3), SOC 430(3), SOC 446(3), SOC 456/WMNST 456(3) (Sem: 5-8)

C. Social Change and Global Perspectives. Select 9 credits from SOC 015(3), SOC 109(3), SOC 297(3), SOC 424(3), SOC 425(3), SOC 432(3), SOC 445(3), SOC 448(3), SOC 454 US(3) (Sem: 5-8)

D. Diversity. Select 6 credits from AF AM 212 US(3), BE SC/WMNST 464 US(3), SOC/AF AM/WMNST 103 US(3), SOC/WMNST 110 GS;US(3), SOC/AF AM 409 US(3), SOC 428(3), SOC 435 or HD FS 434 (3), SOC/RL ST 461 US;IL(3), WMNST/CED 420 US;IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 21 credits

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION AND SOCIAL SERVICES OPTION: (21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
BE SC 370(3) (Sem: 5-8)
SOC 005 GS(3) (Sem 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from each of A, B, and C below (Sem: 5-8)

A. Organization and Leadership: BE SC 376(3), BE SC 408(3), MGMT 321(3), MGMT 331(3)
B. Community Contexts: SOC 015(3), SOC 103 US(3), SOC 406(3), SOC 412(3)
C. Group Processes and Dynamics: BE SC 407(3), BE SC 459(3), SOC 003 GS(3), SOC 403(3), SOC 404(3)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Choose 6 credits (minimum of 3 credits at the 400-level) in consultation with adviser from AF AM, AM ST, ANTH, ART, ART H, BE SC, COMM, CRIMJ, ENGL, GEOG, HD FS, HIST, I HUM, MGMT, MUSIC, PL SC, PSYCH, PUBPL, SOC, THEA, WMNST (Sem: 5-8)

GENERAL SOCIOLOGY OPTION: (21 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from each of sections B, C and D above (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 6 credits (minimum of 3 credits at the 400-level) in consultation with adviser from AAA S, AF AM, BE SC, GEOG, SOC (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits (minimum of 3 credits at the 400-level) in consultation with adviser from AM ST, ANTH, ART, ART H, COMM, CRIMJ, ENGL, HD FS, HIST, I HUM, MGMT, MUSIC, PL SC, PSYCH, PUBPL, THEA, WMNST (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

43-02-022 Change. Drop Geographic Information Systems Option; Increase credits for the Energy Land Management Option from 30 to 31 credits; Revise program description; Add GEOG 363 to Energy Land Management Option – Prescribed courses; Add GEOG 361, 362, 364, 463 to Energy Land Management Option – Additional courses; Move GEOG 160 from Additional to Prescribed Courses; Remove EGEE 120, GEOG 469, MNG 223 from Energy Land Management Option; Remove M E 470 from Energy Systems Option – Additional courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Energy Business and Finance

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (EBF)
University Park, Smeal College of Business

The major in Energy Business and Finance, offered jointly by the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences and the Smeal College of Business, combines training in business, economics, finance, and the physical sciences with a core of courses focusing on energy and related industries. The major helps students prepare for careers in the energy industry, as well as financial institutions, nonprofit groups, and international organizations dealing with energy issues. The curriculum also provides a strong base for further study in business, economics, law, and social sciences.

Entrance Requirement: To be eligible for entrance into the Energy Business and Finance major, a degree candidate must satisfy requirements for entrance to major. Specific entrance requirements include:

  1. The degree candidate must have completed more than 27.1 credits of course work.
  2. The degree candidate must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0.
  3. Complete the following entrance to major requirements: ECON 102 GS(3)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1]. These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.

GENERAL OPTION
The General option of the Energy Business and Finance major is appropriate for students who want a broad understanding of the earth and environmental sciences in preparation for careers in industry, commerce, and government.

ENERGY LAND MANAGEMENT OPTION

The Energy Land Management Option in the major of Energy Business and Finance focuses on issues in the acquisition of sub-surface exploration rights. Thus, it is designed to prepare students for a career as a landman in an energy exploration company. The curriculum, designed in consultation with the American Association of Professional Landmen, requires courses in real estate fundamentals, energy law, geographic information sciences, petroleum engineering and petroleum geology.

ENERGY SYSTEMS OPTION
EBF graduates will spend much of their professional careers working with engineers on a variety of energy related projects, or will desire a strong understanding of energy technologies and processes in order to make good financial and management decisions. The Energy Systems Option is designed to give EBF graduates a more rigorous background in engineering principles and applications together with a demanding economics and business curriculum. The option will give students a basic understanding of chemistry, physics, and other engineering principles critical to energy industries and technologies. Students will also take advanced courses in both energy engineering and economics.

Integrated B.S. in Energy Business and Finance (EBF) and M.S. in Energy and Mineral Engineering (EME)

The integrated undergraduate-graduate (IUG) program between the Energy Business and Finance undergraduate program and the Energy and Mineral Engineering graduate program enables academically superior and research-focused EBF undergraduate students to also obtain an M.S. degree in Energy and Mineral Engineering in five years of study. Students should refer to the Energy and Mineral Engineering graduate program in the Graduate Program Bulletin for the IUG admission and degree requirements. (http://bulletins.psu.edu/bulletins/whitebook/graduate_degree_programs.cfm?letter=E&program=grad_eme.htm)

For the B.S. degree in Energy Business and Finance, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24-30 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 8-21 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 87-101 credits
(This includes 24-30 credits of General Education Courses: 3-9 credits of GN courses, 9 credits of GWS courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, and 6 credits of GS courses.

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 60-61 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (42 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1)
ECON 102 GS(3)[1], EM SC 100S GWS(3) (Sem: 1)
MATH 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 2)
E B F 200 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 3)
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 302 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
E B F 301(3)[1], E B F 304W(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
EME 460(3)[1], I B 303 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
E B F 401(3)[1], E B F 473(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18-19 credits)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3), CMPSC 200 GQ(3), CMPSC 201 GQ(3), CMPSC 202 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
B A 243(4), B LAW 243(3), or E R M 411(3) (Sem: 3-4)
E B F 472(3)[1], STAT 301 GQ(3)[1], or STAT 401(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
E B F 483(3)[1] or E B F 484(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 7-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 27-40 credits

ENERGY LAND MANAGEMENT OPTION (31 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (28 credits)
GEOSC 001(3)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 104 GS(3), GEOG 160 GS(3)[1], GEOG 363(3), R M 302(3) (Sem: 5-8)
E B F 402(3), GEOSC 454(3), P N G 405(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
GEOG 361(3)[1], GEOG 362(3)[1], GEOG 364(3)[1], or GEOG 463(3)[1] (Sem: 6-8)

GENERAL OPTION: (27 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
ECON 104 GS(3), EME 460(3) (Sem: 3-4)
R M 302(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 9 credits from: EARTH 100 GN(3), EARTH 101 GN;US(3), EARTH 103 GN(3), EARTH 111 GN;US(3), EARTH 150 GN(3), EGEE 101 GN(3), EGEE 102 GN(3), EGEE 120 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 110 GN(3), GEOG 115 GN(3), GEOSC 002 GN(3), GEOSC 010 GN(3), GEOSC 020 GN(3), GEOSC 021 GN(3), GEOSC 040 GN(3), MATSE 081 GN;IL(3), METEO 003 GN(3), METEO 101 GN(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 9 credits from: CED 404(3), CED 429(3), CED 431W(3), ECON 428(3), ECON 490(3), GEOG 424 US;IL(3), GEOG 430(3), GEOG 431(3), GEOG 444(3), GEOG 493(3), GEOSC 402Y IL(3), GEOSC 454(3), METEO 473(3), PL SC 490(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ENERGY SYSTEMS OPTION (40 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (28 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1)[1], CHEM 112 GN(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
PHYS 211 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 3)
PHYS 212 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 4)
EME 301(3)[1], EME 460(3)[1] (Sem: 5)
EME 303(3)[1], MATH 251(4)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 3 credits in Engineering Principles:
EGEE 302(3)[1], EGEE 304(3)[1], EGEE 430(3)[1], or M E 430(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
Select 9 credits in Engineering Applications from:
EGEE 420(3), EGEE 430(3) or M E 430(3) [if not taken for requirement above], EGEE 437(3), EGEE 438(3), EGEE 441(3), EGEE 451(3), EGEE 470(3), F SC 431(3), F SC 432(3) (Sem: 5-8)

Course Substitutions for the Integrated B.S. in Energy Business and Finance (EBF) and M.S. in Energy and Mineral Engineering (EME)

As many as twelve of the credits required for the master’s degree may be applied to both the B.S. and M.S. degrees. A minimum of six credits counted for both the B.S. and M.S. degrees must be at the 500-level. Thesis and culminating/capstone experience credits may not be double counted. The undergraduate degree program officer will determine the specific undergraduate required courses for which the 500-level courses may be used to substitute to meet institutional and accreditation requirements.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-02-023 METEO 480M
Undergraduate Research
UNDERGRAD RESEARCH (3)
Undergraduate Research
PREREQUISITE: junior or senior standing as a Meteorology Major
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-024 MNG 494H
Thesis Research
THESIS RESEARCH (1-6)
Independent research under the supervision of the Mining Engineering program.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of program
PROPOSED START: SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-02-025 EGEE 494H
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Thesis Research
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-6 per semester/maximum of 6
PROPOSED START: FA2015


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Education

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-02-026 SPLED 418
Technologies for Persons with Disabilities
TECH FOR DISABL (2:2:0)
Sensory aids, communication systems, computer systems, expert systems, simulations, and other technologies for students who are academically or physically challenged.
PREREQUISITE: SPLED 400 or SPLED 425
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Sensory aids, communication systems, computer systems, expert systems, simulations, and other technologies for students with disabilities.
PROPOSED START: FA2015


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Information Sciences and Technology

COURSE DROPS

43-02-027 IST 247
Contemporary Projects in Software Development
CTMP PROJ SOFT DEV (3:3:0)
The analysis, design, coding, testing, and documentation of a software project using state-of-the art languages/tools and concepts.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 302; IST 211 or IST 256
PROPOSED START: SP2015


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of the Liberal Arts

43-02-028 Change. Revise program description; Add HEBR 151, 152, 451, 452, J ST 010, 012 to Additional Courses.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Hebrew Minor

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (HEBR)

The minor in Hebrew is intended to provide students with a good working knowledge of the Hebrew language, taught in a context that emphasizes the characteristics of Jewish tradition and Israeli culture and society. Students undertake three years of language study (or equivalent); education abroad can be included.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 21 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
HEBR 001(4), HEBR 002(4), HEBR 003(4) (Sem:1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from ), HEBR 110(3), HEBR 111(3), HEBR 151(3), HEBR 152(3), HEBR 199 IL(1-12) HEBR 296(1-18), HEBR 297(1-9), HEBR 399 IL (1-12), J ST/HEBR 010 GH;IL(3), J ST 012 GH;IL(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 6 credits from HEBR 401(3-6), HEBR 402(3-6), HEBR 451(3), HEBR 452(3), HEBR 496(1-18), HEBR 497(1-9), HEBR 499 IL(1-12) (Sem: 5-8)


43-02-029 Change. Revise program description; Revise Supporting Courses and Related Areas.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Jewish Studies Minor

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (J ST)

The Jewish Studies is a flexible interdisciplinary minor for students interested in the study of Jewish history, thought, and culture. Historical coverage ranges from ancient Israel and the contemporary world. Specializations can include, but are not limited to, Modernity and the Jews; Ancient Israel, Bible, and Early Judaism; Holocaust, Anti-Semitism, and Genocide; Jews in America; Jewish Culture and Literature; Israel and Zionism; or Jewish-Christian Relations.

For the Jewish Studies minor, a minimum of 18 credits is required, with at least 6 credits at the 400 level. Up to 9 credits of study abroad may be substituted for supporting course requirements. No more than 4 credits of Modern Hebrew may count toward the requirements for the minor.

All required course work must be completed with a grade of C or higher.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
J ST 010 GH;IL(3)/HEBR 010 GH;IL(3) (Sem: 1-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 15 credits in Jewish Studies, 6 credits of which must be at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)
(Up to 9 credits of education abroad courses selected in consultation with the adviser may be applied to the requirements for the minor. No more than 4 credits of Modern Hebrew may count toward the requirements for the minor.)


43-02-030 Change. Drop Culture and Language Option, Interdisciplinary Option; Revise program description; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Jewish Studies

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (J ST)

The Jewish Studies major addresses the culture, history, literature, philosophy, language, and religious beliefs of the Jewish people across the thousands of years from Biblical times to the present. All students in the major must complete Jewish Studies 010, an introduction to Jewish Civilization, and select from approved lists four courses that are concerned with Jewish studies across its chronological and geographical expanse. Students in the major select one of two options. The Culture and Language option is intended to provide the opportunity for an integrated course of study leading to a second baccalaureate major. This option is recommended for students planning further academic work in Jewish Studies or professional study in a related field. It requires study of Hebrew at the 400 level, and additional language study is encouraged. The Interdisciplinary option is for students who have enrolled in Jewish Studies as a secondary major. This option is recommended for students planning specialized careers within such fields as communications, social service, politics, medicine, education, or law where a knowledge of Jewish history, traditions, and institutions would be important. All students in the major are particularly encouraged to participate in a relevant internship, education abroad program, or archaeological fieldwork. Penn State students also may enroll to study abroad at a university in Israel, and up to 15 credits of related education abroad courses may be applied to requirements for the major in consultation with the adviser.

For the B.A. degree in Jewish Studies, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Per Senate Policy 83-80.5, the college dean or campus chancellor and program faculty may require up to 24 credits of course work in the major to be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned. For more information, check the Recommended Academic Plan for your intended program.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

ELECTIVES: 21 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 30 credits[1]
(15 of these must be at the 400-level. No more than 15 credits in courses numbered 099, 199, 299, 399, or 499 may count toward the requirements for the major.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
J ST/HEBR 010 GH;IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 3 credits in Jewish Studies in the Ancient Period through Medieval Period from approved program list or in consultation with the director (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits in Jewish Studies from the Early Modern Period through the Contemporary period from approved program list or in consultation with the director (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits in Jewish Studies concerned with Jewish culture in Diaspora from approved program list or in consultation with the director (Sem: 1-8)

(No more than 8 credits of Hebrew Language courses may count toward the requirements for the major.)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from Jewish Studies, Hebrew, or appropriate courses in Anthropology, Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Comparative Literature, English, History, Philosophy, or Religious Studies from approved program list (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-02-031 AF AM 213Y (GH;US)
African American Women’s History
AFRICAN AMER WOMEN (3)
This course examines the social, political, and economic history of African American women in the United States from slavery to the present.
CROSS LIST: HIST 213Y, WMNST 213Y
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-032 HIST 213Y (GH;US)
African American Women’s History
AFRICAN AMER WOMEN (3)
This course examines the social, political, and economic history of African American women in the United States from slavery to the present.
CROSS LIST: AF AM 213Y, WMNST 213Y
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-032A PHIL 468
Jewish Philosophy
JEWISH PHIL (3:3:0)
Explores major figures and trends in Jewish philosophy and their influences on other philosophical traditions.
PREREQUISITE: one course in Philosophy and/or Jewish Studies
CROSS LIST: J ST 468
PROPOSED START: FA2015

43-02-033 PL SC 468
Politics and the Media
POLITICS & MEDIA (3)
An examination of how politics and public policy affect and are shaped by the news media, as a political institution, in America.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 001, PL SC 003, PL SC 022, PL SC 409 or CAS 409, CAS 175, CAS 201, CAS 272, COMM 100 or COMM 110
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-034 WMNST 213Y (GH;US)
African American Women’s History
AFRICAN AMER WOMEN (3)
This course examines the social, political, and economic history of African American women in the United States from slavery to the present.
CROSS LIST: AF AM 213Y, HIST 213Y
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-035 WMNST 480
Italian Women Writers Through the Centuries
ITAL WMN WRTS (3)
Analysis of the works of women authors in their historical and literary contexts.
PREREQUISITE: any 300-level Italian course
CROSS LIST: IT 480
PROPOSED START: FA2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-02-036 AFR 464 (IL)
Globalization, Extractive Industries, and Conflict in Africa
RES WARS AFRICA (3)
Socioeconomic and environmental impacts of extractive industries in Africa.
PREREQUISITE: AFR 110 or at least one of the following: PL SC 003 or PL SC 014 or PL SC 022
CROSS LIST: PL SC 464
APPROVED START: FA2012

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Extractive Industries in Africa (OIL & MINING AFR)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-037 ANTH 460
Human Genetics
HUMAN GENETICS (3:3:0)
The human genome, its variation, origins, and relation to disease and other traits.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 230W or 3 credits in genetics (BIOL 133, or BIOL 222, or BIOL 322)
CROSS LIST: BIOL 460
APPROVED START: FA2012

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ANTH 021, or BIOL 110, or BIOL 133, or permission of program for a different course that covers introductory genetics topics for at least part of the semester
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-038 CMLIT 110 (GH;US;IL)
Jewish Literature: An International Perspective
JEWISH LIT (3:3:0)
Literature of the Jewish tradition in various cultures and contexts, such as Europe, Israel, Islamic countries, and the Americas.
CROSS LIST: J ST 131
APPROVED START: SP2011

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: The Jewish Short Story (JEWISH SHORT STORY)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Short fiction of the Jewish tradition in various cultures and contexts, such as Europe, Israel, Islamic countries, and the Americas.
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-039 ENGL 412
Advanced Fiction Writing
ADV FICTION WRTG (3:3:0 per semester/maximum of 6)
Advanced study of the techniques of fiction writing; regular practice in writing the short story; group discussion of student work.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 212 and permission of the department
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3 per semester/maximum of 12
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 212
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-040 ENGL 413
Advanced Poetry Writing
ADV POETRY WRTG (3:3:0 per semester/maximum of 6)
Advanced study of the techniques of poetic composition; regular practice in writing poetry; group discussion of student work.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 213
APPROVED START: FA2013

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3 per semester/maximum of 12
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-041 ENGL 415
Advanced Nonfiction Writing
ADV NONFICT WRTG (3:3:0 per semester/maximum of 6)
Advanced study of the principles of nonfiction; substantial practice in writing and submitting magazine articles for publication.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 215 and permission of the department
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3 per semester/maximum of 12
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 212 or ENGL 215
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-042 ENGL 451
Literary Modernism in English
LIT MODERNISM (3)
Survey of literary modernism in English and English translation in a variety of genres, including poetry, fiction, and drama.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030; ENGL 200, ELISH 300, or ELISH 301
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030 or ENGL 137 or CAS 137 and ENGL 138T or CAS 138T
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-043 HIST 115 (GH;US)
American Jewish History and Culture
AMER JEWISH HIST (3)
Examination of the history, culture, social tensions, and contributions of Jews and Judaism in America.
CROSS LIST: J ST 115 RL ST 115
APPROVED START: S12006

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: The American Jewish Experience (AMER JEWISH EXPR)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-044 HIST 118 (US;IL)
Modern Jewish History: 1492 to Present
JEWISH HISTORY (3:3:0)
Jewish social and political history from 1492 to the present.
CROSS LIST: J ST 118
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Modern Jewish History (MOD JEWISH HIST)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-045 HIST 220 (GH;IL)
The Jewish and Other Diasporas
DIASPORA (3)
Introduction to and survey of the Jewish and other Diasporas around the world.
CROSS LIST: J ST 220
APPROVED START: SP2012

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Global Diaspora and Exile
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-046 HIST 409Y (IL)
European Anti-Semitism from Antiquity to the Present
EUROPEAN ANTISEM (3:3:0)
Surveys the history of anti-Semitism in Europe from antiquity through the Middle Ages to the present.
CROSS LIST: J ST 409Y RL ST 407Y
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Antisemitisms (ANTISEMITISMS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Surveys the history of anti-Semitism from antiquity through the Middle Ages to the present.
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-047 HIST 416
Zionist History 1890-1948
ZIONIST HISTORY (3:3:0)
History of Zionist thought and politics to the foundation of Israel 1948.
CROSS LIST: J ST 416
APPROVED START: S11997

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Zionism (ZIONISM)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-048 IT 450
Nineteenth-Century Italian Literature
XIX CENT IT LIT (3:3:0)
Italian romanticism, Verismo and neoclassicism, their origin and development in the novel, poetry, and drama.
PREREQUISITE: IT 351
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: any 300-level IT course
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-049 IT 460
Twentieth-Century Italian Literature
XX CENT IT LIT (3:3:0)
Modern and contemporary Italian prose, drama, and poetry.
PREREQUISITE: IT 351
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: any 300-level IT course
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-050 IT 480
Italian Women Writers Through the Centuries
ITAL WMN WRTS (3:3:0)
Analysis of the works of women authors in their historical and literary contexts.
PREREQUISITE: any 300-level Italian course
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: junior standing or permission of program
ADD CROSS LIST: WMNST 480
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-051 IT 485
Italian-American Cultural Studies
ITAL-AMER CULTURE (3:3:0)
In-depth exploration of Italian-American cultural contributions.
PREREQUISITE: any 300-level Italian course
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: junior standing or permission of program
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-052 J ST 106 (GH;IL)
Mysticism
MYSTICISM (3)
A survey of the history, philosophy, and cultural impact of various mystical traditions in relation to world religions.
CROSS LIST: RL ST 106
APPROVED START: SP2012

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Mysticism and Kabbalah
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-053 J ST 115 (GH;US)
American Jewish History and Culture
AMER JEWISH HIST (3)
Examination of the history, culture, social tensions, and contributions of Jews and Judaism in America.
CROSS LIST: HIST 115 RL ST 115
APPROVED START: S12006

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: The American Jewish Experience (AMER JEWISH EXPR)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-054 J ST 118 (US;IL)
Modern Jewish History: 1492 to Present
JEWISH HISTORY (3:3:0)
Jewish social and political history from 1492 to the present.
CROSS LIST: HIST 118
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Modern Jewish History (MOD JEWISH HIST)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-055 J ST 131 (GH;US;IL)
Jewish Literature: An International Perspective
JEWISH LIT (3)
Literature of the Jewish tradition in various cultures and contexts, such as Europe, Israel, Islamic countries, and the Americas.
CROSS LIST: CMLIT 110
APPROVED START: SP2011

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Jewish Short Story (JEWISH SHORT STORY)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Short fiction of the Jewish tradition in various cultures and contexts, such as Europe, Israel, Islamic countries, and the Americas.
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-056 J ST 220 (GH;IL)
The Jewish and Other Diasporas
DIASPORA (3)
Introduction to and survey of the Jewish and other Diasporas around the world.
CROSS LIST: HIST 220
PROPOSED START: FA2015

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Global Diaspora and Exile
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-057 J ST 409Y (IL)
European Anti-Semitism from Antiquity to the Present
EUROPEAN ANTISEM (3:3:0)
Surveys the history of anti-Semitism in Europe from antiquity through the Middle Ages to the present.
CROSS LIST: HIST 409Y RL ST 407Y
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Antisemitisms (ANTISEMITISMS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Surveys the history of anti-Semitism from antiquity through the Middle Ages to the present.
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-058 J ST 416
Zionist History 1890-1948
ZIONIST HISTORY (3:3:0)
History of Zionist thought and politics to the foundation of Israel 1948.
CROSS LIST: HIST 416
APPROVED START: S11997

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Zionism (ZIONISM)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-059 J ST 468
Modern Jewish Philosophy
MODERN JEWISH PHIL (3:3:0)
Explores the major figures in modern Jewish philosophy and their influences on contemporary philosophy.
PREREQUISITE: one course in Philosophy and/or Jewish Studies
APPROVED START: S12012

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Jewish Philosophy (JEWISH PHIL)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Explores major figures and trends in Jewish philosophy and their influences on other philosophical traditions.
ADD CROSS LIST: PHIL 468
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-060 PL SC 464 (IL)
Globalization, Extractive Industries, and Conflict in Africa
RES WARS AFRICA (3)
Socioeconomic and environmental impacts of extractive industries in Africa.
PREREQUISITE: AFR 110 or at least one of the following: PL SC 003 or PL SC 014 or PL SC 022
CROSS LIST: AFR 464
APPROVED START: FA2012

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Extractive Industries in Africa (OIL & MINING AFR)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-061 RL ST 106 (GH;IL)
Mysticism
MYSTICISM (3:3:0)
A survey of the history, philosophy, and cultural impact of various mystical traditions in relation to world religions.
CROSS LIST: J ST 106
APPROVED START: SP2012

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Mysticism and Kabbalah
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-062 RL ST 115 (GH;US)
American Jewish History and Culture
AMER JEWISH HIST (3)
Examination of the history, culture, social tensions, and contributions of Jews and Judaism in America.
CROSS LIST: HIST 115 J ST 115
APPROVED START: S12006

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: The American Jewish Experience (AMER JEWISH EXPR)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-063 RL ST 407Y (IL)
European Anti-Semitism from Antiquity to the Present
EUROPEAN ANTISEM (3:3:0)
Surveys the history of anti-Semitism in Europe from antiquity through the Middle Ages to the present.
CROSS LIST: HIST 409Y J ST 409Y
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Antisemitisms (ANTISEMITISMS)
PROPOSED START: FA2015


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

School of Nursing

COURSE ADDS

43-02-064 NURS 455
Graduate Nurse Residency I
NURSE RESIDENCY I (1)
This course is designed to support newly graduated nurses in their professional development as members of the health care team.
PREREQUISITE: associate degree in Nursing or a diploma from an accredited hospital-sponsored School of Nursing
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-065 NURS 456
Graduate Nurse Residency II
NURSE RESIDENCY II (2)
This course enhances the transition into professional nursing practice which focuses on leadership, professional development, quality care and evidence-based practice.
PREREQUISITE: completion of 1 credit NURS 455 Graduate Nurse Residency I with a minimum of a final grade of “C”. Student must have an Associate Degree in Nursing or a diploma from an accredited hospital sponsored School of Nursing
PROPOSED START: SP2015


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Eberly College of Science

43-02-066 Change. Remove CHEM 402 from Forensic Chemistry Option; Remove foreign language recommendation; Change credits for CHEM 423W from 3 to 4 credits; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2015

Forensic Science

University Park, The Eberly College of Science (FRNSC)

Forensic Science is the application of scientific principles and methods to assist criminal and civil investigations and litigation. This major is an inter-college collaboration among academic units and provides students with a strong foundation in the biological, physical, and mathematical sciences. It introduces them to relevant topics in criminalistics forensic chemistry, forensic biology, crime scene investigation, and appropriate social sciences. Students are educated on the role of forensic scientists in the criminal justice system, the collection and analysis of scientific evidence, and the manner in which evidence is presented in court. Graduates of this major could pursue employment as a scientist in a federal, state, or private forensic laboratory or with insurance companies, homeland security agencies, or the judicial community. Graduates could also choose to pursue advanced degrees, for example, in forensic science, medicine, psychology, anthropology, pathology, odontology, entomology, toxicology, law, or in the general sciences.

In order to be eligible for entrance to the Forensic Science major, a student must have: (1) attained at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average; (2) completed CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), FRNSC 210(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), and earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses.

For the B.S in Forensic Science a minimum of 124-126 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin)

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 97-99 credits
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GH courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 63 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (52 credits)[1]
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
PHIL 132 GH(3) (Sem: 1-8)
FRNSC 100(3) (Sem: 2)
FRNSC 210(3) (Sem: 3)
FRNSC 410(2) (Sem: 4-6)
FRNSC 415W(2) (Sem: 5-6)
FRNSC 411(3), FRNSC 413(3) (Sem: 5-7)
STAT 250 GQ(3) (Sem: 5-8)
FRNSC 400(1), FRNSC 475(1), FRNSC 485W(4) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (11 credits)[1]
CRIM 100 GS(3) or CRIM 113 US(3) (Sem: 1-6)
PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4); or PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 2-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 34-36 credits

FORENSIC BIOLOGY OPTION: (36 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (21 credits)[1]
B M B 251(3), MICRB 201(3), MICRB 202(2) (Sem: 1-4)
B M B 400(3), B M B 401(3), B M B 442(3) (Sem: 5-7)
FRNSC 421W(4) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (9 credits)[1]
BIOL 222(3) or BIOL 322(3) (Sem: 3-5)
Select 6 credits from B M B 402(3), B M B 428(3), B M B 433(3), BIOL 405(3), BIOL 422(3), BIOL 460(3) (Sem: 6-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits in consultation with adviser (Sem: 3-8)

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY OPTION: (34 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (19 credits)[1]
BIOL 110 GN(4), BIOL 230W GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
CHEM 227(4) (Sem: 3-5)
CHEM 425(3) (Sem: 5-7)
FRNSC 427W(4) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (9 credits)[1]
Select 9 credits from B M B 428(3), CHEM 410(3), CHEM 412(3), CHEM 423W(4), CHEM 430(3), CHEM 431W(4), CHEM 450(3), CHEM 452(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits in consultation with adviser (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-02-067 CHEM 213M
Laboratory in Organic Chemistry – Honors, Writing Intensive
ORGANIC CHEM LAB M (2)
Basic laboratory techniques learned in context via theme-based modules, spectral analysis, multi-step synthesis, and professional scientific writing. Because of similarity of subject matter, students may not receive credit for both CHEM 203 and CHEM 213.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 210 and prerequisite or concurrent: CHEM 212
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-068 CHEM 213W
Laboratory in Organic Chemistry – Writing Intensive
ORGANIC CHEM LAB (2)
Basic laboratory techniques learned in context via theme-based modules, spectral analysis, multi-step synthesis, and professional scientific writing. Because of similarity of subject matter, students may not receive credit for both CHEM 203 and CHEM 213.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 210 and prerequisite or concurrent: CHEM 212
PROPOSED START: SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-02-069 BIOL 460
Human Genetics
HUMAN GENETICS (3)
The human genome, its variation, origins, and relation to disease and other traits.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 021, BIOL 133, BIOL 222, BIOL 322, or equivalent. A course in statistics. Contact instructor if in doubt.
CROSS LIST: ANTH 460
APPROVED START: FA2011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ANTH 021, or BIOL 110, or BIOL 133, or permission of program for a different course that covers introductory genetics topics for at least part of the semester
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-070 STAT 470W
Problem Solving and Communication in Applied Statistics
PRO SOLV COM/APP (3)
Provide problem solving and communication skills through development of writing ability, interaction with peers and the SCC, and oral presentations.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 460, STAT 462, STAT 480
APPROVED START: SP2000

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: STAT 461, STAT 462, STAT 480 or STAT 483
PROPOSED START: FA2015


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

University College

43-02-071 Drop. Drop American Studies Minor.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

American Studies Minor

Univeristy College: Penn State Brandywine, Penn State Fayette, Penn State York (AMSCC)

This interdisciplinary minor is designed for students who want to complement their major program. With the approval of the American Studies Program committee, appropriate courses other than those below may be selected, including those from the 200, 496, and 497 series. To complete the minor successfully, a candidate must complete all courses with at least a C or above. The minor consists of 18 credits.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
AM ST 491W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
AM ST 100 GH(3), AM ST 100W(3), or AM ST 105 GH;US(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 12 credits from the following list, including at least 6 credits at the 400 level:
CRIMJ 100(3), CRIMJ 221(3), ART H 307 GA(3), COMM 100 GS(3), COMM 120(3), COMM 180 GS(3), COMM 205 US(3), COMM 250 GA(3), ENGL 133 GH(3), ENGL 134 GH(3), ENGL 139 GH;US(3), ENGL 140 GH(3), ENGL 194 GH;US;IL(3), ENGL 231W(3), ENGL 232W(3), HIST 020 GH;US(3), HIST 021 GH;US(3), HIST 150 US(3), HIST 151 GS(3), HIST 152 GH;US;IL(3), HIST 155 GH;US(3), HIST 156(3), HIST 158 US;IL(3), LER 156(3), MUSIC 007 GA;US(3), PL SC 001 GS(3), RL ST 140W GH;US(3), RL ST 145 GH;US;IL(3), WMNST 100 GS;US;IL(3) (Sem: 1-8)
AM ST 410(3), AM ST 415(3), AM ST 432(3), ART H 404(3), ART H 415(3), ART H 416(3), CAS 415(3), CAS 478(3), COMM 407(3), COMM 408(3), COMM 409(3), COMM 411(3), COMM 413W(3), COMM 426(3), CRIMJ 210(3), CRIMJ 421(3), CRIMJ 451 US(3), ENGL 430(3), ENGL 432(3), ENGL 433(3), ENGL 435(3), ENGL 436(3), ENGL 437(3), ENGL 438(3), ENGL 439(3), ENGL 458(3), ENGL 490 US;IL(3), ENGL 493(3), KINES 441 US(3), KINES 444(3), HIST 441 US(3), HIST 442 US(3), HIST 444 US(3), HIST 445 US(3), HIST 446 US(3), HIST 447 US(3), HIST 449 US(3), HIST 450 US(3), HIST 452 US;IL(3), HIST 454 US(3), HIST 458W(3), HIST 459Y US(3), HIST 460 US;IL(3), LER 411(3), LER 414W(3), LER 458W(3), MUSIC 464W(3), PHIL 401(3), PHIL 403(3), PHIL 432(3), PL SC 417(3), PL SC 419(3), PL SC 425(3), PL SC 426(3), PL SC 427(3), PL SC 435(3), PL SC 436(3), PL SC 472(3), PL SC 474(3), RL ST 422(3), SOC 409 GS;US(3), SOC 412(3), SOC 454(3), SOC 461(3), SOC 462(3), THEA 405(3) (Sem: 5-8)


43-02-072 Drop. Drop Building Engineering Technology program..

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2015

Building Engineering Technology

University College: Penn State Fayette (2BLET)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR DAVID MEREDITH, Program Coordinator, Penn State Fayette
PROFESSOR TINA MERLI, Program Coordinator, Penn State Worthington Scranton
PROFESSOR IVAN M. ESPARRAGOZA, Director of Engineering Technology and Commonwealth Engineering, Penn State Brandywine
PROFESSOR SVEN BILÉN, Head, School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs, Penn State University Park

This major is designed to provide technically trained personnel between the level of high school graduate and professional engineer or architect to support the architectural design/construction industry, and technical support firms.

Graduates of the Building Engineering Technology major may qualify for admission to baccalaureate degree majors in Environmental Engineering Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology, or Structural Design and Construction Engineering Technology offered at Penn State Harrisburg.

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY OPTION: This option helps prepare students to translate sketches and design concepts into working drawings and specifications, and to work with architects, structural engineers, and all phases of the building/construction industry.

Program Educational Objectives

Graduates from the Architectural Engineering Technology option must:

  1. Have the technical knowledge and skills to work in the professional sector and building industry.
  2. Use critical thinking skills to solve complex and real world challenges and applications.
  3. Communicate effectively using information technology when appropriate.
  4. Possess workplace skills needed to function in a business environment.
  5. Continue to learn and adopt emerging technology in formal and informal settings.

Program Outcomes (Student Outcomes)

At graduation, an Architectural Engineering Technology Option graduate must have the following attributes:

a)  The knowledge and skills common to A/E/C and technical sales of building industry.
b)  The ability to continue into a 4-year technology program
c)  The ability to work as a team member to select, size and design components of building systems.
d) The ability to prepare, interpret and present written and graphic documents, using IT when appropriate to a specific audience/client.
e) Demonstrated basic knowledge of project management, decision making process, applicable design codes, ethics and professional growth, conflict resolution and ability to conduct meetings.

BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY OPTION: This option helps prepare students for the heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) industry as system designers, equipment sales representatives, building automation supervisors, and indoor air quality specialists.

Program Educational Objectives

Graduates from the Building Environmental Systems Technology option must:

  1. Have the technical knowledge and skills to work in the professional sector of the HVAC&R Industry.
  2. Use critical thinking skills to solve complex real world problems and applications.
  3. Communicate effectively using information technology when appropriate.
  4. Possess the workplace skills needed to function well in a business environment.
  5. Continue to learn and adapt emerging technologies in either formal or informal settings.

Program Outcomes (Student Outcomes)

At graduation, a BEST Option graduate must have the following attributes:

a)  Knowledge and skills identified as critical and common to the design, technical sales, commissioning and building operation sectors of the HVAC&R industry.
b)  Ability to work as a team member to select, size and design an appropriate mechanical system for a given application.
c)  Ability to produce written documents, deliver oral presentations, develop, prepare and interpret graphical information, using information technology when appropriate, to a specific audience or client at a level of effectiveness expected of new employees.
d) Demonstrate awareness of project management, the decision-making process, applicable design codes, appropriate ethics and professional conduct, teamwork and conflict resolution, ability to conduct a literature search.

For the Associate in Engineering Technology degree in Building Engineering Technology, a minimum of 72 credits is required. These options are accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(12 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 63-64 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 42 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (42 credits)
AE T 101(3)[1], AE T 102(3), AE T 103(3), CMPSC 101 GQ(3), EG T 101(1), EG T 102(1), ENGL 015 GWS(3), MATH 081 GQ(3), MATH 082 GQ(3), PHYS 150 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
AE T 204(3), AE T 210W(3)[1], CAS 100 GWS(3), MATH 083 GQ(4), PHYS 151 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 21-22 credits

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY OPTION: (21-22 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (16 credits)
AE T 113(2), MCH T 111(3) (Sem: 1-2)
AE T 206(2), AE T 207(3), AE T 214(3)[1], AE T 215(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (5-6 credits)
Select 5-6 credits from the following technical courses: AE T 212(3), AE T 297(1-9), CHEM 101 GN(3), EET 100(3), EG T 201(2), EG T 297(1-9), IET 105(2), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 231(2), MATH 250(3), MCH T 213(3), MET 281(4) (Sem: 3-4)

BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY OPTION: ( 21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES(15 credits)
AE T 121(2), MET 281(4) (Sem: 1-2)
AE T 227(3), AE T 228(3), AE T 229(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following technical courses: AE T 212(3), AE T 297(1-9), CHEM 101 GN(3), EET 100(3), EG T 201(2), EG T 297(1-9), IET 105(2), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 231(2), MATH 250(3), MCH T 213(3), MET 281(4) (Sem: 3-4)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

43-02-072A MATH 010
Preparation Skills for Success in Mathematics
MATH SKILLS PREP (1 per semester/maximum of 4)
A foundation course that emphasizes study skills and reviews basic mathematical principles.
CONCURRENT: MATH 003-201
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-073 P T 282W
Rehabilitation-2W
REHAB 2W (3)
Examination of techniques and laboratory experiences in rehabilitation techniques for the physically-challenged.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 141, BIOL 142, P T 100, P T 290, P T 270 or P T 270A or P T 270W, P T 395E, and P T 281.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-02-073A P T 270W
Pathophysiology
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY (3)
Introduction to the study of disease and those conditions most often treated by physical therapy methods; basic signs, symptoms, and causes of disease and conditions will be covered.
PREREQUISITE: a grade of C or better in BIOL 141, BIOL 142, P T 100, P T 384
APPROVED START: FA2004

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3-4 per semester
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to medical and post-operative conditions and/or disease states most frequently treated by physical therapy interventions.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: a C or better in BIOL 129, BIOL 141, BIOL 142, P T 100, P T 100S
PROPOSED START: FA2015


APPENDIX B

Graduate

COURSE ADDS

43-02-074 ACCT 890
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3 per semester/maximum of 9)
Continuing, professionally oriented seminars that consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-075 ACCT 896
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9)
Creative projects with a professional orientation, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-076 ACCT 897
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject with a professional orientation that may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-077 ARCH 601
Ph.D. Dissertation
PH.D.DISSERTATION (0)
Ph.D. Dissertation Full-Time
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-078 ARCH 611
Ph.D. Dissertation
PH.D.DISSERTATION (0)
Ph.D. Dissertation Part-Time
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-079 BUS 890
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3 per semester/maximum of 9)
Continuing, professionally oriented seminars that consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-080 BUS 896
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Creative projects with a professional orientation, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-081 BUS 897
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject with a professional orientation that may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-082 FINAN 890
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3 per semester/maximum of 9)
Continuing professionally oriented seminars that consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-083 FINAN 896
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Creative projects with a professional orientation, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-084 FINAN 897
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject with a professional orientation that may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-085 INFSY 890
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3 per semester/maximum of 9)
Continuing professionally oriented seminars that consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-086 INFSY 896
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Creative projects with a professional orientation, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-087 INFSY 897
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject with a professional orientation that may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-088 INTAF 603
Foreign Academic Experience
FOREIGN ACAD EXP (1-12)
Foreign study and/or research approved by the graduate program for students enrolled in a foreign university constituting progress toward the degree.
PROPOSED START: FA2014

43-02-089 LGWR 597
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9 per semester/maximum of 18)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-090 LGWR 897
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9 per semester/maximum of 18)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject with a professional orientation that may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-091 LGWR 898

Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9 per semester/maximum of 18)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject with a professional orientation that may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-092 MNGMT 896
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Creative projects with a professional orientation, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-093 MRKT 890
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3 per semester/maximum of 9)
Continuing, professionally oriented seminars that consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-094 MRKT 896
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Creative projects with a professional orientation, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-095 MRKT 897
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject with a professional orientation that may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-096 PHS 896

Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9)
Creative projects with a professional orientation, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-097 SYSEN 895
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Supervised, professionally oriented, off-campus, nongroup instruction, including field experiences, practicums, or internships.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
43-02-098 ANAT 584
Human Anatomy and Development A: Gross Human Anatomy
HUMAN ANAT (1)
Explore gross human anatomy providing orientation to organs and the overall relationship of organs and structures within the human body.
CROSS LIST: PHARM 584
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
REMOVE CROSS LIST
PROPOSED START: SP2015

OLD
43-02-099 ANAT 585
Human Anatomy and Development B: Human Development
HUMAN DEV (1)
Explores human embryology and organogenesis beginning at the third week of gestation through parturition.
CROSS LIST: PHARM 585
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
REMOVE CROSS LIST
PROPOSED START: SP2015

OLD
43-02-100 ANAT 586
Human Anatomy and Development C: Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine
STEM CELL BIOL (1)
Exploration of stem cell biology and the role of stem cells in regenerative medicine.
CROSS LIST: PHARM 586
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
REMOVE CROSS LIST
PROPOSED START: SP2015

OLD
43-02-101 HRIM 503
Research Methods in Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management
RES METHODS HRIM (3)
An introduction to the process of research; problem-solving approaches; the research proposal and the development of the research question.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 451
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HM
CHANGE TITLES: Research Methods in Hospitality Management (RSRCH METHODS HM)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-102 HRIM 511
Services Marketing for the Hospitality Industry
HPTLY SERV MKTG (3)
Hospitality services marketing.
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HM
CHANGE TITLES: Services Marketing Hospitality Management Seminar (SERV MKTG HM SEM)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-103 HRIM 585
Seminar in Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management
SEMINAR HR&IM (1-9)
This course is a doctoral seminar in HR&IM that addresses the conceptual foundations of the HR&IM knowledge base.
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HM
CHANGE TITLES: Seminar in Hospitality Management (SEMINAR IN HM)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course is a doctoral seminar in HM (Hospitality Management) that addresses the conceptual foundations of the HM knowledge base.
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-104 HRIM 586
Research Methods and Evaluation in Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management
RES METHOD HR&IM (1-9)
This course is a doctoral seminar in HR&IM that addresses various research methodologies and evaluation procedures that are applicable to HR&IM.
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HM
CHANGE TITLES: Data Analysis in Hospitality Management (DATA ANALYSIS HM)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course is a doctoral seminar in HM (Hospitality Management) that addresses multivariate data analysis techniques used in hospitality management.
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-105 INSYS 521
Instructional Systems Analysis
INSTR SYSTEMS ANLY (3)
Conducting needs analysis, performance analysis, task analysis, learner analysis, and environmental analysis in preparation for instructional design.
PREREQUISITE: INSYS 415
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: LDT
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-106 INSYS 522
Analyzing Outcomes and Learners
ANLY OUT & LRNRS (3)
Analyzing instructional outcomes, analyzing tasks, and writing objectives for the instructional design; analyzing learners characteristics.
PREREQUISITE: INSYS 415
APPROVED START: S11998

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: LDT
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-107 INSYS 544
Designing Video for Instruction and Training
DSGN VIDEO (3)
The application of theory to the design of visual instruction for multimedia instruction.
PREREQUISITE: INSYS 447
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: LDT
CHANGE TITLES: Video for Instruction, Training, and Research (VID INST TRN & RES)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Theory, design models, and methodologies supporting the use of video in a variety of learning environments.
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-108 INSYS 549
Current Topics in Emerging Technologies
CUR TPC EMERG TECH (3)
An in-depth seminar on the instructional and training design implications of specific new technologies as they emerge.
PREREQUISITE: INSYS 415
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: LDT
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-109 INSYS 574
Applied Qualitative Research for Work Practice, Innovation, and Systems Design
APP QUAL RSCH (3)
Investigates qualitative research paradigms and methodologies; develops skills in use of ethnographic methods in work practice, innovation and systems design.
PREREQUISITE: any introductory research design course or with instructor permission, for example: ADTED 550
APPROVED START: S12000

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: LDT
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ADTED 550
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-110 INSYS 575
Designing Experimental Research in Instructional Systems
EXP RSCH INSYS (3)
Designing research studies in Instructional Systems of a quantitative and experimental nature. Will result in a research proposal.
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: LDT
CHANGE TITLES: Designing Experimental Research in Learning, Design, and Technology (EXP RSCH LDT)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Designing research studies in Learning, Design, and Technology of a qualitative and experiential nature, which results in a research proposal.
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-111 INSYS 581
Theoretical Foundations of Instructional Systems
THEOR FND INSYS (3)
Analysis of theoretical foundations of the instructional systems (systems and cybernetics, communications, cognitive psychology, sociological, constructivist, ecological) for doctoral students.
PREREQUISITE: PH.D. or D.ED. candidacy
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: LDT
CHANGE TITLES: Theoretical Foundations of Learning, Design, and Technology (THEOR FND LDT)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-112 INSYS 583
Survey of Research in Instructional Systems and Technology
SUR RES INSTR SYS (3)
Analysis and evaluation of research in domains of instructional systems and technology.
PREREQUISITE: PH.D. or ED.D. candidacy
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: LDT
CHANGE TITLES: Survey of Research in Learning Sciences and Technology (SUR RES LS & TECH)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Analysis and evaluation of research in domains of learning sciences and technology.
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-113 INSYS 586
Diffusion and Adoption of Innovations
DIFF ADPT INNOV (3)
Understanding change process in educational contexts, comparing various models, tailoring them to individual needs, and creating personalized model of change.
PREREQUISITE: admission into INSYS doctoral program
APPROVED START: S11998

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: LDT
CHANGE TITLES: Diffusion and Adoption of Innovations and Change (DIF ADPT INN & CHG)
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-114 MNGMT 511
Organizational Behavior
ORG BEHAVIOR (2)
Individual and group behavior in organizations; motivation, performance and rewards, job satisfaction, decision processes, conflict resolution; job and organizational design.
PREREQUISITE: admission to the MBA or MSIS program
APPROVED START: S12004

NEW
REMOVE PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: FA2015

OLD
43-02-115 NEURO 511
Neurobiology II
NEUROBIOLOGY II (3)
Structure and physiology of central and peripheral nervous system, including specific sense organs.
PREREQUISITE: graduate student status
CROSS LIST: ANAT 511
APPROVED START: S11987

NEW
REMOVE CROSS LIST
PROPOSED START: SP2015

OLD
43-02-116 VB SC 534
Current Topics in Cancer Research
CANCER RESEARCH (3)
A discussion of current cancer research literature with the focus on primary research literature.
PREREQUISITE: B M B 514 or VB SC 520 or VB SC 530
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: BIOL 413 or BIOL 416 or B M B 400 or B M B 433 or B M B 460
PROPOSED START: FA2015

COURSE DROPS

43-02-117 ACCTG 504
Seminar in Managerial Accounting
MANAGERIAL ACCTG (3-6)
Accounting and the managerial processes of planning, control, and decision making.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-118 ACCTG 550
Taxation and Management Decisions
TAX & MGMT DEC (2)
Framework for understanding the effects of taxes on business decisions and for devising effective tax planning strategies.
PREREQUISITE: B A 511, B A 521
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-119 ANAT 511

Neurobiology II
NEUROBIOLOGY II (3)
Structure and physiology of central and peripheral nervous system, including specific sense organs.
PREREQUISITE: graduate student status
CROSS LIST: NEURO 511
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-120 B A 574
Business Research
BUSINESS RESEARCH (1-3)
A project paper, comparable in quality and scope of work to a graduate thesis, on problems of a company.
PREREQUISITE: 15 credits of 400- and 500-level courses in business administration
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-121 B ADM 521
Leadership Seminar
LEADERSHIP SEM (3)
Experiential problem-based seminar providing leadership opportunities and practice.
PREREQUISITE: B ADM 502
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-122 B ADM 522
Business Solutions
BUS SOLUTIONS (3)
Practicum experience in solving problems in real business situations.
PREREQUISITE: B ADM 514
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-123 B ADM 530
Investment Theory
INVEST THEORY (3)
Advanced literature pertaining to investments; special reference to the theory of random walks, stock valuation models, and portfolio management.
PREREQUISITE: B ADM 501
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-124 B ADM 533
Derivatives
DERIVATIVES (3)
Applied theory of derivative instruments in hedging risk and management strategies.
PREREQUISITE: B ADM 501, B ADM 503, B ADM 530
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-125 B ADM 550

Global Marketing
GLOBAL MARKETING (3)
Marketing decision making from a global perspective.
PREREQUISITE: B ADM 502
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-126 B ADM 551
Marketing Research
MRKTG RES (3)
Examination of marketing research today, including research and marketing decisions, sampling and measurement, and collection and analysis of data.
PREREQUISITE: B ADM 502, B ADM 503
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-127 B ADM 552
Service Marketing
SERVICE MARKETING (3)
The application of marketing concepts to special needs of a service environment.
PREREQUISITE: B ADM 502
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-128 BCHEM 505
Biological Chemistry II
BIOL CHEM II (2)
A continuation of BCHEM 502. Emphasis on interrelations of metabolic pathways, catabolic end products, and regulation.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-129 EGEE 500
Engineering Physics of Energy and Geo-Environmental Systems
ENG PHYSICS (3)
Momentum, heat and mass transport phenomena in fluids and solids, including phase equilibria.
PREREQUISITE: consent of instructor
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-130 ENTR 501
Opportunity Creation and Launch
OPTY CREATE LAUNCH (2)
Identify a new opportunity, quantify its potential, understand key competitive factors, and develop presentations to secure venture financing.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-131 FIN 504
Problems in Finance
PROB IN FINANCE (3-6)
Planned individual projects involving library, laboratory, or field work.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-132 FIN 563
Financial Management Simulation and Corporate Interaction
FIN MGMT SIM (2)
An immersion experience in financial decision-making through a simulation exercise and interaction with senior financial officers.
PREREQUISITE: FIN 571
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-133 FIN 565
Investment Management Portfolio Analysis Immersion
INVST MGT PRT ANLY (2)
An intensive familiarization with the Smeal College Trading Room in combination with a visit to Wall Street trading rooms.
PREREQUISITE: B A 550
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-134 FIN 585
Financial Innovation and Portfolio Risk Management
FIN INOV PORT RISK (2)
Introduction to fundamental derivatives, standard valuation models, and practical applications to portfolio management; recognition, measurement, and management of portfolio risk.
PREREQUISITE: FIN 550, FIN 581, FIN 583, FIN 587
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-135 FIN 587
Investment Management I
INVESTMNT MGMT I (1)
Applied issues and topics in the management of investments.
PREREQUISITE: FIN 550
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-136 FIN 588
Investment Management II
INVESTMNT MGMT II (1)
Complex applied issues and topics in the management of investments.
PREREQUISITE: FIN 550, FIN 587
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-137 GEOG 521
Map Symbolization and Design Theory
MAP SYM DSG THEORY (3)
Introduction to theoretical issues in map design and symbolization with emphasis on current research trends and practical application of research. Students who have passed GEOG 421 may not schedule this course for credit.
PREREQUISITE: GEOG 361, GEOG 364
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-138 GEOG 580
Spatial Data Structures and Algorithms
ADV SP DATA STRUCT (3)
In-depth examination of geographic information system components; representation and storage of spatial data, spatial algorithms, input-output considerations. Students who have passed GEOG 480 may not schedule this course for credit.
PREREQUISITE: GEOG 456, GEOG 457
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-139 GEOSC 505
Quantitative Physical Sedimentology
QUANT PHYS SED (3)
Principles of fluid mechanics and mathematical modeling; their use in describing sediment transport, sedimentary structures, and sedimentary environments.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-140 GEOSC 512

Principles of Crystal Chemistry
PRIN CRYST CHEM (3)
Relation of structure to ionic size and nature; influence of pressure and temperature on structure; chemical-structural defects, crystalline solutions, phase-transitions.
CROSS LIST: MATSE 512
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-141 GEOSC 529
Paleontology
PALEONTOLOGY (1-6 per semester/maximum of 9)
Morphology and distribution of significant fossil groups; sampling, preparation, and applications to biostatigraphy, evolution, paleoecology, sedimentation, and petrography.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-142 GEOSC 584
Clastic Depositional Environments
DEPOS ENVTS (3)
Readings, group discussions, and field work on processes and sedimentary responses of common rock-forming environments.
PREREQUISITE: GEOSC 439
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-143 I H S 500
Occupational Safety Engineering
OCC SAFETY ENGR (3)
Provides a basis to assist students in understanding/applying the scientific and engineering principles associated with the field of safety.
PREREQUISITE: undergraduate science or engineering degree with previous exposure to occupational safety
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-144 I H S 510
Occupational Health
OCC HEALTH (3)
Introduction to Occupational Health including history, general concepts, hazardous workplace exposures, occupational disorders, and prevention of occupational disease.
PREREQUISITE: undergraduate science or engineering degree with previous exposure to occupational safety and health, and toxicology
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-145 I H S 520
Contemporary Issues in Industrial Health and Safety
CONTEMP ISSUES IHS (3)
Evaluation of industrial processes, hazards, labor, and corporate structure, so that hazard control programs and implementation plans can be formulated.
PREREQUISITE: undergraduate science or engineering degree with previous exposure to occupational safety and health
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-146 M I S 538
Decision Support Systems
DECIS SUPPT SYS (3)
Analysis of information requirements for planning, decision making, and performance measurement in organizations.
PREREQUISITE: SC&IS 505
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-147 M I S 539
Management of MIS
MGMT OF MIS (3)
Organizational issues in managing computer-based information systems.
PREREQUISITE: SC&IS 505, MGMT 501
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-148 MATSE 518
Wetting Properties of Materials: Theory and Practice
MAT. WETTING (3)
Fundamentals of water wetting phenomenon are developed with special emphasis on thermodynamics of absorption and adhesion.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-149 MATSE 561

Metal Electrode Reactions
MET ELECTRODE RXN (2-3)
Evaluation of electrode reaction mechanisms and kinetics at metal/electrolyte interfaces relevant to corrosion and industrial electrolyte processes.
PREREQUISITE: MATSE 421
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-150 METEO 516
Mesoscale Forecasting
MESOSCALE FCSTING (3)
Competitive, simulated, operational, real-time forecasting is covered.
PREREQUISITE: METEO 414 or METEO 415
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-151 METEO 574
Atmospheric Dynamics Seminar
ATMOS DYN SEMINAR (1-3 per semester/maximum of 15)
A weekly seminar course that focuses on current and past research problems in dynamic meteorology and oceanography.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-152 METEO 588
Oceans and Climate Seminar
OCEANS AND CLIMATE (2)
A focussed discussion on some aspect of the ocean’s role in the climate system. Theme to vary from semester to semester.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-153 MFGSE 520
Analytical Techniques in Manufacturing and Design
ANLY MFG DESIGN (3)
Applied statistics, QC, SPC, design for experiments, six sigma, design tolerance and process optimization.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-154 MGMT 558
Seminar in Organizational Decision Making
SEM ORG DEC MKG (3)
An in-depth examination of decision making, including bounded rationality, political behaviors, choice and post-decision processes.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-155 MICRO 554
Principles of Immunology
PRIN IMMUNOL (2)
Study of immune response. Nature of antigens, structure, function of antibodies, hypersensitivity, transplantation and tumor immunology, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-156 MKTG 513
Market Research
MARKET RESEARCH (3)
User-oriented analysis of marketing research process, including problem definition, design, data collection, data analysis, interpretation, and presentation.
PREREQUISITE: MKTG 500
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-157 MKTG 516
Product Development and Management
PRODUCT DEV & MGMT (3)
Marketing and product strategies for new and old products are covered in this course.
PREREQUISITE: MKTG 500
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-158 PATH 520
Biology of Neoplasia
BIOL OF NEOPLASIA (5)
Detailed examination of the initiation and pathogenesis of animal neoplasms with emphasis on the relationship to human neoplasia.
PREREQUISITE: admission to College of Medicine
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-159 PHARM 581
Maintaining Homeostasis A: Heart and Vasculature
HOMEOSTASIS A: HV (1)
Physiology of the cardiovascular system.
PREREQUISITE: BMS 501, BMS 502, and BMS 503
CROSS LIST: PSIO 581
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-160 PHARM 583
Maintaining Homeostasis C: Kidney
HOMEOSTASIS C: KDN (1)
Renal physiology and pharmacology.
PREREQUISITE: BMS 501, BMS 502 and BMS 503
CROSS LIST: PSIO 583
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-161 PHARM 584
Human Anatomy and Development A: Gross Human Anatomy
HUMAN ANAT (1)
Explore gross human anatomy providing orientation to organs and the overall relationship of organs and structures within the human body.
CROSS LIST: ANAT 584
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-162 PHARM 585

Human Anatomy and Development B: Human Development
HUMAN DEV (1)
Explores human embryology and organogenesis beginning at the third week of gestation through parturition.
CROSS LIST: ANAT 585
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-163 PHARM 586
Human Anatomy and Development C: Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine
STEM CELL BIOL (1)
Exploration of stem cell biology and the role of stem cells in regenerative medicine.
CROSS LIST: ANAT 586
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-164 PSIO 581
Maintaining Homeostasis A: Heart and Vasculature
HOMEOSTASIS A: HV (1)
Physiology of the cardiovascular system.
PREREQUISITE: BMS 501, BMS 502, and BMS 503
CROSS LIST: PHARM 581
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-165 PSIO 583
Maintaining Homeostasis C: Kidney
HOMEOSTASIS C: KDN (1)
Renal physiology and pharmacology.
PREREQUISITE: BMS 501, BMS 502 and BMS 503
CROSS LIST: PHARM 583
PROPOSED START: SP2015


APPENDIX D

Dickinson School of Law

COURSE ADDS

43-02-166 CORE 935
Practicing Law in Global World: Contexts and Competencies I
PRAC LW GLBL WLD I (3) CRDT ONLY: Y ANON GR: N
This course will introduce students to the contexts in which lawyers work. Students will be exposed to the transnational and international principles that are a mainstay of the practice of law in the 21st century. They will also learn more about the diverse practice settings and substantive areas in which they may choose to use their law degree. As a result, students will be able to make more informed choices about elective courses and better position themselves for success in the job market.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-167 CORE 936
Practicing Law in a Global World: Contexts and Competencies II
PRAC LW GLBL WD II (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course will focus on the additional skills that a student will need, beyond substantive legal knowledge, in order to be an effective and valued lawyer. Drawing upon some of the latest research as well as input from our prominent alumni, the course will introduce students to the extra-legal competencies that are needed to succeed in a competitive marketplace, including teamwork skills, project management, cultural competency, and familiarity with certain basic business concepts.
PROPOSED START: SP2015

43-02-168 CORE 937A
Legal Argument and Factual Persuasion
LEG ARG FAC PERS (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course systematically introduces the analytical protocols for the three primary elements of law utilized by lawyers in arguing on behalf of their clients: case precedents, codes/statutes and facts.
PROPOSED START: SP2015