Appendix H

9/12/17

SENATE COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

Annual Report of Academic Eligibility and Athletic Scholarships for 2016-2017

(Informational)

Introduction

Each year the Senate Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics is mandated to provide a report on Penn State intercollegiate athletic activities to the Senate. This report focuses on Division 1 athletics at University Park. Included in this report are basic descriptive data, a summary of activities of the Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics and related legislation passed during AY 2016-17, student-athlete academic highlights, team-by-team data on the Academic Progress Rate (APR), and reports on the Graduation Success Rate (GSR) and the Federal Graduation Rate (FGR).

Information

Descriptive Data of Student-Athletes (31 Varsity Teams) for Academic Year 2016-17*

  1. Total number of student-athletes = 810 (Fall 2016) and 753 (Spring 2017)
  2. Total number of student-athletes not eligible for competition for academic reasons = 16
  3. Total number of scholarship studentathletes = 568
  4. Total number of medical non-counter student-athletes = 4
  5. Total number of exhausted eligibility student-athletes = 10

*Based on those student-athletes enrolled at the end of Spring 2017

Summary of Activities of the Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics – AY 2016-17

  1. Major Activities
    1. The major legislative focus of the committee was to carry forward the work of the AY 2015-16 committee on governance structure. In March of 2017 we submitted a legislative report on the governance structure to CC&R. It was not approved in its current draft form, with a recommendation that a task force be formed with representatives from CC&R and IAC. Feedback was provided to incoming ICA committee chair John Regan and the committee was charged by the Senate Chair to consider this feedback during the upcoming year.
    2. A second major focus of IAC was to work with the Committee on Student Life to examine time management issues for all Penn State students, although particular attention would be given to certain sub-groups who may have unique time management and time demand issues. These groups would include, but are not limited to, student-athletes, adult learners, ROTC students, and veterans. This effort continues to be a work in progress.
  1. Senate Informational and Legislative Reports
    1. October 18, 2016:  Revision to Senate Policy 67-00, Athletic Competitions. See http://senate.psu.edu/senators/agendas-records/october-18-2016-agenda/appendix-g/. The recommendation was to delete item B of section 3, Grants-in-Aid of 67-10, which reads “Student athletes may not receive a grant-in-aid unless they are otherwise eligible for participation in intercollegiate athletics.” The policy is now consistent with Big Ten policy and the committee believed that determining receipt of a grant-in-aid should be the same for all students.
  1. Self-monitoring of Student-Athlete Academic Excellence

The Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics continues to monitor various metrics of student-athlete academic performance. The Committee reviews three types of monitoring reports that are reported on a rotating basis. These reports include (1) student-athlete distribution in majors and colleges and enrollment data, (2) student-athlete grade distribution data, and (3) academic performance of student-athletes admitted to UP through the reserved spaces mechanism.

This AY Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education, Robert Pangborn, distributed two reports. One report was the Annual Report on the Reserved Spaces Program sponsored by the Senate Committee on Admissions, Records, Scheduling, and Student Aid. Data were summarized for 2009-2016. In academic year 2015, 14 reserved spaces were used in the Spring, Summer, and Fall.  This represents about half of the reserved spaces available across all units of the University.  Increases in reserved spaces were noted since 2013 reflecting increases in first-year admissions. A second document provided charts of student academic performance in 2014 and 2015 for the reserved spaces program.

Dr. Pangborn also reported the results of a scan of all UP courses with over 20% of the enrollment being student-athletes. As in past years, no issues existed. Grade distributions between student-athletes and non-student-athletes were also compared; Dr. Pangborn reported no issues that arose based on these comparisons.

In addition to the two reports that are typically reviewed, on request of the FAR and Athletics administration, Dr. Pangborn also reported on findings from a scan of grade changes, comparing student-athletes and non-student-athletes. He noted that approximately 10% of undergraduate grades are changed campus wide, a rate that is comparable for student-athletes.

Russ Mushinsky provided two reports. The first was on student-athlete academic major distribution by team. There was no team that had a disproportionate number of student-athletes in the same major. A second report focused on Fall 2016 college enrollments and compared enrollments of general students in colleges with those of student-athletes. Although there were no concerns noted, he explained that as usual, more student-athletes are in DUS during their first two or three semesters in order to find the right major. Once a student-athlete declares a major it is extremely difficult to change majors given NCAA academic eligibility requirements in terms of progress towards the percent of degree completed.

  1. Approval of Competition Schedules and Waivers for Competitions on Study DaysIAC routinely approves competition schedules for each of the 31 ICA teams, paying particular attention to making sure the 8-day rule has been followed.Waivers for competitions on study days are also considered and approved as appropriate if adequate study time is built into the schedule before, during and after the competition period.
  1. Student-Athlete Experience and Wellbeing
    1. Senior Associate Athletic Director Charmelle Green distributed summaries of the Student-Athlete Experience Survey Data. The data were collected from Fall 2013 through Spring 2016. Across all three years, the majority of student-athletes indicated that their overall experience at Penn State met or exceeded expectations. The majority of student-athletes also indicated that their overall learning experience was good or excellent with an average rating of at least 3.40 on a 4-point scale. Other topics included on the survey were about the Morgan Academic Support Center and the Faculty Partner Program.
    2. Charmelle Green summarized the Mental Health Task Force Report (March 2016) for student-athletes. The Intercollegiate Athletics Mental Health Task Force follows five guiding principles: 1) provide leadership; 2) build communication and collaboration; 3) provide education and resources; 4) advocate psychological services for student-athletes; and, 5) develop a supportive culture. Data were collected by the Task Force for Fall 2015, and one important finding was that while only 1.7 percent of the University enrollment for 2015 are student-athletes, student-athletes represented 6.6 percent of all students who sought CAPS assistance. Additionally, since 2010, an increase of 26.2 percent of student-athletes seeking assistance from CAPS was reported.Based on data summaries, the Task Force recommended several priorities that included: 1) expansion of mental health services to allow comprehensive care of student-athletes; 2) development of a comprehensive outreach and education strategy; 3) use of protocols for an institution-wide network of support; 4) development of communication protocols around mental health issues; 5) expansion of mental health topics in the BBH first year seminar; 6) enhanced awareness and improvement with detection of depression, anxiety, etc. with Sports Medicine tools; 7) collection of data; 8) an annual mental health symposium; 9) contact information for teams and staff; 10) creation of a web-based library of resources; and, 11) development of social media presence.
  2. Other Reports, Tasks, and Discussions of the Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics
    1. Morgan Academic Center Director Russ Mushinsky provided a tour of the new location of the Center at the Greenberg Complex, McKean Road. The Morgan Academic Center includes many advising, teaching, work and study areas that are equipped with modern technology resources to provide academic assistance and support for student-athletes.
    2. Russ Mushinsky reported on “How are NCAA Graduation Rates Calculated?” He explained the differences between Federal Graduation Rate, Graduation Success Rate (GSR), and Academic Progress Rate (APR). One of the most significant differences is that the Federal Graduation Rate is based on data collected by the Department of Education and only those student-athletes who enroll in the fall semester are accounted for; whereas, the GSR accounts for students enrolled in the fall, mid-year and transfer student-athletes who receive aid, and student-athletes who leave the institution in good academic standing are not counted negatively.  The remainder of the report provided several comparisons of PSU athletes with national and Big Ten schools, with details by sport and gender.  Details for all PSU teams were included.
    3. The committee heard various reports from Sandy Barbour, Lynn Holleran, Charmelle Green, and Linda Caldwell regarding Big Ten and NCAA activities, including the autonomy legislative proposals and efforts around time balance and management.
    4. Lynn Holleran, Senior Associate Athletic Director for Administration reported on unintended consequences of Policy 42-27 (class attendance policy). Faculty Senate changed the language to make it more obvious when classwork cannot be made up (for an excused absence) and that this may impact a student’s grade.  This has direct implications for student-athletes; some of whom have reported challenges as a result of this change in policy. The Committee supported efforts by the Morgan Center to track how often this happens and what the challenges are.
    5. Throughout the year Athletic Director Sandy Barbour reported on various topics such as the Big Ten media rights that are likely to become public during the summer of 2017. ICA has earmarked some of that money to go to the Blue Band, campus mental health efforts, the Arboretum Arts and Cultural Center, and Summer Pass. Other reports briefly focused on Penn State’s decision against participating in Friday night football, and a discussion on the ICA Facilities Master Plan.
    6. The Committee reviewed and approved participation in the Rose Bowl.

Student-Athlete Academic Highlights

  1. Post-graduate Scholarships
  • Two student-athletes were awarded Big Ten post-graduate scholarships: Geno Morelli (Wrestling) and Casey Francis (Women’s Swimming and Diving).
  • Geno Morelli (Wrestling) was awarded the Big Ten Wayne Duke Post-graduate scholarship.
  1. General Highlights
  • For seven consecutive years, the Penn State men’s and women’s basketball and football programs have achieved a Graduation Success Rate at least four points higher than the Division I average for their sport (NCAA).
  • The men’s basketball team has posted four consecutive 100 percent NCAA Graduation Success rates. The squad’s 100 percent GSR is 24 points higher than the Division I average and has been higher than the national average for 12 consecutive years (NCAA).
  • Penn State is second among all Big Ten institutions with 5,875 Academic All-Big Ten honorees since 1991-92, its first year of competition in some Big Ten sports. Ohio State, which has 36 varsity sports, edged past the Nittany Lions during the spring/at-large tabulation and has had 5,887 selections since 1991-92.
  1. Fall 2016 Semester – Academic Highlights
  • 498 student-athletes earned a 3.0 GPA or higher and a record 24 teams recorded an average GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  1. Spring 2017 Semester – Academic Highlights
  • 495 Student-athletes earned a 3.0 GPA or higher and a record 24 teams recorded an average GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  1. Big Ten Conference Distinguished Scholar Award Recipient Past 5 Year History

*2012-2013 academic year; 68 student-athletes recognized

*2013-2014 academic year; 73 student-athletes recognized

*2014-2015 academic year; 69 student-athletes recognized

*2015-2016 academic year; 81 student-athletes recognized

*2016-2017 academic year: 97 student-athletes recognized

*Overall PSU Nine-Year Total; 604 student-athletes recognized

  1. Big Ten, Academic All-Big Ten Selections Fall, Winter and Spring

    • 78 Penn State student-athletes (in 7 fall sports) earned Academic All-Big Ten honors. Below is the number of selections from each team.
TeamSelections
Football19
Women's Soccer14
Men's Soccer13
Men's Cross Country1
Women's Cross Country7
Women's Volleyball8
Field Hockey16

  • 76 Penn State student-athletes (in 8 winter sports) earned Academic All-Big Ten honors. Below is the number of selections from each team.
TeamSelections
Men's Swimming & Diving6
Women's Swimming & Diving14
Men's Basketball3
Women's Basketball5
Men's Gymnastics12
Women's Gymnastics7
Wrestling15
Men's Ice Hockey14

  • 145 Penn State student-athletes (in 14 spring/at-large sports) earned Academic All-Big Ten honors. Below is the number of selections from each team.
TeamSelections
Softball10
Women's Lacrosse17
Women's Fencing7
Men's Golf3
Women's Tennis9
Women's Track (In/Out)26
Men's Volleyball5
Baseball9
Men's Lacrosse15
Men's Fencing8
Women's Golf6
Men's Tennis9
Men's Track (In/Out)10
Women's Ice Hockey11

  • Overall, Penn State had 145 Academic All-Big Ten selections during the 2016-2017 academic year, which was a school record. Academic All-Big Ten selections are based on being a letter-winner and having a 3.0 GPA or higher.
  • Through (23) years of full membership in the Big Ten Conference, 5,875 Penn State student-athletes have been recognized as Academic All-Big Ten Conference selections.

**Highlights of Penn State’s Academic Progress Rate (APR) for the Cohort of AY 2012-13 through AY 2015-16, Federal Graduation Rate (FGR) for 2009-10 and Graduation Success Rates (GSR) for 2006-09

(See appended tables for further detail).

NOTES: The APR is based on four years of data, with the most current year’s data added and the oldest year removed to create a four-year (multi-year) rolling average. The APR scores are a measure of eligibility and retention/graduation for each student-athlete receiving athletic aid during the identified academic semester/year. Retention is evaluated for each student-athlete with the following question in mind: Did that student-athlete return to the institution the next semester (students can earn 2 points after the fall semester and 2 points after the spring and summer semesters). Eligibility is evaluated using NCAA, conference (if applicable), and institutional standards.

APR is calculated by dividing all possible points for all scholarship athletes into total points earned.

The APR minimum academic standard to participate in postseason competition is 900. Beginning with 2012-13 NCAA championships, teams must earn a minimum 900 four-year APR or a 930 average over the most recent two years to be eligible to participate. For the 2014-15 NCAA championships, teams must earn a 930-four-year average APR or a 940 average over the most recent two years to participate in championships. In 2015-16 and beyond, teams must earn a four-year APR of 930 to compete in NCAA championships.

The Graduation Success Rate (GSR) is a percentage of scholarship student athletes graduating during a six-year window.  Each cohort includes freshmen (fall and mid-year) plus incoming transfer students less any athletes who left the institution in good academic standing.

The Federal Graduation Rate (FGR) measures the percentage of fall, first-time, full-time freshman who graduate within six years of entering their original four-year institution.

Note: This report has been prepared by Dr. Linda Caldwell, Faculty Athletics Representative until June 30, 2016, and Mr. Russell Mushinsky, Director of the Morgan Academic Center.


NCAA ACADEMIC PROGRESS RATE (APR) INFORMATION
2015-2016 (FOUR YEAR DATA) / RELEASED IN MAY 2017
PENN STATE RANKINGS

Penn State Intercollegiate Athletic TeamsMulti-Year
Team APR
APR Ranking w/in Big Ten
Conference
APR All Division I
Average
APR Public
Institution
Average
Baseball9887th (13)973970
Men’s Basketball9806th (14)966963
Men’s Cross Country96610th (12)979974
Men’s Fencing9771st (2)972970
Football96914th (14)962959
Men’s Golf9936th (14)984981
Men’s Gymnastics9945th (7)990989
Men’s Ice Hockey9833rd (6)986984
Men’s Lacrosse9814th (6)979976
Men’s Soccer9797th (9)977973
Men’s Swimming9827th (10)979978
Men’s Tennis9859th (12)981978
Men’s Track (Indoor & Outdoor)96611th (13)971966
Men’s Volleyball9882nd (2)988984
Wrestling9962nd (14)973972
Women’s Basketball97413th (14)980977
Women’s Cross Country99411th (14)988986
Women’s Fencing9822nd (3)980966
Field Hockey9943rd (9)989987
Women’s Golf993Tied for 7th (14)990989
Women’s Gymnastics96510th (10)994993
Women’s Ice Hockey9973rd (4)992989
Women’s Lacrosse9916th (7)990989
Women’s Soccer9964th (14)986984
Softball98612th (14)983981
Women’s Swimming993Tied for 6th (13)991990
Women’s Tennis1000Tied for 1st (14)988987
Women’s Track (Indoor & Outdoor)992Tied for 3rd (13)982979
Women’s Volleyball1000Tied for 1st (14)987985

Numbers in parentheses (#) = Number of schools in the Big Ten Conference who sponsor the sport.


GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE
2006-2009 COHORT
PENN STATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE

PENN STATE VARSITY TEAMSFEDERAL
FOUR-YEAR
GRADUATION
RATE
FEDERAL
GRADUATION RATE -
DIVISION I
FOUR-YEAR
AVERAGE
GRADUATION
SUCCESS
RATE (GSR)
GRADUATION
SUCCESS RATE
(GSR) -
DIVISION I
AVERAGE
GRADUATION
SUCCESS RATE
(GSR) RANKING -
(BIG TEN CONFERENCE)
Baseball715089796th (13)
Men's Basketball8247100761st (14)
Men's Fencing606260902nd (2)
Football666180745th (14)
Men's Golf90679086Tied for 8th (14)
Men's Gymnastics788682927th (7)
Men's Lacrosse807093871st (6)
Men's Soccer645910083Tied for 1st (9)
Men's Swimming & Diving757381877th (10)
Men's Tennis756690898th (12)
Men's Track & Cross Country786583808th (13)
Men's Volleyball717671872nd (2)
Wrestling4654707512th (14)
Women's Basketball77639287Tied for 6th (14)
Women's Fencing75828394Tied for 2nd (3)
Field Hockey958110096Tied for 1st (9)
Women's Golf837510093Tied for 1st (14)
Women's Gymnastics928610096Tied for 1st (10)
Women's Lacrosse848094954th (6)
Women's Soccer8073919113th (14)
Softball1007110089Tied for 1st (14)
Women's Swimming & Diving88799293Tied for 11th (13)
Women's Tennis757210093Tied for 1st (14)
Women's Track & Cross Country93729488Tied for 8th (14)
Women's Volleyball73719192Tied for 12th (14)

Numbers in parentheses (#) = Number of schools in the Big Ten Conference who sponsor the sport.


NCAA GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE (GSR) RANKINGS
BIG TEN CONFERENCE
2006-2009 COHORT

STUDENT-ATHLETE GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
MALE STUDENT-ATHLETE
GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
FEMALE STUDENT-ATHLETE
GSR
(4 Year Percentage)
OVERALL DIVISION I: 84%OVERALL DIVISION I: 79%OVERALL DIVISION I: 91%
Northwestern: 97Northwestern: 96Michigan: 97
Iowa: 90Minnesota: 87Northwestern: 97
Michigan: 90Iowa: 85Illinois: 96
Minnesota: 90Penn State: 84Penn State: 95
Penn State: 89Michigan: 84Indiana: 95
Indiana: 88Nebraska: 84Minnesota: 95
Nebraska: 88Ohio State: 83Rutgers: 95
Illinois: 87Michigan State: 82Iowa: 94
Michigan State: 87Indiana: 81Maryland: 94
Ohio State: 87Illinois: 79Nebraska: 93
Rutgers: 86Purdue: 79Purdue: 93
Wisconsin: 86Wisconsin: 79Wisconsin: 93
Maryland: 85Maryland: 78Michigan State: 92
Purdue: 84Rutgers: 77Ohio State: 92

NCAA GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE (GSR) RANKINGS
BIG TEN CONFERENCE
2006-2009 COHORT

AFRICAN AMERICAN
STUDENT-ATHLETE GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
AFRICAN AMERICAN MALE
STUDENT-ATHLETE GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
AFRICAN AMERICAN
FEMALE STUDENT-ATHLETE GSR
(4-Year Percentage)
OVERALL DIVISION I: 71%OVERALL DIVISION I: 66%OVERALL DIVISION I: 81%
Northwestern: 91Northwestern: 97Michigan: 100
Michigan: 84Michigan: 81Minnesota: 100
Indiana: 82Indiana: 78Wisconsin: 100
Maryland: 79Penn State: 77Illinois: 94
Nebraska: 79Nebraska: 77Rutgers: 93
Purdue: 78Maryland: 76Nebraska: 92
Penn State: 77Purdue: 75Indiana: 91
Rutgers: 77Minnesota: 71Ohio State: 91
Wisconsin: 75Rutgers: 71Purdue: 91
Ohio State: 74Wisconsin: 65Maryland: 89
Minnesota: 73Iowa: 63Iowa: 80
Illinois: 68Ohio State: 63Penn State: 79
Iowa: 65Illinois: 61Northwestern: 79
Michigan State: 61Michigan State: 57Michigan State: 70

NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
CLASS OF 2009-2010, FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES

ALL STUDENTS
(2009-2010)
ALL STUDENTS
(4-Year Average)
ALL STUDENT-ATHLETES
(2009-2010)
ALL STUDENT-ATHLETES
(4-Year Average)
OVERALL DIVISION I: 66%OVERALL DIVISION I: 65%OVERALL DIVISION I: 66%OVERALL DIVISION I: 66%
Northwestern: 93Northwestern: 93Northwestern: 90Northwestern: 91
Michigan: 90Michigan: 90Iowa: 82Michigan: 80
Penn State: 86Penn State: 86Michigan: 81Penn State: 78
Maryland: 86Illinois: 84Minnesota: 80Iowa: 76
Illinois: 85Maryland: 84Penn State: 78Illinois: 75
Wisconsin: 85Wisconsin: 84Illinois: 77Minnesota: 75
Ohio State: 83Ohio State: 83Michigan State: 74Ohio State: 73
Rutgers: 80Rutgers: 80Wisconsin: 74Nebraska: 71
Indiana: 77Michigan State: 78Ohio State: 73Rutgers: 71
Michigan State: 77Indiana: 77Rutgers: 72Wisconsin: 71
Minnesota: 77Minnesota: 76Maryland: 70Maryland: 70
Purdue: 76Purdue: 73Nebraska: 70Michigan State: 70
Iowa: 72Iowa: 70Indiana: 67Purdue: 70
Nebraska: 67Nebraska: 66Purdue: 62Indiana: 66

NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
CLASS OF 2009-2010, FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES

ALL MALE
STUDENT-ATHLETES
(2009-2010)
ALL MALE
STUDENT-ATHLETES
(4-Year Average)
ALL FEMALE
STUDENT-ATHLETES
(2009-2010)
ALL FEMALE
STUDENT-ATHLETES
(4-Year Average)
OVERALL DIVISION I: 59%OVERALL DIVISION I: 59%OVERALL DIVISION I: 74%OVERALL DIVISION I: 73%
Northwestern: 88Northwestern: 90Illinois: 91Northwestern: 92
Iowa: 80Michigan: 73Northwestern: 91Michigan: 90
Minnesota: 78Penn State: 72Penn State: 87Illinois: 88
Michigan: 77Iowa: 70Michigan: 86Penn State: 87
Michigan State: 74Minnesota: 70Rutgers: 86Rutgers: 84
Penn State: 73Nebraska: 66Iowa: 84Ohio State: 83
Wisconsin: 66Illinois: 65Ohio State: 84Iowa: 82
Maryland: 65Ohio State: 65Minnesota: 83Minnesota: 81
Illinois: 64Maryland: 64Wisconsin: 83Wisconsin: 81
Ohio State: 64Michigan State: 64Nebraska: 80Purdue: 79
Nebraska: 62Purdue: 64Purdue: 77Nebraska: 78
Rutgers: 62Wisconsin: 62Maryland: 75Michigan State: 77
Indiana: 60Rutgers: 60Michigan State: 75Maryland: 76
Purdue: 52Indiana: 59Indiana: 74Indiana: 75

NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
CLASS OF 2009-2010, FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES

ALL AFRICAN
AMERICAN STUDENTS
(2009-2010)
ALL AFRICAN
AMERICAN STUDENTS
(4-Year Average)
ALL AFRICAN AMERICAN
STUDENT-ATHLETES
(2009-2010)
ALL AFRICAN AMERICAN
STUDENT-ATHLETES
(4-Year Average)
OVERALL DIVISION I: 46%OVERALL DIVISION I: 46%OVERALL DIVISION I: 57%OVERALL DIVISION I: 55%
Northwestern: 91Northwestern: 91Northwestern: 78Northwestern: 87
Maryland: 81Michigan: 79Indiana: 74Maryland: 69
Michigan: 76Maryland: 77Penn State: 71Michigan: 68
Wisconsin: 74Rutgers: 74Michigan: 71Nebraska: 63
Illinois: 73Ohio State: 73Iowa: 70Penn State: 62
Ohio State: 73Illinois: 72Maryland: 70Purdue: 62
Rutgers: 73Penn State: 70Rutgers: 68Wisconsin: 60
Penn State: 72Wisconsin: 69Wisconsin: 67Rutgers: 59
Indiana: 66Indiana: 59Michigan State: 64Ohio State: 58
Purdue: 62Michigan State: 58Minnesota: 58Indiana: 57
Iowa: 61Purdue: 57Illinois: 56Illinois: 55
Michigan State: 59Iowa: 55Ohio State: 55Minnesota: 54
Minnesota: 56Minnesota: 55Purdue: 40Michigan State: 45
Nebraska: 42Nebraska: 51Nebraska: -Iowa: 42

2016 FEDERAL GRADUATION RATE/NCAA GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE (GSR)
NATIONAL COMPARISON

INSTITUTIONALL
STUDENTS
(2009-2010)
ALL STUDENTS
4-YEAR AVERAGE
(2006-2009)
ALL STUDENT-
ATHLETES
(2009-2010)
ALL STUDENT-
ATHLETES
4-YEAR AVERAGE
(2006-2009)
GRADUATION
SUCCESS RATE
(GSR)
4-YEAR AVERAGE
(2006-2009)
DIVISION I AVERAGE6665666684
Penn State86 (13th)86 (Tied for 12th)78 (Tied for 8th)78 (Tied for 5th)89 (9th)
Baylor7073616787
Boston College9292817795
California9191716979
Duke9595848597
Florida8786626083
Florida State7978646587
North Carolina8889626882
Notre Dame9795909098
Oklahoma6667586085
Pittsburgh8281706884
Stanford9595979598
Syracuse8181667190
Temple7168787188
Texas8080646884
Texas A & M8080737081
UCLA9191737186
USC9291737083
Vanderbilt9292838393
Virginia9393837887
Virginia Tech8383696992
Wake Forest8887837892
West Virginia5757646683

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS (2016-2017)

  • Sandy Barbour
  • Eric Baumer
  • Terry Blakney
  • John Boehmer
  • Ken Brentner
  • Linda Caldwell
  • Julie Del Giorno
  • Morgan Goranson
  • Charmelle Green
  • Kane High
  • Lynn Holleran
  • Raymond Jones
  • Jonna Kulikowich, Chair
  • Craig Meyers
  • Russell Mushinsky
  • Mahdi Nasereddin
  • Kimberlyn Nelson, Vice Chair
  • John Nichols
  • Robert Pangborn
  • Thomas Poole
  • Robert Ricketts
  • Matthew Stolberg