Appendix L

9/15/15

SENATE COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

Annual Report of Academic Eligibility and Athletic Scholarships for 2014-2015

(Informational)

Introduction

Each year the Senate Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics is mandated to provide a report on Penn State athletic activities to the Senate. This report focuses on Division 1 athletics at University Park. Included in this report are basic descriptive data, a summary of the Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics activities and related legislation passed during AY 2014-15, student-athlete academic highlights, team-by-team data on the Academic Progress Rate (APR), reports on the Graduation Success Rate (GSR) and the Federal Graduation Rate (FGR).

Information

Descriptive Data of Student-Athletes (31 Varsity Teams)

1. Total number of student-athletes for academic year 2014-15* = 895

2. Total number of student-athletes not eligible* = 29

3. Total number of scholarship student-athletes for academic year 2014-15* = 545

4. Total number of medical non-counter student-athletes (both Fall 2014 and Spring 2015) = 2

5. Total number of exhausted eligibility student-athletes* = 7

*Based on those student-athletes enrolled at the end of Spring 2015

Summary of Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics Activities during AY 2014-15

1. Self-monitoring of Student-Athlete Academic Excellence

The Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics continues to monitor various metrics of student-athlete academic performance. Historically the Committee has reviewed two types of monitoring reports that are reported on an every other year basis. These reports include (1) student-athlete distribution in majors and colleges and enrollment data and (2) student-athlete grade distribution data. This year we added a third metric focused on academic performance of student-athletes admitted to UP through the reserved spaces mechanism. Over the 2014-15 academic year the IAC reviewed data on all of these metrics.

Student-athlete distribution by college and major and enrollment data. Table 1 contains a summary of distribution of student-athletes by college. As in the past, the Colleges of Communications and Health and Human Development had higher percentages of student-athletes than the general student body. In addition, the Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) had a higher percentage of student-athletes. The IAC deemed these differences to be understandable given the aspirations of many student-athletes who are interested in careers regarding sport management, sport broadcasting, event management, sport media, and so on. The DUS percentage is also understandable given the difficulty, due to NCAA regulations on academic progress, of changing majors once a major is declared. Being in DUS at the beginning of their academic career allows student-athletes to explore and choose majors that fit with their career aspirations. Furthermore, the IAC reviewed a report on student-athlete distribution by major, as well as a review of student-athlete major distribution by team. The committee concluded that there was no clustering of majors among the student-athlete population.

Student-athlete grade distribution data. Every other year, courses with 20% or more student-athletes are flagged and examined for unusually high grade distributions or grades skewed in favor of student-athletes, reoccurring courses or instructors, and continuing education offerings. This year’s review included 9 semesters, beginning with Summer 2010 and ending with Spring 2013. Out of 5,500 total courses, 242 were flagged. Upon examination of those courses it appeared there was nothing alarming or concerning with the courses or instructors.

Academic performance of student-athletes admitted via reserved spaces. This year the IAC added an examination of student-athletes who had been granted a reserved space admission to University Park campus. We reviewed the cumulative GPAs at the end of the first year of enrollment for student-athletes during calendar years 2012 and 2013. The IAC concluded that those enrolled via a reserved space mechanism performed at expected GPA levels.

Click on image to enlarge.

Table 1 As described below: Fall 2014 College Enrollments - Student Athletes Vs. Students at University Park

Table 1 Overview

Agricultural Sciences: UP Student Athlete 21 (2.62%); UP Student 2185 (4.82%)
Arts and Architecture: UP Student Athlete 1 (0.12%); UP Student 1420 (3.13%)
Business: UP Student Athlete 82 (10.24%); UP Student 5723 (12.61%)
Communications: UP Student Athlete 86 (10.74%); UP Student 2666 (5.88%)
Division of Undergraduate Studies: UP Student Athlete 161 (20.10%); UP Student 3619 (7.98%)
Earth and Mineral Sciences: UP Student Athlete 27 (3.37%); UP Student 2465 (5.43%)
Education: UP Student Athlete 32 (4.00%); UP Student 2111 (4.65%)
Engineering: UP Student Athlete 51 (6.37%); UP Student 8961 (19.75%)
Health and Human Development: UP Student Athlete 175 (21.85%); UP Student 4863 (10.72%)
Information Sciences and Technology: UP Student Athlete 6 (0.75%); UP Student 1097 (2.42%)
The Liberal Arts: UP Student Athlete 114 (14.23%); UP Student 5612 (12.37%)
College of Nursing: UP Student Athlete 0 (0.00%); UP Student 652 (1.44%)
Science: UP Student Athlete 45 (5.62%); UP Student 3993 (8.80%)
UP COLLEGES TOTAL COUNT: UP Student Athlete 801; UP Student 45367

[Official University Data and Athletic Team Rosters as of November 6, 2014
Data obtained using the Penn State Institutional Insight System (iTwo) and the Integrated Student Information System (ISIS)]

2. The Faculty Partner Program (FPP)

The FPP is a joint venture between IAC and the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics to increase contact and collaboration between faculty members, coaches and student-athletes. It is in its third year of operation and has grown into a strong program. Only two of the 31 teams do not have faculty partners due to lack of an interested faculty member. Coaches and faculty met at the beginning of the Fall semester and shared ideas for collaboration in the upcoming year. These partnerships resulted in various activities from seminars and workshops for student-athletes on networking and other professional skills to an Easter egg hunt at a faculty member’s farm. Another benefit is that faculty partners have the opportunity to interact with student-athlete’s parents.

3. Coach Visits

Coaches Cooper (Baseball), Doherty (W Lacrosse), Gondack (M & W Indoor/Outdoor Track and Cross-Country), Lehotek (Softball), Morett (Field Hockey), Tambroni (M Lacrosse), Thompson (W Gymnastics), and Zinn (M Tennis) all attended part of IAC meetings during 2014-15.

These visits were scheduled so that coaches could discuss their recruitment strategies, how they assist and support their student-athletes’ academic success, and any issues they had meeting the 8-day rule. These visits provided an excellent forum through which coaches and committee members could discuss student-athlete support and requirements.

4. Student-Athlete Appeals and Hearing Process for Elimination or Reduction of Student Aid

Members of the IAC committee worked with the Faculty Athletics Representative, the Executive Director of Faculty Senate, the Intercollegiate Athletics Compliance Office, and the Registrar’s Office/Financial Aid to update the procedures for hearing appeals from student-athletes whose financial aid was eliminated or reduced. In particular the need for a pool of faculty members with some knowledge of Intercollegiate Athletics and who could be trained in related compliance issues was identified

5. Approval of Competition Schedules and Waivers for Competitions on Study Days

IAC routinely approves competition schedules for each of the 31 ICA teams, paying particular attention to making sure the 8-day rule has been followed.

Waivers for competitions on study days are also considered and approved as appropriate if adequate study time is built into the schedule before, during and after the competition period.

6. Report on the Student-Athlete Experience 2013-14

Annually student-athletes are surveyed to better understand their experiences and concerns around topics such as academics, coaching, equipment, competitive schedule, travel, facilities, medical care, and so on. A 2014 survey of all 825 student-athletes (using Survey Monkey) resulted in 646 returned surveys (78% response rate). Highlights of the survey related to academics and general welfare follow.

Note: the following percentages are those student-athletes endorsing “good” or “excellent” in response to the query.

  • 94% – Overall experience at Penn State as a student-athlete
  • 80% – Instructors understand the challenges with being a student-athlete
  • 81% – Instructors provide flexibility in making up missed work due to athletic practices and games
  • 90% – Instructors provide clear expectations
  • 89% – Instructors empower them to gain a quality education
  • 69% – Opportunity to study while traveling for competitions
  • 91% – Experience with training and medical staff
  • 96% – Penn State Athletics is committed to providing a positive experience for its student-athletes

7. General Topics of Discussion over 2014-15

a. iPad initiative for student-athletes, led by Senior Woman Administrator and Associate Athletic Director Charmelle Green.

b. Discussions and updates as the NCAA granted the Power 5 Conferences more autonomy.

c. Issues brought forth by the Coalition on Intercollegiate Athletics (COIA) presented by John Nichols.

d. The IAC heard a report on the number of student-athlete waivers for outside competition granted by the Faculty Athletics Representative.

Student-Athlete Academic Highlights

1. Post-graduate Scholarships

  • Two student-athletes were awarded Big Ten post-graduate scholarships: Matthew Brown, wrestling and Katie Rodden, cross-country/track and field.
  • Two student-athletes were awarded NCAA post-graduate scholarships: Matthew Brown, wrestling and Connor Curry, men’s volleyball

2. Fall 2014 Semester – Academic Highlights

  • Penn State’s 31 varsity athletic teams had an average Fall 2014 semester team GPA of 3.08. (This number counts indoor track, outdoor track, and cross-country as separate teams, even though many student-athletes are members of all three teams.)
  • 23 Penn State varsity athletic teams (out of 31) had a Fall 2014 semester GPA over a 3.00. (This number counts indoor track, outdoor track, and cross-country as separate teams, even though many student-athletes are members of all three teams.)
  • 241 Penn State student-athletes made the Dean’s List after the Fall 2014 semester (3.50 GPA with at least 12 credits earned for the semester).
  • 500 Penn State student-athletes earned a GPA of 3.00 or above in the Fall 2014 semester. This is 61.73% of the 810 overall Penn State student-athletes (this counts student-athletes only once even if they are on more than one team roster). (This includes student-athletes enrolled in less than 12 credits during the Fall 2014 semester.)

3. Spring 2015 Semester – Academic Highlights

  • Penn State’s 31 varsity athletic teams had an average Spring 2015 semester team GPA of 3.11. (This number counts indoor track, outdoor track, and cross-country as separate teams, even though many student-athletes are members of all three teams.)
  • 21 Penn State varsity athletic teams (out of 31) had a Spring 2015 semester GPA over a 3.00. (This number counts indoor track, outdoor track, and cross-country as separate teams, even though many student-athletes are members of all three teams.)
  • 221 Penn State student-athletes made the Dean’s List after the Spring 2015 semester (3.50 GPA with at least 12 credits earned for the semester).
  • 474 Penn State student-athletes earned a GPA of 3.00 or above in the Spring 2015 semester. This is 62.04% of the 764 Penn State student-athletes (this counts student-athletes only once even if they are on more than one team roster).
  • This includes student-athletes enrolled in less than 12 credits during the Spring 2015 semester.
  • Spring 2015 Academic All-Americans:
  1. Matt Brown, Wrestling
  2. Laura Gebhart, Field Hockey
  3. Robby Creese, M. In/Out Track & Field

*Overall, (3) Academic All-Americans during the 2014-2015 academic year, (Fall 2014 (0) and Spring 2015 (3).

*Overall, (189) Academic All-Americans all-time at Penn State.

Note:   The statistical information outlined above for the Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 semesters include the following student-athletes:

  • Student-athletes actively participating on a varsity team (eligible and ineligible)
  • Student-athletes medically unable to participate, but are completing their degrees
  • Student-athletes whose eligibility has been exhausted, but are receiving athletic aid and completing their degrees

4. Big Ten Conference Distinguished Scholar Award Recipient History (established in February 2008)

  • *2008-2009 academic year; 62 student-athletes recognized
  • *2009-2010 academic year; 57 student-athletes recognized
  • *2010-2011 academic year; 45 student-athletes recognized
  • *2011-2012 academic year; 51 student-athletes recognized
  • *2012-2013 academic year; 68 student-athletes recognized
  • *2013-2014 academic year; 73 student-athletes recognized
  • *2014-2015 academic year; 69 student-athletes recognized

*Overall PSU Seven-Year Total; 425 student-athletes recognized

5. Big Ten, Academic All-Big Ten Selections Fall, Winter and Spring

  • 72 Penn State student-athletes (in 7 fall sports) earned Academic All-Big Ten honors. Below is the number of selections from each team.
TeamSelections
Football20
Women's Soccer11
Men's Soccer13
Men's Cross Country4
Women's Cross Country6
Women's Volleyball6
Field Hockey12
  • 70 Penn State student-athletes (in 8 winter sports) earned Academic All-Big Ten honors. Below is the number of selections from each team.
Team Selections
Men's Swimming & Diving10
Women's Swimming & Diving7
Men's Basketball1
Women's Basketball7
Men's Gymnastics5
Women's Gymnastics3
Wrestling7
Men's Ice Hockey18
  • 135 Penn State student-athletes (in 16 spring/at-large sports) earned Academic All-Big Ten honors. Below is the number of selections from each team.
TeamSelections
Softball10
Women's Lacrosse17
Women's Fencing6
Men's Golf8
Women's Tennis8
Women's Track (In/Out)15
Men's Volleyball4
Baseball8
Men's Lacrosse11
Men's Fencing9
Women's Golf9
Men's Tennis8
Men's Track (In/Out)8
Women's Ice Hockey14
  • Overall, Penn State had 277 Academic All-Big Ten selections during the 2014-2015 academic year.
  • Through (22) years of full membership in the Big Ten Conference, 5,041 Penn State student-athletes have been recognized as Academic All-Big Ten Conference selections.

Highlights of Penn State’s Academic Progress Rate (APR) for the Cohort of AY 2010-11 through AY 2013-14 Federal Graduation Rate (FGR), Graduation Success Rates (GSR) for 2004-07

NOTES: The APR is based on four years of data, with the most current year’s data added and the oldest year removed to create a four-year (multi-year) rolling rate. The APR scores are a measure of eligibility and retention/graduation for each student-athlete receiving athletic aid during the identified academic semester/year. Retention is evaluated for each student-athlete with the following question in mind: Did that student-athlete return to the institution the next semester (students can earn 2 points after the fall semester and 2 points after the spring and summer semesters). Eligibility is evaluated using NCAA, conference (if applicable), and institutional standards.

APR is calculated by dividing all possible points for all scholarship athletes into total points earned.

The APR minimum academic standard to participate in postseason competition is 900. Beginning with 2012-13 championships, teams must earn a minimum 900 four-year APR or a 930 average over the most recent two years to be eligible to participate. For 2014-15 championships, teams must earn a 930 four-year average APR or a 940 average over the most recent two years to participate in championships. In 2015-16 and beyond, teams must earn a four-year APR of 930 to compete in championships.

The Graduation Success Rate (GSR) is a percentage of scholarship student athletes graduating during a six-year window. Each cohort includes freshmen (fall and mid-year) plus incoming transfer students less any athletes who left the institution in good academic standing.

The Federal Graduation Rate (FGR) measures the percentage of fall, first-time, full-time freshman who graduate within six years of entering their original four-year institution.

NCAA 2014 Federal Graduation Rate Information and Graduation Success Rate (GSR) Summary

(Released in October 2014)

  • The class of 2007-2008 had a federal graduation rate of 77% – Division I average is 66%.
  • (The 77% graduation rate is the fourth highest in the Big Ten Conference.)
  • The four-class federal (2004-2007) graduation rate is 79% – Division I average is 65%.
  • (The 79% four-class graduation rate is the second highest in the Big Ten Conference.)
  • Penn State’s four-year (2004-2007) Graduation Success Rate (GSR) for African-American student-athletes is 89% – Division I average is 68%. (This ranked Penn State second overall in the Big Ten Conference.)
  • The four-class federal (2004-2007) graduation rate for African-American student-athletes is 72% – Division I average is 55%. (The 72% four-class graduation rate is the second highest in the Big Ten Conference.)
  • Penn State male student-athletes’ four-year (2004-2007) federal graduation rate is 74% – Division I average is 58%. (This graduation rate ranks second highest in the Big Ten Conference.)
  • Penn State female student-athletes’ four-year (2004-2007) federal graduation rate is 86% – Division I average is 73%. (This graduation rate is tied for the third highest in the Big Ten Conference.)
  • Football student-athletes’ four-year (2004-2007) federal graduation rate is 75% – Division I average (FBS) is 59%. (This graduation rate is the second highest in the Big Ten Conference.)
  • Penn State’s four-year (2004-2007) Graduation Success Rate (GSR) is 89% – Division I average is 82%. (The 89% GSR is tied for second overall in the Big Ten Conference.)
  • Six teams achieved APR rates of 1000 (the highest rating possible): Men’s cross-country, men’s tennis, women’s cross-country, field hockey, women’s golf, and women’s ice hockey.

Note: This report has been prepared by Dr. Linda Caldwell, Faculty Athletics Representative, and Mr. Russell Mushinsky, Director of the Morgan Academic Support Center for Student-Athletes.

Accessible tables for this section of Appendix L


NCAA ACADEMIC PROGRESS RATE (APR) INFORMATION
2013-2014 (FOUR-YEAR DATA) / RELEASED IN MAY 2015
PENN STATE RANKINGS

 

Penn State
Intercollegiate
Athletic Teams
Multi-Year
Team APR
APR Ranking
w/in Big Ten
Conference
APR All
Division I
Average
APR Public
Institution
Average
Men ’ s Baseball9905 th (13)967963
Men’s Basketball97012 th (14)960957
Men’s Cross Country1000Tied for 1 st (12)976971
Men’s Fencing9722 nd (2)985975
Men ’ s Football95614 th (14)955951
Men’s Golf97911 th (14)979976
Men’s Gymnastics9844 th (7)982981
Men’s Ice Hockey9706 th (6)985982
Men’s Lacrosse973Tied for 4 th (6)976973
Men’s Soccer9469 th (9)971966
Men’s Swimming976Tied for 6 th (10)979974
Men’s Tennis1000Tied for 1 st (12)978975
Men’s Indoor Track9885 th (12)966962
Men’s Outdoor Track9944 th (13)969964
Men’s Volleyball9762 nd (2)984981
Men ’ s Wrestling992Tied for 2 nd (14)963963
Women’s Basketball9799 th (14)975971
Women’s Cross Country1000Tied for 1 st (14)985981
Women’s Fencing9593 rd (3)986972
Women ’ s Field Hockey1000Tied for 1 st (9)988986
Women’s Golf1000Tied for 1 st (14)987985
Women’s Gymnastics9858 th (10)991991
Women’s Ice Hockey10001 st (4)990987
Women’s Lacrosse990Tied for 4 th (6)988986
Women’s Soccer9937 th (14)983981
Women ’ s Softball98410 th (14)979976
Women’s Swimming9955 th (13)988986
Women’s Tennis992Tied for 7 th (14)985982
Women’s Indoor Track989Tied for 6 th (13)979976
Women’s Outdoor Track9914 th (13)980977
Women’s Volleyball984Tied for 13 th (14)982979


GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE
2004-2007 COHORT
PENN STATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE

  

PENN STATE
VARSITY TEAMS
FEDERAL
FOUR-YEAR
GRADUATION
RATE
FEDERAL
GRADUATION
RATE -
DIVISION I
FOUR-YEAR
AVERAGE
GRADUATION
SUCCESS
RATE (GSR)
GRADUATION
SUCCESS
RATE
(GSR) -
DIVISION I
AVERAGE
GRADUATION
SUCCESS
RATE (GSR)
RANKING –
(BIG TEN
CONFERENCE)
Men ’ s Baseball4250747710 th (13)
Men’s Basketball854710072Tied for 1 st (14)
Men’s Fencing716471892 nd (3)
Men ’ s Football755987712 nd (14)
Men’s Golf1006610084Tied for 1 st (14)
Men’s Gymnastics758778917 th (7)
Men’s Lacrosse857291882 nd (4)
Men’s Soccer67599282Tied for 3 rd (9)
Men’s Swimming817289865 th (12)
Men’s Tennis73658986Tied for 8 th (14)
Men’s Track & Cross Country7363787810 th (13)
Men’s Volleyball637367852 nd (2)
Men ’ s Wrestling59557375Tied for 9 th (14)
Women’s Basketball646310085Tied for 1 st (14)
Women’s Fencing1007710094Tied for 1 st (4)
Women ’ s Field Hockey1007910094Tied for 1 st (9)
Women’s Golf80749091Tied for 9 th (14)
Women’s Gymnastics7385809510 th (10)
Women’s Lacrosse1008010095Tied for 1 st (5)
Women’s Soccer6373869013 th (14)
Women ’ s Softball936910087Tied for 1 st (14)
Women’s Swimming95799692Tied for 4th (14)
Women’s Tennis1007310092Tied for 1 st (14)
Women’s Track & Cross Country91719286Tied for 11 th (14)
Women’s Volleyball73719391Tied for 10 th (14)


NCAA GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE (GSR) RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
2004-2007 COHORT

Click on image to enlarge.

Table as described in accessible version (see link at top of page): NCAA Graduation Success Rate (GSR) Rankings for the Big Ten Conference - Student Athletes.


NCAA GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE (GSR) RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
2004-2007 COHORT

Click on image to enlarge.

Table as described in accessible version (see link at top of page). NCAA Graduation Success Rate (GSR) Rankings for the Big Ten Conference - 2004-2007 Cohort - African American Student-Athletes/male/female.


NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
CLASS OF 2007-2008, FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES

Click on image to enlarge.

Table as described in accessible version (see link at top of page.): NCAA Graduation Rate Rankings for the Big Ten Conference Class of 2007-2008, Federal Graduation Rates.


NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
CLASS OF 2007-2008, FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES

Click on image to enlarge.

Table as described in accessible version (see link at top of page.): NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE, CLASS OF 2007-2008, FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES; male and female athletes.


NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE
CLASS OF 2007-2008, FEDERAL GRADUATE RATES

Click on image to enlarge.

Table as described in accessible version (see link at top of page.): NCAA GRADUATION RATE RANKINGS, BIG TEN CONFERENCE; CLASS OF 2007-2008, FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES - African American students/athletes.


2014 FEDERAL GRADUATION RATE/NCAA GRADUATION SUCCESS RATE (GSR) – NATIONAL COMPARISON

 

INSTITUTIONALL STUDENTS
(2007-2008)
ALL STUDENTS
4-Year Average (2004-2007)
ALL STUDENT
ATHLETES
(2007-2008)
ALL STUDENT-
ATHLETES
4-Year Average
(2004-2007)
GRADUATION SUCCESS
RATE (GSR)
4-Year Average
(2004-2007)
DIVISION I6564666582
Penn State85 (13th)86 (12th)77 (9th)79 (4th)89 (7th)
Baylor7573706688
Boston College9191757695
California9191786980
Duke9494808497
Florida8785545983
Florida State7775686284
North Carolina9089737286
Notre Dame9595948999
Oklahoma6666515780
Pittsburgh8079716579
Stanford9695969598
Syracuse8181717388
Temple6666686682
Texas7980696983
Texas A & M7980656776
UCLA9090727487
USC9190786780
Vanderbilt9392807590
Virginia9393787686
Virginia Tech8382646988
Wake Forest8688787794
West Virginia5757636583