Appendix N

10/18/16

SENATE COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

Annual Report of Academic Eligibility and Athletic Scholarships for 2015-2016

(Informational)

Introduction

Each year the Senate Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics is mandated to provide a report on Penn State athletic activities to the Senate. This report focuses on Division 1 athletics at University Park. Included in this report are basic descriptive data, a summary of the Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics activities and related legislation passed during AY 2015-16, student-athlete academic highlights, team-by-team data on the Academic Progress Rate (APR), reports on the Graduation Success Rate (GSR) and the Federal Graduation Rate (FGR).

Information

Descriptive Data of Student-Athletes (31 Varsity Teams) for Academic Year 2015-16*

  1. Total number of student-athletes = 773
  2. Total number of student-athletes not eligible for competition for academic reasons = 5
  3. Total number of scholarship studentathletes = 554
  4. Total number of medical non-counter student-athletes = 6
  5. Total number of exhausted eligibility student-athletes = 7

*Based on those student-athletes enrolled during the Spring 2016

Summary of Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics Activities during AY 2015-16

    1. Major Activities

Three task forces were formed that focused on (1) governance and oversight of intercollegiate athletics, (2) updating athletic schedule legislation, and (3) updating the language in 67-00 to reflect current practice as well as to differentiate and clarify the roles and responsibilities of Division I intercollegiate athletics from Division III and PSUAC intercollegiate athletics.

These efforts led, in part, to the following Senate informational and legislative reports. The work of the task force on governance and oversight is still in progress.

Senate Informational and Legislative Reports

September 15, 2015

Informational Report: FAR Annual Report, Appendix L http://senate.psu.edu/senators/agendas-records/september-15-2015-agenda/appendix-l/

December 8, 2015

Legislative Report: Revision to Standing Rules, Article III, Section 7 (University Athletics Representative), Appendix G. http://senate.psu.edu/senators/agendas-records/december-8-2015-agenda/appendix-g/

Summary: Made allowance for a Faculty Athletic Representative elect to serve concurrent year with incumbent Faculty Athletic Representative to serve as transition year.

Informational Report: Faculty Partners Program, Appendix M. http://senate.psu.edu/senators/agendas-records/december-8-2015-agenda/appendix-m/

Summary: Provided update on Faculty Partners Program.

January 26, 2015

Legislative Report: Revisions to Senate Policy 67-00, Athletic Competition, Section 5 Athletic Schedules – Appendix E, http://senate.psu.edu/senators/agendas-records/january-26-2016-agenda/appendix-e/

Summary: Updated language, specified process and requirements for waiver to compete on a study day, updated class times to reflect upcoming course schedules, provided updated guidelines for practice times, and specified submission dates and procedures for submitting and approving missed class time schedules.

Annual Report on the Reserved Spaces Programs – Appendix I, http://senate.psu.edu/senators/agendas-records/january-26-2016-agenda/appendix-i/

Summary: Report provides examination of grades of student-athletes who entered University Park on the reserved spaces allowance compared to others students entering on the same allowance.

March 15, 2016

Legislative Report: Revision to the Standing Rules, Article III, Section 7 (b) Faculty Athletics Representative (other than University Park) – Appendix J, http://senate.psu.edu/senators/agendas-records/march-15-2016-agenda/appendix-j/

Summary: Updated wording to reflect current practice (e.g., eliminated the phrase “two-year intercollegiate athletic “programs””).

  1. Self-monitoring of Student-Athlete Academic Excellence

The Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics continues to monitor various metrics of student-athlete academic performance. The Committee reviews three types of monitoring reports that are reported on a rotating basis. These reports include (1) student-athlete distribution in majors and colleges and enrollment data, (2) student-athlete grade distribution data, and (3) academic performance of student-athletes admitted to UP through the reserved spaces mechanism. This year the committee reviewed a report on the academic performance of student-athletes admitted to UP through the reserved spaces mechanism.

  1. Approval of Competition Schedules and Waivers for Competitions on Study Days

IAC routinely approves competition schedules for each of the 31 ICA teams, paying particular attention to making sure the 8-day rule has been followed.

Waivers for competitions on study days are also considered and approved as appropriate if adequate study time is built into the schedule before, during and after the competition period.

  1. Report on the Student-Athlete Experience 2014-15

Annually all student-athletes are surveyed to better understand their experiences and concerns around topics such as academics, coaching, equipment, competitive schedule, travel, facilities, medical care, and so on. The average response rate over the course of five years has been around 68%.

This year the report highlighted trends in student-athlete responses from 2010 through 2014. Selected findings are presented here.

  • The response to the item “If recruited again I would come to Penn State” has remained very positive, with about 85% endorsing “yes” in 2010 and close to 95% endorsing “yes” in 2014.
  • In response to the items “Penn State Athletics supports gender equity” and “Penn State Athletics does not tolerate discrimination for any reason,” the percentages who agree and/or strongly agree approach 100%. What is interesting is that the percentage who strongly agreed with both items was at 54% and 55% (respectively) in 2010, followed by 60% and 58% (respectively in 2011, followed by two years of 45-47% for both items. In 2014 there was an increase in the percentage who endorsed strongly agree to both items (52% and 54% respectively).
  • Satisfaction with the “overall learning experience at Penn State” shows a slightly disturbing trend. Combining both agree and strongly agree responses, student-athletes have responded that about 95% of them across the years 2010 through 2014 are satisfied. But there is small, growing percentage of student-athletes who have rated their experiences poor, as well as fair.
  • When asked for suggestions for improvement, 32% of student athletes noted some aspect of equipment and facilities in their responses. The next highest category for improvement was regarding academics. The following are quotations from comments from student-athletes that represent some of their views.
    • Do not push “struggling” students to easy majors. Find something they care about as opposed to finding what’s easiest.
    • To get more support in relation to helping student athletes outside of athletics. My professors weren’t very considerate of athletes and whenever I needed help and I often wasn’t given the opportunity to make up work.
    • Hold student-athletes to a higher academic standard. They are given a lot of support which is great, but I believe they can be more greatly challenged.
    • Improve the tutor system by making sure the tutors are fully qualified and can help students effectively
    • Work on getting tutors in an orderly and timely fashion
    • …as I have reached my higher level courses I have had a few rough semesters that have put my eligibility in jeopardy. I think there should be more available help for upper class students, without taking time away from the lower class-men.
  1. Other Reports, Tasks, and Discussions of the Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics
  • ICA budget and financial report, facilities master plan, and town hall meetings presentations and discussion
  • NCAA academic misconduct proposed legislation presentation and discussion
  • At the NCAA and Big Ten levels there is much discussion related to time demands. These issues have been discussed in the committee and will continue to be a major topic for discussion in 2016-17
  • Reports and discussion from extra-senatorial committee on IA
  • Student-athlete survey report
  • Student-athlete led discussion about time demands and other student-athlete issues.
  • Big Ten Scholarship selection committee formed

Student-Athlete Academic Highlights

  1. Post-graduate Scholarships
  • Two student-athletes were awarded Big Ten post-graduate scholarships: Christian Kashack (men’s soccer) and Rebecca Stanley (women’s fencing).
  1. General Academic Highlights
  • The NCAA reported that 13 Penn State teams earned perfect one year APR scores of 1,000 in 2014-15, up from 10 the previous year. Teams with a perfect one-year APR score included: women’s cross country, men’s fencing, women’s fencing, men’s golf, men’s gymnastics, women’s hockey, men’s soccer, women’s soccer, softball, women’s tennis, men’s volleyball, women’s volleyball and wrestling.
  • The Penn State women’s soccer, women’s volleyball and wrestling squads have all won NCAA Championships since December 2014.
  • Four Penn State squads earned perfect multi-year (2011-12 through 2014-15) APR scores of 1,000: women’s cross country, women’s hockey, women’s soccer and women’s tennis
  1. Fall 2015 Semester – Academic Highlights
  • Penn State student-athletes again broke the school standard during the 2015 fall semester, with a record 516 earning a grade point average of 3.0 or higher (previous high of 500 in 2014).
  • Among the 516 student-athletes earning at least a 3.0 GPA, 234 garnered Dean’s List honors during the 2015 fall semester by posting a GPA of 3.50 or higher, the second highest semester total in school history.
  • The number of student-athletes posting at least a 3.0 GPA during the fall semester (2015) has increased 10.5 percent since 2012 (516 vs. 463).
  • Penn State’s varsity student-athletes earned an average Fall 2015 semester team GPA of 3.11 and a record-tying 23 squads earned a team GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • During fall 2015, Haleigh Washington (women’s volleyball) and Tyler Yazujian (football) were Academic All-Americans.
  1. Spring 2016 Semester – Academic Highlights
  • Penn State’s varsity student-athletes earned an average Spring 2016 semester team GPA of 3.10. (This number counts indoor track, outdoor track, and cross-country as separate teams, even though many student-athletes are members of all three teams.)
  • 22 Penn State varsity athletic teams (out of 31) had a Spring 2016 semester GPA over a 3.00. (This number counts indoor track, outdoor track, and cross-country as separate teams, even though many student-athletes are members of all three teams.)
  • 224 Penn State student-athletes made the Dean’s List after the Spring 2016 semester (3.50 GPA with at least 12 credits earned for the semester).
  • 482 Penn State student-athletes earned a GPA of 3.00 or above in the Spring 2016 semester. This is 62% of the 773 Penn State student-athletes (this counts student-athletes only once even if they are on more than one team roster).
    During Spring 2016 Nico Megaludis and Zain Retherford, both on the wrestling team, earned Academic All-Americans status.

    • Penn State’s 193 CoSIDA Academic All-Americans rank 4th among all Division I institutions.
  1. Big Ten Conference Distinguished Scholar Award Recipient History (established in February 2008)
  • *2008-2009 academic year; 62 student-athletes recognized
  • *2009-2010 academic year; 57 student-athletes recognized
  • *2010-2011 academic year; 45 student-athletes recognized
  • *2011-2012 academic year; 51 student-athletes recognized
  • *2012-2013 academic year; 68 student-athletes recognized
  • *2013-2014 academic year; 73 student-athletes recognized
  • *2014-2015 academic year; 69 student-athletes recognized
  • *2015-2016 academic year; 81 student-athletes recognized

*Overall PSU Seven-Year Total; 506 student-athletes recognized

  1. Big Ten, Academic All-Big Ten Selections Fall, Winter and Spring
    • 80 Penn State student-athletes (in 7 fall sports) earned Academic All-Big Ten honors. Below is the number of selections from each team.
TeamSelections
Football22
Women's Soccer14
Men's Soccer12
Men's Cross Country6
Women's Cross Country7
Women's Volleyball9
Field Hockey10
  • 79 Penn State student-athletes (in 8 winter sports) earned Academic All-Big Ten honors. Below is the number of selections from each team.
TeamSelections
Men's Swimming & Diving7
Women's Swimming & Diving23
Men's Basketball3
Women's Basketball3
Men's Gymnastics9
Women's Gymnastics4
Wrestling14
Men's Ice Hockey16
  • 140 Penn State student-athletes (in 14 spring/at-large sports) earned Academic All-Big Ten honors. Below is the number of selections from each team.
TeamSelections
Softball13
Women's Lacrosse15
Women's Fencing6
Men's Golf5
Women's Tennis10
Women's Track (In/Out)18
Men's Volleyball4
Baseball7
Men's Lacrosse13
Men's Fencing5
Women's Golf5
Men's Tennis8
Men's Track (In/Out)10
Women's Ice Hockey21
  • Overall, Penn State had 299 Academic All-Big Ten selections during the 2015-2016 academic year.
  • Through (23) years of full membership in the Big Ten Conference, 5,576 Penn State student-athletes have been recognized as Academic All-Big Ten Conference selections.

Highlights of Penn State’s Academic Progress Rate (APR) for the Cohort of AY 2011-12 through AY 2014-15 Federal Graduation Rate (FGR), Graduation Success Rates (GSR) for 2005-08

(See appended tables for further detail).

NOTES: The APR is based on four years of data, with the most current year’s data added and the oldest year removed to create a four-year (multi-year) rolling rate. The APR scores are a measure of eligibility and retention/graduation for each student-athlete receiving athletic aid during the identified academic semester/year. Retention is evaluated for each student-athlete with the following question in mind: Did that student-athlete return to the institution the next semester (students can earn 2 points after the fall semester and 2 points after the spring and summer semesters). Eligibility is evaluated using NCAA, conference (if applicable), and institutional standards.

APR is calculated by dividing all possible points for all scholarship athletes into total points earned.

The APR minimum academic standard to participate in postseason competition is 900. Beginning with 2012-13 championships, teams must earn a minimum 900 four-year APR or a 930 average over the most recent two years to be eligible to participate. For 2014-15 championships, teams must earn a 930 four-year average APR or a 940 average over the most recent two years to participate in championships. In 2015-16 and beyond, teams must earn a four-year APR of 930 to compete in championships.

The Graduation Success Rate (GSR) is a percentage of scholarship student athletes graduating during a six-year window.  Each cohort includes freshmen (fall and mid-year) plus incoming transfer students less any athletes who left the institution in good academic standing.

The Federal Graduation Rate (FGR) measures the percentage of fall, first-time, full-time freshman who graduate within six years of entering their original four-year institution.

NCAA Graduation Success Rate (GSR) for 2005-2008 Cohort and Federal Graduation Rate (Class of 2008-2009) Information and Summary

  • The class of 2005-2008 had a graduation success rate of 88% – Division I average is 83%.
    • The Penn State GSR for male student-athletes was 84% and for female student-athletes it was 94%. Overall Division one percentages were 78% and 90% respectively.
    • The Penn State GSR for African American male student-athletes was 79% and for African American female student-athletes it was 75%. Overall Division one percentages were 65% and 80%, respectively.
  • The 2008-09 Federal Graduation rate is 80% – Division I average is 67%.
  • The four-class Federal Graduation rate is 79% – Division I average is 66%.
  • For Penn State African American student-athletes the 2008-09 Federal Graduation rate is 45% – Division I average is 56%.
  • For Penn State African American student-athletes the four-class Federal Graduation rate is 62% – Division I average is 55%.

Intercollegiate Athletics Committee Summary Comments

The committee regards the academic picture of Penn State student-athletes to be very healthy and applauds the student-athletes, coaches, Athletics staff, and staff at the Morgan Academic Support Center for Student-Athletes for their continued hard work together to support student-athletes in their academic journey. There is a concern regarding the Graduation Success Rate for African American female student athletes, which is below the national average.

Note: This report has been prepared by Dr. Linda Caldwell, Faculty Athletics Representative, and Mr. Russell Mushinsky, Director of the Morgan Academic Support Center for Student-Athletes.


NCAA ACADEMIC PROGRESS RATE (APR) INFORMATION
2014-2015 (FOUR-YEAR DATA) / RELEASED IN APRIL 2016
PENN STATE RANKINGS

Penn State Intercollegiate Athletic TeamsMulti-Year
Team APR
APR Ranking
w/in Big Ten
Conference
APR All
Division I
Average
APR Public
Institution
Average
Baseball9906 th (13)970966
Men’s Basketball9709 th (14)964960
Men’s Cross Country9709 th (12)977972
Men’s Fencing9741 st (2)984970
Football96014 th (14)959956
Men’s Golf9868 th (14)983980
Men’s Gymnastics9894 th (7)986986
Men’s Ice Hockey9766 th (6)987984
Men’s Lacrosse9754 th (6)977973
Men’s Soccer9728 th (9)974970
Men’s Swimming9834 th (10)980976
Men’s Tennis993Tied for 2 nd (12)979978
Men’s Track Indoor & Outdoor967Tied for 10 th (13)969965
Men’s Volleyball9822 nd (2)985982
Wrestling9922 nd (14)970969
Women’s Basketball96913 th (14)978975
Women’s Cross Country1000Tied for 1 st (14)986983
Women’s Fencing9653 rd (3)984961
Field Hockey997Tied for 2 nd (9)988985
Women’s Golf993Tied for 8 th (14)989987
Women’s Gymnastics9809 th (10)992992
Women’s Ice Hockey10001 st (4)992990
Women’s Lacrosse9954 th (6)989987
Women’s Soccer1000Tied for 1 st (14)984982
Softball985Tied for 9 th (14)981978
Women’s Swimming9927 th (12)980976
Women’s Tennis1000Tied for 1 st (14)979978
Women’s Track Indoor & Outdoor9924 th (13)981977
Women’s Volleyball995Tied for 8 th (14)984982

(#) = Number of schools in the Big Ten Conference who sponsor the sport.


GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE
2005-2008 COHORT
PENN STATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE

Penn State
Varsity Teams
Federal
Four-Year
Graduation
Rate
Federal
Graduation
Rate -Division I
Four-Year
Average
Graduation
Success
Rate (GSR)
Graduation
Success
Rate
(GSR) -
Division I
Average
Graduation
Success Rate
(GSR) Ranking
- (Big Ten
Conference)
Baseball565082778 th (13)
Men’s Basketball754710074Tied for 1 st (14)
Men’s Fencing606560892 nd (3)
Football69608172Tied for 4 th (14)
Men’s Golf1006710084Tied for 1 st (14)
Men’s Gymnastics678570907 th (7)
Men’s Lacrosse847290882 nd (5)
Men’s Soccer675992825 th (9)
Men’s Swimming & Diving80728986Tied for 5 th (10)
Men’s Tennis7066888710 th (12)
Men’s Track & Cross Country75658179Tied for 7 th (12)
Men’s Volleyball717575862 nd (2)
Wrestling575577769 th (14)
Women’s Basketball6963908611 th (14)
Women’s Fencing837786933 rd (3)
Field Hockey958010095Tied for 1 st (9)
Women’s Golf78748992Tied for 7 th (14)
Women’s Gymnastics828790969 th (10)
Women’s Lacrosse92809695Tied for 3 rd (6)
Women’s Soccer7073909011 th (14)
Softball1007010088Tied for 1 st (14)
Women’s Swimming & Diving93809693Tied for 5 th (13)
Women’s Tennis887310093Tied for 1 st (14)
Women’s Track & Cross Country9272928612 th (14)
Women’s Volleyball7770929112 th (14)

(#) = Number of schools in the Big Ten Conference that sponsor the sport.


NCAA GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE (GSR) RANKINGS,
BIG TEN CONFERENCE
2005-2008 COHORT

Student-Athlete GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
Male Student-Athlete GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
Female Student-Athlete GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
OVERALL DIVISION I: 83%OVERALL DIVISION I: 78%OVERALL DIVISION I: 90%
Northwestern: 97%Northwestern: 96%Northwestern: 99%
Iowa: 89%Ohio State: 85%Illinois: 96%
Michigan: 89%Penn State: 84%Indiana: 96%
Ohio State: 89%Michigan: 83%Michigan: 96%
Penn State: 88%Minnesota: 83%Iowa: 95%
Minnesota: 88%Iowa:82%Minnesota: 95%
Illinois: 87%Michigan State: 80%Penn State: 94%
Indiana: 87%Nebraska: 80%Maryland: 94%
Michigan State: 87%Illinois: 79%Michigan State: 94%
Rutgers: 86%Indiana: 79%Nebraska: 94%
Nebraska: 86%Rutgers: 79%Rutgers: 94%
Wisconsin: 85%Wisconsin: 79%Ohio State: 93%
Maryland: 85%Maryland: 78%Purdue: 93%
Purdue: 84%Purdue: 78%Wisconsin: 92%

NCAA GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE (GSR) RANKINGS,
BIG TEN CONFERENCE
2005-2008 COHORT

African American
Student-Athlete GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
African American
Male Student-Athlete GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
African American
Female Student-Athlete GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
OVERALL DIVISION I: 69%OVERALL DIVISION I: 65%OVERALL DIVISION I: 80%
Northwestern: 94%Northwestern: 97%Illinois: 100%
Nebraska: 81%Penn State: 79%Michigan: 100%
Rutgers: 80%Nebraska: 79%Minnesota: 100%
Penn State: 78%Rutgers: 75%Purdue: 100%
Ohio State: 78%Indiana: 72%Wisconsin:100%
Maryland: 77%Maryland: 72%Indiana: 93%
Indiana: 76%Michigan: 70%Nebraska: 92%
Michigan: 76%Ohio State: 70%Ohio State: 91%
Purdue: 75%Purdue: 69%Rutgers: 91%
Minnesota: 70%Minnesota: 67%Maryland: 90%
Illinois: 69%Illinois: 62%Northwestern: 88%
Wisconsin: 69%Wisconsin: 61%Michigan State: 80%
Michigan State: 59%Michigan State: 50%Penn State: 75%
Iowa: no dataIowa: no dataIowa – no data

NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
CLASS OF 2008-2009, FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES

All Students
(2008-2009)
All Students
(4-Year Average)
All Student-
Athletes
(2008-2009)
All Student-
Athletes
(4-Year Average)
OVERALL DIVISION I: 65%OVERALL DIVISION I: 65%OVERALL DIVISION I: 67%OVERALL DIVISION I: 66%
Northwestern: 93%Northwestern: 94%Northwestern: 93%Northwestern: 90%
Michigan: 91%Michigan: 90%Michigan: 85%Michigan: 80%
Penn State: 86%Penn State: 86%Penn State: 80%Penn State: 79%
Wisconsin: 85%Illinois: 84%Purdue: 77%Ohio State: 75%
Maryland: 85%Maryland: 83%Illinois: 73%Illinois: 75%
Ohio State: 84%Wisconsin: 83%Nebraska: 73%Iowa: 74%
Illinois: 84%Ohio State: 82%Michigan State: 72%Minnesota: 73%
Rutgers: 80%Rutgers: 79%Minnesota: 72%Purdue: 72%
Michigan State: 79%Michigan State: 78%Wisconsin: 71%Wisconsin: 71%
Minnesota: 78%Indiana: 76%Iowa: 71%Rutgers: 70%
Indiana: 78%Minnesota: 74%Maryland: 70%Michigan State: 70%
Purdue: 74%Purdue: 71%Ohio State: 70%Maryland: 69%
Iowa: 70%Iowa: 70%Rutgers: 68%Nebraska: 67%
Nebraska: 67%Nebraska: 66%Indiana: 64%Indiana: 66%

NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
CLASS OF 2008-2009, FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES

All Male
Student-Athletes
(2008-2009)
All Male
Student-Athletes
(4-Year Average)
All Female
Student-Athletes
(2008-2009)
All Female
Student-Athletes
(4-Year Average)
OVERALL DIVISION I: 60%OVERALL DIVISION I: 59%OVERALL DIVISION I: 74%OVERALL DIVISION I: 73%
Northwestern: 89%Northwestern: 90%Northwestern: 96%Northwestern: 91%
Michigan: 80%Penn State: 73%Michigan: 91%Michigan: 91%
Penn State: 76%Michigan: 72%Michigan State: 87%Penn State: 86%
Purdue: 70%Ohio State: 68%Illinois: 86%Illinois: 85%
Nebraska: 67%Purdue: 67%Purdue: 85%Iowa: 83%
Minnesota: 64%Minnesota: 67%Penn State: 84%Ohio State: 83%
Wisconsin: 64%Iowa: 66%Minnesota: 84%Minnesota: 81%
Iowa: 63%Illinois: 66%Ohio State: 83%Wisconsin: 81%
Maryland: 63%Wisconsin: 63%Nebraska: 82%Rutgers: 80%
Illinois: 62%Maryland: 63%Iowa: 81%Michigan State: 79%
Ohio State: 60%Michigan State: 62%Rutgers: 81%Purdue: 78%
Michigan State: 59%Rutgers: 62%Wisconsin: 78%Maryland: 77%
Rutgers: 57%Nebraska: 61%Maryland: 75%Indiana: 76%
Indiana: 56%Indiana: 58%Indiana: 72%Nebraska: 74%

NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
CLASS OF 2008-2009, FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES

All African
American
Students
(2008-2009)
All African
American
Students
(4-Year Average)
All African
American
Student-Athletes
(2008-2009)
All African
American
Student-Athletes
(4-Year Average)
OVERALL DIVISION I: 47%OVERALL DIVISION I: 46%OVERALL DIVISION I: 56%OVERALL DIVISION I: 55%
Northwestern: 93%Northwestern: 90%Purdue: 88%Northwestern: 90%
Michigan: 79%Michigan: 79%Michigan: 83%Maryland: 69%
Maryland: 77%Maryland: 76%Northwestern: 82%Michigan: 65%
Illinois: 75%Ohio State: 73%Maryland: 80%Nebraska: 65%
Rutgers: 74%Rutgers: 73%Wisconsin: 78%Purdue: 65%
Ohio State: 72%Illinois: 72%Ohio State: 57%Ohio State: 64%
Wisconsin: 72%Penn State: 69%Illinois: 56%Penn State: 62%
Penn State: 70%Wisconsin: 66%Rutgers: 55%Rutgers: 61%
Purdue: 63%Michigan State: 57%Indiana: 46%Illinois: 55%
Indiana: 59%Iowa: 54%Penn State: 45%Wisconsin: 55%
Minnesota: 59%Indiana: 53%Michigan State: 33%Indiana: 51%
Michigan State: 58%Nebraska: 53%Iowa: no dataMinnesota: 50%
Nebraska: 52%Purdue: 53%Minnesota: no dataMichigan State: 43%
Iowa: 49%Minnesota: 52%Nebraska: no dataIowa: 33%

2015 Federal Graduation Rate/NCAA Graduation Success Rate (GSR) – National Comparison

InstitutionAll Students
(2008-2009)
All Students
4-Year Average
(2005-2008)
All Student-
Athletes
(2008-2009)
All Student-
Athletes
4-Year Average
(2005-2008)
Graduation
Success Rate (GSR)
4-Year Average
(2005-2008)
DIVISION I Average6564676683
Penn State86 (13 th )86 (T12 th )80 (5 th )79 (5 th )88(T8 th )
Baylor7273776988
Boston College9191767695
California9191626879
Duke9594898698
Florida8886635981
Florida State7976636385
North Carolina9090727285
Notre Dame9695939098
Oklahoma6767706084
Pittsburgh8280696882
Stanford9595939598
Syracuse8081717390
Temple6967787085
Texas8180757085
Texas A & M7980716878
UCLA9191667386
USC9190706881
Vanderbilt9392928093
Virginia9494737586
Virginia Tech8382726988
Wake Forest8887767792
West Virginia5757716582

SENATE COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

  • Sandy Barbour
  • Eric Baumer
  • Terry Blakney
  • John Boehmer
  • Ken Brentner
  • Linda Caldwell
  • Julie Del Giorno
  • Morgan Goranson
  • Charmelle Green
  • Kane High
  • Lynn Holleran
  • Raymond Jones
  • Jonna Kulikowich, Chair
  • Craig Meyers
  • Russell Mushinsky
  • Mahdi Nasereddin
  • Kimberlyn Nelson, Vice Chair
  • John Nichols
  • Robert Pangborn
  • Thomas Poole
  • Robert Ricketts
  • Matthew Stolberg