Appendix D

9/6/16

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY BENEFITS
SENATE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE

Changes to the Smoking Policy: A Tobacco-Free University?

(Forensic)

Background

One of the guiding principles identified in the report in the Faculty Benefits Advisory/ Consultative Report, “Principles for the Design of Penn State Health Care Plans” approved by the University Faculty Senate on March 15, 2016 reads:

6) A principle of fostering and promoting a culture of health, which is included as a thematic priority in the university’s 2016-2020 strategic plan, should guide the design of plan features and programs that promote healthy choices and activities, shared efforts to establish tobacco-free campuses, and support the consistent and effective management of health risks.

With this guiding principle in mind, the Senate Committee on Faculty Benefits Committee and the Student Life Committee have been jointly charged with reviewing the University’s smoking policy and facilitating discussion regarding this policy with the University Faculty Senate.

Present Policy (AD 32)

Smoking of any material is prohibited in all University facilities, at all locations, including University-owned vehicles. It also is prohibited in any outside area adjacent to a facility whose configuration and/or other physical circumstances allow smoke either to enter and affect the internal environment or to unduly affect the environment of those entering or exiting the facility. Exemptions to this policy may be made by the Smoking Policy Review Committee if the committee deems granting the exemption to be reasonable for business or research reasons as submitted by the unit that requests the exemption.

According to Policy AD 32, “smoking” may include but is not limited to, “the burning of any type of lighted pipe, cigar, cigarette, or any other smoking equipment, whether filled with tobacco or any other type of material.”

In the spring of 2016, the University Park Undergraduate Association (UPUA), The Pennsylvania State University’s undergraduate student government, compiled a report regarding the history of the smoking policy at Penn State and compared the PSU policy to the policy of other Big Ten institutions. The report also provided results from a survey of undergraduate students at the University Park campus regarding the present smoking policy. After completing the benchmarking and research for this report, the UPUA provided 16 recommendations to the University, ultimately stating that The Pennsylvania State University should become a smoke-free institution. The full report is included as an appendix to this report (Appendix 1).

Some of the important points presented in the report include:

  1. The smoking policy has been reviewed in the past and has been amended to prohibit smoking inside University facilities, including University-owned vehicles, and areas outside buildings which allow smoke to enter buildings.
  2. Most Big Ten Universities (9 of the 14 universities) have smoke-free or tobacco-free policies in place.
  3. Forty-five percent of students surveyed in 2015 were in favor of a smoke-free University Park campus.
  4. The UPUA recommends a revision to the University Park smoking policy, namely to ban smoking from university-owned property, both indoors and outdoors. In addition, the creation of a task force to oversee the alteration of the policy is also recommended.

The Faculty Benefits Committee researched published smoking or tobacco-use policies from Penn State’s various campuses, and found the following:

  1. 9 campuses use Policy AD 32 (Abington, Beaver, Erie, Harrisburg, Hazleton, Greater Allegheny, Mont Alto, University Park, Worthington Scranton)
  2. 10 campuses have implemented policies more restrictive than AD 32 (smoking permitted in designated areas only) (Altoona, Berks, Brandywine, Fayette, DuBois, Penn College, Schuylkill, Shenango, Wilkes Barre, York)
  3. 2 campuses are tobacco-free (Hershey, Lehigh Valley)
  4. 2 campuses specifically mention and prohibit vaping or e-cigarettes (DuBois, Shenango)
  5. 1 campus specifically mentions and identifies guidelines for chewing tobacco (DuBois)
  6. The committee was unable to locate smoking policies for 2 campuses (Carlisle, Great Valley)

Smoking and tobacco-use on Penn State campuses is an issue that is relevant to the health and well-being of all University employees, students, and visitors. Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the US. As the number of schools increase that have considered stronger and/or more strictly enforced smoking and tobacco policies, The Pennsylvania State University has been asked to do the same. The University Faculty Senate should thoughtfully discuss the future of these policies regarding the use of tobacco products on all Penn State campuses.

We present 3 questions for the consideration and discussion of the Senate:

  1. Does the Faculty Senate support Penn State moving towards tobacco-free campuses?  This includes not only the items listed in AD 32, but also vaping, e-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.
  2. (What is the role of) or How should the Faculty Senate engage with student organizations and administration to overcome challenges resulting from implementing a tobacco-free policy?
  3. What does the Faculty Senate recommend as “next steps”?

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY BENEFITS

Kimberly Baran
Susan Basso
Renee Borromeo, Chair
Victor Brundsen
Mark Horn
Peter Jurs
Cassandra Kitko
James Miles
Jamie Myers
Willie Ofosu
Erica Smithwick, Vice-Chair
Gregory Stoner

SENATE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE

Paul Barney
Mark Brennen
Kevin Harwell
Matthew Kaag
Barrett Lee
Martha Levine
Mary Miles, Chair
Michael Tews
Alex Shockley, Vice Chair


University Park Undergraduate Association LogoThe University Park Undergraduate Association

presents a cumulative report on the

Campus Smoking Policy

An assessment of University Park’s smoking policy as well as those across the B1G

      Authored by the UPUA’s 10th General Assembly of Student Representatives

Executive Summary

The University Park Undergraduate Association (UPUA) represents approximately 40,000 undergraduate students at University Park. Over the last several years, college campuses have re-evaluated their smoking policies at the request of students, faculty, and staff. At University Park, our own students, faculty, staff, administration, and various departments have expressed the need for the university to revisit our own policy.

The purpose of this report is to collect information on the university’s current policy, asses how we compare to our peers in the Big Ten, and gauge the opinion of students on the topic. With the completion of this report, the University Park Undergraduate Association will take an official stance on the best way to move forward with the smoking policy, and will advocate that stance to the university administration.

History

On April 3rd 1989, Policy AD32 “Smoking Policy and Guideline” was created. In 1992, Policy AD32 was edited to include “all living spaces” as smoke free areas. From there in July of 2003, the policy was amended to include “any outside area adjacent to a facility whose configuration and/or other physical circumstances allow smoke either to enter and affect the internal environment or to unduly affect the environment of those entering or exiting the facility” as smoke free areas. This revision became effective in order to improve the internal environment of all facilities by reducing the amount of smoke entering within. In addition, the Smoking Policy Review Committee’s jurisdiction was broadened to have the authority to make official revision recommendations to the policy. The membership of the Smoking Policy Review Committee consists of “representatives from the Office of Human Resources, the Department of Environmental Health and Safety, and up to seven additional members representing technical-service employees, staff, faculty, students and locations away from University Park (https://guru.psu.edu/policies/ad32.html). The most recent change in 2006 authorized the Smoking Policy Review Committee to handle any exemption requests to the policy.

On March 31, 2000, the Undergraduate Student Government (USG) created a student referendum to gauge the interest of the student body in the possibility of turning University Park into a smoke-free campus.  With 3,225 responses, 54% of respondents voted against changing the policy, an idea that had been discussed by USG and Penn State’s Office of the Physical Plant (OPP) (http://www.collegian.psu.edu/archives/article_6869fe08-bdb7-5a65-ad40-cdf5f06e63ab.html) as one possible way to limit the amount of cigarette related litter. After the response from the referendum, OPP took alternative measures to help reduce the cigarette-related trash on campus such as purchasing sweep machines as well as installing new cigarette receptacles (http://www.collegian.psu.edu/archives/article_b6268909-ef76-5246-9242-68149b55ca10.html).

On April 12, 2007 campus officials considered whether or not to implement a smoking ban. The Commission for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) and the chairman of the university smoking policy committee discussed changing the policy to specify the distance from buildings where individuals could smoke or eliminate smoking on campus all together (http://www.collegian.psu.edu/archives/article_c4404011-5542-5b0d-a117-b026283cd3d6.html). These conversations occurred after a Penn State Pulse Survey conducted in the spring of 2007 revealed that 64.9% of the 1,574 students who participated in the survey supported a campus-wide ban on smoking (http://studentaffairs.psu.edu/assessment/pdf/146.pdf).

On October 15, 2015 the idea of a smoke free campus was brought to the 10th Assembly of the University Park Undergraduate Association (UPUA) (http://www.collegian.psu.edu/news/campus/article_29ada0d6-72f3-11e5-9265-17182a822ab2.html). Although the University has designated smoking areas throughout campus, students have expressed concerns that smoking is often conducted in locations either banned by policy, or of high traffic and calls have been made to create a campus-wide ban.

Current Policies Enforced

The Pennsylvania State University smoking policy, Policy AD32, reads “the smoking of any material is prohibited in all University facilities, at all locations, including University-owned vehicles. It also is prohibited in any outside area adjacent to a facility whose configuration and/or other physical circumstances allow smoke either to enter and affect the internal environment or to unduly affect the environment of those entering or exiting the facility. Exemptions to this policy may be made by the Smoking Policy Review Committee if the committee deems granting the exemption to be reasonable for business or research reasons as submitted by the unit that requests the exemption.” (http://guru.psu.edu/policies/AD32.html).

Defined in Policy AD32, “smoking” may include but is not limited to, “the burning of any type of lighted pipe, cigar, cigarette, or any other smoking equipment, whether filled with tobacco or any other type of material (http://guru.psu.edu/policies/AD32.html).

Implementation of this policy is to be carried out under the jurisdiction of the assigned budget executives. These executives are responsible for the following as described in the policy:

  1. Assuring that building entrances are posted with signs stating “This is a No-Smoking Building.”
  2. Assuring that this policy is communicated to everyone within their jurisdiction, including new members of the University community.
  3. Implementing the established policies.

Enforcement of the policy is dependent “upon obtaining and maintaining the willingness, understanding, and cooperation of all smokers and nonsmokers in all University facilities. It is the responsibility of all members of the Penn State community to observe this smoking policy. Each University member is responsible for monitoring compliance with this policy at his/her level of involvement in the University community (http://guru.psu.edu/policies/AD32.html).

The policy outlines enforcement details as follows:

Office/Administrative/General Work Area –

The budget executive or designee, is responsible for enforcement of this policy for office, administrative, and all general work areas in facilities or portions of facilities under his/her jurisdiction. It shall be his/her responsibility to determine appropriate disciplinary sanctions, consistent with current personnel policies and practices, for violations of this policy. Disputes regarding the implementation of this policy shall first be referred to the employee’s supervisor for resolution. Complaints, concerns, or requests for clarification regarding this policy, or disputes regarding its enforcement beyond the level of an employee’s supervisor, shall be referred to the Employee Relations Division of the Office of Human Resources for additional guidance and consultation.

Openly Assigned: Classrooms, Laboratories, and Seminar/Meeting Rooms –

The leader in charge of the user group in openly assigned classrooms, seminar/meeting rooms, laboratories, and other instructional or general usage facilities will be responsible for enforcement of this policy for those portions of the facility under his/her jurisdiction. It shall be his/her responsibility to determine if corrective or disciplinary action needs to be taken. Formal complaints, concerns, or requests for clarification regarding the policy, or disputes regarding this enforcement in such facilities, shall be referred to the Smoking Policy Review Committee, where a decision will be made regarding final disposition.

Visitors –

Visitors are expected to comply with this smoking policy. The budget executive or designee, or leader in charge of a specific “openly assigned” area will be ultimately responsible for adherence to this policy by visitors. It shall be his/her responsibility to determine if corrective action needs to be taken. Formal complaints, concerns, or requests for clarification regarding the policy, or disputes regarding its enforcement relative to visitors shall be referred to the Smoking Policy Review Committee, where a decision will be made regarding final disposition (http://guru.psu.edu/policies/AD32.html).

Students –

Students are expected to comply with the guidelines provided to them through the Code of Conduct as well as residence life policies. If a student violates the university’s smoking policy  they will be referred to the office of Residence Life, if they are an on campus resident and found in violation in a residence area, or the office of Student Conduct.

Resources

University Health Services offers programs to aid students in quitting smoking. The Freedom from Smoking Program is a seven-week program that encourages and fosters a support system for students as they move through the steps to quit smoking. Each module addresses a different aspect in the quitting process, such as stress management techniques, confronting cravings, as well as controlling weight loss (http://studentaffairs.psu.edu/health/wellness/freedomFromSmoking.shtml).

UHS also provides individual consultation with a health care provider during regular hours. Health professionals encourage setting a “quit date,” as well as possible assistance through the pharmacy if necessary.

Additionally, UHS provides information on its site about the following outside resources:

  • American Lung Association (F F S online program): www.ffsonline.org
  • American Lung Association (Lung Helpline): 1.800.LUNG-USA
  • Centre Volunteers in Medicine (F F S Program): 814.231.4043
  •  Centre County Drug and Alcohol: 814.355.6744
  •  Clinical Outcomes Group (Individualized phone or email services): 1.800.264.1290
  •  National Cancer Institute’s Quit line: 1.877.44U.QUIT
  •  National Quit line: 1.800.QUIT.NOW
  •  PA Quit line: 1.800.784.8669

Survey

In 2015, a survey sponsored by The University Park Undergraduate Association was sent to 5,000 students to gauge the student opinion on making University Park a smoke-free campus. Out of the 5,000 surveys sent out, 1,372 surveys were started, and 1,241 of them were completed, a response rate of 24.8%. The survey was distributed to students living on campus.

Specific results from the survey are as follows:

  • 9% of respondents said they smoked
  • 85% of respondents said they do not smoke
  • 69% of respondents who said they smoke started before coming to Penn State and their usage of tobacco has remained the same
  • 23% of respondents, who smoke, reported smoking 1-2 days out of the previous 30 days before completing the survey
  • 19% of respondents who report they smoke claimed they smoked every day
  • 734 respondents, which represented 59% of all respondents, claimed they were exposed to secondhand smoke as they walked through campus
  • 67% of respondents expressed concern of the effect secondhand smoke had on their health
  • 38% of students believed tobacco should be regulated on campus
  • 45% of respondents agreed that Penn State should adopt a policy that enforced a smoke free campus
  • 41% of respondents believed if a smoke-free policy were to be adopted, e-cigarettes and chewing tobacco should not be banned

The demographics of this survey can be described as follows:

  • 68% of respondents lived in East, South, or Pollock residence halls
  • 21% of respondents lived in Eastview Terrace, Nittany Apartments, North Halls, West Halls, or White Course Apartments
  • 57% of respondents were in their first year at Penn State
  • 25% of respondents were in their second year at Penn State
  • 12% of respondents were in their third year at Penn State
  • 5% of respondents were in their fourth year at Penn State
  • 1% of respondents were in their fifth year at Penn State
  • Institutional Efforts at Peer Universities:

Indiana

In 2007, Indiana University transitioned to become an entirely smoke-free campus in accordance with Indiana’s smoke-free air policy. In 2013, the policy was revised to include all tobacco products in the ban. The University’s reason for the policy states,

“Indiana University is concerned about the toll that smoking and tobacco use has on the health and well-being of the university community. As a public institution of higher education with units that research and treat the effects of smoking and tobacco use, IU believes it has an obligation to exercise leadership by promoting a healthy, smoke-free environment for its students, employees, and visitors.” (http://policies.iu.edu/policies/categories/administration-operations/public-safety-institutional-assurance/PS-04.shtml.).

The Indiana University policy states:

“The use or sale of tobacco, tobacco products, and smoking related products is prohibited on Indiana University property. The use or sale of tobacco, tobacco products, and smoking related products is prohibited in university-owned, university-operated, or university-leased vehicles. The use of tobacco, tobacco products, and smoking related products is permitted inside privately owned vehicles.  Limited exceptions may be approved in writing by the campus chancellor or provost or relevant vice president and must be in accordance with state law. In accordance with Indiana state law, signs prohibiting smoking must be posted at all public entrances. In accordance with Indiana state law, managers or officials in charge of a public building must ask an individual who is smoking in the public building or within 8 feet of the entrance of a public building to refrain from smoking and to cause that individual to be removed if the individual then fails to refrain from smoking.  In accordance with Indiana state law, ashtrays or other smoking receptacles are prohibited in public buildings or at the entrances to public buildings.” (http://policies.iu.edu/policies/categories/administration-operations/public-safety-institutional-assurance/PS-04.shtml).

As stated in the policy, Indiana University managers or officials of certain buildings and areas are responsible for ensuring the policy is followed by asking a noncompliant to stop smoking or cause that individual to be removed if they do not comply.

The means of enforcing the policy are outlined below:

“Enforcement of this policy will depend on the cooperation of all faculty, staff, and students not only to comply with the policy, but also to encourage others to comply, in order to promote a healthy environment in which to work, study, and live. Civility and respect are expected by all members of the university community in regards to this policy.

Violations of the policy should be referred to the appropriate administrative office for review and action: for academic employees, the campus office of academic affairs; for staff, University Human Resources; and for students, the campus office of student life.

Violations may also result in a citation by law enforcement in accordance with state law.” (http://policies.iu.edu/policies/categories/administration-operations/public-safety-institutional-assurance/PS-04.shtml).

In accordance with the policy, Indiana University also offers resources to assist students, faculty, and staff to quit smoking. The “Quit For Life” program is a tobacco treatment program available to full-time Academic and Staff employees and spouses who are enrolled in an IU-sponsored medical plan. (http://smokefree.indiana.edu/employees.html). Additionally, Student resources vary by campus, however each campus has varying levels of cessation programs and clinics available for students to help quit smoking (http://iuhealth.org/primary-care/smoking-cessation/).

Michigan

The University of Michigan implemented a smoke-free campus policy in July of 2011, citing its commitment to promote both health and healthy living. Michigan’s movement towards a smoke free campus cost approximately $240,805 over the course of three years. These costs included the advertisements associated with informing the public, the salary of a Program Coordinator to oversee the training, evaluation, data collection, enforcement strategies of the new policy, the removal of old smoking signs, and the addition of new “no smoking” signs.

The University of Michigan’s policy states:

“I. Policy

In recognition of environmental tobacco smoke health risks, the University intends to provide a smoke free environment for its faculty, staff, students, and visitors.

  1. Regulations
  2. Smoking is prohibited in all University buildings, facilities, grounds, and University-owned vehicles, as they are considered property of the University and under the authority of the Board of Regents of the University, except as indicated below.
  3. Smoking in University facilities will be permitted for controlled research, educational, theatrical, or religious ceremonial purposes, with prior approval of the Dean or Director responsible for the facility.
  4. Smoking in privately-owned vehicles and on sidewalks adjacent to public thoroughfares is not prohibited.
  5. The sale of tobacco products is prohibited in all University buildings, facilities and grounds under the authority of the Board of Regents of the University.
  6. Assistance with smoking cessation for faculty and staff is available through MHealthy at hr.umich.edu/mhealthy/programs/tobacco which includes information about the UM Tobacco Consultation Service, current health plan offerings and available on-line programs. Students can receive assistance through the University Health Service and the Tobacco Consultation Service.

III. Procedures

The success of this policy depends upon the thoughtfulness, consideration, and cooperation of smokers and non-smokers. All faculty, staff, students, and visitors share the responsibility for adhering to and enforcing the policy. Any concern should be brought to the attention of the individuals responsible for the operation of the University facility in question and/or the Supervisor responsible for the work area. Any exceptions to this Standard Practice Guide must be approved by the appropriate executive officer or designated representative.”(http://spg.umich.edu/policy/601.04).

Michigan’s enforcement plan is described below:

“We are an institution of higher education and education will be key to implementing this policy. We will make people aware of the smoke-free environment through posters, signage, notices in event programs and advertising and we will seek voluntary compliance. An explanation of the smoke-free campus will be included in the orientation program for new employees and in materials distributed to all outside groups that use university facilities.

For visitors, we believe reminders about the smoke-free campus will be important and we expect that will happen naturally. For students and employees we expect to deal with any repeat offenders in the same way that violation of any other policy of the university is handled. Repeated student smoking violations will be directed to the Office of Student Conflict Resolution. For staff, the Standard Practice Guide that references smoking will be updated to reflect the smoke-free campus (http://smokefree.umich.edu/qa.html).

The University of Michigan offers smokers free one-on-one cessation counseling and free nicotine replacement products. Their respective Health Services Website also lists additional local resources for quitting including, the MHealthy Tobacco Consultation Service, Michigan Department of Community Health, National Cancer Institute, Nicotine Anonymous, The American Cancer Society, and the American Lung Association. Michigan’s University Health Services building offers quit kits, free one-on-one cessation counseling, and free nicotine replacement products.

In order to effectively promote the smoke free campus policy, University of Michigan also has student SmokeFree Ambassadors that assist people in finding a place to smoke off of campus. When the University first implemented the smoke-free initiative, they used ads in local newspapers, advertisements on televisions around campus, advertisements on bus signs, table tents, posters, and held a nicotine gum giveaway. Overall, the campus has seen a change in the smoking culture that has led to less smokers on campus since the implementation of the smoke-free policy. Even smokers not yet ready to quit are expected to comply with university policy. However, Michigan has noted that they still have issues with “hotspot areas”, such as areas surrounding their library. According to the University of Michigan Smoke-Free Environment Project Coordinator, the biggest drawback they have faced in their efforts is a lack of signage. They suggest to any university attempting to undergo a similar policy to ensure they have effective signage.

Minnesota

The University of Minnesota went tobacco free in 2014. The policy states:

“The University of Minnesota, Crookston, Duluth, Rochester, and Twin Cities are smoke- and tobacco-free campuses. All students, staff, faculty, and visitors are prohibited from smoking and using, selling, free distributing, and advertising tobacco products and electronic cigarettes in all facilities and on all University property.” (https://policy.umn.edu/operations/smoketobacco)

Minnesota’s policy allows for the following exceptions:

“Tobacco use will be permitted on university property only in these situations:

  1. Peer-reviewed, approved scientific studies that require participants to use tobacco, require advance approval (see procedure.)
  2. Tobacco use as part of a traditional Native American spiritual or cultural ceremony is permitted without prior approval. To ensure that ceremonies held indoors do not inadvertently activate fire alarms or sprinkler systems, event organizers must follow the attached procedures.
  3. Theatrical productions where actors and actresses are permitted to use tobacco as part of the theatrical performance, theatre staff must meet the notification requirements (see procedure.)
  4. Enclosed, privately-owned vehicles, while driving on campus or parked in surface parking lots as defined by Parking and Transportation Services, provided users make a reasonable effort to contain smoke and tobacco materials inside the vehicle.”

Enforcement and disciplinary procedures of the policy state:

“The success of this policy will depend upon the thoughtfulness, consideration, and cooperation of everyone on campus, including tobacco-users and non-users. All members of the University community are responsible for enforcing this policy. Students, faculty, staff, and visitors who violate this policy should be reminded of the policy and asked to comply. Repeated violation of this policy may be cause for disciplinary action in accordance with applicable student or employee codes of conduct. Visitors who refuse to comply with this policy may be asked to vacate campus property.” (https://policy.umn.edu/operations/smoketobacco)

According to UMN, the policy has significantly reduced smoking on their campus and their smoking rates continue to decline.

In order to help members of the university community quit tobacco use, UMN implemented the Quit & Win! program, where faculty, staff, and students are incentivized to stay tobacco-free for an extended period of time and were able to receive prizes if they completed the challenge (http://www.bhs.umn.edu/quitandwin/). Additionally, the University offers tobacco cessation counseling to help individuals put together personalized plans to quit tobacco use (http://www.bhs.umn.edu/east-bank-clinic/tobacco-cessation.htm).

Ohio State

The Ohio State University went tobacco free in April of 2013. Ohio State University administration felt such a policy was critical in assuring the overall well being of the campus. Ohio State’s statement detailing their reasoning for changing the policy states:

“Ohio State strives to enhance the general health and wellbeing of its faculty, staff, students, and visitors, to become the world’s healthiest university. We desire to support individuals to be tobacco free, achieve their highest state of health, and to launch students into their careers at a high level of health and wellbeing. To support this commitment, we intend to provide a tobacco free environment.” (http://hr.osu.edu/public/documents/policy/policy720.pdf)

Ohio State’s policy is outlined as such:

“I.   The university is strongly committed to supporting individuals to become tobacco free.

  1. Tobacco cessation programs and support will be available to faculty, staff, and students as   identified below.
  2. Nicotine replacement therapy products for the purpose of cessation are permitted.
  3.   The success of this policy depends upon the thoughtfulness, consideration, and cooperation of tobacco users and non-tobacco users. Leaders and those to whom this policy applies share the responsibility for adhering to and enforcing the policy.
  4. Concerns about tobacco use should be respectfully addressed in the moment whenever feasible.
  5. Continued concerns should be referred to the appropriate unit for review and action. For faculty, staff, and student employees, issues should be referred to the employing unit head. For students in the non-employment setting, issues should be referred to Student Conduct. For volunteers and visitors, issues should be referred to the hosting unit head.

III.   The university will not advertise tobacco on university owned, operated, or leased property or at any university sponsored event or university owned or sponsored media.

  1.   Sale of tobacco is prohibited on university owned, operated, or leased property.
  2.   Exceptions
  3. Research involving tobacco is an exception from this policy. Acceptance of tobacco industry funded research grants will be evaluated by the vice president for research and the appropriate dean/administrator prior to acceptance of the funds.
  4. Tobacco use as well as any product intended to mimic tobacco products (e.g. sage, sweetgrass, or cedar) is permitted as part of an American Indian spiritual or cultural ceremony and must be approved by the Ohio State American Indian Studies Advisory Committee.” (https://www.osu.edu/giving/assets/downloads/volunteers/tobacco.pdf)

The enforcement plan is outlined in the above policy as well as their commitment to providing cessation programs for their faculty, staff, and students, but more detail regarding where cessation programs can be found and how the university spreads the message across campus is defined in their procedure:

  1. Cessation
  2. The university is committed to supporting all faculty, staff, and students who wish to stop using tobacco or nicotine products.
  3. Assistance to faculty and staff to overcome tobacco or nicotine addiction is available through The Ohio State University Health Plan and the resources identified below.
  4. Assistance to students to overcome tobacco or nicotine addiction is available through the Student Health Center, Student Wellness Center, student health insurance, and the resources identified below.
  5. Communication
  6. Leaders, managers, supervisors, and building coordinators are responsible for leading by example and respectfully communicating the policy to faculty, staff, students, volunteers, and visitors.
  7. Faculty, staff, students, volunteers, and visitors who observe individuals using tobacco on university property are encouraged and empowered to respectfully explain that its use is prohibited.

III. Signage

  1. Installation and maintenance of signage are the responsibility of Facilities Operations and Development (FOD), in consultation with the Office of Human Resources.
  2. Signage must be placed appropriately on entrances to and exits from buildings, including parking garages, and on university owned and leased vehicles. C. Areas that experience difficulties with tobacco use may request supplemental signage from FOD.

Additionally, Ohio State’s policy specifically lays out the responsibility of each area of the university in ensuring compliance with the policy. (http://hr.osu.edu/public/documents/policy/policy720.pdf/responsibilities)

Position of OfficeResponsibilities
University leaders, managers and supervisors1. Communicate policy expectations to the university community.
2. Hold individuals responsible for compliance with the policy.
3. Communicate policy violations to leaders and managers in specific areas where problems occur.
4. Forward complaints of violation of the Ohio Smoke Free Workplace Law to the appropriate unit within five days.
5. Address and respond to complaints of violation of the Ohio Smoke Free Workplace Law and this policy.
Office of Human Resources1. Communicate policy expectations to the university community.
2. Consult with units on this policy.
3. Forward complaints of violation of the Ohio Smoke Free Workplace Law to the appropriate unit within five days.
4. Consult with & support units that receive complaints of violation of the Ohio Smoke Free Workplace Law.
OSU Health PlanOffer tobacco cessation support through the health plans.
Office of Student Life1. Communicate policy expectations to the university community.
2. Address policy violations with students in the non-employment setting.
3. Offer tobacco cessation support to students.
Employing or volunteer sponsoring unit1. Communicate policy expectations to individuals.
2. Work with FOD to ensure that signage is appropriately displaced on building entrances and exits.
3. Provide information on tobacco cessation resources.
4. Address policy violations with faculty, staff, and student employees.
5. Forward complaints of violation of the Ohio Smoke Free Workplace Law to the appropriate unit within five days.
6. Respond to complaints from a public health department about the Ohio Smoke Free Workplace Law and this policy.
Facilities Operations and Development, building coordinators1. Communicate policy expectations to individuals.
2. Install and maintain signage.
3. Communicate policy violations to leaders and managers in specific areas where problems occur.
Individuals1. Comply with the policy.
2. Inform others about the policy when possible.
3. Use cessation resources as desired.

Chart

Information below outlines the smoking policies of our peers in the Big Ten.

Illinois – Smoke Free
Indiana – Tobacco Free
Iowa – Tobacco Free
Maryland – No Smoke/Tobacco Ban
Michigan – Smoke Free
Michigan State – Transitioning to Tobacco Free 2016
Minnesota – Tobacco Free
Nebraska-Lincoln – Tobacco Free
Northwestern – No Smoke/Tobacco Ban
Ohio State – Tobacco Free
Purdue – Smoke Free
Rutgers – No Smoke/Tobacco Ban
Wisconsin – No Smoke/Tobacco Ban

Recommendations:

The UPUA recommends the University revise the University Park smoking policy to ban smoking from university owned property. Additionally, the UPUA recommends the university create a taskforce to oversee the altering of the policy and the necessary changes that will come with it. In order to create a smooth and effective transition it is imperative a committee of relative parties including representatives from the three student governments, UPUA, CCSG, and GPSA, to oversee the altering of the policy and the necessary changes that will come with it. This taskforce will create a plan for implementation and make official recommendations to the university to be adopted. Below are a list of recommendations from the UPUA.

Recommendation 1:

All University Park facilities, buildings and grounds, including athletic properties, should be smoke free.

Recommendation 2:

In general, smoking should not be prohibited on sidewalks adjacent to public thoroughfares on the University Park campus.

Recommendation 3:

All parking structures and surface lots should be smoke free. This does not include smoking in privately owned vehicles within these locations.

Recommendation 4:

There should be no installation of new smoking shelters.

Recommendation 5:

Cigarette butt containers and waste receptacles should be removed from building areas and should be located next to public thoroughfares. The impact on surrounding areas should be monitored.

Recommendation 6:

Supervisor oversight, voluntary compliance, and peer support should be relied upon to lead to behavioral changes over time. Smokers refusing to extinguish the product or repeat offenders of the policy should be addressed through disciplinary processes crafted to deter individuals from violating the policy.

Recommendation 7:

University Park should provide resources to support managers, supervisors, students, faculty, and staff with methods to address violations in a respectful manner.

Recommendation 9:

University Health Services should continue to support faculty, staff and students in their efforts to assist individuals to stop smoking. UHS should re-evaluate the services they offer to ensure there will be adequate resources to assist the campus with the transition.

Recommendation 10:

The smoke-free policy should be communicated and continually reinforced to all members and guests of the University community in a simple and respectful manner.

Recommendation 11:

Signage should be located on the periphery of campus in areas of major public gathering including visitor parking. The signage should communicate that all University facilities, buildings and grounds are smoke-free zones.

Recommendation 12:

A Tobacco Consultation Service should be created or appointed within an already existing university department and serve as the group responsible for managing ongoing operations, periodic evaluation, response to issues raised by members of the community, education and training, expert consultation to the University, and collaboration with relevant parties.

Recommendation 13:

The University should provide resources adequate to initiate and sustain the recommendations of this report.

Recommendation 14:

The three tour groups on campus: Lion Scouts, Lion Ambassadors, and SMART, introduce Penn State to thousands of potential students and parents every year. These groups should be utilized to assist in informing prospective students that University Park is a smoke free campus.

Recommendation 15:

Both New Student Orientation (NSO) and International Student Orientation (ISO) reach a large number of incoming students. The office of Student Orientation & Transition Programs (SOTP) should include information in regards to the smoke free policy to students during their orientations and should educate orientation leaders on the policy so they can inform their orientation groups.

Recommendation 16:

The Office of Residence Life should educate and equip Residence Assistants with the training and information on the policy in order to provide students with the proper knowledge of the Smoke free policy and the resources available for students to quit. In addition, Residence Assistants should have the proper training to be able to enforce the policy through the enforcement procedure.