Appendix D

3/13/18

SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

Revisions to Bylaws; Article I Officers, Section 1

(Legislative)

Implementation: Upon Approval by the Senate

Background:

On May 7, 1974, the University Faculty Senate adopted a series of recommendations made by the Joint Senate Administrative Select Committee on Faculty Participation in University Governance. The committee was charged with examining “the faculty’s role in the governance of the University with special attention to the role of the Senate; to recommend means for its improvement, if necessary; and to recommend means for better communication with the University community.” Among the report’s 35 proposals, recommendation #17 stated:

“The Committee also recommends that the Senate elect a Chairman-elect, who will serve one year in that capacity prior to service as Chairman and that the individual serve as Past Chairman in the year following his Chairmanship. The Chairman-elect should serve as Vice-Chairman of the Senate. These three individuals together with the Secretary will serve on the Faculty Executive Committee as well as on the University Coordinating Council.”

The recommended change, subsequently adopted in the December 10, 1974 legislative report, altered University Senate bylaws from a traditional executive structure with an independently elected Vice-Chair and Chair, which had been the case since 1965, to the current rotating system wherein the Senate elects a Chair-Elect, who subsequently becomes Chair of the Senate and then the Immediate Past Chair.

Rationale:

In order to strengthen the faculty’s voice in University governance, we propose that the Senate adopt changes to the bylaws that would both restore the independent election of a Vice-Chair and Chair, and also permit the Chair to stand for reelection. Furthermore, we propose a change in the manner in which the Chair’s senior advisor, currently the Immediate Past Chair, is determined. These proposed changes would enable the Senate to be more agile, would limit executive political authority, minimize the long-term consolidation of political power, ensure that Senate officers are accountable to their constituencies, strengthen the influence of the Senate, and provide more flexibility for Senators interested in running for office.

Beyond giving future Chairs a potentially longer term of service, moving away from our current rotating system would make the Senate more politically nimble. By giving Chairs an introductory year of service as the Chair-elect, the Senate now creates a lengthy delay between the outcome of one’s election as Chair-elect and the time the successful candidate assumes the office of Chair. While there must be some time to facilitate a transition, excessive delays make it hard for the Senate to choose leaders to address urgent concerns.

Furthermore, in terms of governance, short terms of office and term limitations can be tools that limit an executive’s political authority and minimize the long-term consolidation of political power. In the context of a faculty Senate, CC&R believes that it is counterproductive and overly-restrictive to constrain a Chair’s term of office to one single-year term, as this tends to diminish the Senate’s influence with both the administration and the Board of Trustees. Additionally, a mechanism that requires the Chair to run for reelection in order to serve for a second year has the added benefit of ensuring that executives remain attentive to their core constituency. Chairs who during their first year act in a manner that runs counter to the collective judgment of the Senate, or simply become too complacent in their role as the faculty’s chief representative, will risk losing their bid for reelection. The ability to serve more than a single one-year term would both strengthen the influence of the Senate and hold Chairs more accountable for their actions.

An additional goal of moving away from our rotating system is to provide more flexibility for Senators to run for a specific office, serve for a narrowly defined period of time, and have the option of returning to their normal duties at the end of their term. Under a revised (non-rotating) executive system, both the Secretary and the Vice Chair would be able to choose to step away from their duties at the conclusion of their term, rather than feel obliged to continue to serve as an officer.

In our rotating system, the outgoing Chair is required to succeed to the office of Immediate Past Chair, adding a third year of service as a Senate officer to their obligations. CC&R believes that that Senators should be free to return to the faculty upon completion of their year(s) as Chair. The changes proposed in the recommendations that follow would change the role of the Chair’s senior advisor from “Immediate Past Chair” to a more broadly defined “Past Chair.” In other words, this Senate Officer, who is frequently the current Chair’s senior advisor on Senate matters, would not necessarily have to be the immediate past Chair, but could, instead, be another former Senate Chair. In this model, the outgoing Chair would have the option of serving in the office of Past Chair or returning to their normal faculty duties. If the outgoing Chair chose to step away from further service, the Senate Council would elect a faculty member from the Council of Past Chairs to serve as this Senate Officer. CC&R believes that this flexibility preserves the best of both systems.

It is noteworthy that, when the Senate adopted the rotating executive in 1974, there is no indication in the Record that it considered the implications of precluding the reelection of the Senate Chair. There are no examples of any Senate Vice-Chair or Chair serving a second term prior to the adoption of the rotating system. We presume that this had been prohibited, or at least discouraged, since the elected Chair position was established in 1965. The present national trend to move away from longstanding practices of shared governance, makes it all the more important that the Senate take steps to both empower future Chairs with potentially longer terms, while at the same time, through reelection, binding them more closely to the views of their faculty colleagues.

Among our peer institutions, the rotating executive, such as we have now, is fairly common. The Senate officers conducted an extensive study of Senates within the Big Ten schools (see the enclosed table). Approximately two thirds of Big Ten senates have a rotating executive. Indeed, the rotating system is also used frequently to govern academic organizations, and professional societies. At the 2017 meeting of the Big Ten Academic Alliance shared governance conference (held this year at University Park), Senate chairs held lengthy discussions about governance structures.  It is noteworthy that when asked why they had a rotating executive or an independent Vice-Chair and Chair, many Senate Chairs cited precedent. For most Big Ten senates, their current system had been in place so long, it had not occurred to the leadership to consider alternative executive structures. Discussions of the alternative models of executive leadership generated considerable interest among senate leaders within the Big Ten. Presently, the University of Illinois, Michigan State, the University of Minnesota and Rutgers University have Senate Chairs who can stand for reelection to continuous terms.

The proposed reform of the Senate executive includes two further alterations to the standing rules (See Appendix A: Proposed Changes to the University Faculty Senate Standing Rules). First, as Chairs will not be required to serve as a Chair-Elect before assuming office, nominees will have to meet a minimum standard of Senate experience, including two full years of elected service, and service in a leadership post (i.e., a senate officer, a committee chair, two years as a vice chair, Senate Council, CC&R or the Faculty Advisory Committee to the President). Additionally, in the second to last meeting of the full Senate, when nominations for the Senate officers are closed, Chair candidates will have an opportunity to make brief remarks before the plenary session of the Senate. By providing the candidates an opportunity to address the full Senate, it will give all Senators the opportunity to hear from the candidates, and make a more informed judgment about the upcoming election.

One of the most significant reforms to come out of the 1974 governance report was the creation of the office of Immediate Past Chair. Prior to the adoption of the rotating executive, there was no formal role for a former chair among the Senate officers. Many Senate Chairs have found it useful to have the former chair function as a senior advisor available to the Chair to provide insight, guidance and perspective. In proposing that the Senate give chairs the opportunity to seek re-election, CC&R felt it was important to maintain this innovation, in a manner that was compatible with an independently elected Vice-Chair and a Chair who may serve a second term.

Finally, the standing rules reduces the term limit of the Senate Secretary from three one-year terms to two one-year terms to increase the number of Senators who will serve as an officer, thus expanding the pool of candidates prepared to run directly for Chair.

As an aid to Senators, CC&R elected to include a list of Frequently Asked Questions (F.A.Q.) which came up during the committee’s deliberations and during consultation with senators.

#1 Why does the executive need reform? What benefits does the Committee on Committees and Rules expect will result from this change?

Although the Senate’s rotating executive serves the basic needs of the Senate, the structure almost certainly weakens the Senate’s influence with respect to both the administration and the Board of Trustees. First, executives who govern for exceptionally short terms of office are limited in their ability to serve the Senate as they often lack the time to pursue important reforms or projects that require more than one year for their realization. Second, by prohibiting them to stand for reelection, executives are, by nature, less sensitive to the interest and demands of their constituency. The option of seeking re-election creates an institutional incentive to be responsive to the views of the Senate, and to confront difficult issues (e.g., concerns about transparency and small merit increases) that sometimes divide the faculty and the administration.  The possibility of re-election thus creates rational incentives for incumbents to press for the administration to address issues that are important to the faculty.

#2 Do the potential advantages of having a re-electable Chair outweigh the loss of the ‘internship’ year as Chair-Elect?

The Committee on Committee and Rules is mindful of the need to mitigate the potential loss of the Chair’s “internship” year. Whereas some Chairs might be elected immediately after serving as the Senate’s Vice-Chair, this is by no means guaranteed. Therefore, to maximize the number of Senators who have exposure to the work of the Senate officers, the revised bylaws limit Vice-Chairs to a single one-year term.  Since the Vice-Chairs would have a more restrictive term limit than the Chairs, there will tend to be considerably more senators who serve as Vice-Chair than senators who are elected Chair. This will, over time, broaden the pool of faculty who serve as Senate officers, and who thereby become familiar with the day-to-day responsibilities of the Chair.

Additionally, the committee feels that, on the whole, the benefits of these changes will outweigh the loss of the “internship” year.  It should be noted that the value of the year as Chair-Elect as a learning period has, in the past, been very strongly influenced by the relationship between the current Chair and their Chair-Elect. Past Chairs also report that, in addition to Chair-Elect, the position of Senate Secretary often provides a valuable perspective on the work of the Chair. To expand the pool of Senators who serve as Senate Secretary, CC&R also proposes changing the term limit from three one-year terms to two one-year terms.

As a precaution against the possibility that the Senate would nominate an inexperienced and inadequately prepared candidate, CC&R proposes changes to the standing rules so that only senators with significant leadership experience can run for Chair. See #3 for details.

#3 Is it possible that someone will be elected as Chair who does not have the experience to immediately step into the position?

CC&R had lengthy discussions about how to ensure that a Senator would be capable of stepping directly into the office of Chair without first serving as a Chair-Elect. The proposed reforms have three safeguards that makes it unlikely that someone would be elected Chair without the necessary qualifications. First, under the revised bylaws, Chair nominees will have to meet a minimum standard of Senate experience, including two full years of elected service, and service in a leadership post (e.g. a senate officer, a committee chair, two years as a committee vice-chair, Senate Council, membership on the CC&R or the Faculty Advisory Committee to the President). Second, the qualifications listed in the bylaws are minimum qualifications. The nominating committee would continue to identify highly qualified candidates, presumably giving preference to candidates with a strong track record and diverse leadership experience. Third, the elected Senators who choose the Chair will be the ultimate screening mechanism, as the membership will weigh experience as one of many factors in deciding between alternative candidates.  Candidates with comparatively few qualifications will prevail only if they have other significant strengths that outweigh the experience of the electoral alternatives.

#4 Why not simply increase the length of the terms for Chair-Elect/Chair to 2 years?

Theoretically, within a rotating system, it is possible to permit a Chair to serve for two years, by extending the term of service of the Chair-Elect, Chair and Immediate Past Chair. This type of restructuring would create additional problems. First, exacerbating the already long time commitment, it would require six years of service as a Senate officer to serve for two years as Chair. Second, a six-year commitment might exclude faculty on fixed-term contracts as the rotation may very well exceed the length of their contract. Third, a two-year term for the Vice-Chair and Chair would create a delay of two years between the election of a Chair-Elect and the time they take office. Long delays between elections and the start of an office-holder’s term tends to undermine the democratic process and make leaders less responsive to changing constituent needs. Fourth, short of invoking the Senate’s version of impeachment (see Article I, Section 6 and Standing Rules, Article I, Section 11 (b)), it precludes the Senate from changing course if the Chair has an unsuccessful first year.

#5 Why not permit the Chairs to run for more than two one-year terms?

The Committee on Committees and Rules felt that it was important to strengthen the influence of the Senate by providing the Chair the option of serving for more than a single term. Accordingly, CC&R seriously considered providing the Chair with the option of serving for up to three one-year terms, as is the case for the Chair of the Rutgers University Senate. However, the committee felt that the utility of increasing the length of the Chair’s potential term of service is subject to diminishing returns. While the Chair would benefit from having an additional year, having too much time in office could eliminate the sense of urgency often required to move initiatives forward. If, at a later date, the Senate finds that two one-year terms are insufficient to accomplish faculty objectives, the bylaws can be altered to include a third term, as experience dictates.

#6 How do other Big Ten schools organize their Senate executives?

Among our peer institutions, the rotating executive is fairly common. The Senate officers conducted an extensive study of Senates within the Big Ten schools (see the enclosed table). Approximately two thirds of Big Ten senates have a rotating executive. Indeed, the rotating system is used frequently to govern academic organizations, and professional societies. At the 2017 meeting of the Big Ten Academic Alliance shared governance conference (held this year at University Park), Senate chairs held lengthy discussions about governance structures, including the trade-offs between traditional and rotating executive systems.  It is noteworthy that when asked why they had a rotating or traditional executive structures, many Senate Chairs cited precedent. For most Big Ten senates, their current system had been in place so long, it had not occurred to the leadership to consider alternative executive structures. Discussions of the alternative models of executive leadership generated considerable interest among senate leaders within the Big Ten. Presently, the University of Illinois, Michigan State, the University of Minnesota and Rutgers University have Senate Chairs that can stand for reelection.

#7 Do the powers and responsibilities of the Chair meaningfully change under these proposed reforms?

CC&R concluded that, in proposing reforms to the Senate executive structure, it was prudent to make the fewest possible changes to the power and responsibilities of the officers. Accordingly, the office of Chair has no more authority than it does in the present system. In fact, combined with other proposed reforms (e.g., permitting the Senate Council to convene a meeting of the body over the objections of the Chair), in some respects, the executive will have less autonomy from the full Senate. Presuming the Senate approves the reforms, once the new system is in place, future CC&R committees might wish to consider adjustments in the duties of Senate leaders. It seemed imprudent to simultaneously propose reforms to the structure of the executive and reforms in the balance of responsibilities among Senate officers.

#8 Did CC&R consider any other alternatives to reestablishing the independent election of a Chair and Vice-Chair?

Yes. CC&R considered a range of reorganization plans, including one system that permitted the Chair and Vice-Chair to run as a “ticket” like that of the President and Vice President in U.S. national elections. However, in an effort to make the proposed reforms as consistent with the existing system as possible, CC&R adopted a plan that merely provides that Chair and Vice-Chairs stand for separate elections, much as the University Faculty Senate did from 1965 to 1974. While CC&R considered the possibility that there are other, potentially more advantageous models, members concluded that to minimize risk and uncertainty, it was important that the proposed reforms adhere, as closely as possible, to the existing Senate configuration.

#9 Why does the Senate propose changing the title of “Immediate Past Chair” to simply “Past Chair?”

CC&R had extensive discussions about whether to make changes to the office of “Immediate Past Chair.” The committee concluded that the office, designed to provide the Chair with a senior advisor, works reasonably well. It was inadvisable to make dramatic changes to its responsibilities or method of selection. However, to accommodate the potential re-election of the Chair, CC&R proposed that service as immediate past chair should be optional. If an officer served for a year as Vice-Chair and two years as Chair, outgoing chairs might be reluctant to serve for another one or even two years as the Immediate Past Chair. To provide outgoing chairs with a degree of flexibility, the proposed reform changes the name of the office to “Past Chair,” and provides that if the most recent chair wishes to return to his or her normal faculty responsibilities, Senate Council will elect a replacement from the Council of Past Chairs. It was CC&R’s judgment that this modest revision captures the best of both worlds.  In many (and perhaps most cases) the outgoing Chair will serve at least one year to aid in the transition. Particularly in a Chair’s second term, the outgoing Chair would have an opportunity to retire from continuing as a Senate officer, thus giving outgoing Chairs the flexibility to serve in a way that balances the needs of their college, their department, and the Senate as a whole.

#10 If Senate Chairs have the opportunity to run as incumbents, won’t this make some Chair elections less competitive?

Yes. When Chairs have a successful first year, CC&R presumes that the incumbent will enjoy an advantage in seeking reelection. This is not a bug; it is a feature. The purpose of a system that permits office-holders to seek reelection is to create incentives for executives to work hard, solve problems and attend to the needs of the faculty constituency. Chairs who attend to their duties, and demonstrate a commitment to representing the views of the Senate will, in all likelihood, enjoy an electoral advantage. Where circumstances force a Chair to choose between the wishes of the administration and the desires of the Senate, a retention election provides a mechanism whereby the officeholders who are seen to have made the “wrong” choice can be eased into retirement. If the system works as it is intended, the need to seek reelection will encourage Chairs to govern in a manner that enhances their prospect to serve a second term.  Conscious of the need to provide the electorate with contrasting perspectives on elected office, changes to the standing rules will provide Chair candidates with an opportunity to address the full Senate prior to the election. In the next to last plenary session, when the chair nominations are officially closed, the new rules would give the candidates a chance to briefly address the Senate, describe their governance philosophy, and lay out an agenda for the coming year. By providing the candidates an opportunity to address the full Senate, the elected Senators will be in a position to make a more informed judgment about the upcoming election. Indeed, regardless of whether a Chair is standing for reelection, these presentations will make it easier for voters to focus on the issues.

Recommendation:

That Article I, Section 1 of the Bylaws be and is hereby amended as follows:

Please note that the following contains bold text for additions and strikeouts indicating deleted text. Deleted text is notated with [Delete] [End Delete]. Added text is notated with [Add] [End Add].

Article I – Officers

Section 1

(a) The officers of the Senate shall be a Chair, a [Add]  Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect, an Immediate [End Delete] [Add] a [End Add] Past Chair, and a Secretary.

(b) Elected senators shall elect annually a [Add]  Chair, a Vice- [End Add] Chair, [Delete]-Elect [End Delete] and a Secretary from among faculty members who are serving as elected faculty senators in the current Senate year. The Secretary shall be eligible for reelection, but shall serve no more than [Delete]  three [End Delete] [Add] two [End Add] consecutive one-year terms. [Add] The Vice-Chair shall not be eligible for reelection. The Chair shall be eligible for reelection, but shall serve no more than two consecutive one-year terms. [End Add] [Delete] The Chair-Elect, at the end of one year of service in that office, shall automatically succeed to the office of Chair. [End Delete] The Chair, at the end of one year of service in that office, [Delete]  shall automatically [End Delete] may succeed to the office of [Delete]  Immediate [End Delete] Past Chair. [Add]  If the immediate past chair elects not to serve in the office of Past Chair, the elected members of the Senate Council will elect a replacement from the Council of Past Chairs. Nominees for Past Chair must be full-time university faculty members who have served as Chair and who do not, at the time of their nomination, hold an administrative appointment as defined in Article II, Section 1 of the Constitution. No person may serve in the office of Past Chair for more than two consecutive one-year terms. [End Add]

[Delete] (c) If a senator’s term as representative of an academic voting unit expires while serving as Chair or Chair-Elect, and the senator is not reelected, that senator shall be permitted to succeed to the offices of Chair and/or Immediate Past Chair. While completing terms as Chair and Immediate Past Chair, the officer will have all the rights and privileges of a regular member of the Senate. [End Delete]

[Delete] (d) [End Delete] [Add] (c) [End Add] When a vacancy occurs in the office of [Delete]  an Immediate [End Delete] Past Chair, the elected members of the Senate Council shall elect a faculty member from among [Add]  the Council of [End Add] Past Chairs to complete the unexpired term. If a vacancy occurs in the office of Chair, the [Add]  Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect [End Delete] will move immediately into the office, [Add] and [End Add] complete the unexpired term, [Delete]  and continue through a full term as Chair. [End Delete] When a vacancy occurs in the office of [Add]  Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect, [End Delete] the elected Secretary of the University Faculty Senate shall, within no more than thirty days of notification of the vacancy, convene a meeting of the Nominating Committee for the purpose of presenting nominees to fill the unexpired term of the [Add]  Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect. [End Delete] The Nominating Committee, acting under the procedures enumerated in the Standing Rules, Article I, Section 11 (c), shall present at least two nominees to fill the vacancy. These nominees shall be announced at the next meeting of the Senate. At this time, additional nominations may be made from the floor of the Senate. The Elections Commission shall then conduct a special election to fill the vacancy. The special election shall be conducted in the manner enumerated in the Standing Rules, Article I, Section 1 (b). The name of the new [Add]  Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect [End Delete] shall be announced at the next Senate meeting. The [Delete]  new [End Delete] [Add] newly elected Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect [End Delete] shall complete the unexpired term [Delete] and succeed to the office of Chair. [End Delete] If a vacancy occurs in the office of Secretary, the elected members of the Senate Council shall elect a senator to complete the unexpired term.

[Add] (d) Partial terms, resulting from mid-year elections, will not count toward the incumbent’s term limits. Restriction on re-election shall apply only to complete Senate terms. [End Add]

(e) Utilizing all four Senate Officers and two additional Faculty Senators by Chair appointment, the Chair of the Senate shall determine appropriate committee assignments for Faculty Senators serving on the Board of Trustees, subject to continuing invitation by the Board of Trustees.

[Add] (f) In a transitional year, where a Chair-Elect is scheduled to assume the office as Chair, the Senate shall elect a Vice-Chair who will assume office at the beginning of the new Senate term. [End Add]

Section 2

(a) The Chair shall be the presiding officer of the Senate and shall appoint a faculty member as Parliamentarian who shall not vote unless otherwise entitled.

(b) The Chair, after consultation with the other Senate officers and the President of the University, shall have the authority to declare the existence of a situation of special Senate concern and convene the Senate Council. If the Senate Council acts on behalf of the Senate, the Chair shall also convene a special meeting of the Senate within a week following the announcement unless a regular meeting of the Senate is scheduled within that period. At either the special or a regular meeting of the Senate, the Chair shall report the actions taken under authority of Article II, Section 1, below, and the Senate shall then take appropriate action.

Section 3

The [Add]  Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect [End Delete] shall convene the officers and the chairs of the Standing Committees of the Senate before each Senate meeting for the purpose of exchanging information on committee activities and advising the officers. The [Add]  Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect [End Delete] shall also assume the duties of the Chair in the absence of the Chair.

Section 4

The [Delete]  Immediate [End Delete] Past Chair shall serve on the Faculty Advisory Committee to the President and shall also assume the duties of the Chair when the Chair and [Add]  Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect [End Delete] are both absent.

Appendix 1:

Proposed Changes to the University Faculty Senate Standing Rules

Provided the Senate approves reforms to the Senate executive under Article I, Section 1 of the Bylaws, the standing rules must be amended to reflect the new names for the Chair-Elect and the Immediate Past Chair. Additionally, since Senate officers would have the opportunity to run directly for the office of Chair, CC&R concluded that it was useful to provide minimum qualifications for the office of Chair, based on time served in the Senate, and basic leadership experience. Finally, to help Senators make a more informed judgement of the election for Chair, the revisions to the standing rules require that Senate Council set aside time for candidates to briefly address the plenary session of the Senate.

Recommendation:

That Article I, and Article II of the Standing Rules be and is hereby amended as follows:

Please note that the following contains bold text for additions and strikeouts indicating deleted text. Deleted text is notated with [Delete] [End Delete]. Added text is notated with [Add] [End Add].

Article I

Section 12

(a) The elective year of the Senate and Senate Council shall begin with the installation of the new officers at the last regularly scheduled meeting, before which meeting the Senate shall elect a Chair, if necessary, a [Add] Vice- [End Add]Chair [Delete]-Elect[End Delete], and a Secretary. The terms of Senate officers, Council members, and members shall be from this time until the corresponding time at the last regularly scheduled meeting the following Senate year. Names of newly elected senators shall be reported to the Senate office no later than four weeks prior to the next-to-last regularly scheduled meeting of the Senate year.

(b) At any meeting of Senate Council, a petition may be presented to the Chair requesting that any Senate officer be removed from office for neglect of duty or misconduct in office. The petition must be signed by at least two elected Senate Council members. Senate Council after appropriate investigation and discussion shall vote whether the Senate shall be polled to consider the removal of the officer. A majority vote of the total number of elected councilors shall be required. If the Council vote is to poll the Senate, a ballot or e-mail notification of the election website will be sent to all senators allowing at least ten working days for voting. A two-thirds majority vote shall be required for removal of the officer. In the case of the removal of the Senate Chair, [Add] the Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete]-Elect [End Delete] shall succeed immediately to the Chair. If the [Add] Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete]-Elect [End Delete] is removed, a new election will be held using regular procedures. If the Secretary is removed, the Senate Council shall elect a replacement.

(c) The Nominating Committee of the Senate shall develop the slate of nominees for the offices of [Add] Chair, Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete]-Elect, [End Delete] and Secretary, as well as for a member of the Faculty Advisory Committee to the President. It shall also be responsible for developing the slate of nominees for the Committee on Committees and Rules. The Nominating Committee shall consist of the elected members of Senate Council and the [Delete] Immediate  [End Delete] Past Chair of the Senate, who shall chair the committee. The Chair of the Senate shall activate the Nominating Committee at least four weeks prior to the second regularly scheduled meeting of the spring semester. The committee shall meet at the call of the Secretary, who shall charge the committee. The committee shall present at least two nominees for the offices of [Add] Chair, Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect, [End Delete] and Secretary.

[Add] (d) Nominees for Chair shall have a minimum of two complete years of Senate experience, and leadership experiences in one or more of the following categories:

(i) At least one year of service as a Senate Officer, a member of Senate Council, a member of the Committee on Committees and Rules, or a member of the Faculty Advisory Committee to the President.

(ii) At least one year of experience as the Chair of a standing committee or special committee.

(iii) At least two years of experience as the Vice Chair of a standing committee or special committee.

(iv) For the purposes of establishing a nominee’s qualifications to stand for election as Chair, a partially completed term shall count as a year of leadership experience. [End Add]

[Add] (e) [End Add] In addition, in the event that the [Add] Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete]-Elect [End Delete] received a vote of no-confidence or that the Secretary is serving as interim [Add] Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete]-Elect, [End Delete] the committee shall report a slate of at least two nominees for the office of [Add] Vice- [End Add] Chair. The committee shall also report a slate of at least two nominees for a member of the Faculty Advisory Committee to the President (three-year term). Nominations shall reflect the variety of disciplines, functions, and geographic locations of University units. A report of all the nominations for Senate offices and the Faculty Advisory Committee to the President shall be submitted to the Chair of the Senate at least fourteen calendar days before the next-to-last regularly scheduled meeting of the Senate year, and the slate shall be published in the agenda for the next-to-last meeting. These nominations shall be announced to the Senate at the next-to-last meeting by the Chair of the Nominating Committee [Add] immediately following the remarks of the President and the Provost [End Add]. At this time, additional nominations may be made from the floor of the Senate. [Add] Candidates for Chair, including those nominated from the floor, will have an opportunity to offer brief remarks to the Senate. [End Add] Nominations for the Committee on Committees and Rules shall be presented to the Senate Council at their next-to-last regularly scheduled meeting of the Senate year. Senate Council shall then elect the members of the Committee on Committees and Rules in accordance with Article II, section 6 of the Standing Rules of the Senate.

[Delete] (d) [End Delete] [Add] (f) [End Add] Elections will be conducted by mail or electronically by secret preferential ballot. Ballots or e-mail notification of the election website will be sent to all current senators at least 21 days before the date of the last regularly scheduled meeting of the Senate.

[Delete] (e) [End Delete] [Add] (g) [End Add] Votes shall be counted or verified by three tellers, appointed by the Chair of the Senate from among the members of the Senate who are not members of the Nominating Committee [see (c)]. The tellers will report the results of the election to the Executive Director of the Senate Office who will immediately inform the Senate officers, candidates, and the chair of the Committee on Committees and Rules of these results. The full Senate will be notified of the results in a timely fashion.

[Delete] (f) [End Delete] [Add] (h) [End Add] The Chair of the Senate for the previous elected year shall preside at the last regularly scheduled meeting of the Senate year until a successor shall have been duly installed.

[Delete] (g) [End Delete] [Add] (i) [End Add] At the last regularly scheduled meeting of the Senate year, announcement shall be made of the results of elections of Senate officers, of the member of the Faculty Advisory Committee to the President, of the Committee on Committees and Rules, and the Senate Council, and their installation shall be placed on the agenda between Items “j” (informational reports) and “k” (new legislative business). The results of Senate elections, including the number of votes received by each candidate for [Add] Chair, Vice- [End Add] Chair-Elect, Secretary, Faculty Advisory Committee to the President, Faculty Rights and Responsibilities Committee, University Promotion and Tenure Committee, and Standing Joint Committee on Tenure, will be posted on the Senate website immediately after the last regularly scheduled meeting of the Senate year.

Article II – Senate Committee Structure

Section 1

The Chair of the Senate as an ex officio member of all Standing Committees may authorize the [Add] Vice- [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect, [End Delete] the Secretary, the [Delete] Immediate [End Delete] Past Chair, or any elected member of the Senate Council to be a representative at meetings of any committee.

Section 2

All Standing Committees may add to their membership (consistent with the distribution requirement imposed by the Constitution, and with the approval of the Committee on Committees and Rules) nonvoting resource personnel on the basis of their position, interest, expertise, or membership in a particular sector of the University community. Committees may add resource personnel on either a continuing or an ad hoc basis depending on the issues before the committee.

All Standing Committees are encouraged to invite individuals to render testimony or advice on particular questions as circumstances indicate. They are also encouraged to appoint ad hoc subcommittees as needed. The Chair of the Committee on Committees and Rules is to be notified of the charge and personnel of all ad hoc subcommittees at the time of their formation. These ad hoc subcommittees shall be terminated no later than the end of the Senate year unless reappointed by the new Standing Committee. Their reports, if any, are an internal responsibility of the parent Standing Committee. All Standing Committees shall file reports of their actions with the Senate office for inclusion in The Senate Record.

Most standing committee duties include liaison with other University bodies. Liaison implies information sharing. Membership on other bodies is pre-scribed by the appointing authority. The Chair of the Senate has full authority to decide which Committee has responsibility for considering and proposing legislation and/or consultation on any item which may overlap the responsibilities of more than one Committee. Committees may speak on behalf of the Senate on items specifically delegated in their charge in the Standing Rules.

Section 3

Elected members of the Committee on Committees and Rules of the Senate may not serve as members of [other] Standing Committees of the Senate except in such ex officio capacities as may now or in the future be designated. This restriction on committee membership may be suspended on an individual basis by a two-thirds vote of the senators present at a regular or special meeting.

Section 4

Except for the Committee on Committees and Rules all committee positions held by elected faculty senators are normally tenable for two years ending on May 31 and beginning on June 1. Administrative and Student senator positions are tenable for one year, unless otherwise specified. In any given year the Committee on Committees and Rules may assign senators one year terms of membership on a committee in order to balance membership. As far as practicable at least half of any committee’s elected faculty membership should extend for two years. No senator may serve longer than six consecutive years on a given committee nor more than three consecutive years as its chair. However, under extenuating circumstances the Committee on Committees and Rules may allow, by a two-thirds vote in the affirmative, a Senator to serve a seventh consecutive year as a committee member, or a fourth consecutive year as the committee chair. Committee chairs are selected annually by the Committee on Committees and Rules in consultation with the Senate Chair.

Section 5

All Senate committees will be available for consultation with the Office of the President of the University.

Section 6

Senate Committees:

(a) Committee on Committees and Rules

  1. Membership:

(i) Ten (10) elected faculty senators

(ii) [Add] Vice [End Add] Chair [Delete] -Elect [End Delete] of the Senate (non-voting)

(iii) [Delete] Immediate [End Delete] Past Chair of the Senate (non-voting)

(iv) Secretary of the Senate (non-voting)

2. Election: By the Senate Council for a term of two years. Elected members of the Committee may serve no more than four consecutive years nor more than three consecutive years as its chair. Elected members of Senate Council may not serve on the Committee on Committees and Rules.

3. Duties: The Committee on Committees and Rules shall review and make recommendations on the Senate’s committee structure. It shall appoint the members of all Standing Committees. It shall be responsible for proposing changes in the Constitution, Bylaws, and Standing Rules of the University Faculty Senate for action by the Senate. This committee shall serve as a Nominating Committee to the administrative officers of the University in the selection of University faculty to serve on University-wide committees. In addition, this committee has the investigative function in determining the constitutionality of acts of the Senate, failures to implement Senate legislation, problems resulting from conflicting legislation, and errors in the implementation of legislation. The Committee on Committees and Rules shall have the authority to interpret the Senate Constitution, Bylaws, and Standing Rules subject to review by the Senate.

Each spring, the Committee on Committees and Rules shall select a pool of faculty members who will be available to serve as a member of all Division I Intercollegiate Head Coach athletics searches. The Committee on Committees and Rules will ask for nominations from faculty members who are currently participating in or have participated within the last four calendar years on the Senate Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, the Athletics Integrity Council, and/or the Faculty Partners Program. The assignment of faculty members to serve on a head coach search committee will be the prerogative of the Senate Chair but under most circumstances, it is expected that the faculty member will be drawn from the pool of candidates identified each year by the Committee on Committees and Rules.

Each year the Committee on Committees and Rules shall ask returning and new senators to rank their preferences for committee assignments. The Committee on Committees and Rules will then select the senatorial members of each Standing Committee, taking into consideration the preferences of senators. Where a representative of an administrative office is to be an ex officio member of a committee, this member will be selected by the Committee on Committees and Rules in consultation with the appropriate administrative officer. Appointments to all committees should reflect the variety of disciplines, functions, and geographic locations of University units. Annually, the Committee on Committees and Rules shall elect its own Chair and Vice Chair. In consultation with the Senate Chair, the Committee shall designate the leadership of all other Standing Committees of the Senate.

While the Senate officers are the primary faculty representatives to the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), the Committee on Committees and Rules shall be informed and consulted on faculty governance issues that arise in the CIC. Such items will be periodically reported to the Senate.

4. Mandated reports: Nomination report. The Committee on Committees and Rules shall have the authority to approve its mandated Informational Reports for publication to the Senate Agenda. The committee shall send its Informational Reports to the Senate Council.

SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

  • Jonathan Abel
  • Michael Bérubé
  • Victor Brunsden
  • Mark Casteel
  • Ann Clements
  • Amy Dietz
  • Beth King
  • Richard Robinett
  • James Strauss
  • Jane Sutton
  • Ann Taylor
  • Kent Vrana, Chair
  • Nicole Webster, Co-Chair
  • Matthew Woessner