Appendix L

4/25/17

JOINT SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS’ WELL-BEING AND SAFETY

Curricular and co-Curricular Learning Pathways to Promote
the Well-Being and Safety of First-Year Undergraduate Students

(Legislative)

Implementation: Upon Approval by the Senate

CHARGE:

On July 2, 2014, President Eric Barron announced his appointment of the Task Force on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment.  After a six-month long extensive inquiry, the Task Force Report was completed and presented to the President, on January 23, 2015.  On February 16, 2015, President Barron publicly accepted all eighteen of the recommendations made by the Task Force stating that “everyone has merit and when combined the actions will present a strong and comprehensive response to sexual violence” Further, the President emphasized that they provide “a roadmap for moving Penn State into a national leadership position in the struggle to address sexual misconduct” (see Penn State News Article). The administration has used this roadmap for the implementation of numerous enhanced and new policies and practices surrounding the issue of sexual assault and sexual harassment. The President aims to have Penn State  be a national leader in dealing with these issues and enhancing the well-being and safety of its students.

Of the Task Force recommendations, #13 read as follows: “The Task Force recommends the creation and implementation of various educational experiences that reflect their [students’] evolving developmental needs during the course of their college experience, including a required course for all first-year students that explores issues of student well-being and safety, with an emphasis on building positive relationships and preventing sexual misconduct and alcohol misuse.”

From this recommendation emerged the creation of the Special Joint Committee on First-Year Students’ Well-Being and Safety, originally charged by Faculty Senate Chair Ansari on June 18, 2015 and recharged by Faculty Senate Chair Strauss on August 28, 2016. The current charge states that the Joint Special Committee is: “to develop curricular and/or co-curricular learning pathways with respect to educational programming on well-being and safety beginning with first-year students. Such programming should emphasize the building of positive relationships and the prevention of alcohol misuse and sexual misconduct. To help ensure financial well-being, issues of financial literacy can be addressed as well. To this end, the Special Joint Subcommittee should consult and maintain liaisons with and provide any reports to the University Faculty Senate Standing Committees on Curricular Affairs, Student Life, and Undergraduate Education.”

Please Note:  The Curricular and Co-Curricular Learning Pathways are dealt with in two separate reports. Since curriculum is the purview of the faculty, it will be presented in a Legislative Report (this current report) and the complementary and collaborative co-curricular recommendations, which are aimed towards the administration, will be presented in a companion Advisory and Consultative Report.

RATIONALE:

The issues of students’ well-being and safety (as identified in the charge as the prevention of alcohol misuse and sexual misconduct), as well as concerns about financial literacy, are timely and of critical importance, as described below.

Well-being and Safety (Focusing on Sexual Misconduct and Alcohol Misuse):

A critical issue of well-being and safety for students on all campuses throughout the United States, as well as at Penn State, is sexual assault and its major contributing factor of alcohol misuse (Abbey, Ross, McDuffie, & McAuslan, 1996; Caldeira, et al, 2009). As noted in the report released by the White House Council on Women and Girls on Rape and Sexual Assault: A Renewed Call to Action (January, 2014), campus sexual assault is a particular problem with 1 in 5 women being sexually assaulted while in college (although sexual assaults can happen to anyone no matter their sex/gender). A particular risky time for the occurrence of campus sexual assault is the first few months of a new academic year, referred to as the “Red Zone”, when campus sexual assaults spike among new incoming women (Kimble, Neacsiu, & Flack, 2008). Sexual assaults are most often committed by someone the victim knows and fueled by alcohol consumption (Abbey, et al., 1996) and occur in students’ free or leisure time (Murphy, Hoyme, Colby, & Borsari, 2006). Excessive alcohol consumption is a significant challenge on many U.S. college campuses, including Penn State (USC American College Health Association – National College Health Assessment Report: University Park Campus 2012).

At Penn State, for example, about one-half of the students (51.3%) who responded to a 2015 student drinking survey reported engaging in high-risk drinking behavior (consuming four or more drinks in a two-hour period for women and five or more drinks in a two-hour period for men).  Approximately one-quarter of students (23.9%) had engaged in high-risk drinking 3 or more times during a two-week period (Penn State Student Affairs Research and Assessment, 2015: http://studentaffairs.psu.edu/assessment/analysisreports.shtml).  Students who report high levels of alcohol use also have higher rates of negative consequences, including blacking out, getting hurt or injured, and having policy and legal violations.  Studies also find an association between drinking and risky and non-consensual sexual experiences (Caldeira et al., 2009). Nationally more than 100,000 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 reported having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having sex during the preceding year (Hingson et al., 2002).

The 2015 Penn State Sexual Misconduct Climate Survey (see Summary Report: University Park attached) reports some alarming findings specific to Penn State. The following percentages of undergraduate students at University Park reported sexual assault involving non-consensual penetration or attempts at penetration (Women- 27.5%, Men -6.2%, LGBTQ – 25.7%; Overall – 18.1%). Unfortunately only about one-half (54.8%) of the students surveyed reported that they know how to prevent sexual misconduct and only about one in ten of them are “very” to “extremely aware” of the campus resources that target prevention and treatment of sexual assault. Further, less than two-thirds (62.3%) of students believe that Penn State is “likely” or “very likely” to “take action to address factors that may have led to sexual misconduct.” These findings should be seen as a call to action to us all to provide more comprehensive and accessible education to every undergraduate student regarding sexual misconduct and alcohol misuse. Further, the federal government has mandated that sexual assault prevention programs be conducted on all college campuses that receive federal funding. Underscoring this mandate, the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights has asserted that schools have a duty to develop comprehensive plans for educating students about sexual assault. Research has provided insights into the types of educational interventions that are effective (Anderson & Whiston, 2005; Banyard & Moynihan, 2007; Lonsway & Kothari, 2000). The factors of such programs include 1) being longer in duration and focused, 2) having multiple sessions presented across a student’s college career, 3) having clear goals and measurable objectives, 4) include content addressing attitudes and beliefs as well as factual information, 5) describing specific risk reduction techniques (e.g., responsible use of alcohol, bystander interventions), and 6) being tailored to the needs of specific audiences (e.g., males, student-athletes, fraternity and sorority members, LGBT individuals, people of differing races and ethnicities). Research from programming/coursework at other campuses, as well as conducted with courses at Penn State (BBH 146, RPTM 120), has demonstrated that attitudes and risk behaviors related to  sexual assault can be significantly changed to enhance well-being and safety.  Yet, it has been generally observed on college campuses that “sexual assault prevention programming remains a confused, scattered, and sporadic enterprise with little scientific underpinning” (Anderson & Whiston, 2005). We aim to make sure that this is not the case for our university.

Financial Literacy:

Another critical issue for students on college campuses throughout the United States, including  Penn State, is the need for financial literacy education.  The U.S. Department of Treasury, on behalf of the Financial Literacy and Education Commission, published a report on Opportunities to Improve the Financial Capability and Financial Well-being of Postsecondary Students (2015) stating that at the end of March 2015: 1) outstanding federal student loan debt stood at over $1.1 trillion, not including private student loan debt, and 2) there were more than 41 million federal student loan borrowers (U.S. Department of Education 2015).  More specifically, in 2014-15, 10,029 baccalaureate students graduated from Penn State with loan debt, representing approximately 64% of graduates. The average debt among those who borrowed was $37,623. This compares to Pennsylvania and national rates of average debt at $28,950 and $29,661, respectively, for 75% and  69% of graduating students, respectively. For a standard 10-year repayment plan, the monthly loan repayment would be $425 per month.

In addition to making choices about paying for college expenses, young adults, often for the first time, make a number of other important financial decisions in college, such as whether to secure credit cards. As students graduate and transition to the workplace, they are faced with other complex financial decisions such as budgeting, buying a car and/or house, securing health insurance, saving for retirement, and a series of other complex consumer spending decisions.  These types of decisions may have a long-term impact on their future, making the college years an important opportunity to address these critical issues in financial literacy. Financial education is one strategy to equip college students with the skills and resources needed to make informed decisions regarding their money management, college access and completion, as well as other lifelong financial health issues.

Given this background literature and information our Special Committee focused on developing recommendations for both curricular and co-curricular learning pathways since these should be complementaryto and integrated  with one another. Thus, they should share the same guiding principles, goal and objectives as described below.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR THE RECOMMENDED  CURRICULAR (AND CO-CURRICULAR) LEARNING PATHWAYS

  • The topics emphasized in the charge (i.e., alcohol misuse, sexual misconduct, and financial literacy) are the ones addressed by these recommendations.
  • Alcohol misuse/ sexual misconduct and financial literacy are different issues that deserve separate attention but can be addressed collaboratively when appropriate.
  • Learning pathways must be accessible to all Penn State students at all locations (including World Campus).
  • Learning pathways must be flexible so that they are appropriate for and adaptable to differing campuses/locations, as well as differing needs of students.
  • Learning pathways must be feasible. In addition to any new initiatives, courses and programs that are already in place will be built upon and enhanced and thus unnecessary duplication will be avoided.
  • Curricular and co-curricular learning pathways should complement one another and be integrated.
  • Learning pathways will be aligned with Penn State’s on-going efforts in related areas (described under “Placing the Recommendations into Context”).
  • Learning pathways will be aligned with federal mandates, state laws, and Penn State policies for the protection of student safety and enhancement of well-being.
  • Penn State Values will be an integral part of all learning pathways.
  • The optimization of student engagement will be a goal.
  • Recognition of and respect for diversity will be imbedded in the learning pathways.
  • Learning pathways will be systematically assessed.

LEARNING PATHWAYS FOR PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND SEXUAL MISCONDUCT

The recommended learning pathways would consist of collaborative curricular and co-curricular opportunities that would facilitate students’ examination of effective ways to engage in positive relationships with others and with one’s community. More specifically, they would focus on the areas of  alcohol use/misuseand sexual relationships/sexual misconduct. They would highlight the exploration and application of the Penn State Values vis-à-vis the enhancement of personal, interpersonal, and community well-being and safety.

Overarching Goal and Objectives

Goal: To sustain and enhance a positive and supportive Penn State environment that promotes healthy relationships and enhances well-being and safety while reducing the risks involved with alcohol misuse and sexual misconduct.

Objectives: The objectives for learning pathways to reach this goal are based upon the results of research of effective education to prevent sexual misconduct and alcohol misuse (Anderson & Whiston, 2005; Banyard & Moynihan, 2007; Lonsway & Kothari, 2000). They include:

  • Increase awareness of and knowledge about risks to well-being and safety, particularly posed through alcohol misuse and sexual misconduct.
  • Increase awareness of and knowledge about strategies and resources for enhancing well-being and safety (e.g., positive relationships and constructive community engagement) and for reducing risk (e.g., alcohol misuse and sexual misconduct).
  • Explore and examine how intrapersonal factors (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, self-efficacy, etc.), interpersonal factors (e.g., relationships, networks, support systems, etc.) and/or community factors (e.g., engagement, cultural awareness, Penn State Values, etc.) affect alcohol use/misuse and sexual relationships/misconduct.
  • Develop skills (e.g., communication, decision-making, assertiveness, critical thinking, healthy use of free time, etc.) that will enhance well-being and safety and reduce risk.

Overview of Curricular Learning Pathways with Recommendations:

The Special Committee has worked diligently to identify opportunities available within the current curricular structure that could be expanded in order to provide education to a greater number of students. For example, first-year seminars (FYS;offered at University Park) and first-year experiences (FYE;offered at other campuses) would be appropriate places for first-year students to be exposed early in their college careers to important well-being and safety content. In fact, such content is already included in the FYE of students on many of the commonwealth campuses. In our discussions with other committees and faculty members, the suggestion that all first-year seminars be consistent in covering the topics emphasized in this report was made repeatedly. However, restructuring of FYS was not in the purview of our special committee but should be considered by a committee specifically dedicated to this topic.

Another appropriate venue for first-year students to receive education on the topics emphasized in this report is in general education courses. General education courses offered at University Park whose focus seems to most closely align with the goal and objectives put forward in this report (e.g., information on alcohol and other drugs, gender & sexuality, relationships, sexual health, or sexual risks, including sexual victimization and domestic or relationship violence) are listed in Appendix A. Note that this is not an exhaustive list and that there is a derth of courses particularly focusing on the topic of alcohol and other drugs. More courses on this topic need to be developed. Other appropriate general education courses may also be currently offered at University Park, the Commonwealth Campuses, and through World Campus. However, due to the popularity of many of these courses, students are often not able to enroll in them until their senior year. This defeats the purpose of students learning this valuable information early in their college careers in order to enhance their own well-being and safety, as well as being effective bystanders when they observe potential risk or harm towards others. Thus, it is imperative that students have the opportunity to access courses early in their college careers. It is important to note that content on well-being and safety may appear in courses other than FYS/FYE and general education as well (e.g. upper-level and major courses).

We must keep in mind that most students have reported, through focus groups and a survey, that they had not been exposed through their formal coursework to the issues falling within the Task Force’s purview. Therefore, it must be emphasized that the only way to ensure that all Penn State undergraduate students have at least one formal educational experience emphasizing well-being and safety, as defined in this charge, is to require every student to take a course that includes such content. Yet, the Special Committee, in consultation with other standing faculty senate committees, is mindful of not adding any additional number of credits or requirements for graduation.  Therefore, in the spirit of other university required courses, such as courses designated as United States (US) and International Cultures (IL), the committee recommends that a WS designation be applied to Well-being and Safety courses.  The specific characteristics of WS designated courses will be further elucidated by an implementation committee.

The Task Force has identified a number of general education courses that might include information on alcohol and other drugs, gender & sexuality, sexual health, or sexual risks, including sexual victimization and domestic or relationship violence (see Appendix A.) In addition, there are a number of courses offered  at the 400 level, which are most frequently taken by students in related majors. Other non-permanent special topics courses on these subjects are offered periodically, and these topics may be covered in other courses, too.

Recommendations for Curricular Learning Pathways:

Recommendation 1: The University should provide the financial resourses to expand the offering of general education courses at University Park and the Commonwealth Campuses that focus on the areas of the use of alcohol and other drugs, gender & sexuality, relationships, sexual health, or sexual risks, including sexual victimization and domestic or relationship violence. Sections of these courses could be offered through resident instruction and online to make them more broadly available to more Penn State students at all locations.

Recommendation 2: Sections of the aforementioned general education courses should be designated for first-year students only so that these courses can be better accessed by underclassmen.

Recommendation 3:  The University should establish a “Well-being and Safety” (WS) designation for any course having at least 25% content that relates to such matters as the development of healthy relationships and the prevention of substance abuse and sexual misconduct, in order to meet the goal and objectives set forth in this Legislative Report. WS courses should be able to double-count with other requirements.

Recommendation 4: Baccalaureate and associate degree candidates must complete 3 credits of courses designated as Well-being and Safety (WS) before graduation. Students are encouraged to take WS courses as early in their college career as possible.

Recommendation 5: The courses focusing on well-being and safety, as defined in this report, should undergo regular and systematic assessment via the processes and procedures that the University has in place to determine course effectiveness in meeting the overall goal and the objectives of these courses.

Comments about and Suggestions for Implementation:

  • An “Implementation Committee” to oversee the process of implementation of the approved recommendations should be established by Faculty Senate and administration. For example, this committee could work with faculty of targeted general education courses, and their corresponding departments, to develop new and expand access to targeted courses with the goal of offering them system-wide online and through the World Campus.
  • Funds for the development of new general education courses could be provided through the Office of General Education. When appropriate and possible, courses dealing with these topics could be linked to permit satisfaction of the integrative studies option in the revised general education curriculum.
  • Any redesignated and/or new courses would be approved by the appropriate Curricular Affairs Committee.
  • Communication among faculty teaching these courses should be facilitated and resources made available for faculty use. This has already been accomplished by the establishment of a Well-being and Safety site in the “Tools and Resources Repository” at Schreyer Institute for Teaching and Learning web site. Dr. Mary Ann Tobin has been designated as the Well-being and Safety liaison and is already working with a Well-being & Safety Faculty Teaching and Learning Group to identify and post materials and resources.
  • Academic courses should link with appropriate co-curricular activities. Such co-curricular activities will also be listed on the Well-being and Safety web site.
  • Courses should encourage student engagement.
  • Courses should include information regarding how people from diverse backgrounds (e.g. race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, (dis)ability, country of origin) may experience the issues of well-being and safety that are addressed.
  • Questions should be added to the university-wide Sexual Misconduct Survey, when it is conducted periodically, to assess students exposure to academic courses on the topic as well as their perceptions of the effectiveness of these courses.
  • Two years following implementation, a report should be submitted to update Faculty Senate on the progress of achieving the recommendations.

LEARNING PATHWAYS FOR FINANCIAL LITERACY

The recommended learning pathways for financial literacy would consist of collaborative curricular and co-curricular opportunities that would facilitate students’ examination of effective ways to acquire financial skills and knowledge as a life skill to make informed financial decisions during and after graduation from the university. More specifically, these pathways would focus on the areas of budgeting, building assets, investment in education, acquiring and using credit cards, student loans, the impact of compounded interest, and debt management.  They would highlight the exploration and application of personal and consumer principles such as seeking present and future financial stability, freedom and security. Note: that the curricular pathways and recommendations are presented in this current Legislative Report, whereas the collaborative co-currricular learning pathways and recommendations are presented in a companion Advisory and Consultative Report.

Overarching Goal and Objectives for Financial Literacy Learning Pathways

Goal: To sustain and enhance a positive and supportive Penn State environment that is committed to provide students with the resources needed to make informed financial decisions regarding their money management while promoting financial literacy education centered around the concepts of financial security and freedom.

Objectives: The objectives for learning pathways to reach this goal are based upon the principles of personal finance, consumer trends and behavior, mathematics of money, and principles of economics. They include:

  • Increase awareness of and knowledge about personal finance, particularly budgeting, credit card use and student loans.
  • Increase awareness of and knowledge about strategies and resources for making informed financial decisions, increasing assets and reducing debts.
  • Explore and examine how intrapersonal factors (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, self-efficacy, etc.), interpersonal factors (e.g., relationships, networks, support systems, etc.) and/or community factors (e.g., engagement, cultural awareness, Penn State Values, etc.) affect financial well-being, security and freedom.
  • Develop skills (e.g., communication, decision-making, assertiveness, critical thinking, etc.) that will enhance financial education, and behavior modification to reach financial stability and success.

Recommendations for Curricular Learning Pathways:

Recommendation 6: The University should support the offering of more sections of MATH 034 and AYFCE 270 across campuses and online.

Recommendation 7: The courses identified in the preceeding recommendation should undergo regular and systematic assessment via the processes and procedures that the University has in place to determine course effectiveness in meeting the overall goal and the objectives for financial literacy education.

Comments about and Suggestions for Implementation:

  • Implementation of the approved recommendations will be overseen by the Financial Literacy and Wellness Center.

 PLACING THE RECOMMENDATIONS INTO CONTEXT:

This is the opportune time to initiate learning pathways at Penn State to improve students’ well-being and safety and to enhance students’ financial literacy since there are other Penn State initiatives that are supportive and with which meaningful collaboration could be established. These include the recognition and diffusion of the Penn State Values, The University’s Strategic Plan for 2016-2020, the recent revisions to the general education curriculum, the expansion of student engagement, the expansion of learning assessment, and the establishment of  the Office of Sexual Misconduct Prevention and Response.

Penn State Values

Through an inclusive and comprehensive process facilitated by the Office of Ethics and Compliance, the Penn State Community has endorsed a set of values that represent our core ethical aspirations for all our daily activities and actions as students, faculty, staff, and volunteers at Penn State.  These include respect, integrity, responsibility, and community, as well as excellence and discovery. (See: Penn State Values: Office of Ethics and Compliance). These are certainly core values at the heart of ensuring student well-being and safety, as well as developing financial literacy and would be incorporated into all learning experiences on these topics.

Penn State’s Strategic Plan for 2016-2020

Two of the five thematic priority areas in the Strategic Plan, relevant to students’ well-being and safety, are “Transforming Education” and “Enhancing Health” (see The Pennsylvania State University’s Strategic Plan for 2016 to 2020).  A particular area of emphasis involving the enhancement of health is the fostering and enabling of wellness “because our university is only as strong as its people” (p. 10). More specifically, the Plan states: “we will invest in innovative, multi-pronged, institution-wide health initiatives that inspire faculty, staff, and students to focus proactively on their physical, mental, and emotional health.” (p.10). This is exactly what the recommendations for improving well-being and safety and enhancing financial literacy would do.

Revised General Education Curriculum

A Task Force, charged to make recommendations for enhancing/revising the general education curriculum, submitted its report to Faculty Senate in April 2015 and received support from the senators for approval of the recommendations. In 2016, further reports were submitted to Faculty Senate and were approved for the implementation regarding the foundation and domain courses in general education, as well as a new requirement for integrative studies. Plans for the assessment of general education courses were also approved.  A new Office for General Education has been established to oversee these recommendations. (See http://www.gened.psu.edu/).  Recommendations in this current report regarding general education courses would follow the policies, procedures, and practices endorsed by the Office for General Education and the Faculty Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs.

Expansion of Learning Assessment

In 2015, the University added a Learning Outcomes Assessment Office (LOA) to the Office of Planning and Institutional Development under the auspices of the Office of Planning and Assessment (Penn State’s Office of Planning and Assessment website) . The LOA Office coordinates University-wide studies of undergraduate and graduate education, including general education assessment. With expanded expectations of and resources for learning assessment, the learning pathways that are recommended in this report can be examined for their effectiveness in reaching the goal and objectives for enhancing students’ well-being and safety, as defined in this report.

The Office of Sexual Misconduct Prevention and Response

In August of 2016, the Title IX Office was renamed the Office of Sexual Misconduct Prevention and Response. (Penn State’s Office of Sexual Misconduct Prevention & Response website). This Office helps people to report incidents, get help, support a friend, as well as identifying campus resources. Both Paul Apicella, Title IX Coordinator, and Any Cotner, Educational Programs Coordinator, have been instrumental in the preparation of this report and its recommendations.

SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE CONSIDERATION:

  1. Examine issues of alcohol misuse and sexual misconduct past the first-year of students’ college careers. For example, how do these issues change once a student moves off-campus or reaches the age of 21? What other iniatives should be implemented throughout students’ college careers?
  2. Consider ways to better educate/train faculty and staff around the issues emphasized in this report so that they will be better resource people for the students.
  3. Examine the first-year seminars (FYS) and first-year experiences (FYE) to see if they should be restructured to better deal with the topics focused on in this report.
  4. Consider ways that curricular and/or co-curricular learning pathways can be implemented with graduate students.

REFERENCES USED IN REPORT

Abbey, A. (2002). Alcohol-related sexual assault: A common problem among college students. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Supplement (S14), 118-128.

Anderson, L.A., & Whiston, S. C. (2005). Sexual assault education programs: A meta-analytic       examination of the effectiveness. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 29(4), 374-388.

Banyard, V. L., & Moynihan, M. M. (2007). Sexual violence prevention through bystander education: An experimental evaluation. Journal of Community Psychology, 35(4),l 463-481.

Caldeira, K.M., Arria, A. M., O’Grady, K. E., Zarate, E. M., Vincent, K. B., & Wish, E.D. (2009). Peospective associations between alcohol anddrug consumption and risky sex among female college students. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education, 53(2). nihpa115858.

Hingson, R. W., Heeren, T., Zakocs, R. C., Kopstein, A., & Wechsler, H. (2002). Magnitude of alcohol-related mortality and morbidity among U.S. college students: Age 18-24. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 63(2), 136-144.

Lonsway, K. A., & Kothari, C. (2000). First year campus rape education:

Evaluating the impact of a mandatory intervention. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 24, 220–232.

Murphy, J. G., Hoyme, C. K., Colby, S. M., & Borsari, B. (2006). Alcohol consumption, alcohol-related problems, and quality of life among college students. Journal of College Student Development, 47(1), 110-121.

Pascarella, E. T., & Terenzini, P. T. (2005). How college affects students: A third decade of research, Jossey-Bass, CA.

Schewe, P. A., & O’Donohue, W. (1993). Rape prevention: Methodological problems and new directions. Clinical Psychology Review, 19, 667–682.

Upcraft, M. L., Gardner, J. N., & Barefoot, B. O. (2004). Challenging and supporting the first-year student: A handbook for improving the first year of college. Jossey-Bass, IN.

PEOPLE/GROUPS CONSULTED FOR REPORT

  • Paul; Apicello, Title IX Coordinator
  • Adam Christensen, Director, Student Affairs Research & Assessment
  • Curricular Affairs Committee of Faculty Senate
  • Angela Linse, Executive Director & Associate Dean, Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence
  • Dan Murphy, Director, Student Orientation & Transition Programs
  • Mark Rameker, Senior Director, Residence Life
  • Damon Sims, Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Maggie Slattery, Interim Director, Office for General Education
  • Student Life Committee of Faculty Senate
  • Katie Tenney, Coordinator, Stand for State
  • Undergraduate Education Committee of Faculty Senate

View the 2015 PENN STATE SEXUAL MISCONDUCT CLIMATE SURVEY Summary Report: University Park.

2016-2017 JOINT SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS’ WELL-BEING AND SAFETY

  • Martha Aynardi
  • Asad Azemi
  • Linda Caldwell
  • Colleen Connolly-Ahern
  • Amy Cotner
  • Yvonne Gaudelius, Co-chair
  • Katie Jordan
  • Patricia Koch, Co-chair
  • Linda LaSalle
  • Shawn Lichvar
  • Peggy Lorah
  • Daad Rizk