Appendix D

Dickinson School of Law

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
42-01-134 IHCLC 995
Community Law Clinic
COMMUNITY LW CLNC (4 per semester/maximum of 8) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
A general civil litigation clinic, which includes various forms of medication, negotiation, etc., in addition to civil hearings and traditional courtroom litigation. Due to the litigation component of this clinic, it will serve only students residing in Carlisle. Areas of law which students will be exposed to include: divorce, custody, support, protection from abuse, adoption, social security and supplemental security income claims, guardianships, special education, American with Disabilities Act claims, civil rights actions, and health care directives. Cases will be selected based on educational value to students and expertise of the clinical faculty.
PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: FMEST 962 or SEM 926; faculty approval required
APPROVED START: S12012

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: FMEST 962 or Disability Law course depending on the student are of concentration; faculty approval required
PROPOSED START: FA2013

OLD
42-01-135 SEM 913
European Union Law Seminar
EUROPEAN UNION LAW (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course examines basic principles of the Union legal system, such as free movement of goods, persons, services, and capital, the right of establishment, common commercial policy, and foreign policy. It also examines the organization and functions of the Union’s institutions and contrasts the United States federal experience. The relationship between Union law and the legal systems of member states will be addressed along with the jurisdiction of the Court of Justice. The relevance of the Union experience to the evolution of other common markets in North and South America and Asia will also be addressed.
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This seminar examines the main elements of European Union (EU) law. It covers the institutional structure of the EU and its law-making process and compares it with US government and federalism. It explores the judicial architecture of the EU and the role of the European Court of Justice. It looks at the legal framework covering EU inter-state trade, corporate mobility, and free movement of persons within the EU. It also examines trade between the EU and third states, in particular of persons the US, and foreign relations law of the EU.
PROPOSED START: SP2014

OLD
42-01-136 SEM 925
Jurisprudence Seminar
JURISPRUDENCE SEM (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar investigates myriad theories about law. It is an aim of this offering to afford students a vehicle whereby they might test and place in perspective many of the theories of law gleaned from classroom work and personal experience.
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This seminar investigate basic themes in jurisprudence, political philosophy, and constitutionalism. Using the Federalist Papers as our base text, we will also read selections from other important works of classical and modern legal and political thought. We will address several seminal topics, including separation of powers, the notion of an independent judiciary, the role of the executive branch, a republican form of government, democracy and federalism. This seminar will emphasize theoretical and historical dimensions of these topics, and also consider some of their contemporary implications.
PROPOSED START: SP2014

OLD
42-01-137 SKILS 968
Written Advocacy and Judicial Opinions
WRIT ADV JUD OPIN (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
The bulk of advocacy is in the form of written submissions to the courts, and the vast majority of judicial decisions are written. In order to advocate effectively, lawyers must communicate their arguments clearly and persuasively to the courts. In order to resolve cases and establish useful precedent, judges must communicate their reasoning clearly and authoritatively. This course will explore both forms of written communication and develop the writing skills associated with each.
PREREQUISITE: Legal Analysis, Research and Writing I and II
APPROVED START: S12012

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Judicial Opinion Writing (JUDICIAL OP WRTING)
CHANGE CREDITS: 2
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Students will learn about the role of a judicial clerk and how to draft judicial opinions. Students will recognize the impact of written advocacy on judicial opinion writing as they switch roles from advocating as a lawyer to deciding issues raised by the advocates and writing opinions that implement subtle persuasive writing techniques. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the process for creation of legal precedent through opinions, including the impact of standards of review and procedural posture. The course will cover the common forms of judicial writing. With individualized feedback, students will develop precision in self-editing and revision skills and will practice producing concise, clear, and accessible written work.
PROPOSED START: SP2014